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This module addresses the following issues. -Introduction to communicable diseases - patterns of infection; infectious disease threats, surveillance systems and epidemiological investigation. Read more
This module addresses the following issues:
-Introduction to communicable diseases - patterns of infection; infectious disease threats, surveillance systems and epidemiological investigation
-Contact diseases - skin and eye conditions; sexually transmitted diseases; HIV/AIDS; malaria; diseases spread through faeco-oral route; air-borne diseases; Tuberculosis, hepatitis viruses, hospital acquired infection
-Global patient safety challenge - sterilization and cross infection control; trends, / prevention and control measures; effectiveness of a number of key national disease control programmes, for example: working on the efficacy, safety and uptake of vaccines in routine use; the uptake and effectiveness of national screening, antibiotic use and misuse
-Role of NGO, WHO, policy and government targets, surveillance of targets. Service planning; contingency, responsibility, inequality, public perception of threat, organizational responsiveness. Role of the media, UK infection control and management of public health threats

Why Bradford?

At the Faculty of Health Studies, University of Bradford, you can choose to study for individual modules, a named award or build module credits through the SSPRD Framework for Flexible Learning to achieve an award relevant to your professional needs.

The Framework for Flexible Learning in Health and Social Care is a Faculty-wide academic structure for Specialist Skills and Post-Registration Development. It offers students increased flexibility and choice in the modules and courses that can be undertaken and it is also responsive to employer needs. The flexibility also allows you to move from one award to another if your career changes or you take time out from regular studying. Shared teaching and research expertise from across the Faculty is offered through interdisciplinary teaching across our core research modules.

The Faculty of Health Studies is regionally, nationally and internationally recognised for its teaching and research, and works with a number of healthcare partners to ensure clinical excellence.

Modules

This module is provided as part of this interdisciplinary Framework within the Faculty of Health Studies. The Framework enables students to create an individualised programme of study that will meet either their needs and/or the employers’ needs for a changing diverse workforce within a modern organisation.

The modules and academic awards are presented in areas representing employment practice or work based or clinical disciplines.

Whilst some students can build their own academic awards by choosing their own menu of module options, other students will opt for a named academic award. The Framework also provides the option for students to move from their chosen named award to another award if their job or personal circumstances change and they need to alter the focus of their studies. The majority of named awards also offer students, the option of choosing at least one module, sometimes more, from across the Faculty module catalogue enabling them to shape their award more specifically to their needs.

Career support and prospects

The University is committed to helping students develop and enhance employability and this is an integral part of many programmes. Specialist support is available throughout the course from Career and Employability Services including help to find part-time work while studying, placements, vacation work and graduate vacancies. Students are encouraged to access this support at an early stage and to use the extensive resources on the Careers website.

Discussing options with specialist advisers helps to clarify plans through exploring options and refining skills of job-hunting. In most of our programmes there is direct input by Career Development Advisers into the curriculum or through specially arranged workshops.

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Advance your knowledge of analytical chemistry, your practical skills and professional and organisation skills on this course. You learn the fundamentals of analytical chemistry and how it is applied to pharmaceutical, environmental and materials analyses. Read more

Advance your knowledge of analytical chemistry, your practical skills and professional and organisation skills on this course. You learn the fundamentals of analytical chemistry and how it is applied to pharmaceutical, environmental and materials analyses.

The course is taught by researchers with an international reputation in advanced analytical techniques, such as the application of mass spectrometry to the analysis of biological matrices. Tutors also have expertise in production and detection of nanoparticles and detection of pollutants, particularly in soil.

This course is suitable if you wish to increase your knowledge and skills and increase your competitiveness in the job market or pursue a PhD. It will also suit you if you work in a chemistry-related profession and are seeking to further your career prospects.

You gain experience and understanding of

  • key techniques in separation sciences, including liquid and gas chromatography
  • atomic and molecular spectroscopy, such as atomic absorption and emission, NMR and IR
  • analytical technologies applied in process control and solving complex biological problems

This is a multi-disciplinary course where you learn about various topics including statistics, laboratory quality assurance and control, environmental analysis and fundamentals of analytical instrumentation.

You also gain the transferable skills needed to continue developing your knowledge in science, such as data interpretation and analysis, experimental design and communication and presentation skills.

You complete a research project to develop your research skills and their application to real world situations. You are supported by a tutor who is an expert in analytical chemistry.

Your laboratory work is carried out in our teaching laboratories which are extensively equipped with the latest models of analytical instruments such as HPLCs and GCs. This is supplemented by access to our research facilities where you have access to more sophisticated equipment, such as NMR and a suite of various types of mass spectrometers.

Professional recognition

This course is accredited by the Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC). Applicants should normally have a degree (bachelors or equivalent) in chemistry that is accredited by the RSC. Applicants whose first degree is not accredited by the RSC, or with overseas degrees or degrees in which chemistry is a minor component will be considered on a case by case basis on submission of their first degree transcript.

Candidates who do not meet the RSC criteria for accreditation will be awarded a non-accredited masters qualification on successful completion of the programme.

Applicants will be informed in writing at the start of the programme whether or not they possess an acceptable qualification and, if successful on the masters programme, will receive an RSC accredited degree. If you do not meet the RSC criteria for accreditation, you will be awarded a non-accredited masters after successfully completing the programme.

Course structure

The masters (MSc) award is achieved by successfully completing 180 credits.

The postgraduate certificate (PgCert) is achieved by successfully completing 60 credits.

The postgraduate diploma (PgDip) is achieved by successfully completing 120 credits.

Core modules:

  • Quality issues, laboratory accreditation and the analytical approach (15 credits)
  • Separation, detection and online techniques (15 credits)
  • Surface analysis and related techniques (15 credits)
  • Drug detection and analysis (15 credits)
  • Methods for analysis of molecular structure (15 credits)
  • Process analytical technology (15 credits)
  • Professional development (15 credits)
  • Research methods and statistics (15 credits)
  • Research project (60 credits)

Assessment

Assessment methods include written examinations and coursework including

  • problem-solving exercises
  • case studies
  • reports from practical work.

Research project assessment includes a written report and viva voce. 

Employability

This course is aimed at either recent graduates or those already in employment who wish to develop a career in analytical chemistry or enhance their laboratory skills and knowledge in the techniques and methods used in a modern analytical science laboratory. It also offers you the training and knowledge to go on to research at PhD level in analytical science.



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Our programme will give you a thorough grounding in the radiation and environmental protection aspects of nuclear physics. Read more

Our programme will give you a thorough grounding in the radiation and environmental protection aspects of nuclear physics.

This includes in-depth knowledge of radiation protection and showing you how the technical and organisational procedures of the discipline may be applied to the broader concept of environmental protection.

The substantial practical element of this programme enables you to relate taught material to real-world applications. Formal lectures are complemented with work in specialist radiation laboratories that were recently refurbished as part of a £1m upgrade to our facilities.

Here you will work with a wide range of radioactive sources and radiation detectors. There is also an extended project in the spring and an eleven-week MSc dissertation project in the summer.

Programme structure

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year and part-time students must study at least two taught technical modules per academic year. It consists of eight taught modules and a dissertation.

Example module listing

The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.

Research-led teaching

The programme material is taught by a combination of academics from the Department of Physics at Surrey and specialists provided by industrial partners. The Surrey academics are part of the Centre for Nuclear and Radiation Physics which houses the largest academic nuclear physics research group in the UK.

In addition to the formal lectures for taught modules, the programme provides a wide range of experimental hands-on training. This includes a nine-week radiation physics laboratory which takes place in the specialist radiation laboratories within the Department of Physics at the University of Surrey.

These were recently refurbished as part of a £1 million upgrade to the departmental teaching infrastructure. Within the Department, we also have a common room and a departmental library, which contains copies of earlier MSc dissertations.

As well as the laboratory training, you will also undertake a research project at the beginning of the Spring semester as a precursor to the eleven-week research dissertation project which makes up the final part of the MSc.

There are many opportunities for both the spring research project and summer dissertation project to be taken in an external industrial environment.

Careers

The programme has produced over 500 UK and overseas graduates, many of whom have gone on to well-paid positions in companies in the nuclear and radiation sectors. In the UK we need to decommission old reactors and build new ones to provide a low-carbon source of energy.

This, together with, for example, the importance of radioisotopes in fields such as medicine, means that the career prospects of our graduates are excellent.

Educational aims of the programme

The programme integrates the acquisition of core scientific knowledge with the development of key practical skills with a focus on professional career development within medical physics and radiation detection, and related industries.

The principle educational aims and outcomes of learning are to provide participants with advanced knowledge, practical skills and understanding applied to medical physics, radiation detection instrumentation, radiation and environmental practice in an industrial or medical context.

This is achieved by the development of the participants’ understanding of the underlying science and technology and by the participants gaining an understanding of the legal basis, practical implementation and organisational basis of medical physics and radiation measurement.

Programme learning outcomes

Knowledge and understanding

  • A systematic understanding of Radiation and Environmental Protection in an academic and professional context together with a critical awareness of current problems and / or new insights
  • A comprehensive understanding of techniques applicable to their own research project in Radiation and / or Environmental Protection
  • Originality in the application of knowledge, together with a practical understanding of radiation-based, experimental research projects
  • An ability to evaluate and objectively interpret experimental data pertaining to radiation detection
  • Familiarity with generic issues in management and safety and their application to Radiation and Environmental Protection in a professional context

Intellectual / cognitive skills

  • The ability to plan and execute under supervision, an experiment or investigation and to analyse critically the results and draw valid conclusions from them. Students should be able to evaluate the level of uncertainty in their results, understand the significance of uncertainty analysis and be able to compare these results with expected outcomes, theoretical predictions and/or with published data. Graduates should be able to evaluate the significance of their results in this context
  • The ability to evaluate critically current research and advanced scholarship in the discipline of radiation protection
  • The ability to deal with complex issues both systematically and creatively, make sound judgements in the absence of complete data, and communicate their conclusions clearly to specialist and non- specialist audiences

Professional practical skills

  • The ability to communicate complex scientific ideas, the conclusions of an experiment, investigation or project concisely, accurately and informatively
  • The ability to manage their own learning and to make use of appropriate texts, research articles and other primary sources
  • Responsibility for personal and professional development. Ability to use external mentors for personal / professional purposes

Key / transferable skills

  • Identify and resolve problems arising from lectures and experimental work
  • Make effective use of resources and interaction with others to enhance and motivate self-study
  • Make use of sources of material for development of learning and research such as journals, books and the internet
  • Take responsibility for personal and professional development

Global opportunities

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.



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The Applied Computing Department is a young department of modest size but is successful in attracting research funding from various sources in the UK and the EU (including industry, research councils and charitable foundations). Read more

Course Outline

The Applied Computing Department is a young department of modest size but is successful in attracting research funding from various sources in the UK and the EU (including industry, research councils and charitable foundations). It supports a significant range of research interest and over the last few years the number of research students has grown steadily. The Department has a history of involvement in EU framework projects. More recently, we were partners in two EU FP6 funded projects: SecurePhone and BroadWan. We have been working and collaborating with many European research institutions including The Technical University Graz, CNUCE, Pisa, Thales, Thomson, TELENOR, RAL, Salzburg, Telephonica – Spain, Atos Origin, The University of Saarbrucken – Germany, INFORMA – Italy, and ENST – France.

The main research areas of interest in the Department cover image / video processing and analysis techniques and applications; wireless mobile network technologies; and biometric-based authentications for constrained devices / environments. In image processing we mainly, but not exclusively, use wavelet transform techniques for facial feature detection and recognition, online image / video compression for constrained devices, visual speech recognition, feature detection in biomedical images, digital watermarking, content-based video indexing for biometric video databases. In the wireless networking area, our research effort focuses on convergence and integration of different wireless technologies and standards, wireless mesh technologies, intrusion detection and prevention, efficiency and stability of ad hoc networks.

Currently the Department has a number of research groups consisting of 5 research active academics, 12 PhD and 3 MSc/MPhil students at various stages of their studies.

Find out more about our Department of Applied Computing on http://www.buckingham.ac.uk/appliedcomputing.

Teaching Method

Candidates spend a considerable part of their studies undertaking supervised research, at the end of which they submit a thesis embodying the results of that research. This thesis must demonstrate familiarity with, and an understanding of the subject, its principal sources and authorities. It should display critical discrimination and a sense of proportion in evaluating evidence and the judgements of others. The subject should be dealt with in a competent and scholarly manner.

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Why Surrey?. At the University of Surrey, our MSc in Nuclear Science and Applications is a new and innovative programme, taught by a combination of world-leading nuclear physics academics and leading experts from the UK’s nuclear industries. Read more

Why Surrey?

At the University of Surrey, our MSc in Nuclear Science and Applications is a new and innovative programme, taught by a combination of world-leading nuclear physics academics and leading experts from the UK’s nuclear industries.

Programme overview

Drawing upon our existing expertise and supported by our MSc in Radiation and Environmental Protection, one of UK’s longest running programmes in its field, our programme will give you a thorough grounding in nuclear science and its applications. This new programmes differs from our existing MSc in Radiation and Environmental Protection as both the group project and the summer dissertation project will be on nuclear science and application topics.

The substantial practical element of this programme enables you to relate taught material to real-world applications. Formal lectures are complemented with work in specialist radiation laboratories that were recently refurbished as part of a £1m upgrade to our facilities.

Here you will work with a wide range of radioactive sources and radiation detectors. There is also an extended project in the spring and an eleven-week MSc dissertation project in the summer and students will have the opportunity to complete their dissertation on a topic specialising in nuclear research.

Programme structure

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year. Part-time students study over two academic years, within which the workload is evenly distributed.

The course consists of eight taught modules and a dissertation.

Example module listing

The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that modules may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.

Research-led teaching

The programme material is taught by a combination of academics from the Department of Physics at Surrey and specialists provided by industrial partners. The Surrey academics are part of the Centre for Nuclear and Radiation Physics which houses the largest academic nuclear physics research group in the UK.

In addition to the formal lectures for taught modules, the programme provides a wide range of experimental hands-on training. This includes an eight-week radiation physics laboratory which takes place in the specialist radiation laboratories within the Department of Physics at the University of Surrey.

These were recently refurbished as part of a £1 million upgrade to the departmental teaching infrastructure. Within the Department, we also have a common room and a departmental library, which contains copies of earlier MSc dissertations.

As well as the laboratory training, you will also undertake a research group project at the beginning of the Spring semester as a precursor to the eleven-week research dissertation project which makes up the final part of the MSc.

There are many opportunities for the summer dissertation project to be taken in an external industrial environment.

Careers

Completion of this programme will result in strong job opportunities in the nuclear industry, a growing international industry.

The programme will also naturally lead into further study, such as completion of a PhD.

Educational aims of the programme

The programme integrates the acquisition of core scientific knowledge with the development of key practical skills with a focus on professional career development within medical physics and radiation detection, and related industries.

The principle educational aims and outcomes of learning are to provide participants with advanced knowledge, practical skills and understanding applied to medical physics, radiation detection instrumentation, radiation and environmental practice in an industrial or medical context.

This is achieved by the development of the participants’ understanding of the underlying science and technology and by the participants gaining an understanding of the legal basis, practical implementation and organisational basis of medical physics and radiation measurement.

Programme Learning Outcomes

Knowledge and understanding

  • A systematic understanding of Nuclear Science and Applications in an academic and professional context together with a critical awareness of current problems and / or new insights
  • A comprehensive understanding of techniques applicable to their own research project in Nuclear Science and / or its application
  • Originality in the application of knowledge, together with a practical understanding of radiation-based, experimental research projects
  • An ability to evaluate and objectively interpret experimental data pertaining to radiation detection
  • Familiarity with generic issues in management and safety and their application to nuclear science and applications in a professional context

Intellectual / cognitive skills

  • The ability to plan and execute under supervision, an experiment or investigation and to analyse critically the results and draw valid conclusions from them. Students should be able to evaluate the level of uncertainty in their results, understand the significance of uncertainty analysis and be able to compare these results with expected outcomes, theoretical predictions and/or with published data. Graduates should be able to evaluate the significance of their results in this context
  • The ability to evaluate critically current research and advanced scholarship in the discipline of nuclear science
  • The ability to deal with complex issues both systematically and creatively, make sound judgements in the absence of complete data, and communicate their conclusions clearly to specialist and non- specialist audiences

Professional practical skills

  • The ability to communicate complex scientific ideas, the conclusions of an experiment, investigation or project concisely, accurately and informatively
  • The ability to manage their own learning and to make use of appropriate texts, research articles and other primary sources
  • Responsibility for personal and professional development. Ability to use external mentors for personal / professional purposes

Key / transferable skills

  • Identify and resolve problems arising from lectures and experimental work
  • Make effective use of resources and interaction with others to enhance and motivate self-study
  • Make use of sources of material for development of learning and research such as journals, books and the internet
  • Take responsibility for personal and professional development


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Gain the knowledge and practical skills needed to develop methods to determine the levels of active ingredients and contaminants in pharmaceutical preparations. Read more

Gain the knowledge and practical skills needed to develop methods to determine the levels of active ingredients and contaminants in pharmaceutical preparations.

You learn the skills of an analyst and become familiar with the principles of modern instrumental analytical techniques, analytical methods and statistics. You learn how to conduct your tests according to regulations which demand that you work under a strict quality assurance and quality control regime.

Because we have designed the course in close consultation with the pharmaceutical industry, your training is excellent preparation for a career in the industry. In addition to giving input on course structure, industrial practitioners deliver lectures on a variety of topics which relate to industry. You can take modules individually for continuing professional development.

Your laboratory work is carried out in our teaching laboratories which are extensively equipped with the latest models of analytical instruments such as HPLCs and GCs. We also have excellent research facilities where you have access to more sophisticated equipment, such as NMR and a suite of various types of mass spectrometers, which are used in taught modules and research projects.

As a student, you

  • gain knowledge and practical skills to operate commonly used analytical laboratory instruments
  • become familiar with automated approaches to analysis and process analytical technology
  • apply good experimental design techniques and use statistical methods for data evaluation
  • develop your knowledge of validated analysis methods for determining chemical compounds and elements in a range of sample types
  • understand the principles and practice of laboratory quality systems
  • interpret mass spectra and nuclear magnetic resonance data.

Course structure

The masters (MSc) award is achieved by successfully completing 180 credits.

The postgraduate certificate (PgCert) is achieved by successfully completing 60 credits.

The postgraduate diploma (PgDip) is achieved by successfully completing 120 credits.

Core modules:

  • Quality issues, laboratory accreditation and the analytical approach (15 credits)
  • Separation, detection and online techniques (15 credits)
  • Pharmaceutical drug development (15 credits)
  • Drug detection and analysis (15 credits)
  • Methods for analysis of molecular structure (15 credits)
  • Process analytical technology (15 credits)
  • Professional development (15 credits)
  • Research methods and statistics (15 credits)
  • Research project (60 credits)

Assessment

Mostly by coursework including

  • problem solving exercises
  • case studies
  • practical laboratory work
  • written examinations.

Research project assessment includes a written report and viva voce. 

Employability

You improve your career prospects in areas such as • pharmaceutical research and drug development • medical research in universities and hospitals • care products • biotechnology companies • government research agencies.

It also offers you the training and knowledge to go on to research at PhD level in pharmacology, biotechnology pharmaceutical and analytical science.

How we support your career

Sheffield Hallam University is committed to the employability of its students. That’s why we design so many of our courses with employers. Find out how we can support your career.



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Why Surrey?. Our Medical Physics MSc programme is well-established and internationally renowned. We are accredited by IPEM (Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine) and we have trained some 1,000 medical physicists, so you can look forward to high-quality teaching during your time at Surrey. Read more

Why Surrey?

Our Medical Physics MSc programme is well-established and internationally renowned. We are accredited by IPEM (Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine) and we have trained some 1,000 medical physicists, so you can look forward to high-quality teaching during your time at Surrey.

Programme overview

The syllabus for the MSc in Medical Physics is designed to provide the knowledge, skills and experience required for a modern graduate medical physicist, placing more emphasis than many other courses on topics beyond ionising radiation (X-rays and radiotherapy).

Examples of other topics include magnetic resonance imaging and the use of lasers in medicine.

You will learn the theoretical foundations underpinning modern imaging and treatment modalities, and will gain a set of experimental skills essential in a modern medical physicist’s job.

These skills are gained through experimental sessions in the physics department and practical experiences at collaborating hospitals using state-of-the-art clinical facilities.

Why not discover more about our programme in our video?

Programme structure

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year. It consists of eight taught modules and a dissertation project. Part-time studemts study the same content over 2 academic years.

Example module listing

The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that all modules are compulsory, there are no optional modules, and may be subject to change.

Facilities, equipment and academic support

Common room

A student common room is available for the use of all Physics students.

Computers

The University has an extensive range of PC and UNIX machines, full internet access and email. The University has invested in resources to allow students to develop their IT skills. It also has an online learning environment, SurreyLearn. Computers are located in dedicated computer rooms. Access to these rooms is available 24 hours per day.

Prizes

Hounsfield Prize

A prize of £200 is awarded annually for the best dissertation on the Medical Physics programme. Sir Hounsfield was jointly awarded the Nobel Prize for Medicine in 1979 for his work on Computed Tomography.

Mayneord Prize

A prize of £200 in memory of Professor Valentine Mayneord will be awarded to the student with the best overall performance on the Medical Physics course. Professor Mayneord was one of the pioneers of medical physics, who had a long association with the Department and encouraged the growth of teaching and research in the field.

Knoll Prize

A prize of £300 in memory of Professor Glenn Knoll is awarded annually to the student with outstanding performance in Radiation Physics and Radiation Measurement on any of the department's MSc programmes. Professor Knoll was a world-leading authority in radiation detection, with a long association with the department

IPEM Student Prize (MSc Medical Physics)

A prize of £250 is awarded annually to a student with outstanding performance in their dissertation.

Educational aims of the programme

The programme integrates the acquisition of core scientific knowledge with the development of key practical skills with a focus on professional career development within medical physics and related industries. The principle educational aims and outcomes of learning are to provide participants with advanced knowledge, practical skills and understanding applied to medical physics, radiation detection instrumentation, radiation and environmental practice in an industrial or medical context. This is achieved by the development of the participants’ understanding of the underlying science and technology and by the participants gaining an understanding of the legal basis, practical implementation and organisational basis of medical physics and radiation measurement.

Global opportunities

We give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities and through our international research collaboration. Hence, it may be possible to carry out the dissertation project abroad.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.



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This programme is intended for graduates already working in Medical Microbiology laboratories, or in a closely-related field, who want to enhance their understanding of the role of microorganisms in health and disease. Read more

This programme is intended for graduates already working in Medical Microbiology laboratories, or in a closely-related field, who want to enhance their understanding of the role of microorganisms in health and disease.

You will study the theoretical aspects of medical microbiology, which encompasses: the biological and pathogenic properties of microbes; their role in health and disease; the reactions of the host to infection; and the scientific basis for the detection, control and antimicrobial treatment of infectious disease.

Upon successful completion of the course, you will possess a deeper knowledge of medical microbiology and highly developed management and research skills which will enhance your professional activities.

Programme structure

This programme is studied part-time over two academic years. It consists of eight taught modules and a research project.

Example module listing

The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.

Short courses

All our lecture modules are offered as stand-alone short courses and are accredited by the Institute of Biomedical Sciences for the purposes of Continuing Professional Development (CPD).

Each module lasts for five or six weeks, with the lectures taking place on Wednesdays throughout the academic year. Individuals wishing only to attend the lectures may do so; alternatively, you may decide to take the assessment and acquire credits which may contribute to a postgraduate qualification, either at the University of Surrey or elsewhere.

You may take up to three modules as stand-alone courses before registering retrospectively for the MSc and counting the accumulated credits towards your degree.

The fee structure for short courses is different to that for registered students and details may be obtained upon enquiry to the programme administrator. Also contact the programme administrator for information regarding the timing of each module.

Who is the programme for?

The programme is intended for graduates already working in medical microbiology laboratories, or in a closely-related field, who want to enhance their understanding of the role of microorganisms in health and disease. This includes:

  • Diagnostic microbiology staff
  • Pharmaceutical research personnel
  • Veterinary laboratory staff
  • Food and water laboratory personnel

Other applicants seeking an understanding of the advances in modern medical microbiology and its associated disciplines will also be considered. This includes:

  • Clinicians
  • Public health personnel
  • Nurses

Educational aims of the programme

This part-time two year programme is intended primarily for those who are already working in the field of Medical Microbiology who aspire to become leaders in their profession.

The programme has been designed to increase your scientific understanding of medical microbiology and develop your critical and analytical skills so that you may identify problems, formulate hypotheses, design experiments, acquire and interpret data, and draw conclusions.

It will allow you to study theoretical aspects of medical microbiology encompassing the biological and pathogenic properties of microbes, their role in health and disease, the reactions of the host to infection, and the scientific basis for the detection, control and anti-microbial treatment of infectious disease.

Programme learning outcomes

Knowledge and understanding

  • Medical Microbiology and its underlying scientific basis
  • Analytical skills to allow interpretation of data and formulation of conclusions
  • Managerial and research skills required for further professional development as scientists

Intellectual / cognitive skills

  • Appraise scientific literature
  • Critically analyse new developments in technology
  • Formulate hypothesis
  • Critically analyse experimental data
  • Design experiments

Professional practical skills

  • Analyse numerical data using appropriate statistical packages and computer packages
  • Articulate experimental data effectively through oral and written work
  • Apply key Medical Microbiology laboratory skills to academic research
  • Compose an original experiment independently

Key / transferable skills

  • Critically analyse literature and data
  • Solve problems
  • Evaluate and exploit new technology
  • Reason effectively
  • Time management whilst working independently and as a team member
  • Interrogate data using statistical and numerical skills
  • Prepare high quality assignments using Information Technology including specialist packages

Global opportunities

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.

Learn more about opportunities that might be available for this particular programme by using our student exchanges search tool.



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This MSc provides students with a thorough understanding of how science and scientifically based techniques can deliver immediate and sustainable reductions in crime. Read more

This MSc provides students with a thorough understanding of how science and scientifically based techniques can deliver immediate and sustainable reductions in crime. The programme focuses on how to better apply science to understand crime problems, develop strategies for preventing them, and increase the probability of detecting and arresting offenders.

About this degree

Students develop the ability to apply scientific principles to crime control, think more strategically in developing and implementing crime control policies, appreciate the complexity of implementation issues, critically assess the likely impact of planned crime reduction initiatives and generate more innovative proposals for reducing particular crime problems.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of four core modules (60 credits), four optional modules (60 credits) and a research dissertation (60 credits).

A Postgraduate Diploma comprising four core modules (60 credits) and four optional modules (60 credits) is offered.

Core modules

  • Foundations of Security and Crime Science
  • Designing and Doing Research
  • Preventing Crimes
  • Quantitative Methods

Optional modules

Students choose four of the following:

  • Perspectives on Organised Crime
  • Crime Mapping and Spatial Analysis
  • Investigation and Detection
  • Intelligence Gathering and Analysis
  • Qualitative Methods
  • Cybercrime
  • Introduction to Cybersecurity

Dissertation/report

All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of approximately 10,000 words.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through lectures, seminars, tutorials, projects, laboratory classes, and practical exercises. Practical work will involve the analysis and interpretation of datasets, and the development of new ideas for solving problems. Assessment is through lab and project reports, unseen written examination, coursework, presentations, and the dissertation.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Crime Science MSc

Careers

Many graduates now work in the field of crime prevention and detection for public sector employers such as the Home Office, police and Ministry of Defence, or private sector companies with a crime prevention and community safety focus. Other graduates go on to further doctoral research.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Intern, OSCE: Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe
  • Detective Constable, Metropolitan Police Service
  • Forensic Associate, Deloitte
  • Research Assistant, Universiti Brunei Darussalam
  • Client Service Representative, Ministry of the Attorney General

Employability

Each year we ask our graduates to tell us about their experience of the programme and their career after leaving UCL and we include some real-life graduate profiles on our website.

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Security & Crime Science is a world-first, devoted specifically to reducing crime through teaching, research, public policy analysis and by the dissemination of evidence-based information on crime reduction.

The Crime Science MSc is a multidisciplinary degree, drawing on expertise in psychology, social science, statistics, mathematics, architecture, forensic sciences, design, geography and computing.

Our graduate students come from varied backgrounds; many are practitioners and are encouraged to contribute their experience in and out of the classroom.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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This programme provides students with a thorough understanding of how science and scientifically-based techniques can deliver immediate and sustainable reductions in crime. Read more

This programme provides students with a thorough understanding of how science and scientifically-based techniques can deliver immediate and sustainable reductions in crime. The programme focuses on how to apply science better to understand crime problems, develop investigative strategies for preventing them and increase the probability of detecting and arresting offenders.

About this degree

Students develop the ability to apply scientific principles to crime control, think more strategically in developing and implementing crime control policies, appreciate the complexity of implementation issues, critically assess the likely impact of planned crime reduction initiatives and generate more innovative proposals for reducing particular crime problems.

This programme can be taken as classroom based (full time or flexible) or by distance learning. Students undertake modules to the value of 60 credits.

The programme consists of one core module (15 credits) and three optional modules (45 credits).

Core modules

  • Foundations of Security and Crime Science

Optional modules

Students choose three of the following:

  • Designing and Doing Research
  • Quantitative Methods
  • Preventing Crimes
  • Crime Mapping and Spatial Analysis
  • Qualitative Methods
  • Investigation and Detection
  • Perspectives on Organised Crime
  • Perspectives on Terrorism
  • Prevention and Disruption

Dissertation/report

Not applicable.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through lectures, seminars, tutorials, projects, laboratory classes, and practical exercises. Practical work will involve the analysis and interpretation of datasets, and the development of new ideas for solving problems. Assessment is through laboratory and project reports, unseen written examinations, coursework and presentations.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Security and Crime Science PG Cert

Funding

For a comprehensive list of the funding opportunities available at UCL, including funding relevant to your nationality, please visit the Scholarships and Funding website.

Careers

Many graduates now work in the field of crime prevention and detection for public sector employers such as the Home Office, police and Ministry of Defence (MOD), or private sector companies with a crime prevention and community safety focus. Other graduates go on to further doctoral research.

Employability

Each year we ask our graduates to tell us about their experience of the programme and their career after leaving UCL and we include some real-life graduate profiles on our website.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL Security & Crime Science is a world first, devoted specifically to reducing crime through teaching, research, public policy analysis and by the dissemination of evidence-based information on crime reduction.

Crime science is supported by the police, forensic psychologists, applied criminologists, economists, architects, statisticians and geographers, and has been strongly endorsed by the government.

This multidisciplinary programme draws on expertise in psychology, geography, criminology, philosophy and a range of forensic sciences. Our graduate students come from varied backgrounds; many are practitioners and are encouraged to contribute their experience in and out of the classroom.



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Aerospace systems are the future of the aerospace industry and constitute the major component of all modern aircraft. They are the essential onboard systems that ensure the safe and accurate operation of all aerospace vehicles, from civil passenger planes to sophisticated unmanned aerial vehicles. Read more
Aerospace systems are the future of the aerospace industry and constitute the major component of all modern aircraft. They are the essential onboard systems that ensure the safe and accurate operation of all aerospace vehicles, from civil passenger planes to sophisticated unmanned aerial vehicles.

Why this programme

◾The University of Glasgow has been the home of Aerospace Research for over 60 years. This long-standing activity has culminated in the Division of Aerospace Sciences having internationally recognised expertise in all areas of Aeronautics and Aerospace Systems.
◾The University of Glasgow is one of the few institutions in the UK, and the only University in Scotland, to offer an Aerospace Systems MSc.
◾Aeronautical engineering at the University of Glasgow is consistently highly ranked recently achieving 10th in the UK and 1st in Scotland (Complete University Guide 2017).
◾If you are an aeronautical engineering or avionics graduate wanting to improve your skills and knowledge; a graduate of another engineering discipline, mathematics or physics and you want to change field; looking for a well-rounded postgraduate qualification in electronics & electrical engineering to enhance your career prospects; this programme is designed for you.
◾Students in this programme can benefit from access to our outstanding facilities: including several wind tunnels, a flight simulation lab, an autonomous unmanned vehicle (UAV) laboratory, helicopter test rig laboratories and computer labs for modelling and simulation.

Programme structure

Modes of delivery of the MSc in Aerospace Systems include lectures, seminars and tutorials and allow students the opportunity to take part in lab, project and team work.

The summer period is dedicated to project work, with either academic or industrial placements providing the context for your project.

Semester 1 core courses
◾Aircraft flight dynamics
◾Control M
◾Navigation systems
◾Simulation of aerospace systems
◾Space flight dynamics 1.

Semester 2 core courses
◾Autonomous vehicle guidance systems
◾Fault detection, isolation and reconfiguration
◾Radar and electro-optic systems
◾Robust control 5.
◾Aerospace systems team design project.

Projects

◾To complete the MSc degree you must undertake a project worth 60 credits.
◾The project will integrate subject knowledge and skills that you acquire during the MSc programme
◾The project is an important part of your MSc where you can apply your newly learned skills and show to future employers that you have been working on cutting edge projects relevant to the industry.
◾You can choose a topic from a list of MSc projects in Aerospace Systems. Alternatively, should you have your own idea for a project, department members are always open to discussion of topics

Example projects

Examples of projects can be found online

*Posters shown are for illustrative purposes

Accreditation

MSc Aerospace Systems is accredited by the Royal Aeronautical Society (RAeS)

Industry links and employability

◾You will be introduced to this exciting multi-disciplinary area of technology, gaining expertise in autonomous guidance and navigation, advanced aerospace control, simulation and simulators, fault detection and isolation, electro-optic and radar systems, and space systems.
◾The School of Engineering has extensive contacts with industrial partners who contribute to several of their taught courses, through active teaching, advising on projects, curriculum development, and panel discussion.
◾During the programme students have an opportunity to develop and practice relevant professional and transferrable skills, and to meet and learn from employers about working in the aerospace industry.

Career prospects

Career opportunities include aerospace, defence, laser targeting systems, radar development, electro-optics, autonomous systems and systems modelling.

Graduates of this programme have gone on to positions such as:
Software Engineer at Hewlett-Packard
Avionic and Mission System Engineer at Qinetiq
Engineering Corporal & Driver at Hellenic Army.

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The Masters in Physics. Nuclear Technology provides an understanding of the application of nuclear processes and technology to energy generation, medical physics and environmental monitoring, and at a level appropriate for a professional physicist. Read more

The Masters in Physics: Nuclear Technology provides an understanding of the application of nuclear processes and technology to energy generation, medical physics and environmental monitoring, and at a level appropriate for a professional physicist.

Why this programme

  • Physics and Astronomy at the University of Glasgow is ranked 3rd in Scotland (Complete University Guide 2017).
  • You will gain theoretical, experimental and computational skills necessary to analyse and solve advanced physics problems relevant to the theme of Nuclear Technology, providing an excellent foundation for a career of scientific leadership.
  • You will benefit from direct contact with our group of international experts who will teach you cutting-edge physics and supervise your projects.
  • With a 93% overall student satisfaction in the National Student Survey 2016, Physics and Astronomy at Glasgow continues to meet student expectations combining both teaching excellence and a supportive learning environment.
  • This programme has a September and January intake*. 

*For suitably qualified candidates

Programme structure

Modes of delivery of the MSc Physics: Nuclear Technology include lectures, seminars and tutorials and allow students the opportunity to take part in lab, project and team work.

Core courses include

  • Advanced data analysis
  • Detection and analysis of ionising radiation
  • Environmental radioactivity
  • Imaging and detectors
  • Nuclear power reactors
  • Research skills
  • Extended project

Optional courses include

  • Advanced electromagnetic theory
  • Computational physics laboratory
  • Dynamics, electrodynamics and relativity
  • Energy and environment
  • Medical imaging
  • Nuclear and particle physics
  • Nuclear physics
  • Relativistic quantum fields
  • Statistical mechanics

The programme in Physics: Nuclear technology lasts 1 year and contains a minimum of 180 credits. You will undertake a minimum of 120 credits in Semesters 1 and 2 and be assessed on these courses either via continuous assessment, or unseen examination in the May/June examination diet, or a combination thereof. The remaining 60 credits will take the form of an extended MSc project, carried out on a specific aspect of theoretical, computational or experimental physics which has current or potential application in the areas of nuclear technology, nuclear energy, radiation detection or environmental monitoring. You will conduct this project while embedded within a particular research group – under the direct supervision of a member of academic staff.

Your curriculum will be flexible and tailored to your prior experience and expertise, particular research interests and specific nature of the extended research project topic provisionally identified at the beginning of the MSc programme. Generally, however, courses taken in Semester 1 will focus on building core theoretical and experimental/computational skills relevant to the global challenge theme, while courses taken in Semester 2 will build key research skills (in preparation for the extended project).

Career prospects

Career opportunities in academic research, based in universities, research institutes, observatories and laboratory facilities; industrial research in a wide range of fields including energy and the environmental sector, IT and semiconductors, optics and lasers, materials science, telecommunications, engineering; banking and commerce; higher education.



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This programme focuses on applied aspects of advanced and emerging analytical technologies to address current issues in food safety, nutrition and food supply. Read more

Research Strategies

This programme focuses on applied aspects of advanced and emerging analytical technologies to address current issues in food safety, nutrition and food supply. It covers the entire food chain from farm to fork and places a strong emphasis on the link between improved food safety and nutrition and improved public health.

Research Strengths

•Advanced and emerging technology platforms (biosensors and omics)

•Animal food and feed safety

•Animal health and disease diagnostics

•Food and nutrition metabolomics

•Food and nutrition quality measurements

•Food chemistry

•Food safety detection methodology

•Food traceability and authenticity

•Immunodiagnostics for food contaminant and toxin detection

•Natural compounds and their health applications

•Novel and functional foods

•Therapeutic biomolecules

Special Features

•Students will be based in modern, world-class laboratory facilities equipped with state-of-the-art, highly advanced analytical instruments.

•Students will gain excellent practical experience of advanced and emerging analytical techniques for food safety analysis and monitoring.

•The School has a wide range of strong, international links with governments, academia and industry.

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Studentships. * One-year masters studentships are available for this stream. Each studentship will be worth £5000 and can be taken either as a reduction in fees or as a bursary. Read more

Studentships

* One-year masters studentships are available for this stream. Each studentship will be worth £5000 and can be taken either as a reduction in fees or as a bursary. Studentships will be awarded based on academic merit and are open to all applicants, regardless of fee status (home/EU/overseas). Please indicate 'Data Science' in the first line of your personal statement.

* Two PhD Studentships targeted at successful graduates from this stream. Two 3-year PhD studentships will be on offer, targeted at students obtaining a minimum of a Pass with Merit on the Data Science stream. These studentships will cover the cost of tuition fees for home/EU applicants and a stipend at standard Research Council rates.

Stream overview

This course is a stream within the broader MRes in Biomedical Research.

The Data Science stream provides an interdisciplinary training in analysis of ‘big data’ from modern high throughput biomolecular studies. This is achieved through a core training in multivariate statistics, chemometrics and machine learning methods, along with research experience in the development and application of these methods to real world biomedical studies. There is an emphasis on handling large-scale data from molecular phenotyping techniques such as metabolic profiling and related genomics approaches. Like the other MRes streams, this course exposes students to the latest developments in the field through two mini-research projects of 20 weeks each, supplemented by lectures, workshops and journal clubs. The stream is based in the Division of Computational and Systems Medicine and benefits from close links with large facilities such as the MRC-NIHR National Phenome Centre, the MRC Clinical Phenotyping Centre and the Centre for Systems Oncology. The Data Science stream is developed in collaboration with Imperial’s Data Science Institute.

Who is this course for?

Students with a degree in physical sciences, engineering, mathematics computer science (or related area) who wish to apply their numeric skills to solve biomedical problems with big data.

Stream Objectives

Students will gain experience in analysing and modelling big data from technologically advanced techniques applied to biomedical questions. Individuals who successfully complete the course will have developed the ability to:

• Perform novel computational informatics research and exercise critical scientific thought in the interpretation of results.

• Implement and apply sophisticated statistical and machine learning techniques in the interrogation of large and complex

biomedical data sets.

• Understand the cutting edge technologies used to conduct molecular phenotyping studies on a large scale.

• Interpret and present complex scientific data from multiple sources.

• Mine the scientific literature for relevant information and develop research plans.

• Write a grant application, through the taught grant-writing exercise common to all MRes streams.

• Write and defend research reports through writing, poster presentations and seminars.

• Exercise a range of transferable skills by taking short courses taught through the Graduate School and the core programme of the

MRes Biomedical Research degree.

Projects

A wide range of research projects is made available to students twice a year. The projects available to each student are determined by their stream. Students may have access from other streams, but have priority only on projects offered by their own stream. Example projects for Data Science include (but are not limited to):

• Integration of Multi-Platform Metabolic Profiling Data With Application to Subclinical Atherosclerosis Detection

• What Makes a Biological Pathway Useful? Investigating Pathway Robustness

• Bioinformatics for mass spectrometry imaging in augmented systems histology

• Processing of 3D imaging hyperspectral datasets for explorative analysis of tumour heterogeneity

• Fusion of molecular and clinical phenotypes to predict patient mortality

• 4-dimensional visualization of high throughput molecular data for surgical diagnostics

• Modelling short but highly multivariate time series in metabolomics and genomics

• Searching for the needle in the haystack: statistically enhanced pattern detection in high resolution molecular spectra

Visit the MRes in Biomedical Research (Data Science) page on the Imperial College London web site for more details!



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The aim of the MSc programme in Nuclear Engineering is to prepare engineers with the skills necessary to design, build and operate power generation plants, radioactive waste treatment plants, systems using radiation for industrial and medical applications, etc. Read more

Mission and goals

The aim of the MSc programme in Nuclear Engineering is to prepare engineers with the skills necessary to design, build and operate power generation plants, radioactive waste treatment plants, systems using radiation for industrial and medical applications, etc. The educational programme, therefore, gives emphasis to topics referring to energy applications, i.e. fission and fusion plants, nuclear fuel, materials and safety. Topics applied also in non-energy applications are accounted for, as in medical and industrial applications of radiation, material physics, plasma physics and nanotechnologies with a strong link to the nuclear field.

See the website http://www.polinternational.polimi.it/educational-offer/laurea-magistrale-equivalent-to-master-of-science-programmes/nuclear-engineering/

Career opportunities

The graduates in Nuclear Engineering, thanks to the MSc multidisciplinary training, can easily be employed in the nuclear sector (e.g. industries operating in nuclear power plants design, construction and operation, in nuclear decommissioning and nuclear waste processing and disposal, in design and construction of radiation sources, in centers for nuclear fusion and high-energy physics), as well as in other areas such as the energy industry, the medical sector, the health, safety and environment sector (e.g. engineering companies, hospitals, consultancy and risk analysis firms) and also research centers and universities.

Presentation

See http://www.polinternational.polimi.it/uploads/media/Nuclear_Engineering.pdf
In this Course emphasis is given to energetic applications, e.g. those referring to fission and fusion plants, the nuclear fuel, materials and safety. Also nonenergetic applications are accounted for, i.e. medical and industrial applications of radiation; radiation detection and measurements; nuclear electronics for radiation detection; radiochemistry; radiation protection and material physics, plasma physics and nanotechnologies with a strong link to their impact in the nuclear field. Graduates in Nuclear Engineering can find employment not only in the nuclear sector (industries operating in electro-nuclear power generation, nuclear plant dismantling, nuclear waste processing and disposal, design and construction of radiation sources, institutes and centers for nuclear fusion and high-energy physics), but also in other areas operating in the field of hightechnology, engineering companies, companies for industrial, medical and engineering advice, hospitals, companies for risk analysis, etc.

Subjects

1st year subjects
Fission reactor physics, nuclear measurements and instrumentation, nuclear plants, nuclear and industrial electronics, reliability safety and risk analysis, solid state physics.

2nd year subjects (subjects differentiated by three specializations)
- Nuclear plants
Nuclear technology and design, Applied Radiation Chemistry, Reliability, Safety and Risk Analysis A+B, Nuclear Material Physics. Fission Reactor Physics II + Radioactive Contaminants Transport, Statistical Physics.

- Nuclear Technology
Medical applications of radiation, Applied Radiation Chemistry, Nuclear technology and design, Reliability, Safety and Risk Analysis A+B, Nuclear material physics, Fission Reactor Physics II + Radioactive Contaminants Transport.

- Physics for Nuclear Systems
Subjects: Nuclear technology and design, Nuclear Material Physics, Medical applications of radiation, Applied Radiation Chemistry, Nuclear material physics, Fission Reactor Physics II + Radioactive Contaminants Transport.

See the website http://www.polinternational.polimi.it/educational-offer/laurea-magistrale-equivalent-to-master-of-science-programmes/nuclear-engineering/

For contact information see here http://www.polinternational.polimi.it/educational-offer/laurea-magistrale-equivalent-to-master-of-science-programmes/nuclear-engineering/

Find out how to apply here http://www.polinternational.polimi.it/how-to-apply/

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