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An intensive studio introducing students to the Scandinavian-Nordic context and region, focusing on the public realm with attention to the urban form analysis, social life, landscape design and processes of collaborative work in strategic planning and implementation of public space. Read more
An intensive studio introducing students to the Scandinavian-Nordic context and region, focusing on the public realm with attention to the urban form analysis, social life, landscape design and processes of collaborative work in strategic planning and implementation of public space. Students work collaboratively to produce a project that is theoretically rooted in the form of a strategic urban design public space project on the city level. This course is about rethinking the public realm and designing new public spaces - an urban square or an urban park in the urban landacape. The space should have an actuality in the local political discussion as well as the global discussions about climate and ecological issues but also the issues of human scale, enjoyment, aestethics, history and culture. Public space should be complex and contain a variety of functions and programs for all. The question that will be raised is how can we work according to long-term goals when the public’s mood, expectations and desires change so easily? The question of what should be public spaces, and what our public should be like, is highly political, since we all have different opinions of what constitutes a good life. Can we design and maintain public places for good life based on timeless principles of civic design? Can Urban Design, Landscape Architecture and Urban -Town Planning have a common language and understanding when it comes to design of urban, nature and landscape sensitive places - public realms that should be attractive, enjoyable, engaging, inclusive but also lifelong transformative. [STUDIO WILL FEATURE AND INTERNATIONAL NORDIC STUDY TRIP WITHIN THE PROJECT]

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This industry-focused course is for Computer Science graduates and experienced professional programmers interested in developing high-quality, complex software systems. Read more
This industry-focused course is for Computer Science graduates and experienced professional programmers interested in developing high-quality, complex software systems.

Who is it for?

This industry-focused course is for Computer Science graduates and experienced professional programmers interested in developing high-quality, complex software systems and aiming at a high-quality career in the industry, e.g. software houses, consultancies, and major software users across different sectors.

Students will have a keen interest in designing complex software systems, coding them in a programming language using the latest technologies (SOA, cloud, etc.), and ensuring that they are of high quality and that they actually meet the needs of their stakeholders.

Objectives

You will develop skills in analysing requirements and designing appropriate software solutions; designing and creating complex software systems to solve real-world problems, evaluating and using advanced software engineering environments, design methods and programming languages, and evaluating and responding to recent trends in interoperability and software development.

The course focuses on advanced engineering concepts and methods, as well as design issues for the systematic development of high-quality complex software systems. These are explored using industrial strength technologies, like the C++ and Java programming languages and the UML modelling language.

The course covers significant trends in systems development, including service-oriented architecture, cloud computing, and big data. The course is delivered by acknowledged experts and draws on City's world-class research in Systems and Software Engineering, which has one of the largest groups of academics working in this area in London, covering almost all aspects - from requirements, to designing reliable systems for the nuclear industry.

Placements

Postgraduate students on a Computing and Information Systems course are offered the opportunity to complete up to six months of professional experience as part of their degree.

Our longstanding internship scheme gives students the chance to apply the knowledge and skills gained from their taught modules within a real business environment. An internship also provides students with professional development opportunities that enhance their technical skills and business knowledge.

Internships delivered by City, University of London offer an exceptional opportunity to help students stand out in the competitive IT industry job market. The structure of the course extends the period for dissertation submission to January, allowing students to work full-time for up to six months. Students will be supported by our outstanding Professional Liaison Unit (PLU) should they wish to consider undertaking this route.

Teaching and learning

Software Engineering MSc is available full-time (12 months) as well as part-time (up to 28 months).

Students successfully completing eight taught modules and the dissertation for their individual project will be awarded 180 credits and a Master's level qualification. Alternatively, students who do not complete the dissertation but have successfully completed eight taught modules will be awarded 120 credits and a postgraduate diploma. Successful completion of four taught modules (60 credits) will lead to the award of a postgraduate certificate.

Assessment

Each module is assessed through a combination of coursework and examination.

Modules

You will develop skills in analysing requirements and designing appropriate software solutions; designing and creating complex software systems to solve real-world problems, evaluating and using advanced software engineering environments, design methods and programming languages and evaluating and responding to recent trends in interoperability and software development.

The focus of the course is on advanced engineering concepts and methods, as well as design issues for the systematic development of high-quality complex software systems. These are explored using industrial strength technologies, such as the C++ and Java object-oriented programming languages and the UML modelling language.

The course covers significant trends in systems development, including service-oriented architecture, mobile and pervasive computing, cloud computing, big data, and XML-enabled interoperable services. The course is delivered by acknowledged experts and draws on City's world-class research in Systems and Software Engineering. City has one of the largest groups of academics working in the area in London, working on almost all aspects of the area - from requirements, to designing reliable systems for the nuclear industry.

Core modules - there are five core modules:
-Advanced Database Technologies (15 credits)
-Research Methods and Professional Issues (15 credits)
-Service Oriented Architectures (15 credits)
-Software Systems Design (15 credits)
-Advanced Programming: Concurrency (15 credits)

Elective modules - you will be required to take three elective modules, choosing from the following:
-Advanced Algorithms and Data Structures (15 credits)
-Big Data (15 credits)
-Programming in C++ (15 credits)
-Business Engineering with ERP Solutions (15 credits)
-Mobile and Pervasive Computing (15 credits)
-Data Visualization (15 credits)
-Cloud Computing (15 credits)

Career prospects

The MSc in Software Engineering aims to meet the significant demand for graduates with a good knowledge of computing. This demand arises from consultancies, software houses, major software users such as banks, large manufacturers, retailers, and the public services, defence, aerospace and telecommunications companies.

Typical entrants to the course have a degree in an engineering or scientific discipline, and wish to either move into the software engineering field or to the development of software for their current field. Entrants must have previous exposure to computing, especially to programming (particularly in Java or C#) and relational databases (from either academic or professional experience).

From this base, the course provides solid technical coverage of advanced software development, including such widely used languages as C++, Java, UML and XML for which demand is particularly high. The course is therefore quite demanding; its success in providing advanced academic education along these lines is evident from the fact that recent graduates of the course are currently employed in a wide spectrum of organisations.

Of course, the employment value of a master's degree is not just short term. Although on-the-job training and experience as well as technology specific skills are valuable, they can be rather narrow and difficult to validate, and to transfer. The structure of this course ensures that there is a strong balance between the development of particular skills and a solid education in the enduring principles and concepts that underlie complex software system development.

SAP Certification - in parallel to your degree you will be able to register for a SAP TERP10 Certification course at a substantial discount, thus obtaining an additional, much sought-after qualification

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Advances in technology are yielding smaller and higher-performance computer systems permeating into a wide range of applications, from communication systems to consumer products and common household appliances. Read more
Advances in technology are yielding smaller and higher-performance computer systems permeating into a wide range of applications, from communication systems to consumer products and common household appliances. Computer engineering encompasses the principles, methods, and modern tools for the design and implementation of computing systems.

Our MSc Computer Engineering is the first in the UK and provides a balanced perspective of both hardware and software elements of computing systems, and their relative design trade-offs and applications. It will build on your knowledge in mathematics, science, and engineering to ensure you have a sound foundation in the areas needed for a career in this field.

Laboratory experiences enable you to understand experimental design and simulation techniques. We are internationally leading in this and you will have access to unique computer engineering platforms including our:
-Intelligent Flat (iSpace)
-Robotics Arena
-Networked intelligent campus (iCampus)
-Advanced networking and multimedia labs

Our School is a community of scholars leading the way in technological research and development. Today’s computer scientists are creative people who are focused and committed, yet restless and experimental. We are home to many of the world’s top scientists, and our work is driven by creativity and imagination as well as technical excellence.

We are ranked Top 10 in the UK in the 2015 Academic Ranking of World Universities, with more than two-thirds of our research rated ‘world-leading’ or ‘internationally excellent (REF 2014).

This course is also available on a part-time basis.

Professional accreditation

This degree is accredited by the Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET).This accreditation is increasingly sought by employers, and provides the first stage towards eventual professional registration as a Chartered Engineer (CEng).

Our expert staff

Our research covers a range of topics, from materials science and semiconductor device physics, to the theory of computation and the philosophy of computer science, with most of our research groups based around laboratories offering world-class facilities.

Our impressive external research funding stands at over £4 million and we participate in a number of EU initiatives and undertake projects under contract to many outside bodies, including government and industrial organisations.

In recent years we have attracted many highly active research staff and we are conducting world-leading research in areas such as evolutionary computation, brain-computer interfacing, intelligent inhabited environments and financial forecasting.

Specialist facilities

We are one of the largest and best resourced computer science and electronic engineering schools in the UK. Our work is supported by extensive networked computer facilities and software aids, together with a wide range of test and instrumentation equipment.
-We have six laboratories that are exclusively for computer science and electronic engineering students. Three are open 24/7, and you have free access to the labs except when there is a scheduled practical class in progress
-All computers run either Windows 7 or are dual boot with Linux
-Software includes Java, Prolog, C++, Perl, Mysql, Matlab, DB2, Microsoft Office, Visual Studio, and Project
-Students have access to CAD tools and simulators for chip design (Xilinx) and computer networks (OPNET)
-We also have specialist facilities for research into areas including non-invasive brain-computer interfaces, intelligent environments, robotics, optoelectronics, video, RF and MW, printed circuit milling, and semiconductors

Your future

Upon graduation, you can look for employment in:
-Heavy industries, designing advanced computer systems and control
-Hardware companies, designing and developing microprocessors, personal computers, and supercomputers
-Communication and mobile phone companies, designing advanced computer systems for communications systems
-Large computer and microelectronics companies, writing software and firmware for embedded microcontrollers, and designing VLSI chips, analog sensors, mixed signal circuit boards, and operating systems
-Embedded system companies, developing advanced computer systems, and mobile applications and phones
-Banks and businesses, designing intelligent distributed systems to serve their operations
-Computer games companies, designing advanced computer games
-Our recent graduates have progressed to a variety of senior positions in industry and academia.

Some of the companies and organisations where our former graduates are now employed include Electronic Data Systems, Pfizer Pharmaceuticals, Bank of Mexico, Visa International, Hyperknowledge (Cambridge), Hellenic Air Force, ICSS (Beijing), United Microelectronic Corporation (Taiwan) and within our University.

We also work with the university’s Employability and Careers Centre to help you find out about further work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

Example structure

-MSc Project and Dissertation
-Converged Networks and Services
-Digital Signal Processing
-High Level Logic Design
-Professional Practice and Research Methodology
-Programming Embedded Systems
-Advanced Embedded Systems Design (optional)
-Artificial Neural Networks (optional)
-Constraint Satisfaction for Decision Making (optional)
-Creating and Growing a New Business Venture (optional)
-Electronic System Design & Integration (optional)
-Intelligent Systems and Robotics (optional)
-Mobile Communications (optional)

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The two year MSc programme Biosystems Engineering is for students with an (agricultural) engineering background on bachelor level that are interested to pursue a MSc degree in a field where the interaction between technology and biology plays an important role. Read more

MSc Biosystems Engineering

The two year MSc programme Biosystems Engineering is for students with an (agricultural) engineering background on bachelor level that are interested to pursue a MSc degree in a field where the interaction between technology and biology plays an important role.

Programme summary

During the master Biosystems Engineering, students are educated in finding innovative solutions. The programme combines knowledge of technology, living systems, natural and social sciences with integrated thinking using a systems approach. Solutions can be applied to either the field of food or nonfood agricultural production. During the programme, you develop independence and creativity while acquiring skills that enable you to analyse problems and work as part of an interdisciplinary team. Biosystems Engineering is a tailor-made, thesis oriented programme based on the specific interests and competencies of the student.

Thesis tracks

Farm Technology
This topic consists of four main themes, namely automation for bioproduction, greenhouse technology, livestock technology and soil technology. All these topics have the shared goal of designing systems in which technology is applied to the demands of plants, animals, humans and the environment. Examples of such applications include precision agriculture, conservation tillage, fully automated greenhouses and environmentally friendly animal husbandry systems that also promote animal welfare.

Systems and Control
Production processes and various kinds of machinery have to be optimised to run as efficiently as possible; and with the least amount of possible environmental impact. To achieve this, computer models and simulations are developed and improved. Examples include designing control systems for a solar-powered greenhouse to include a closed water cycle and designing a tomato-harvesting robot.

Information Technology
Information and communication play a vital role in our society. It is necessary to acquire, use and store data and information to optimise production processes and quality in production chains. This requires the design and management of business information systems, software engineering, designing databases and modelling and simulation.

Environmental Technology
Environmental technology revolves around closing cycles and reusing waste products and by-products. Processes have to be designed in such a way that they either reuse waste or separate it into distinct and reusable components. Examples include the production of compost, the generation of green energy or the design of environmentally friendly animal husbandry systems and greenhouses.

AgroLogistics
The goals of agrologistics are to get the right product in the right quantity and quality at the right time and to the right place as efficiently as possible while fulfilling the requirements of the stakeholders (such as government legislation and regulations). This requires the design of effective, innovative logistics concepts in agrifood chains and networks. Examples are the design of greenhouses developed for optimal logistics or designing a dairy production process with minimal storage costs.

Biobased Technology
The importance of biobased economy is increasing. Energy savings and the use of renewable energy are directions for achieving an environmentally sustainable industrial society. Biomass of plants, organisms and biomass available can be turned into a spectrum of marketable products and energy. In this track, you learn more about process engineering, biological recycling technology, biorefinery and how to abstract a real system into a physical model and analyse the physical model using dedicated software.

Your future career

Most graduates are employed in the agrofood sector, or related sectors of industry and trade, from local to international companies. They are project leaders, product managers, technical experts, sales specialists or managers at many kinds of companies including designers of agricultural buildings (animal husbandry systems, greenhouses) and bioenergy production systems. Others find jobs with IT companies (climate control computers, automated information systems) or firms in the agro-food chain that produce, store, process, distribute and market agricultural products. In the service sector or at governments, graduates enter careers as consultants, information officers or policymakers in the fields of technology and sustainable agricultural production, while others enter research careers at institutes or universities.

Alumnus Patrick Honcoop.
"I am working as a product manager at 365 FarmNet in Germany. 365FarmNet supports farmers to manage their whole agrarian holding with just one software application. I am responsible for the content of the software. I am the link between the farmers, the agrarian holdings and the software developers. I really enjoy these dynamics and variety within my function. Just like during my studies, when we visited farmers, companies and fairs during courses and excursions organised by the study association."

Related programmes:
MSc Animal Sciences
MSc Plant Sciences
MSc Geo-information Science
MSc Geographical Information Management and Applications
MSc Organic Agriculture

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Artificial intelligence deals with the theory, design, application, and development of biologically, socially and linguistically motivated computational paradigms. Read more
Artificial intelligence deals with the theory, design, application, and development of biologically, socially and linguistically motivated computational paradigms.

You focus on linking artificial intelligence techniques to real-world applications and projects, including artificial intelligence in business and financial applications, artificial intelligence in games, artificial intelligence in biological sciences and medicine, and artificial intelligence in industrial control.

Our unique course covers the theoretical, applied and practical aspects of artificial intelligence, with an emphasis on:
-Genetic algorithms
-Evolutionary programming
-Fuzzy systems
-Neural networks
-Connectionist systems
-Hybrid intelligent systems

Our School is a community of scholars leading the way in technological research and development. Today’s computer scientists are creative people who are focused and committed, yet restless and experimental. We are home to many of the world’s top scientists, and our work is driven by creativity and imagination as well as technical excellence.

We are ranked Top 10 in the UK in the 2015 Academic Ranking of World Universities, with more than two-thirds of our research rated ‘world-leading’ or ‘internationally excellent (REF 2014).

This course is also available on a part-time basis.

This degree is accredited by the Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET).This accreditation is increasingly sought by employers, and provides the first stage towards eventual professional registration as a Chartered Engineer (CEng).

Our expert staff

Our research covers a range of topics, from materials science and semiconductor device physics, to the theory of computation and the philosophy of computer science, with most of our research groups based around laboratories offering world-class facilities.

Our impressive external research funding stands at over £4 million and we participate in a number of EU initiatives and undertake projects under contract to many outside bodies, including government and industrial organisations.

In recent years we have attracted many highly active research staff and we are conducting world-leading research in areas such as evolutionary computation, brain-computer interfacing, intelligent inhabited environments and financial forecasting.

Specialist facilities

We are one of the largest and best resourced computer science and electronic engineering schools in the UK. Our work is supported by extensive networked computer facilities and software aids, together with a wide range of test and instrumentation equipment.
-We have six laboratories that are exclusively for computer science and electronic engineering students. Three are open 24/7, and you have free access to the labs except when there is a scheduled practical class in progress
-All computers run either Windows 7 or are dual boot with Linux
-Software includes Java, Prolog, C++, Perl, Mysql, Matlab, DB2, Microsoft Office, Visual Studio, and Project
-Students have access to CAD tools and simulators for chip design (Xilinx) and computer networks (OPNET)
-We also have specialist facilities for research into areas including non-invasive brain-computer interfaces, intelligent environments, robotics, optoelectronics, video, RF and MW, printed circuit milling, and semiconductors

Your future

Our course opens up employment opportunities designing intelligent software – in banks and businesses designing prediction systems, in computer games companies designing adaptive games, in pharmaceutical companies designing intelligent systems that model a given drug and its various interactions, and in heavy industries designing control systems.

Our recent graduates have progressed to a variety of senior positions in industry and academia. Some of the companies and organisations where our former graduates are now employed include:
-Electronic Data Systems
-Pfizer Pharmaceuticals
-Bank of Mexico
-Visa International
-Hyperknowledge (Cambridge)
-Hellenic Air Force
-ICSS (Beijing)
-United Microelectronic Corporation (Taiwan)

We also work with the university’s Employability and Careers Centre to help you find out about further work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

Example structure

Postgraduate study is the chance to take your education to the next level. The combination of compulsory and optional modules means our courses help you develop extensive knowledge in your chosen discipline, whilst providing plenty of freedom to pursue your own interests. Our research-led teaching is continually evolving to address the latest challenges and breakthroughs in the field, therefore to ensure your course is as relevant and up-to-date as possible your core module structure may be subject to change.

Artificial Intelligence - MSc
-MSc Project and Dissertation
-Machine Learning and Data Mining
-Professional Practice and Research Methodology
-Group Project
-Intelligent Systems and Robotics
-Computer Vision (optional)
-Game Artificial Intelligence (optional)
-Evolutionary Computation and Genetic Programming (optional)
-Natural Language Engineering (optional)
-Artificial Neural Networks (optional)
-Virtual Worlds (optional)
-Creating and Growing a New Business Venture (optional)
-Learning and Computational Intelligence in Economics and Finance (optional)

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The PgDip/ MSc in Medical Education is committed to promoting excellence in learning and teaching for health professionals. Read more
The PgDip/ MSc in Medical Education is committed to promoting excellence in learning and teaching for health professionals. Having established the first Masters in Medical Education in the UK, we continue to lead, providing innovative programmes for all medical, dental and health professionals who aim to professionalise the role of the clinician as teacher.

It recognises the diverse, complex and challenging contexts of both those new to educator roles and responsibilities and those with considerable years of experience. The overall aim of the course is to develop a community of educators committed to promote improvements in both ‘what’ and ‘how’ we teach future healthcare professionals.

The course is highly practical and aims to model best practice in learning and teaching and draws upon a wide range of innovative approaches to learner support and development. The course is organised into a series of modules that usually last two days each followed by a period of independent study. The first session of each two-day unit is a synthesis of the previous module and the independent study period. This three stage process develops and clarifies understanding of the module topic, gives the opportunity and time to apply new concepts and skills, and concludes by allowing reflection on and sharing of experiences and insights with colleagues. The culmination of the programme is a practical teaching project, a student-led symposium on a contemporary issue in medical education.

A comprehensive menu of face-to-face modules will enable you to contribute to critical dialogues that promote deeper insights into educational theory and principles applied to clinical practice.

The MSc component of the course, follows the successful completion of the PgDip modules. This component of the course will allow you to develop skills in designing and conducting an educational project, culminating in the submission of a dissertation. Many of the projects provide the basis for practical innovations in the workplace and can also extend engagement with and contribution to the wider medical education community.

The course is accredited by the Higher Education Academy, conferring Fellowship of the Higher Education Academy. The course is also aligned to the Academy of Medical Educators professional standards enabling you to apply for recognition of the Academy of Medical Educators.

Structure

• PgDip

The full-time Postgraduate Diploma course involves studying all the modules in one academic year (September-June).

The part-time Postgraduate Diploma course usually involves attending two-day sessions in Cardiff every six weeks during the academic year (September to June). You will therefore spend about 23 days in Cardiff, 11 days during the first year and 12 days in the second year.

You may exit with a Cardiff University Postgraduate Certificate in Medical Education having successfully achieved the required standard, although most students continue on to the Postgraduate Diploma or MSc award. 

Core modules:

Learning and Teaching in Clinical Education
Educational Media and Technologies
Assessing Learning
Evaluating Courses
Research Skills
Contemporary Issues in Medical Education
Practical Teaching Project

• MSc

The full-time MSc course involves studying all the modules in one academic year (September-June) and acceptance of an approved dissertation (July-September). Successful completion of the modules will allow you to progress to the MSc component and undertake an educational project culminating in the submission of a dissertation.

The part time MSc course involves attending a series of Postgraduate Diploma modules and completion of a dissertation.  Modules usually involve attending two-day sessions in Cardiff every six weeks during the two academic years (September to June).  You will therefore spend about 23 days in Cardiff, 11 days during the first academic year and 12 days in the second academic year.  Once you have successfully completed the modules you will undertake an educational project culminating in the submission within 12 months of a dissertation.

Core modules:

PgDip core modules PLUS dissertation.

Teaching

Teaching on the modules mainly takes place in small groups, which are facilitated by the core teaching team. There is the opportunity for discussions, debates, instructor presentations, tutorials, case studies, role play and peer interactions designed to enhance learning in addition to guided and independent study. Participation, collaboration and practical application are key tenets of the course, and you will be encouraged to try out new approaches to learning and teaching throughout the programme. Activities may include video-recording a teaching session for review, implementing and appraising untried assessment techniques, developing and coding a questionnaire; designing and producing instructional media for a teaching session.

The Master’s component will require the completion of a small scale empirical or literature-based study. You will be allocated a supervisor to support your study following successful completion of the modules.

Assessment

You will be assessed in a variety of ways both to inform learning (formative) and to assess learning (summative).

Methods include assignments, practical projects and a reflective journal and for the Master’s component a dissertation. All assignment tasks are linked to your educational practise. For example typical assignments may relate to designing and producing some instructional media for a specific teaching need you identify, critically reviewing an assessment method you use or designing a proposal for an educational project in your clinical teaching context.

Satisfactory standard in the modules is required for progress on to the MSc. The MSc component will require the completion of a small scale empirical or literature based study, culminating in the submission of a dissertation.

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Information Technology is now fundamental in every aspect of our daily lives. IT systems are crucial for delivering every day services such as banking, web based services and information systems. Read more
Information Technology is now fundamental in every aspect of our daily lives. IT systems are crucial for delivering every day services such as banking, web based services and information systems.

The MSc Information Technology is a full time, one year taught course, intended for students who are seeking a professional career in the IT industry. There is no requirement for a first degree in computing, but proficiency in at least one programming language is a requirement.

The course covers a range of topics including advanced programming, user-interface design, software engineering and management.

This course will give you the knowledge of IT from an organisation oriented viewpoint, allowing you to be capable of designing and implementing IT systems for a wide range of organisations.

The course has been specifically designed to suit the requirements of the IT industry, where you will be able to take up technical or management positions. Our graduates enter employment in many roles, including computer programmers, technical authors and research associates.

Course Aims
-Programming: You will gain a thorough grounding of advanced programming concepts using Java including efficient data structures and algorithms and high performance distributed computing.
-User-Interfaces: You will learn the theory of human computer interaction (HCI) and put this into practice in a number of ways, including user centred design of aspects of people's interaction with digital systems.
-Software Engineering: You will learn and be able to apply the principles of software engineering and case studies using UML, software testing techniques, and privacy and security aspect of software systems.

Learning Outcomes
We expect our graduates to be capable of designing and implementing IT systems for a wide range organisations. A thorough understanding of the following subjects are expected:
-Designing user interfaces following sound principles of interface design
-Designing, specifying, implementing and testing software components and systems using UML, Java and a range of software testing techniques
-Dependability of IT systems including topics in privacy and security
-Computer architectures and high performance distributed computing

Project

The dissertation project undertaken by students in Terms 3 and 4 (Summer Term and Vacation Term) is carried out individually, which might involve collaboration with another organisation. The subject matter of projects varies widely; most projects are suggested by members of staff, some by external organisations, and some by students themselves, usually relating to an area of personal interest that they wish to develop further.

A collaborative project is supervised by a member of the Department, but the collaborating organisation will normally provide an external supervisor. Organisations that have collaborated in projects in the past include Glasgow Town Planning Department, British Rail Passenger Services Department, North Yorkshire Police, North Yorkshire Fire Services, NEDO, the Royal Horticultural Society, Biosis UK, Centre Point sheltered housing, York Archaeological Trust, and the University of York Library.

The subject matter of projects varies widely; most projects are suggested by members of staff, some by external organisations, and some by students themselves, perhaps relating to an area of personal interest that they wish to develop further.

All project proposals are rigorously vetted and must meet a number of requirements before these are made available to the students. The department uses an automated project allocation system for assigning projects to students that takes into account supervisor and student preferences.

Examples of previous project include:
-A Study into the User Experience and Usability of Web Enabled Services on Smartphones
-Agent simulation of large scale complex IT systems
-Do People Disclose their Passwords on Social Media?
-Dynamic Sound Generation for Computer Games
-Iterative linear programming as an optimisation method for buyer resources in online auctions evaluated using a Java-based Monte Carlo simulation
-Qchat (Web-based chat application for quantum physicists)
-Software for dyslexic readers: an empirical investigation of presentation attributes
-Web-based IQ Testing Application for Fluid Intelligence Analysis
-Agent simulation of large scale complex IT systems

Information for Students

Whilst the MSc in Information Technology does not require a formal qualification in computing, we do expect you to have some understanding of computer related issues.

As everyone arrives with different experience, we have put together the following summary of what we expect you to know, with some suggestions of how you can prepare before you arrive.

You'll start the course with a focus on writing and developing Java programs. We assume that you are familiar with programming concepts and terminology, so we advise you to review basic programming concepts, such as:
-Variables and their types
-Control structures (e.g. if-statements, loops)
-Subprograms (e.g. procedures, functions)
-Compilation and debugging.

If you have never used Java, you will benefit greatly from doing some reading and trying out Java programming before you arrive. We will teach you from first principles, but the pace will be fast and you will find it easier to keep up if you've practiced with the basics beforehand. Tutorials and practical exercises are the best way for you to prepare, and the Deitel and Deitel book below is a good source of these.

Careers

Here at York, we're really proud of the fact that more than 97% of our postgraduate students go on to employment or further study within six months of graduating from York. We think the reason for this is that our courses prepare our students for life in the workplace through our collaboration with industry to ensure that what we are teaching is useful for employers.

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The MSc in Human-Centred Interactive Technologies is a full-time, one-year taught course that is intended for students seeking a professional career related to human-computer interaction, user experience, usability or related fields or those wishing to pursue research in the area. Read more
The MSc in Human-Centred Interactive Technologies is a full-time, one-year taught course that is intended for students seeking a professional career related to human-computer interaction, user experience, usability or related fields or those wishing to pursue research in the area. The course is intended for students who already have a good first degree in a computer science or an appropriate discipline related to human-computer interaction or have equivalent industrial experience. The course covers a range of topics associated with designing interactive systems for good usability and enhancing the user experience. The course has been specifically designed for students wishing to specialise in the design and evaluation of interactive technologies.

The MSc Human-Centred Interactive Technologies course was updated for October 2016 entry. The course had been running successfully for eight years, but in that time the landscape of interactive systems has changed considerably, with the growth of iPhones and apps and the introduction of tablet computers. We have also responded to feedback from students who have asked for more integrated modules and more opportunities to practice interaction design.

Course Aims
The aims of the course are:
-To provide a specialist education in the theories of and methods for designing and evaluating interactive technologies
-To provide an opportunity to engage in a rigorous and scholarly manner with a range of current research topics around designing and evaluating interactive technologies
-To provide practical experience of designing and evaluating interactive technologies
-To develop the skills necessary to conduct research, particularly with users, into the design, engineering or science of interactive technologies
-To provide experience of undertaking a sizeable individual project, on a subject related to research in human-centred interactive technologies
-To prepare students for entry into research degrees or industry-based projects

Learning Outcomes
A fundamental objective of the course is to provide students with a sound theoretical knowledge and practical experience of the skills essential to the design and evaluation of interactive technologies. Having completed the course, students will be able to understand theories of the design of interactive technologies and critique individual technologies from a theoretical viewpoint. In particular they will be able to:
(a) choose appropriate methods for empirical investigations for the design, prototyping and evaluation of interactive technologies, including both quantitative and qualitative methods

(b) plan and undertake a range of empirical investigations of existing or proposed interactive technologies at all stages of the development lifecycle

(c) analyse, draw conclusions from and present the results of such investigations, and

(d) conduct a range of expert and theoretical analyses of interactive technologies to investigate their usability, accessibility and appropriateness for different user groups.

Graduates completing the course will be equipped to play leading and professional roles related to the designed and evaluation of interactive technologies in industry, commerce, academia and public service. The MSc in Human-Centred Interactive Technologies is also intended to provide a route into a PhD or research in this rapidly expanding field.

Project

The dissertation project undertaken by students over the summer is carried out individually, which might involve collaboration with another organisation. A collaborative project is still supervised by a member of the Department.

Projects are worth 50% of the total mark for the MSc. Examples of previous projects include:
-A Gesture Language for Interaction with Art and Cultural Artefacts in Museums
-Analysis of WCAG 2.0 Techniques and Remote Evaluation by People with Visual Disabilities
-Cultural issues in design of online banking websites: a Chinese case study
-Evaluating Human Error through Video Games
-Have the Same Image in Mind? Investigation of Personas in Web Design
-Inattention and Immersion in Video Games
-Measuring User Experience of Mobile Phones: a Study with Retrospective Protocol and Emotion Word Prompt List
-The Application of Game Mechanics to a Virtual Learning Environment
-The Design and Evaluation of NHS Pharmacy Dispensing Computer Software
-Using User-Generated Content as Discourses on the Gaming Experience

Careers

Here at York, we're really proud of the fact that more than 97% of our postgraduate students go on to employment or further study within six months of graduating from York. We think the reason for this is that our courses prepare our students for life in the workplace through our collaboration with industry to ensure that what we are teaching is useful for employers.

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The MA Education is designed to enhance your professional practice and help you make improvements which will make a positive difference either within the classroom or your particular work environment. Read more
The MA Education is designed to enhance your professional practice and help you make improvements which will make a positive difference either within the classroom or your particular work environment.

Highly flexible, it caters for educators with a diverse range of experience, development needs, and study requirements. It is suitable for teachers, those in leadership or policy-making roles, and other practitioners working in education or related settings.

Mathematics Education

Many learners struggle with mathematics, and yet numerical ability is essential both in the workplace and every day life. This specialism will give you the tools to improve your own professional practice and adopt the latest innovations to help your students excel.

The syllabus may include:

* Context and issues - nature of mathematical knowledge; mathematics as human activities; an overview of research in mathematics education

* Curriculum and task design - designing mathematically rich tasks; mathematics education as design science; designing learning hypothetical trajectory; designing teaching units and tasks

* Mathematical understanding and thinking - models of mathematical thinking and understanding; concept formations of mathematical knowledge; socio-cultural theories of learning

* Teachers’ roles in the classroom - teaching approaches and interventions; establishing social norms in classrooms; use of technologies; evaluation of teaching

* Assessment of students’ learning - methodologies to assess understanding; attitude towards mathematics; use of assessment

* Technology – use of technologies in the classroom; latest innovations and potential impacts; evaluations of software such as GeoGebra or Tinkerplots and digital textbooks; designing innovative learning environments with digital technology

Modules

The precise modules available to you in future years may vary depending on staff availability and research interests, new topics of study, timetabling and student demand, please see the website for a current list of modules available http://www.exeter.ac.uk/postgraduate/taught/education/educationma/modules/

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Join our diverse academic community for a year of challenges and collaborations that will help you change and shape your career trajectory. Read more

About the course

Join our diverse academic community for a year of challenges and collaborations that will help you change and shape your career trajectory. Our students are driven designers, architects, visual and fine artists, performing artists, writers and others who work in the creative and cultural industries. Our faculty members are a lively mix of management specialists and creatives. All of us are passionate about doing work that has a real impact on society.

This unique programme is designed to advance your career as a solo practitioner, an entrepreneur or a member of a larger organisation within the creative economy. During the 12-month programme, you will:

- Build knowledge of business and management within the context of creative and cultural industries
- Gain new methods of learning, creating and managing to improve your career success and satisfaction – in socially responsible and meaningful ways
- Develop a diverse international network of peers, mentors and industry professionals across creative and cultural fields

The interdisciplinary MSc in Management and Entrepreneurship in the Creative Economy is built around the unique learning styles and goals of creative people like you. Designed and taught by Audencia Business School and The Glasgow School of Art’s Institute of Design Innovation (InDI), each module has been created specifically for this programme and integrates a creative mix of teaching and learning methods for both business and arts/design education.

Your programme combines the design approaches and studio (project-based) teaching methods of The Glasgow School of Art (GSA) with the internationally recognised, innovative, collaborative and responsible business education of Audencia Business School. The programme includes:

- Modules designed and taught collaboratively by faculty members at Audencia and the GSA
- Study in Nantes, France, a vibrant, modern city with old-world flair
- Two-week International Winter School in the inspirational Scottish Highlands
- Real-world consulting or research project
- Optional internship in a creative industry
- Collaborative and creative live projects both online and offline, studio (project-based) work and more

Audencia and the Glasgow School of Art

Rather than putting pre-existing management and creative classes on a schedule to form a so-called “new” programme, Audencia and the GSA’s Institute of Design Innovation have jointly designed a customised programme of classes and projects that respond to emerging trends, circumstances and opportunities within the global creative economy.

Every aspect of the programme combines learning in business and management with creative processes and people. The programme is located in Nantes, France, but the GSA faculty members teach one-third of the classes – and the two-week International Winter School, which brings international design schools together in Scotland, is a highlight of the programme.

Taught by Audencia

Shaping a creative career:

Shaping a creative career is an ongoing process which requires the will and ability to keep learning and re-skilling, a good knowledge of yourself and your values and a set of practical tools that will help to enhance your career. This module will mark the start of your journey to design a creative career that is sustainable, enjoyable and fulfilling.

Mapping the creative economy:

Learn what it really means to be a part of the creative economy. Mapping the Creative Economy offers an overview of the development of the cultural and creative industries and their relationship to the creative economy. You’ll learn about important challenges the industries face, such as technological, legal and economic – and the policies adopted to meet those challenges.

Reimagining management:

This module covers the following topics:

- Critical understanding of management
- Management of creativity and innovation
- Sustainable future

From idea to action: starting up:

Building skills to act as bridge between the worlds of creativity and business, you’ll work on a real-life collaborative project where you and your peers will be faced with design, managerial and entrepreneurial challenges.

You’ll learn by doing – working together with a diverse group of students, industry professionals and academic staff.

This experiential work will serve to further develop your career project, as well as help you internalise core entrepreneurial skills and knowledge in an authentic way. Here, you can make mistakes and learn from them in a safe environment.

Creating value in the creative economy:

To have knowledge is a good thing – but to spread it is even more rewarding. During this period, you will be asked to increase societal awareness of the possibilities within the creative economy. How you communicate your knowledge about the creative economy is up to you: conference, digital project, charity work, radio programme, etc. Get creative and begin establishing yourself as a subject-matter expert.

Teaching Methods

A variety of teaching methods are used for the above modules including:

Lectures
Seminars
Workshops
Coaching sessions
Personal blog/vlog
Learning journal
Visits to creative organisations
Group presentations
Debates
Case studies, videos, articles and academic papers
Data visualising techniques

For more information about the course content taught by Audencia please visit the website below

http://master.audencia.com/programmes-english/management-entrepreneurship-in-the-creative-economy/

Taught by GSA

Designing today:

Designing Today will help you develop a critical appreciation of the role of design practice and of designers as drivers of social, economic and organisational change. Your final project will be an exhibition. Topics include:

- Exploring service design and organisational design tools and methods
- Seeing social interaction as value creation
- Considering the contemporary role of designers in the area of management: industrial, experience and knowledge economies
- Understanding design not simply as the manufacture of industrial artefacts, but as an activity that creates value

Designing research:

Within Designing Research, you’ll develop an understanding of user-centred design as an ethnographic and engagement-led process of iterative development built upon collaborative working practices and creative refinement and resolution that responds to a variety of contexts. You’ll be evaluated via a project process journal and reflective writing. Components include:

- Formulating design enquiries (open-ended, empirically validated and discursive) that create the possibility of new knowledge and innovative practices or behaviours
- Methods: critical observation, ethnography, STEP analysis, future casting
- Participation in InDI’s two-week International Winter School to gain international, multi-disciplinary teaching and learning experience and develop a personal and professional network of practitioners, researchers and scholars

From idea to application:

From Idea to Application will help you internalise design practice as the material manifestation and evolution of value propositions. You’ll move from collaborative concept generation to product proposal, refinement and validation as understood across a variety of value regimes: manufacture and supply chain, branding and communication, user experience, etc.

The focus will be on the blend of industrial and digital artefacts, experience of use and the cognitive and narrative dimensions of innovative products and their collaborative production.

You’ll be evaluated through a project presentation and exhibition.

International winter school:

Led by the Institute of Design Innovation, the Winter School is an exemplar of our progressive teaching style and offers a method of research and learning that is both bespoke and distinct. The Winter School brings together international students and academics to fashion a new role for design in the exploration of a contemporary challenge during an intense two-week period.

Leading design academics and students from Köln International School of Design (KISD) and Copenhagen’s KADK (The Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts, Schools of Architecture, Design and Conservation) will join students and academics of the GSA, Audencia and other institutions from around the globe, forming an international network of diverse disciplines.

This component of the course offers a unique opportunity to examine current issues in a transcultural environment at the GSA’s stunning new campus in the Highlands and Islands of Scotland. Research and teaching carried out during the Winter School benefit organisations and communities as well as students.

Company experience

Research or consulting project

Your project is the culmination of your programme experience and the most ambitious expression of your individual motivation, creativity and ability to deliver. It can take the shape of a research project or a consulting project done during an optional internship. You will conduct secondary research, but great value will also be placed on your own primary research efforts.

For more information regarding the project please visit the website by clicking the link below

http://master.audencia.com/programmes-english/management-entrepreneurship-in-the-creative-economy/

Optional Internship

This component of the program is not required. However, we will encourage and support you in finding an internship that corresponds to your personal creative project and helps you shape your creative career.

Creative culture

The MSc in Management and Entrepreneurship in the Creative Economy is an alternative to an MBA or MFA programme. It offers you a uniquely creative culture with a degree from a respected and socially responsible business and management school.

Student profile

The students who will join this programme:

- Are creative people who are passionate about their area of expertise
- Want to explore fields in creative and cultural industries
- Love working with people from all over the world
- Know collaboration will be across fields and disciplines
- Understand the importance of business and management to the creative and cultural industries
- Are motivated by the ability of the creative and cultural industries to improve people's lives

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Study jewellery and metalwork at an advanced level and develop your talents for designing and making. You're challenged to think differently about design and creatively push boundaries, while developing the skills needed to become an imaginative and versatile designer. Read more
Study jewellery and metalwork at an advanced level and develop your talents for designing and making. You're challenged to think differently about design and creatively push boundaries, while developing the skills needed to become an imaginative and versatile designer. Your studies are project led and develop through researching, designing, producing and exhibiting your work. As a Postgraduate Design student you join an established network of creative people that encourage and support you to drive your studies to the next level. Our Postgraduate framework of design courses has been specially designed to allow students from different disciplines, backgrounds and cultures to come together, share teaching and learning experiences and explore their creative identities through dialogue and practice. Your studies will be project-led and developed through researching, designing, producing and communicating through presentations and exhibitions of your work.

If you are a highly motivated individual this course prepares you for a career working at the forefront of jewellery and metalwork. You build upon existing craft traditions, extending them in response to the needs of our rapidly changing society both in terms of function and style.

Your work on the course is project led and studio based. You develop and apply advanced skills using traditional and new technologies in the field. You also carry out research through practical and theoretical investigation.

Your individual project work includes research and creative work which explores your study topic. This is supported by lectures and seminars dealing with professional practice issues and reviewing progress. You also take part in regular group and individual tutorials.

This culminates with your final project that demonstrates you can deal with difficult contemporary questions and take a leading role in your profession as a designer. There are also residential study trips at home and abroad, complemented by opportunities to visit design conferences and debates.

See website for more information: https://www.shu.ac.uk/study-here/find-a-course/mamfa-design-jewellery-and-metalwork

Excellent facilities and creative resources

You have access to a huge range of creative resources to experiment and engage with including:
-3D printing for rapid prototyping.
-State-of-the-art hardware and software.
-Photography studios.
-A creative media centre.
-A gallery.
-Well-equipped workshops.

You also have access to our award-winning learning centre featuring a specialist art, design and media library and extensive online resources.

Research-led expertise

We are one of the oldest established art and design institutions in the UK, renowned for producing internationally recognised research. Your projects are supported by lecturers who are reknowned specialists in jewellery and metalwork. You benefit from a strong relationship between the masters design programme and the University’s Art and Design Research Centre which has gained international recognition for its work in both practice-based and strategic research. This has led to an approach to postgraduate study in design which emphasises the role of research in professional practice.

Vibrant and supportive learning environment

During the course you regularly take part in constructive critical debates about your own work and that of your peers. You need to communicate your research, ideas and designs in ways that are appropriate to professional leadership. You study alongside MA and MFA Design students for part of your course and benefit from a vibrant, international, collaborative and supportive postgraduate environment.

Sheffield: an international centre for excellence in metalwork

Sheffield is famous not only for its innovative steel and tool industries but also for being at the leading edge of the design and production of contemporary metalwork, silversmithing and tableware.

MA and MFA study

MA and MFA students complete the same modules during the course except that MFA students complete an extra project module. The MFA project encourages you to develop professional skills that help you to identify, instigate, and deliver projects with external partners, such as communities, galleries or businesses. You find a project partner, agree a brief and then deliver the project to a professional standard. We are normally asked to shortlist applicants before recommending a small number to apply. If this happens, we consider your interview, portfolio of work, academic qualifications and learning aims. We aim to pick people whose abilities and aims are relevant for the company and who are most likely to be successful in a competitive interview.

Course structure

MA
Full time – 1 year continuous or 16 months including a summer break.
Part time – typically 3 years.
MFA
Full time – typically 2 years.
Part time – typically 4 years.
When studying part-time, you share teaching with full-time students.
Starts September.

Full time structure
Semester One
-Project 1
-Theory supporting practice
Semester Two
-Project 2
-Negotiated project
Semester Three
-Major project
Semester Four – MFA students only
-MFA project

Part time structure
Semester One (Year 1)
-Theory supporting practice
-Negotiated project
Semester Two (Year 2)
-Project 1
-Project 2
Semester Three (Year 3)
-Major project
Semester Four – MFA students only (year 4)
-MFA project

Assessment: assessment and feedback are vital parts of the learning process in creative disciplines. Most assessment is through individual project work which combines research and creative practice.

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This programme has been designed to provide postgraduate education for current or future practitioners engaged in education, training or business practice relevant to Technology Enhanced Learning. Read more
This programme has been designed to provide postgraduate education for current or future practitioners engaged in education, training or business practice relevant to Technology Enhanced Learning.

Course Overview

The programme will be delivered online and will be available to anyone who meets the entry requirements and is professionally engaged in learning support, teaching or training practice. It is highly relevant for professional practitioners who work in learning in a university or college, in business training, public sector services or for people considering moving into one of these areas.

The programme provides theory and practice through experience of a range of learning technologies. It enables learners to explore the processes of designing and implementing technology-enhanced learning and issues concerning the practicalities of professional practice in their own context.

Learners will also develop their academic research skills as postgraduate learners. Learners will participate with other EU and non-EU professionals and with their tutors through a range of innovative online communication technologies. The programme aims to capitalise on a collaborative community of practitioners sharing the diversity of their experiences.

The first year of this three year programme is funded for successful applicants in working in vocational education and training in UK, Cyprus, Greece, Bulgaria and Sweden through the EU Lifelong Learning Programme.

Modules

PART 1
-Designing for Technology Enhanced Learning (30 credits)
-Implementing Technology Enhanced Learning (30 credits)
-Identity, Communities and Networks (30 credits)
-The Practitioner as Researcher (30 credits)

Within part 1 of the programme students undertaking the Postgraduate Diploma or MA must take all part 1 modules. Students who are undertaking a Postgraduate Certificate must take Designing for Technology Enhanced Learning and Implementing Technology Enhanced Learning.

PART 2
-Students undertaking the MA Technology Enhanced Learning take the 60 credit Dissertation module.

Key Features

63% of survey respondents from both the public and private sectors say that technological innovation will have a major influence on teaching methodologies over the next five years and that it will become a core differentiator in attracting students and corporate partners (Economist, 2008).

Technology led learning is continuing to grow at a phenomenal rate and the market for eLearning has exceed $52.6 billion in 2010 (Cegos, 2009). Cegos (2009) indicate the development of professional qualifications to meet the personnel demands of this “star” industry are lagging demand.

As an increasingly preferred approach for delivering training and education (Cedefop, 2010) the HE sector is now responding to the need for qualifications and learning demands of this fast changing sector. This MA Technology Enhanced Learning course is an online programme that is intended to attract a global student body.

Knowledge and understanding is achieved through learning activities that emphasise students’ engagement with research-led resources and dialogue and with each other and their tutor. Resources are made available electronically from a range of different sources including: e-books, electronic journal articles, videos, images, numerical data, voice recordings, transcripts, web applications and web documents, available through the University’s Virtual Learning Environment.

Assessment

The assessment scheme is designed to enable students to demonstrate individually that they have met the aims of the programmes and achieved the learning outcomes at the standard required for the MA. Assessment will also be used to provide feedback to students so as to assist in subsequent learning.

The assessment will enable theory to inform practice, with students demonstrating intellectual rigor and reflecting critically on their own experiences of using technology for learning. The overall assessment package is developed out of an inter-dependent learning culture. The assessment strategy aims to make use of the benefits to be gained from sharing practice in multiple contexts.

Career Opportunities

The MA Technology Enhanced Learning programme combines a theoretical approach with practical skills relevant for the teaching and training sectors and promotes an understanding of key concepts from an applied perspective. Graduates from the programme will have developed transferable employability skills such as research, problem solving, data interpretation and critical thinking as well as gaining the knowledge and practical skills applicable to the sector.

Graduates of the programme are likely to find employment within universities, vocational colleges, HRM departments, training companies and be employed as course managers, lecturers, teachers, instructional designers, authors, TEL Directors, information specialists or media design.

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Areas of research include, but are not limited to. evaluation of spacial heterogeneity for the design and layout of experimental sites. Read more
Areas of research include, but are not limited to: evaluation of spacial heterogeneity for the design and layout of experimental sites.
The course

This course builds on the Engineering Department’s long history of working closely with industry teaching students how to apply engineering science to industrial product design. Mechatronics is a multi-disciplinary field of engineering that combines with mechanical, electronic, computer, software, control and systems design engineering in the design and manufacture of useful products. It is an increasingly important discipline as most modern vehicles and machinery incorporate multiple mechatronic systems.

Some of the technologies that mechatronics encompasses include: robotics, vision systems, satellite navigation systems, communications technology, and biometric and other new advanced sensors. Introduction of these new technologies means that engineers cannot rely upon prior knowledge when designing machinery. As a consequence it has become normal practice for new highly technical equipment to be developed by specialist manufacturers, either through subcontract subsystem devolution or commercial partnership.

When developing new products, much of the work of the engineer involves the recombination or reapplication of previously un-combined technologies to solve new problems or enable new functionalities. Engineers therefore need to develop the greatest possible body of knowledge as a resource to call upon during the resolution of novel challenges in new or different environments.

This postgraduate programme builds upon students’ existing engineering skills and knowledge developed through prior education and focuses them into a more specific and applied area of study. This approach is designed to allow students to expand their applied knowledge and develop the necessary powers of analysis required to solve complex design problems. Learning largely takes place through a series of individual and group engineering projects intended to enable students to apply their existing academic skills and knowledge to the design, fabrication and testing of new products or systems. Where applicable, projects will be sponsored and supported by engineering companies and will focus on the development of mechatronic systems, machinery and equipment.

How will it benefit me?

This programme is designed for students with a strong academic background but limited industrial experience. It is intended to expedite the experiential development of these engineers through a series of industrially linked projects. Students will complete the course with a view to taking leading positions in manufacturing companies designing innovative machinery and equipment by employing new and emerging technologies to develop mechatronic systems, machinery and solutions.

Careers

This course provides an understanding of the practical application of engineering science and mathematics to the development of mechatronic systems. It is designed to aid students with good engineering qualifications, but limited applied industrial experience, learn the skills to take leading positions in manufacturing companies designing innovative machinery and equipment by employing new and emerging technologies to develop mechatronic systems, machinery and solutions.

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Discovering the politics of public policymaking. Immigration, environmental degradation, population ageing and global poverty are just a few of the political challenges that contemporary policymakers face. Read more

Master’s specialisation in Comparative Politics, Administration, and Society (COMPASS)

Discovering the politics of public policymaking.
Immigration, environmental degradation, population ageing and global poverty are just a few of the political challenges that contemporary policymakers face. In an increasingly globalised world, it is more important than ever that governments respond quickly and effectively to these challenges. National governments, however, increasingly share responsibility for designing and implementing effective policy with several layers of government (local, regional, national, international) and different types of actors (governments, non-profit organisations, businesses).

Designing effective policies in different political systems
The COMPASS specialisation provides the skills needed for a career in government or other policymaking organisations (NGOs, international organisations, advocacy groups). Courses focus on the barriers to and facilitators of reform, Europeanisation and compliance with EU directives, welfare state reform, and the problems governments face in the 21st century.

The degree awarded for completing COMPASS is either a Master's degree in Public Administration or in Political Science. By joining both disciplines, the specialisation incorporates the strengths of both.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/cpas

Why study Comparative Politics, Administration, and Society at Radboud University?

- The programme offers a unique combination of the theoretical foundations of Comparative Politics and the practical side of Public Administration
- Teaching takes place in a stimulating, collegial setting, with small groups, giving ample opportunity for debate
- The staff has a wide range of expertise, integrating their latest research into their seminars
- Staff members are actively involved in advising government, societal and political organisations

Career prospects

The Master’s specialisation in Comparative Politics, Administration, and Society (COMPASS) addresses themes of current significance to governance in Europe and elsewhere, drawing on experiences from different countries and teaching the analytical skills necessary for devising effective solutions for the challenges facing society. Because of COMPASS’s emphasis on understanding and analysing policymaking and administration at different levels of government, graduates will be able to identify the barriers to and facilitators of reform.
If you want to become a professional in government, COMPASS provides you with the tools needed for working in an ever changing environment and gives you an edge in an increasingly competitive job market. By choosing topics in their course works, students have the opportunity to specialise within the programme. Thus, developing a personal profile that strengthens their distinctiveness. Once graduated, you will leave the programme with a firm knowledge of complex issues and current changes in governance and international politics, and the skills to provide clever solutions. The programme thus
prepares you for senior positions in different organisations, for example the UN, the OECD and EU; public employers, such as local, regional and central government departments; thinktanks, advisory bodies and consultancy firms.

Our approach to this field

Political decisions are increasingly made in complex multi-governance systems. Transnational institutions such as the UN, the EU, the World Bank and the IMF have grown in importance. Policy problems are seldom the remit of a single government, but often involve several layers of government (local, regional, national, transnational) and several types of actors (governments, non-profit organisations, businesses). Moreover, recent reforms in many countries have led to the fragmentation of the public sector.

This fragmentation of the public sector comes at a time when governments face a particularly difficult set of problems. Economic and financial crises threaten the sustainability of what we used to take for granted. Social and demographic changes, such as population ageing, have made existing social policies and public programmes controversial. New technologies have radically changed the risks that we face and how we perceive them. These developments have implications for the training and skills of those who wish to work in the public sector and NGO sector.

- Components
The Master’s specialisation in Comparative Politics, Administration and Society is designed to address these issues and impart the skills necessary for a young professional in contemporary public administration. The one-year programme consists of two components:

An advanced general course that refines the analytical skills necessary for an international and comparative orientation.
Courses that specifically address the issue of the interaction between different levels of administration: international, national, and regional. The courses focus on, for instance, the barriers to and facilitators of reform, Europeanisation and compliance with EU directives, how various countries deal with problems concerning the social welfare state, and the challenges governments face in the 21st century. Courses emphasise questions such as: what are the implications when policy risks and issues are spread over different levels of administration? What happens when national administrations lose competencies to international bodies?

- Ethics
All courses in this Master’s specialisation include some training in the ethical dimensions of public administration. We believe that professions in the public and semi-public sector should be able to identify the ethical aspects of politics and public administration, because political processes are never neutral. Courses emphasise questions such as: which criteria need to be met for which players before an agreement can be reached? What hidden agendas could influence a policy? What interests are involved during an official inquiry?

- Change perspective
This Master’s specialisation provides students with a broad foundation concerning the way in which governments deal with contemporary problems. Students will learn that standardised solutions can be counter-productive because each country has its own unique context (such as culture and history) which needs to be taken into account when designing policy solutions.

Find information on Scholarships here http://www.ru.nl/scholarships

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/cpas

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MSc Internet, Mobile Systems and Applications is a future-oriented Masters course. You’ll develop technical knowledge of advance topics such as wireless mobile networking, open-based networking, cloud computing and next-generation media networking technologies. Read more
MSc Internet, Mobile Systems and Applications is a future-oriented Masters course.

You’ll develop technical knowledge of advance topics such as wireless mobile networking, open-based networking, cloud computing and next-generation media networking technologies. This focus on emerging and near-future technologies will prepare you for a career in the dynamic business and ICT industries.

All taught modules contain both theoretical knowledge and practical skills, and guest lecturers from industry will provide critical insight into the IT and technology sectors. You’ll have the chance to work in in our R&D lab, which is equipped with latest tools and technologies to allow to develop your hands-on skills.

Modules

Research methods and professional issues
Future internet technologies
Statistical analysis and modelling
Systems and cyber threats: vulnerabilities and countermeasures
Wireless and mobile networking
Media (VoIP/Video) technologies
MSc thesis

All modules are assessed by a mix of coursework and examinations.

Teaching and learning

You'll make use of our e-learning suite and learn in a combination of lectures, seminars, workshops and private study.

Our R&D lab equipped with latest tools and technologies, providing you with opportunities to develop hands-on skills and practice latest technologies in the area of wireless-mobile networking, open-based networking, cloud computing and next-generation media networking technologies.

Placements

You are encouraged to actively seek placements, work experience and voluntary work during your studies to improve your CV and to give you the opportunity to put theory into practice. Many opportunities are offered through the University's central Employability team, who can support you in finding a placement.

Professional links

In order to ensure the course runs in accordance with industry recognised standards we are seeking accreditation for both Chartered Engineer (CEng) status as well as Chartered IT Professional (CITP) accreditation by the British Computer Society, the Chartered Institute for Information Technology.

We are also seeking Chartered Engineer (CEng) status with both the Institute of Engineering and Technology and the Engineering Council.

Employability

The course will prepare graduates for variety of roles including:

• Cloud architecture: responsible for developing, designing and implementing scalable, secure and reliable multimedia cloud-based infrastructure and platforms.
• Mobile software engineer: responsible for designing and developing software modules for mobile distributed systems and applications that integrate with cloud service providers.
• Data centre manager: responsible for the implementation and maintenance of enterprise-shared virtualised infrastructure and platforms services.
• Multimedia application developer: responsible for designing and developing software solutions requiring skills in the areas of VoIP and video technologies, systems and applications that integrate with cloud service providers.

LSBU Employability Services

LSBU is committed to supporting you develop your employability and succeed in getting a job after you have graduated. Your qualification will certainly help, but in a competitive market you also need to work on your employability, and on your career search. Our Employability Service will support you in developing your skills, finding a job, interview techniques, work experience or an internship, and will help you assess what you need to do to get the job you want at the end of your course. LSBU offers a comprehensive Employability Service, with a range of initiatives to complement your studies, including:

• Direct engagement from employers who come in to interview and talk to students
• Job Shop and on-campus recruitment agencies to help your job search
• Mentoring and work shadowing schemes.

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