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Masters Degrees (Detective)

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Taught at our Parkgate Road Campus in Chester, our MA in Modern and Contemporary Fiction is an innovative and stimulating course that explores a rich variety of 20th- and 21st-century fiction. Read more

Taught at our Parkgate Road Campus in Chester, our MA in Modern and Contemporary Fiction is an innovative and stimulating course that explores a rich variety of 20th- and 21st-century fiction.

The next entry for this course is October 2019.

Why Study Modern and Contemporary Fiction with us?

This distinctive course is taught by a dynamic and experienced team with research strengths in modern and contemporary British, Irish, American, and South African fiction. Department members have published on a wide range of modernist, postmodernist, and postcolonial authors; on genres including science fiction, historical fiction, and crime/detective fiction; and on representations of addiction, terrorism, apartheid, fashion, and the female body. Two of the teaching team edit Flash: The International Short-Short Story Magazine.

The Parkgate Road Campus library is well stocked with texts on modern and contemporary fiction, and houses the Flash Fiction Special Collection, the world’s largest archive of flash-related books and magazines.

What will I learn?

The course comprises six modules. Shorter Fiction typically covers flash fiction, the short story, and the novella. Novel Histories: Past, Present, Future considers historical fiction, representations of the contemporary, and ‘future histories’ (including utopian/dystopian fiction), while Popular Fictions analyses such ‘genre fictions’ as crime/ detective fiction, science fiction, and the campus novel. Special Author(s)/Topic(s) focuses on an area in which the Department has particular expertise, and Research Methods will equip you to pursue your own interest in the Dissertation.

How will I be taught?

Typically, the first five modules are each taught by nine two-hour seminars. These are distributed over 23 weeks, generally with two two-hour seminars per week. One-to-one tutorials are also available. For the Dissertation, you will work one-to-one with a supervisor.

The total workload (including reading, preparation, seminars, tutorials, research, and writing) is approximately 37.5 hours per week.

How will I be assessed?

Modules are assessed by coursework. The first five modules each have 4,000 words of assessment, followed by the 16,000-word Dissertation. There are no exams.

Postgraduate Visit Opportunities

If you are interested in this courses we have a number of opportunities to visit us and our campuses. To find out more about these options and to book a visit, please go to: https://www1.chester.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/postgraduate-visit-opportunities

Request a Prospectus

If you would like to know more about the University please request a prospectus at: http://prospectus.chester.ac.uk/form.php



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This course offers an opportunity for the advanced study of popular literature. In recent years a body of theoretical and cultural historical material has developed that attempts to define what 'the popular' means now, and what it has meant historically. Read more
This course offers an opportunity for the advanced study of popular literature. In recent years a body of theoretical and cultural historical material has developed that attempts to define what 'the popular' means now, and what it has meant historically. At the same time texts that do not seem to belong to traditional canons increasingly attract critical attention, and have come to be taught at university level alongside more canonical texts. In this light the course will cover such popular genres as adventure fiction, children's literature, horror, detective fiction, romance, pornography and science fiction, as well as offering an advanced introduction to such topics as the bestseller, genre theory, print culture and readership.

The course comprises two elements:

A core course meeting twice a week for 2 hours over 2 terms
Option courses meeting once a week for 2 hours - students take one per term

This creates a total of 6 contact hours per week. Students are also expected to spend a substantial amount of time in library research. Assessment is a combination of four 5,000 word essays and a 15,000 word dissertation to be supervised by a member of staff.

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Our MRes programme provide a personalised and focused introduction to postgraduate research allowing you to develop as an independent researcher with the support of an expert in Modern Languages and Cultures. Read more
Our MRes programme provide a personalised and focused introduction to postgraduate research allowing you to develop as an independent researcher with the support of an expert in Modern Languages and Cultures. It provides a rigorous overview of the current state of scholarship in your selected field, guides you, through a programme of directed, individualised reading, to the selection of a feasible research project, and allows you to complete a substantial piece of research.

Within Modern Language and Cultures, we offer pathways in:

- Latin-American Studies
- Hispanic Studies
- Spanish Studies
- Portuguese Studies, Catalan Studies
- Basque Studies
- French Studies
- German Studies
- Italian Studies
- Film Studies
- Chinese Studies.

As an MRes student you will benefit from your membership of the university research community, both students and academic staff. You will also have access to facilities available to doctoral students e.g. free Interlibrary loans, a print allowance and a research allowance.

Why Department of Modern Languages and Cultures?

We are a smaller department than many, but manage at the same time to maintain a variety of very distinctive areas of strength in research. As a result we are uniquely placed to offer taught programmes which are tailored to the individual in a friendly, supportive atmosphere and, for research students, close contact with your supervisors from the outset.

There is a high degree of interdisciplinary activity, with students and staff from all disciplines interacting through institutional research centres, cross-School reading groups, research groups and seminars.

We offer an MA in Latin American Studies and an MA in Modern Languages (French / German / Hispanic Studies/Italian) and supervision on a wide range of topics for both MPhil and PhD study.

Applications are welcome for both full-time and part-time study. Postgraduate students form an integral part of our research culture, and are encouraged to become involved in conference, workshops and seminar series, in addition, we have postgraduate reading groups and a regular programme of postgraduate workshops involving leading scholars visiting the institution. We have an active and vibrant research community, with staff engaging in research covering eight language areas consisting of French, German, Italian, Spanish, Galician, Catalan, Portuguese and Corsican. Research interests range from medieval manuscripts to contemporary cyber literature, and cover a wide geographical remit, with staff working on American, Latin American, and Caribbean, African and Indian contexts as well as European ones.

We are home to three scholarly journals: Bulletin of Hispanic Studies, Bulletin of Latin American Research, and Migrations and Identities as well as a number of prominent book series.

Research Overview

Our research activities are broadly organised around four research groups in addition to the Research Institute of Latin American Studies. The groups are engaged in interdisciplinary work, taking in literary, visual and historical sources, and collaborating across the language areas.

French Studies

Research interests in French Studies cover all areas of French literature, culture and history, including Medieval studies, sixteenth, seventeenth and eighteenth century studies, French theatre, French cinema, travel literature, francophone postcolonial studies (including French language representations of India),modern and contemporary France, and sociolinguistics. Colleagues are actively involved in interdisciplinary research centres, namely the Research Centre in Eighteenth-Century Studies, the Centre of International Slavery, the Centre for Medieval and Renaissance Studies and the India in the World Research Centre.

German Studies

Postgraduate teaching and supervision in German Studies covers the full range of modern (post 1750) German literary and cultural studies, including German cinema. It also offers tuition and supervision in many areas of social history, where staff specialisms include gender and women’s history since the eighteenth-century, twentieth-century labour history, Holocaust studies, issues of race and ethnicity (Afro-German and Gypsy studies), the culture and politics of East and West Germany and contemporary Berlin. The University Library’s Special Collections include uniquely rich holdings on German and European Gypsy studies. Research contacts exist with numerous universities and institutes in Germany and the United States.

Hispanic Studies

The University has the oldest chair of Spanish in the country (established 1908). It has a distinguished tradition of excellence within an extensive area of Hispanic Studies teaching and research which includes not only the Peninsula (Spain and Portugal), but also Latin America (Peru, Brazil, Mexico, Argentina, Chile, etc). Among the section’s achievements and publications in research are the Bulletin of Hispanic Studies, a quarterly journal of international influence (published by Liverpool University Press), Hispanic Textual Research and Criticism (TRAC) and a scholarly series of books and editions. Postgraduate supervision and courses are offered in diverse specialist subjects within the broad range of Spanish, Portuguese, Catalan and Latin American Studies. This reflects the varied research interests and publications of members of staff in the section. Postgraduate students have at their disposal in the Sydney Jones Library large holdings in Hispanic books and periodicals, which are among the most comprehensive in the country.

Italian Studies

Postgraduate supervision in Italian is provided in the following areas: sociolinguistics, Italian dialectology, Italian cinema and crime/detective fiction. Postgraduate students benefit from the remarkable digitised collections and resources available in the Sydney Jones Library and the personalised services provided by library staff.

Latin American Studies

Latin American Studies is one of Modern languagesa dn Cultures' major research specialisms. The six permanent members of staff have research interests in the following domains of Latin American Studies: anthropology, cultural studies, history, literature, politics, and sociology and extend to Brazil, Argentina, Chile, Central America, the Caribbean and southern USA. The Sydney Jones Library is an acknowledged centre of excellence for collections in Latin American Studies. Additional facilities for all postgraduates include access to regular seminars and short conferences, language tuition, and use of the University’s networked computer facilities.

Career prospects

Former postgraduates in French, German and Hispanic Studies are currently employed in senior positions at the universities of: Aberdeen, Sussex, Leeds, Sheffield, Kings College London, Loughborough, Salford and Liverpool, as well as in a variety of careers.

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The M.Sc. in Medical Physics is a full time course which aims to equip you for a career as a scientist in medicine. You will be given the basic knowledge of the subject area and some limited training. Read more
The M.Sc. in Medical Physics is a full time course which aims to equip you for a career as a scientist in medicine. You will be given the basic knowledge of the subject area and some limited training. The course consists of an intense program of lectures and workshops, followed by a short project and dissertation. Extensive use is made of the electronic learning environment "Blackboard" as used by NUI Galway. The course has been accredited by the Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine (UK).

Syllabus Outline. (with ECTS weighting)
Human Gross Anatomy (5 ECTS)
The cell, basic tissues, nervous system, nerves and muscle, bone and cartilage, blood, cardiovascular system, respiratory system, gastrointestinal tract, nutrition, genital system, urinary system, eye and vision, ear, hearing and balance, upper limb – hand, lower limb – foot, back and vertebral column, embryology, teratology, anthropometrics; static and dynamic anthropometrics data, anthropometric dimensions, clearance and reach and range of movement, method of limits, mathematics modelling.

Human Body Function (5 ECTS)
Biological Molecules and their functions. Body composition. Cell physiology. Cell membranes and membrane transport. Cell electrical potentials. Nerve function – nerve conduction, nerve synapses. Skeletal muscle function – neuromuscular junction, muscle excitation, muscle contraction, energy considerations. Blood and blood cells – blood groups, blood clotting. Immune system. Autonomous nervous system. Cardiovascular system – electrical and mechanical activity of the heart. – the peripheral circulation. Respiratory system- how the lungs work. Renal system – how the kidneys work. Digestive system. Endocrine system – how hormones work. Central nervous system and brain function.

Occupational Hygiene (5 ECTS)
Historical development of Occupational Hygiene, Safety and Health at Work Act. Hazards to Health, Surveys, Noise and Vibrations, Ionizing radiations, Non-Ionizing Radiations, Thermal Environments, Chemical hazards, Airborne Monitoring, Control of Contaminants, Ventilation, Management of Occupational Hygiene.

Medical Informatics (5 ECTS)
Bio statistics, Distributions, Hypothesis testing. Chi-square, Mann-Whitney, T-tests, ANOVA, regression. Critical Appraisal of Literature, screening and audit. Patient and Medical records, Coding, Hospital Information Systems, Decision support systems. Ethical consideration in Research.
Practicals: SPSS. Appraisal exercises.

Clinical Instrumentation (6 ECTS)
Biofluid Mechanics: Theory: Pressures in the Body, Fluid Dynamics, Viscous Flow, Elastic Walls, Instrumentation Examples: Respiratory Function Testing, Pressure Measurements, Blood Flow measurements. Physics of the Senses: Theory: Cutaneous and Chemical sensors, Audition, Vision, Psychophysics; Instrumentation Examples: Evoked responses, Audiology, Ophthalmology instrumentation, Physiological Signals: Theory Electrodes, Bioelectric Amplifiers, Transducers, Electrophysiology Instrumentation.

Medical Imaging (10 ECTS)
Theory of Image Formation including Fourier Transforms and Reconstruction from Projections (radon transform). Modulation transfer Function, Detective Quantum Efficiency.
X-ray imaging: Interaction of x-rays with matter, X-ray generation, Projection images, Scatter, Digital Radiography, CT – Imaging. Fundamentals of Image Processing.
Ultrasound: Physics of Ultrasound, Image formation, Doppler scanning, hazards of Ultrasound.
Nuclear Medicine : Overview of isotopes, generation of Isotopes, Anger Cameras, SPECT Imaging, Positron Emitters and generation, PET Imaging, Clinical aspects of Planar, SPECT and PET Imaging with isotopes.
Magnetic Resonance Imaging : Magnetization, Resonance, Relaxation, Contrast in MR Imaging, Image formation, Image sequences, their appearances and clinical uses, Safety in MR.

Radiation Fundamentals (5 ECTS)
Review of Atomic and Nuclear Physics. Radiation from charged particles. X-ray production and quality. Attenuation of Photon Beams in Matter. Interaction of Photons with Matter. Interaction of Charged Particles with matter. Introduction to Monte Carlo techniques. Concept to Dosimetry. Cavity Theory. Radiation Detectors. Practical aspects of Ionization chambers

The Physics of Radiation Therapy (10 ECTS)
The interaction of single beams of X and gamma rays with a scattering medium. Treatment planning with single photon beams. Treatment planning for combinations of photon beams. Radiotherapy with particle beams: electrons, pions, neutrons, heavy charged particles. Special Techniques in Radiotherapy. Equipment for external Radiotherapy. Relative dosimetry techniques. Dosimetry using sealed sources. Brachytherapy. Dosimetry of radio-isotopes.

Workshops / Practicals
Hospital & Radiation Safety [11 ECTS]
Workshop in Risk and Safety.
Concepts of Risk and Safety. Legal Aspects. Fundamental concepts in Risk Assessment and Human Factor Engineering. Risk and Safety management of complex systems with examples from ICU and Radiotherapy. Accidents in Radiotherapy and how to avoid them. Principles of Electrical Safety, Electrical Safety Testing, Non-ionizing Radiation Safety, including UV and laser safety.
- NUIG Radiation Safety Course.
Course for Radiation Safety Officer.
- Advanced Radiation Safety
Concepts of Radiation Protection in Medical Practice, Regulations. Patient Dosimetry. Shielding design in Diagnostic Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Radiotherapy.
- Medical Imaging Workshop
Operation of imaging systems. Calibration and Quality Assurance of General
radiography, fluoroscopy systems, ultrasound scanners, CT-scanners and MR scanners. Radiopharmacy and Gamma Cameras Quality Control.

Research Project [28 ECTS]
A limited research project will be undertaken in a medical physics area. Duration of this will be 4 months full time

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The Sequential Design/Illustration MA attracts new and established illustrators, artists and designers from all over the world who are keen to explore the principles of sequence within their chosen field and make them visible through a variety of forms. Read more
The Sequential Design/Illustration MA attracts new and established illustrators, artists and designers from all over the world who are keen to explore the principles of sequence within their chosen field and make them visible through a variety of forms.

These forms have included written and illustrated books for children and adults, interactive design, film, graphic novels, stage and exhibition design, animation, book arts, narrative textiles, experimental writing, product design and even community projects that encourage social development through storytelling.

In its 25-year history, this course has built on the gathered knowledge and experience of its staff and students to cover topics that are relevant to all MA students interested in storytelling, visual narrative and delivering complex sequential messages.

Recent graduate work – ranging from a biography of Edith Sitwell to a series of calendars made from human hair – demonstrates the diversity of individual research. Other students have examined the legacy of recipes, the secret language of headscarves, the parallels between quantum physics and Taoism as demonstrated through a detective novel, and the role of plumage in communication.

Course structure

You can study on a part-time or full-time basis:

• Part-time, for two years, is designed to fit in with your professional life and allows more time for reflection. Part-time students work on the course for two days a week – one day on site and one day working independently.

• Full-time, for one year, is an intensive year of study. You work four days a week: two days with the course and two days independently.

Lectures, seminars, reviews and assessments are held at fixed times on Wednesdays. Other patterns of attendance vary according to individual circumstances. During holidays you will be engaged in independent study.

Your work will be predominantly project based, which may comprise of one or more parts focusing on a central theme or idea. A single project or investigation will in most cases sustain a student through the entire duration of the course, but at stage assessment, in consultation with tutors, it may naturally evolve into a new or related area of study.

The nature of the subject demands the continual interaction between research, analysis, and practical realisation, as well as an extended period of development for ideas to become fully meaningful. Throughout this investigation you will receive support and guidance from the course tutors.

Areas of study

As the course develops, there is increasing opportunity for independent and self-directed work, though each student is allocated a personal tutor who oversees the planning and content of individual projects. Besides practice-based work, the course also includes a written element in which you will be asked to reflect critically on the research and development of your project.

The Visual Narrative module includes lectures, themed group events and small practical activities such as the Surprise Project, where you are asked to deliver a surprise though a sequence of six images or objects, with the module group as your target audience. From this experience, you learn the nature and importance of surprise in basic storytelling and develop a vocabulary for narrative. In scheduled theme day events, such as Modern Cautionary Tales, you work in groups to challenge your quick-thinking skills in the invention, planning and presentation of a story.

While students accepted on the course should come with the technical skills necessary to fulfil their projects, access to the diverse workshops facilities – for example in bookbinding, letterpress, printmaking and photography – will be made available as appropriate to your project. There is also a substantial specialist library and a full range of computer facilities.

In order to bring together a variety of students and approaches, this course coexists with the Arts and Design by Independent Project MA. Both are based at our Grand Parade campus.

Stage 1:

Sequential Project(s)
Visual Narrative
Research and Investigation

Stage 2:

Major Sequential Project(s)
Project Report

Visiting lecturers

We arrange a programme of weekly lectures by a range of practitioners and academics to broaden your experience and understanding of professional issues and activity. Lecturers describe their practice and professional experience, sharing insights about their research methods and discoveries.

The programme is organised to relate to specific stages of the course and varies on a two-year cycle, so part-time students have access to a different set of events in each of their two years of study.

Careers and employability

Because of the diversity of our students and the projects they create, their professional achievements are equally wide-ranging. Successful commercial enterprises have been established, research degrees undertaken, books published, collaborative design groups formed, and work exhibited in major galleries and institutions. Graduates have also participated in festivals and conferences around the world.

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Taught at our Parkgate Road Campus in Chester, the MA in Nineteenth-Century Literature and Culture explores the dynamic relationship between literary texts of the long 19th century (1789-1914) and the fascinating culture from which they emerged. Read more
Taught at our Parkgate Road Campus in Chester, the MA in Nineteenth-Century Literature and Culture explores the dynamic relationship between literary texts of the long 19th century (1789-1914) and the fascinating culture from which they emerged.

Why Study Nineteenth-Century Literature and Culture with us?

The Department of English, housed in a Grade II-listed Vicarage designed by John Douglas, in a University founded in 1839 and officially opened by Gladstone in 1842, has longstanding teaching and research strengths in 19th-century literature.

Our course is taught by a dedicated and experienced team of tutors with expertise in a wide range of areas, including Romantic poetry; the Sensation novel; detective fiction; the Gothic; and 19th-century Irish, American and South African literature. Our research publications include work on Shelley, Coleridge, the Brontës, Dickens, Collins, Eliot, travel literature, women and material culture, the Victorian periodical press, literature of the Great Famine, colonialism, Neo-Victorian literature, and representations of the body.

What will I learn?

The course offers a wide-ranging exploration of the representation of ideas such as revolution, crime, the body, gender, performance, domestic life, religious belief, nationality, empire, science, technology, and medicine, in 19th-century literature and culture.

Authors studied may include Austen, Shelley, Dickens, Gaskell, Alcott, Conan Doyle, Zola, Wells, and Conrad. You will also have the opportunity to develop your own research interests and expertise through the Research Methods module and your Dissertation.

ow will I be taught?

Nineteenth-Century Literature, Nineteenth-Century Culture, Research Methods, and Special Author(s)/Topic(s) will be taught by seminars (typically nine seminars per 20-credit module, and 18 per 40-credit module). For the Dissertation, you will work one-to-one with a supervisor.

Total workload (including reading, preparation, seminars, tutorials, research, and writing) is approximately 37.5 hours per week.

How will I be assessed?

Modules are assessed by coursework, including essays, research portfolios, presentations, and a 16,000-word Dissertation. There are no formal exams.

Postgraduate Visit Opportunities

If you are interested in this courses we have a number of opportunities to visit us and our campuses. To find out more about these options and to book a visit, please go to: https://www1.chester.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/postgraduate-visit-opportunities

Request a Prospectus

If you would like to know more about the University please request a prospectus at: http://prospectus.chester.ac.uk/form.php

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This MSc provides students with a thorough understanding of how science and scientifically based techniques can deliver immediate and sustainable reductions in crime. Read more

This MSc provides students with a thorough understanding of how science and scientifically based techniques can deliver immediate and sustainable reductions in crime. The programme focuses on how to better apply science to understand crime problems, develop strategies for preventing them, and increase the probability of detecting and arresting offenders.

About this degree

Students develop the ability to apply scientific principles to crime control, think more strategically in developing and implementing crime control policies, appreciate the complexity of implementation issues, critically assess the likely impact of planned crime reduction initiatives and generate more innovative proposals for reducing particular crime problems.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of four core modules (60 credits), four optional modules (60 credits) and a research dissertation (60 credits).

A Postgraduate Diploma comprising four core modules (60 credits) and four optional modules (60 credits) is offered.

Core modules

  • Foundations of Security and Crime Science
  • Designing and Doing Research
  • Preventing Crimes
  • Quantitative Methods

Optional modules

Students choose four of the following:

  • Perspectives on Organised Crime
  • Crime Mapping and Spatial Analysis
  • Investigation and Detection
  • Intelligence Gathering and Analysis
  • Qualitative Methods
  • Cybercrime
  • Introduction to Cybersecurity

Dissertation/report

All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of approximately 10,000 words.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through lectures, seminars, tutorials, projects, laboratory classes, and practical exercises. Practical work will involve the analysis and interpretation of datasets, and the development of new ideas for solving problems. Assessment is through lab and project reports, unseen written examination, coursework, presentations, and the dissertation.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Crime Science MSc

Careers

Many graduates now work in the field of crime prevention and detection for public sector employers such as the Home Office, police and Ministry of Defence, or private sector companies with a crime prevention and community safety focus. Other graduates go on to further doctoral research.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Intern, OSCE: Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe
  • Detective Constable, Metropolitan Police Service
  • Forensic Associate, Deloitte
  • Research Assistant, Universiti Brunei Darussalam
  • Client Service Representative, Ministry of the Attorney General

Employability

Each year we ask our graduates to tell us about their experience of the programme and their career after leaving UCL and we include some real-life graduate profiles on our website.

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Security & Crime Science is a world-first, devoted specifically to reducing crime through teaching, research, public policy analysis and by the dissemination of evidence-based information on crime reduction.

The Crime Science MSc is a multidisciplinary degree, drawing on expertise in psychology, social science, statistics, mathematics, architecture, forensic sciences, design, geography and computing.

Our graduate students come from varied backgrounds; many are practitioners and are encouraged to contribute their experience in and out of the classroom.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Applied Criminal Justice and Criminology at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Applied Criminal Justice and Criminology at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

The Department of Criminology at Swansea University has run a successful MA in Applied Criminal Justice and Criminology since 1997. Students of the Applied Criminal Justice and Criminology will have the opportunity to learn about crime, the criminal justice system and cutting edge themes in criminology from leading experts in the field. The MA in Applied Criminal Justice and Criminology specialises in the application of criminological knowledge to the workings of the Criminal Justice System and this is strongly reflected in the exciting range of diverse and cutting-edge modules on offer.

The MA in Applied Criminal Justice and Criminology focuses mainly on the application of knowledge to the operation of the criminal justice system, reflecting the policy/ practice orientation of members of the staff team.

Whether you are a practitioner working in the criminal justice system, a researcher wishing to gain a firm foundation for a research degree in an ESRC recognised Doctoral Training Centre, or an undergraduate aspiring to a career in criminal justice, our Masters-level degree in Applied Criminal Justice and Criminology is for you! The MA in Applied Criminal Justice and Criminology offers you:

• an up-to-date and high quality programme which includes some of the most important theory and research in criminal justice and criminology

• an opportunity to develop your ability to apply criminal justice and criminological knowledge to research and the operation of the criminal justice system

• an opportunity to develop and apply research methods knowledge and skills

• enhanced employability for those wishing to pursue a career in the criminal justice system and for those interested in an academic or research career

Modules

Modules on the MA in Applied Criminal Justice and Criminology typically include:

• Ethics and Philosophy of Social Research

• Quantitative Methods

• Qualitative Methods

• Case Studies in Applied Social Research

• Data Visualisation

• Crime, Drugs and Alcohol

• Gender, Crime and Criminal Justice

• Applied Criminal Justice

• Understanding Policing

• Youth Justice: Research, Policy & Practice

• Criminal Justice System in England and Wales

• Sexual Abuse and Exploitation of Children

• Human Trafficking

Careers and Employability

The MA in Applied Criminal Justice & Criminology will open the door to a range of careers, including: Local Government, Police Force, Prison Service, Social Work, Victim Support, Teaching, and Probation Service to name a few. Enhancing your career prospects whilst studying on this course, you will have a wealth of opportunities to take advantage of in order to boost your CV and form important employment links for the future.

Additional Information

Every student is allocated a Personal Tutor who offers academic and pastoral care throughout the student’s stay in Swansea. Several lecturers invite senior criminal justice practitioners, managers, and policy makers to deliver lectures on key aspects of criminal justice policy and practice. The Department of Criminology also ensures that MA in Applied Criminal Justice & Criminology students participate in social events through the Criminology Society which organises events that give students opportunities to socialise and meet others in the Department of Criminology. There may also be placement and research internship opportunities available to students (subject to availability). Research internships provide opportunities for students to observe practices in a criminal justice agency and then produce their dissertation on a topic that is relevant to the work of the agency.

Student Quotes

- Christie Owen, MA in Applied Criminal Justice and Criminology graduate 2010 -11

“There are a range of different modules covering a broad spectrum of subjects. Helpful tutoring means that those who have not studied Criminology previously will find the subject easy to pick up. There are plenty of approachable staff and lecturers to seek advice if you are unsure. Lectures are well structured with scope for debate with your peers and lecturers, as well as informative media such as videos and power point presentations. There is continuous mentoring while completing dissertations, with supervisors engaging well with students and aiding them in making it more manageable. Supervisors are continuously available to answer any questions or solve any problems that arise while writing such a large piece of work. The library services are also extremely helpful, with access to many books, journals and the internet with a room specifically for postgraduates which is very much needed during busier periods.

The Masters degree in Criminology encouraged me to pursue a career in the Prison Service. After graduating I was offered a position following my first interview and the course has given me skills to use in my new position.”

- Peter Doyle, MA in Applied Criminal Justice and Criminology graduate

Retired Detective Chief Inspector and Senior Investigating Officer Peter, from Kenfig near Porthcawl, had specialised in Homicide and Serious Crime Investigation and has an extensive background in Child Sexual Exploitation (CSE) investigation.

“The course was challenging for me as I do not possess a first degree – a particular challenge was writing in an academic style. I overcame the challenges by applying practice and more practice – plus support from those within the College and my family. I believe the key is not worrying about every mistake you make but learning from them instead.

“I chose Swansea University because it has an excellent reputation for criminology studies and I also worked in Swansea for many years as a police officer. It was a great honour to meet people on my course from such a wide spectrum and of all ages – this was very inspiring, I was made to feel welcome by everyone involved.”



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This programme offers you the chance to study a range of theories in depth. It engages with modern literary theory, psychoanalytical theory, political theory and theories of visual and aesthetic experience. Read more
This programme offers you the chance to study a range of theories in depth. It engages with modern literary theory, psychoanalytical theory, political theory and theories of visual and aesthetic experience.

You reflect on these areas of thinking in themselves and as they relate to particular literary texts, to post-enlightenment philosophy and to other relevant areas of culture and experience. It is for those interested in writing, reading, language, art, the self, literature and discovering more about the relations between literature and philosophy.

The MA in Critical Theory offers a choice of two core courses that survey a wide range of modern theoretical approaches, and a range of taught options covering postcolonial theory, theories of art, modern approaches to comparative literature, deconstruction and a chance to work in depth on a single key theoretical text and the writings it refers to.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/216/critical-theory

About the School of English

The School of English has a strong international reputation and global perspective, apparent both in the background of its staff and in the diversity of our teaching and research interests.

Our expertise ranges from the medieval to the postmodern, including British, American and Irish literature, postcolonial writing, 18th-century studies, Shakespeare, early modern literature and culture, Victorian studies, modern poetry, critical theory and cultural history. The international standing of the School ensures that we have a lively, confident research culture, sustained by a vibrant, ambitious intellectual community. We also count a number of distinguished creative writers among our staff, and we actively explore crossovers between critical and creative writing in all our areas of teaching and research.

The Research Excellence Framework 2014 has produced very strong results for the School of English at Kent. With 74% of our work graded as world-leading or internationally excellent, the School is ranked 10th out of 89 English departments in terms of Research Intensity (Times Higher Education). The School also received an outstanding assessment of the quality of its research environment and public impact work.

Course structure

You take two modules in the autumn term and two in the spring term; one core module (FR866: Literature and Theory) and three optional modules. You are also expected to attend the Faculty and School Research Methods Programmes.

You then write a theory-based dissertation between the start of the Summer Term and the end of August.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

FR866 - Literature and Theory (30 credits)
FR807 - Postmodern French Detective Fiction (30 credits)
EN889 - Literary Theory (30 credits)
EN897 - Advanced Critical Reading (30 credits)
FR872 - Theories of Art in Modern French Thought (30 credits)
CP808 - Writing the Self: Autobiography in the Modern Period (30 credits)
CP810 - Comparative Literature in Theory and Practice (30 credits)
EN852 - Colonial and Postcolonial Discourses (30 credits)
EN857 - Body and Place in the Postcolonial Text (30 credits)
TH831 - Spirituality and Therapy (30 credits)
TH833 - Contemporary Critical Approaches to the Study of Religion (30 credits)
EN876 - Dickens and the Condition of England (30 credits)
EN888 - Extremes of Feeling: Literature and Empire in the Eighteenth Century (30 credits)
EN818 - American Modernism 1900-1930 (Teaching Period I) (30 credits)
EN832 - Hacks, Dunces and Scribblers: Authorship and the Marketplace in the Eig (30 credits)
EN835 - Dickens, The Victorians and the Body (30 credits)
EN842 - Reading the Contemporary (30 credits)
EN850 - Centres and Edges: Modernist and PostcolonialQuest Literature (30 credits)
MT864 - Reading the Medieval Town: Canterbury, an International City (30 credits)

Assessment

The course is assessed by coursework for each module and by the dissertation which accounts for a third of the final grade.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- extend and deepen through coursework and research your understanding of modern literary and critical theory

- study the reading-practices, analytic tools and vocabularies of modern critical thought

- develop your independent critical thinking and judgement

- introduce you to the research methods that facilitate advanced theoretical study of literature

- provide a basis in knowledge and skills if you intend to teach critical theory, especially in higher education

- develop your understanding and critical awareness of the expressive and analytical resources of language

- offer scope for the study of critical theory within an interdisciplinary context, notably that provided by philosophy

- develop your ability to argue a point of view with clarity and cogency, both orally and in written form

- examine this writing in the wider context of literature, culture and philosophy

- provide teaching which is informed by current research and scholarship and which requires you to engage with aspects of work at the frontiers of knowledge

- develop your research skills to the point where you are ready to undertake a research degree, should you so wish.

Careers

Many career paths can benefit from the writing and analytical skills that you develop as a postgraduate student in the School of English. Our students have gone on to work in academia, journalism, broadcasting and media, publishing, writing and teaching; as well as more general areas such as banking, marketing analysis and project management.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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Application closing date. August 10, 2018.  . The only course of its kind offered by a Russell Group University, our MA in Screenwriting is an intensive one-year training programme designed to professionalise writers and present a genuine gateway into the film and television industries. Read more

Application closing date: August 10, 2018.  

The only course of its kind offered by a Russell Group University, our MA in Screenwriting is an intensive one-year training programme designed to professionalise writers and present a genuine gateway into the film and television industries. Over the course of the year, students will work with leading industry practitioners to develop their screenwriting, pitching and story-breaking skills. By the end of the programme, each student will have developed a full length feature film screenplay, a pilot TV episode and two short films. Like all courses at the Centre for New Writing, this programme is taught by practitioners and as such it is vocationally-oriented and industry-focused. Students will have access to individual career guidance and training in how to navigate entry-level work in both the television and film industries.

The course includes regular speakers from the industry which last year included Beth Pattinson BBC Films ( Brooklyn, We Need to Talk About Kevin, Philomena ), Chris Chibnall (writer and creator of Broadchurch) and Pete Czernin, producer of In Bruges and Best Exotic Marigold Hotel (1 and 2).  

The course runs across two twelve week long semesters, during which students will attend weekly writing workshops in which they will study the very best of contemporary screenwriting, including shows such as Breaking Bad, True Detective, The Killing, Broadchurch, This is England, Rev, Transparency and The Sopranos. They will also cover British and American examples of charismatic film screenwriting from Goodfellas to The King's Speech via Alien .

In the second semester there will be a London industry day based at BAFTA with talks from agents, producers, and writers as well as a meeting with the BFI.

Students will study story design, visual story-telling and character arcs in both long-running television series and feature films. They will develop the tools to be able to analyse and critique screenwriting craft, and learn how to disseminate their own work. There will be weekly film screenings, and students will have access to an excellent lending library of films to watch at home. Through the duration of the course students will develop a broad and eclectic knowledge of cinema and television.

We intend to keep learning as specific to individual study as possible and study groups will be intentionally small in scale. The course capacity is limited to twelve students each year and you will be taught through a mixture of screenings, lectures and group discussion. Our `writers' room' ethos ensures an environment that encourages collaboration, sharing and creative risk-taking.

Importantly, each summer, we offer students a two week `hands-on' industry placement at a renowned film or TV production company either in London or the North West. Current partners include Film4 ( Room. Ex_Machina, The Lobster) , Wildgaze (Brooklyn) , Number 9 Films (Carol) , Left Bank (The Crown), Warp (This is England) , Red Productions ( Happy Valley, Scott and Bailey ), and Hammer Films ( The Woman in Black , Let Me In ). These placements are an excellent opportunity for students to make useful contacts, and to develop a practical and direct understanding of the professional context within which screenwriters ply their trade.

Coursework and assessment

To complete the MA, students are required to take 180 credits in total. They will take two semesters of courses consisting of workshops/tutorials and seminars. There are 60 credits in the first semester and 30 in the second with 90 for the dissertation.

  • All writing workshops meet for three hours per week.
  • Workshops will help students add to their portfolio by including adaptations, scenes, draft scripts, script reports, and genre presentations. 
  • Each workshop is assessed by a portfolio which will include pitches, treatments, scenes, draft scripts, script reports and notes on how to progress a draft.
  • Seminars also meet for three hours per week.
  • Students will also be offered two individual half- to one-hour tutorials per semester in order to discuss the progress of their writing.

Over the summer students complete a 'dissertation' which consists of a final revised version of a full-length screenplay. This is worth 60 credits.

Course unit details

In both semesters all students take a weekly writing workshop and a parallel seminar on craft. Both are 3 hours long. All teaching takes place on Monday or Tuesday.

Career opportunities

This programme is designed to train its graduates to work in the UK film and television industries. Some will work as professional screenwriters, others may take up other, related, positions.



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The distinctive emphasis of Goldsmiths' Department of History is a theorised, interdisciplinary and comparative approach to research. Read more

The distinctive emphasis of Goldsmiths' Department of History is a theorised, interdisciplinary and comparative approach to research.

The culture of the Department of History is open, friendly and accessible, and research students are encouraged to be innovative in their use of sources and methodologies.

Our staff is young and we are on the cutting-edge of our fields and the student-teacher ratio allows us to devote an unmatched amount of time to individual supervision. Find out more about staff in the department

MPhil and PhD topics in the department currently include:

  • The Song of the Pen: Penny Romantic Literature 1839-89
  • The Freak Show in Nineteenth-Century Britain
  • British Women and German Prisoners of War in the 1940s
  • Decoding Dress in Interwar Detective Fiction
  • The British Diaspora - Race Return Migration and Identity in 20th Century Britain
  • Atatürk and his Cult - A Visual History, 1918-1968
  • Another Balkan Myth? The Extreme Right Wing in Serbia: Indigenous Phenomenon or Foreign Adaptation?
  • London Schools and Children, 1870-1920
  • The Seekers Found: Radical Religion during the English Revolution

Find out more about research degrees at Goldsmiths

Assessment is by thesis and viva voce.

Research

Research in the Department of History is esteemed internationally. History staff publish books and articles with leading international publishers and journals and their research has been externally funded by the AHRC, the British Academy, the Panacea Society and Wellcome Trust.

Find out about individual Staff.

Skills & careers

Our PhD students have taken up academic posts in history and related fields around the world; others are employed in the media and as researchers and teachers.



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COURSE OVERVIEW. Research cutting-edge methods and techniques. Opportunity to gain experience in a work placement. Prepare for a career in policing, forensic psychology or security . Read more

COURSE OVERVIEW

  • Research cutting-edge methods and techniques
  • Opportunity to gain experience in a work placement
  • Prepare for a career in policing, forensic psychology or security 

Can you eliminate the impossible to find the truth, however improbable? Whether you’re pursuing a career as a consulting detective or a more conventional route into the world of criminology, Applied Criminology at Winchester equips you with the skills and knowledge to enter your chosen profession. 

Explore the fascinating and complex world of crime, deviance, security and insecurity as they relate to careers in crime prevention, detection and security. Develop your understanding of criminological concepts and methods and how they’re used in professional contexts, with opportunities to gain direct experience through a work placement or internship. Complete advanced training in criminological research methods relevant to applied settings, in keeping with our ethos of active and engaged learning. 

In core modules including Applied Criminology and Applied Criminological Research you consider and discuss the impact of criminology on a range of professions – which can be as wide-ranging as counter-terrorism, criminal and social justice issues, and global security. Optional modules such as Foundations of Forensic Psychology Practice, Cybercrime and Cybersecurity, and The Criminal Justice System and the Legal Framework provide you with opportunities to develop your particular specialist interests. You complete a professionally focused extended research project on a relevant topic, which can be informed by your work placement. Part-time students who are employed in a relevant profession can complete a work-based learning module. 

The course leader, Johannes P Oosthuizen, is a former UK police officer with 14 years’ experience, having conducted attachments with the FBI (2008 and 2013) and Dutch Police (2007 to 2011). He has experience and research interests in counter-terrorism, neighbourhood policing and private sector partnership strategies. 

The Applied Criminology MSc equips your to pursue a career in policing, forensic psychology, or security.

Careers

The programme is designed to prepare students for a range of criminological careers, specifically focused around three professional pathways: forensic psychology, policing and security.

Pre-approved for a Masters

If you study a Bachelor Honours degrees with us, you will be pre-approved to start a Masters degree at Winchester. To be eligible, you will need to apply by the end of March in the final year of your degree and meet the entry requirements of your chosen Masters degree.

ABOUT THIS COURSE

Suitable for applicants from:

UK, EU, World

Work placements

The programme offers a work-based learning module for those students employed in a relevant professional sector for which they receive credit, and an internship opportunity for full-time students. All students complete a professionally focused extended research project.

Learning and teaching

Start date: September

Teaching takes place: Daytime

The programme is taught through a variety of methods including lectures, seminars, workshops, external visits, work-based learning and independent research. Contact with industry experts is a key feature of the course and students meet with regular guest speakers from a number of external organisations concerned with crime, deviance and security. Students have the opportunity to explore these organisations through field visits and work placements.

Location

King Alfred or West Downs, University of Winchester

Assessment

Our validated courses may adopt a range of means of assessing your learning. An indicative, and not necessarily comprehensive, list of assessment types you might encounter includes essays, portfolios, supervised independent work, presentations, written exams, or practical performances.

We ensure all students have an equal opportunity to achieve module learning outcomes. As such, where appropriate and necessary, students with recognised disabilities may have alternative assignments set that continue to test how successfully they have met the module's learning outcomes. Further details on assessment types used on the course you are interested in can be found on the course page, by attending an Open Day or Open Evening, or contacting our teaching staff.

Feedback

We are committed to providing timely and appropriate feedback to you on your academic progress and achievement in order to enable you to reflect on your progress and plan your academic and skills development effectively. You are also encouraged to seek additional feedback from your course tutors.

Further information

For more information about our regulations for this course, please see our Academic Regulations, Policies and Procedures.



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Based in the city that gave Charles Dickens inspiration throughout his writing life, this groundbreaking London research programme offers students unique access not only to world-class scholars and practitioners drawn from the field of Dickens Studies and the media, but furthermore to the unique collections of the Charles Dickens Museum. Read more

Course outline

Based in the city that gave Charles Dickens inspiration throughout his writing life, this groundbreaking London research programme offers students unique access not only to world-class scholars and practitioners drawn from the field of Dickens Studies and the media, but furthermore to the unique collections of the Charles Dickens Museum.

It is directed by Professor John Drew and Dr Pete Orford, Dickens experts of international reputation, who are also full-time members of the University’s highly regarded Department of English.

The course enables the student to undertake research on a specific topic, agreed with the supervisor, in any area of Dickens Studies: his novels, short fiction, journalism, plays, the public readings, adaptations of his work (cinematic, theatrical) as well as comparative work on translations, writing by precursors, contemporaries, rivals, imitators and inheritors. The research is presented in the form of three ‘Project Preliminaries’: an extended research proposal, an annotated bibliography, and a short research-based case study for which students will be invited to investigate either the archive holdings of the Charles Dickens Museum or the network of Dickens’s collaborators for his journals, as made available by the University’s celebrated project Dickens Journals Online. On successful completion of these three preliminary projects, students will then progress to their dissertation, written under the guidance of the supervisor, of not less than 20,000 words.

Teaching methods

A central feature of the course will be its series of ten evening seminars with distinguished speakers, held both at the University’s Gower Street premises and in the Board Room of the Charles Dickens Museum, each followed by a dinner and discussion, in private rooms at a nearby restaurant in Bloomsbury.

The incredibly wide-reaching influence and impact of Dickens as a writer, performer, editor and social reformer in the English-speaking world means that Dickens Studies can therefore span an equally wide range of research topics right across nineteenth- and twentieth-century literary and print culture. Themes addressed by the seminars will include:

- the lights and shadows of Dickensian biography
- Dickens as a short-story writer
- Dickens’s reception in the twentieth-century
- Dickens and the development of detective and thriller fiction
- Dickens’s influence as an editor and social reformer
- the cultural importance of adaptations of Dickens’s work
- the power of Dickens’s language
- the performative nature of Dickensian characters
- Dickens in the digital age

The course will begin with three practical seminars about how to choose, research and write an academic dissertation, and how to handle archival materials.

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The M.S. in Criminal Justice trains individuals through an interdisciplinary focus in an online environment. The program prepares students through the core curriculum and allows for specialty training through various concentrations. Read more

The M.S. in Criminal Justice trains individuals through an interdisciplinary focus in an online environment. The program prepares students through the core curriculum and allows for specialty training through various concentrations.

This facilitates choice for students and fosters the development of specialized expertise. Students will complete the thirty hour program that includes core courses, specialty concentrations, and electives.

Proudly Offering the Valor Award 20% Scholarship for Law Enforcement, Veterans, Military, and First Responders

This program is designed for individuals looking for careers in or as:

  • Police Officer
  • County Sheriff / Deputy Sheriff
  • State Trooper / Highway Patrol Officer
  • Game Warden / Conservation Officer
  • Detective
  • Canine Officer / K9 Handler
  • Animal Cruelty Investigator
  • Park Ranger
  • FBI Special Agent
  • DEA Agent
  • Secret Service Special Agent
  • ICE Special Agent
  • Federal Air Marshal
  • Correctional Officer
  • Correctional Counselor
  • Parole Officer
  • Legal Assistant or Legal Researcher
  • Bailiff
  • Pre-trial Officer
  • Loss Prevention Officer - Loss Prevention Manager
  • Bounty Hunter - Bail Enforcement Agent
  • Public Safety Officer
  • Community Liaison Officer

To see a complete list of possible career options, click here.

Program Format

The master's program is offered entirely online. The online format allows for students to participate in courses from anywhere in the world where internet access is available. In addition, it allows for the flexibility of completing your master's degree without interrupting your career. For information on the online/residential bachelor's program, click here. For information on the online doctoral program, click here.

Master's students are provided NSU computer accounts including email and Blackboard, but must obtain their own Internet service providers, use their own computer systems and have a usable web camera. Online students use the web to access course materials, announcements, email, distance library services, subscription library databases, and other information, and for interaction with faculty and fellow students. Online, interactive learning methods are based on the use of Blackboard as a course management system. Online activities facilitate frequent student-to-faculty and student-to-student interaction. They are supported by threaded discussion boards, white boards, chat rooms, email, and multimedia presentations. In addition, Blackboard enables students to submit assignments online in multimedia formats and to receive their professors' reviews of assignments online in the same formats.

Curriculum

The Master's program is comprised of 30 credits. The core curriculum is comprised of five courses (15 credits) and one elective course (3 credits). The specialty concentrations are comprised of four courses (12 credits).

Core Courses (15 Credits)

  • CJI 0510 Survey Issues in Criminal Justice (3 credits)
  • CJI 0520 Social Administration of Criminal Justice (3 credits)
  • CJI 0530 Legal Issues in Criminal Justice (3 credits)
  • CJI 0540 Program Evaluation in Criminal Justice (3 credits)
  • CJI 0550 Investigative Processes (3 credits)

Specialty Concentrations (12 Credits)

Students must choose one concentration below and complete 12 credits within the concentration. (The concentrations remain the same)

Electives (3 Credits)

Students must choose one or a combination of electives below to obtain a total of 3 credit hours.

  • One, three (3) credit class
  • Practicum Placement (3, 6, or 9 Credit options)
  • Master's Thesis (6 Credits)


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Why study this programme?. Taught by those with academic and professional experience in the subject, this course will develop the student’s ability to understand the criminal justice system, at both theoretical and operational levels, from UK and international perspectives. Read more

Why study this programme?

Taught by those with academic and professional experience in the subject, this course will develop the student’s ability to understand the criminal justice system, at both theoretical and operational levels, from UK and international perspectives. The core module applies social science to explain why crime concentrates in specific places at particular times. Then by analysing social, economic and political influences (including youth, race, gender and media), it explores how different societies attempt to control crime and offenders. This leads the student into examining the constituent parts of the CJS process, exploring the challenges surrounding risk assessment, diversion, sentencing, policing and prisons.

Learning Environment and Assessment

The course leader is Dr Rebecca Coleman, whose Ph.D. relates to Applied Psychology. An experienced lecturer in the field of Criminal Justice she is also an active researcher, with a specific interest in violent offenders and evidence based policing. She has worked with the Police, Home Office and NGO’s in generating innovative approaches to issues of crime and disorder.

Assisting will be Professor Stuart Kirby. Stuart is a chartered psychologist and following a 30 year career with Lancashire Police, retired as a Detective Chief Superintendent, and joined academia. He is widely published in the field of Policing and Criminal Justice and has extensive research experience. He has also trained and presented to Criminal Justice agencies in Europe, USA, Canada, India, UAE, and Australia.

Opportunities

This course is designed to enhance the development of those already working in the CJS. It is also aimed at developing those who wish to be employed in the diverse field of Criminal Justice or the Security industry.

Progression routes

For those with professional experience those who wish to continue their studies can enrol onto the Professional Doctorate programme.



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