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This programme is grounded on the belief that architects should be thinking well beyond the constraints of market forces and the traditional disciplinary limits of the profession, towards forms, technology and spaces for a more sustainable future. Read more
This programme is grounded on the belief that architects should be thinking well beyond the constraints of market forces and the traditional disciplinary limits of the profession, towards forms, technology and spaces for a more sustainable future. This is a student-led programme, and you can have very different experiences within it depending on the choices of studios and courses you make.

Why choose this course?

Founded in 1927, the School of Architecture at Oxford Brookes has established an international reputation for the quality of both its research and its teaching. As one of the largest architecture schools in the UK, with around 600 students and 70 staff, it plays a leading role in defining the national, and international, agenda in design education and research. The school enjoys an international reputation in research, in areas ranging from sustainable design to modular buildings and from design for well-being to vernacular architecture.

Staff in the school regularly secure research funding from the UK's research councils and the European Union as well as industry, with an annual research grant income averaging £1m in recent years. This programme provides RIBA/ARB Part 2.

Professional accreditation

Accredited by the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) and the Architects Registration Board (ARB).

This course in detail

Year 1 - Research into design
This year has a very strong emphasis on acquiring in-depth knowledge of an architecturally important field of study and utilising that knowledge in design. This is achieved by taking one of the six 'design specialisations'.

You choose which design specialisation is best for you. The specialisations on offer are deliberately highly diverse to cater for the changing nature of the profession in practice. This course produces graduates for the global market and as such requires a high level of commitment from staff and students.

The design specialisations are:
-Advanced Architectural Design
-International Architectural Regeneration and Development
-Development and Emergency Practice
-Sustainable Building: Performance and Design
-Research-led Design
-Urban Design.

Each of the research specialisations offers teaching from experts within that subject area, and links, through teaching focus and staff, to the five research clusters that are an invaluable resource within the School of architecture.

The five research clusters keep the specialisations at the cutting edge in terms of a global agenda. They are, in general terms, environmental design, technology, development and emergency practice, humanities and architectural design.

Each of the design specialisations include a design project or projects, to which you will apply your detailed learning.

In addition to the design specialisation the first year will, through the Research Philosophy for Design module, widen your thinking in terms of what constitutes research, test your critical thinking and improved your analytical abilities. All of these are essential tools and their enhancement will place you in a stronger position to undertake the design studio in the second year.

Your ability to represent your ideas in a coherent and focused manner is the remit for the Representation module. This module will identify your strengths and build up your weaknesses, both in terms of visual and verbal communication methods. You will be able to dedicate time to fine-tuning techniques or building from basics in sketching, model making, 2D and 3D CAD. Your presentation of methods and actual practice will enable you to build confidence in verbal communication skills.

The Management, Practice and Law module in year one looks at the landscapes within which these issues are being informed. This module is taught by practising architects who have first-hand experience of the issues under discussion. Through a series of workshops you will work on topics that are essential to the practice of architecture. Management, practice and law is part of the design delivery of the programme and you will be expected to approach the coursework from a design position. This module asks that you approach this subject with a very different mind-set than the traditional position.

Due to the diverse and preparative basis of this year it is compulsory for all students to pass all compulsory components of the Research into Design year in order to be progress to the Design and Technology year.

Year 2 - Design and technology
This year is structured to enable you to synthesise a broad range of complex cultural, aesthetic, research and technical factors, and design-specialisation learning, into your major design project and portfolio.

The year is spent participating in one of six design studios. All studios have control over their own programme of projects, and each has a different view of architectural culture and promotes different design methods. The design studios are taught by some of the brightest designers and tutors in the country and consequently their programmes demand high levels of creative and intellectual endeavour from you, as well as high levels of productivity. Their aim is to raise your design thinking, skills and production to the highest possible standard.

All six units present their projects for the year in the induction session and you are asked to select all six in order of preference. This system is to allow for an even distribution of students across all six units. Most students are allocated to their first choice of studio although there is no guarantee of a particular design unit - normally at worst you are allocated your second choice.

During the design and technology year, your design work must develop into technically ambitious architecture and be the subject of your compulsory Advanced Technology for Design module. This module designs through technology and fully complements and parallels your work in the design studio. There is a very strong emphasis here upon the creative possibilities for architectural technology. We ask for an open and experimental approach to technology, but also a clear understanding of its context and aims.

The staff delivering the teaching in the design studio unit and the Advanced Technology for Design module are made up from academics and practitioners. This energetic mix will challenge you to think about design and technology in a new manner, building confidence in ability, enabling deep thinking, and aiding you to define a personal design spirit.

Sitting alongside the design and technology is the second Management, Practice and Law module. This module builds on the learning and skills from the first year module and prepares you for stepping back into practice. As in the first year module this is learning is delivered by practicing architects. Through focus groups with architectural practices, this module figures in the skills that are seen as highly desirable for the ARB part 2 graduate to have when seeking employment.

Throughout the two years of the programme there will be interim reviews. This offers an opportunity to receive feedback from outside of your design studio or design specialisation. We have strong links with practice and architectural institutions and can attract the most able people to sit on our reviews.

This is a programme that aims to give you the skills for international practice.

As our courses are reviewed regularly, modules may vary from those listed here.

Teaching and learning

The unique nature of the Applied Design in Architecture offers you the opportunity to select an individual pathway that will create a distinctive graduate profile that is unique to you alone.

The ability to choose modules from within design specialisations offers you the prospect of defining your own position. You will find that you are being taught with, in most cases, direct entry master's students from countries around the world.

This aspect is complemented by the Year 2 design studio where you will engage with a distinctive agenda and experience a diversity of design specialisation thinking from students within your unit.

Self-directed learning is highly supported by staff in the School of Architecture. Personal choice engenders motivation and a high level of commitment, and the programme has been designed to embrace this aspect whilst clearly building on skills, thinking, application and design production to achieve a final portfolio of the highest standard.

Careers and professional development

The modules Management Practice, and Law 1 and 2, include guidance on the necessary professional skills that are required both for ARB Part 2 and for preparation in commencing ARB Part 3. The design studio generates a portfolio of work that not only demonstrates the learning for ARB Part 2 but also written, research and visual skills. The design portfolio is intended as the vehicle for students to synthesise all facets of their learning in order to seek practice employment.

In addition the school maintains a jobs wall that advertises vacancies locally, nationally and internationally.

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Surrey’s highly regarded Department of Sociology specialises in pioneering research methods and offers a stimulating study environment for our highly sought-after graduates. Read more
Surrey’s highly regarded Department of Sociology specialises in pioneering research methods and offers a stimulating study environment for our highly sought-after graduates.

The MSc Social Research Methods programme is backed by decades of experience: we were the first in the UK to run this type of programme in 1974.

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW

Social researchers employ a constantly evolving range of qualitative and quantitative methods to explore attitudes and experiences, and to understand patterns of social behaviour.

This programme won't just train you in the application of specific research techniques: it will illuminate the connections between sociological theory and empirical research, and relate research to the development of public policy and the analysis of substantive social issues.

Wider issues of the social research process are also covered and include: the planning and management of research projects; the methodological, theoretical, philosophical and ethical aspects of research; and the presentation and publication of research findings.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year and part-time students must study at least two taught technical modules per academic year. It consists of eight taught modules and a dissertation. The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.
-Data Analysis
-Documentary Analysis and Online Research
-Field Methods
-Principle of Survey Design
-Research: From Design to Dissemination
-Evaluation Research
-Statistical Modelling
-Theory and Method
-Dissertation

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF THE PROGRAMME

The main aims of the programme are to:
-Provide an appropriate training for students preparing MPhil/PhD theses, or for students on to employment involving the use of social science research
-Introduce students to a variety of different approaches to social science research at an advanced level
-Cover the principles of research design and strategy, including formulating research questions or hypotheses and translating these into practicable research designs
-Make students aware of the range of secondary data available and equip them to evaluate its utility for their research
-Develop skills in searching for and retrieving information, using library and Internet resources
-Introduce students to the philosophical, theoretical and ethical issues surrounding research and to debates about the relationship between theory and research, about problems of evidence and inference, and about the limits of objectivity
-Develop skills in the use of SPSS, and in the main statistical techniques of data analysis, including multivariate analysis
-Develop skills in the use of CAQDAS software for the analysis of qualitative data
-Develop skills in writing, in the preparation of a research proposal, in the presentation of research results and in verbal communication
-Help students to prepare their research results for wider dissemination, in the form of seminar papers, conference presentations, reports and publications, in a form suitable for a range of audiences, including academics, policy makers, professionals, service users and the general public

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes in the following areas:
-Formulate, design, plan, carry out and report on a complete research project
-Use the range of research techniques commonly employed in sociological research, from survey research to field methods
-Collect or generate quantitative and qualitative data through an array of techniques, and select techniques of data generation on appropriate methodological bases
-Analyse: quantitative data using basic and more advanced skills; qualitative data from both ‘real world’ and ‘virtual world’ environments
-Employ a quantitative and qualitative software package to manage and analyse data
-Apply critical reflection skills to the methodological, theoretical, ethical, and philosophical aspects of social research practice
-Plan, manage and execute research as part of a team and as a sole researcher
-Present research findings to differing audiences
-Have an understanding of the contribution social research makes to social policy formulation and the evaluation of planned social interventions

Knowledge and understanding
-Appreciate the epistemological and ontological questions that underpin social research
-Show critical awareness and understanding of the methodological implications of a range of sociological theories and approaches
-Show systematic knowledge of basic principles of research design and strategy
-Understand the use and value of a wide range of different research approaches across the quantitative and qualitative spectra
-Show advanced knowledge of techniques, and appropriate use, of quantitative and qualitative data analysis
-Recognise the significance of social/political contexts and uses of research
-Show engagement with innovations and developments in social research
-Demonstrate a comprehensive understanding of research ethics

Intellectual / cognitive skills
-Systematically formulate researchable problems; analyse and conceptualise issues; critically appreciate alternative approaches to research; report to a range of audiences
-Analyse qualitative and quantitative data drawn both from ‘real world’ and ‘virtual world’ environments, using basic and more advanced techniques, and draw warranted conclusions
-Develop original insights, questions, analyses and interpretations in respect of research questions
-Use methodological, theoretical, ethical, and philosophical knowledge about social research practice to address complex issues creatively
-Critically evaluate the range of approaches to research

Professional practical skills
-Formulate, design, plan, carry out and report on a complete research project
-Use the range of research techniques commonly employed in sociological research
-Generate both quantitative and qualitative data through an array of techniques, and select techniques of data generation on appropriate methodological bases
-Employ a quantitative (SPSS) and qualitative software package to manage and analyse data
-Plan, manage and execute research as part of a team and as a sole researcher
-Present research findings to differing audiences in both written and oral formats, as appropriate

Key / transferable skills
-Communicate complex ideas, principles and theories by oral, written and visual means
-Work to deadlines and within work schedules
-Work independently and self-organise
-Apply computing skills for research instrument design, data analysis, and report writing and presentation
-Formulate and solve problems, both individually and as part of a team
-Demonstrate experience of a work environment

GLOBAL OPPORTUNITIES

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.

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We're committed to developing our postgraduates into skilled researchers who can conduct rigorous research using a variety of methodologies and methods- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/mphil-phd-psychology/. Read more
We're committed to developing our postgraduates into skilled researchers who can conduct rigorous research using a variety of methodologies and methods- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/mphil-phd-psychology/

Supervision can be offered in any of the areas of departmental activity.

During your first year you may take a range of taught modules including research design and analysis, methodology, theoretical issues, and statistics; requirements will vary depending on any postgraduate research training you have already undertaken.

The MPhil programme offers the opportunity for you to continue your research to a PhD.

You will attend and contribute to research seminars, and through departmental and Goldsmiths-wide modules you are also encouraged to develop practical skills such as public speaking, poster preparation, scientific writing, and how to deal with the media.

You meet regularly with your supervisor at every stage, and develop a structured approach to designing, executing, analysing and writing up your research.

You will have access to the Department of Psychology's range of laboratories, testing rooms and research equipment. You have an annual allowance to contribute towards your research expenses and participation in at least one national or international conference.

What kind of research could I do?

We are able to support research in most areas of psychology. Some students have already formulated specific research ideas before they apply here, and find a supervisor in the department who is able to help them develop these into a doctoral research programme; if this applies to you, see information on the expertise of all our staff and contact any who you think may be able to help you to pursue these.

Other students are attracted by the research interests of our staff, and may decide to undertake a project which has been suggested by them and which relates to their ongoing research. To explore these or other research ideas, start by emailing the member of staff whose research interests you. Each staff member will discuss research ideas with you via email, skype or phone; and you are very welcome to visit staff at Goldsmiths to discuss your options further.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Denise Barry.

Structure

Our postgraduate students are offered a stimulating study environment in which to research their higher degree.

We have a thriving postgraduate school with some 40 current students on full-time and part-time programmes, including mature students and students from the EU and overseas.

We provide training modules in research methods in your first year, a regular report/presentation schedule, and excellent computing/research facilities.

If you are thinking of doing an MPhil at Goldsmiths, the first step is to get in touch with any members of our staff whose research is in line with your interests.

The MPhil programme offers the opportunity for you to continue your research to a PhD.

Training and support

All our MPhil students are assigned a specific research supervisor (or sometimes joint supervisors).

As well as receiving ongoing support and guidance from their allocated supervisor(s), our students undergo comprehensive training in psychological research methods (unless they already hold an MSc approved by the ESRC) in line with current ESRC training guidelines, which includes quantitative and qualitative research methodologies. This is mainly during the first year of registration (or first two years for part-time students. Our MPhil students also attend various short generic research skills and methods training (CRT) modules run by the College, also in their first year (or first two years if part-time).

Our students have full access to the Department's excellent facilities for lab and field research, and first-rate technical support is available from the Department's five-strong team of full-time technical staff.

Your progress

You may have the option to upgrade to a PhD after 12 months full-time, or 20 months part-time.

Your progress on your thesis is regularly monitored by the Department's Postgraduate Programmes Committee. The Head of Department can recommend suspension from the programme at any stage if progress is not satisfactory.

Postgraduate facilities

All full-time students have their own workplace and a networked computer with access to programmes for their research needs, plus email and internet facilities. Part-time students also have access to a networked computer, generally shared between two or three students. In addition, we have a lab solely for the use of postgraduates, and a postgraduate computing room. We also run a psychological test library for staff and students.

Seminars and presentations

Our postgraduates have regular opportunities to meet up with other students and to make contact with staff.

The Department runs a number of active visiting lecturer seminar programmes and a weekly Postgraduate Seminar Series, at which students learn about the research of their colleagues, and receive guidance on topics such as giving presentations or writing up a thesis. There are also several specialised research groups (including affective neuroscience, consciousness studies, development and social processes, occupational psychology, visual cognition) open to staff, researchers and postgraduate students which hold regular discussion sessions and talks.

All postgraduates are invited to attend an annual Research Seminar Weekend in an informal setting at Cumberland Lodge in Windsor Great Park, which is funded by the Department. Here, we have a programme of internal and external speakers.

In addition, our annual Postgraduate Poster Party gives students the opportunity to update the Department on their work.

Conferences

Besides the yearly presentation to the Department, our postgraduates are strongly encouraged to present their work, eg as a paper or poster, at external conferences and financial support is set aside for this. Some recent presentations by postgraduates include:

-Priming for depth-rotated objects depends on attention. (Vision Sciences, Sarasota)
-Imagining objects you have never seen: Imagery in individuals with profound visual impairment. (BPS Annual Conference)
-Modelling dopaminergic effects on implicit and explicit learning tasks. (Annual Summer Interdisciplinary Conference)
-Individual differences in affective modulation of the startle reflex and emotional stroop task. (BPS Conference)
-Evolution and psi: Investigating the presentiment effect as an adapted behaviour. (Society for Psychical Research 25th International Conference)
-Presence: Is your heart in it? (4th Annual International Workshop on Presence)
-The effects of state anxiety on the suggestibility and accuracy of child eyewitnesses. (11th European Conference of Psychology and Law)
-The psychosocial sequelae of aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage. (6th Scientific Meeting of the Stroke Association)
-The role of Electrophysiology in Human Computer Interaction. (HCI Conference)
-Categorical shape perception. Experimental Psychology Society and Belgian Psychological Society)
-Schizotypy, eye movements, and the effects of neuroticism. (10th Biennial Meeting of the International Society for the Study of Individual (ISSID))
-Eye movements in siblings of schizophrenic patients. (World Congress of Biological Psychiatry, Berlin, Germany)

Assessment

Thesis and viva voce.

Department

Psychology at Goldsmiths is ranked joint 3rd in the UK for the quality of our research**

**Research Excellence Framework 2014, Times Higher Education research intensity subject rankings

How does music affect mood?
Why do some people believe in the paranormal?
How do people with autism think?

In the Department of Psychology we try and investigate questions like this, conducting research that’s relevant to a range of sectors and industries – from advertising to education, and from banking to the public sector.

You’ll be taught by experts in the field, who are carrying out research that’s world class. And you’ll learn in a department with excellent specialist and general-purpose research laboratories, including:

EEG and brain stimulation labs for neuroscience research
a visual perception and attention laboratory equipped with state-of-the-art eye tracking systems
an infant lab
in-house technical support staff

Skills & Careers

You will receive training in and develop wide-ranging research skills, including:

database searching and bibliographic skills
managing and analysing data
presentation and communication skills
quantitative and qualitative research methods
handling legal and ethical issues in research
research design
project management

How to apply

Before you apply for a research programme, we advise you to get in touch with the programme contact, listed above. It may also be possible to arrange an advisory meeting.

Before you start at Goldsmiths, the actual topic of your research has to be agreed with your proposed supervisor, who will be a member of staff active in your general field of research. The choice of topic may be influenced by the current research in the department or the requirements of an external funding body. Supervision can be offered in any of the areas of departmental activity, as reflected in the research interests of our staff. Please contact a member of staff in the department, before making a formal application, and establish that they would be willing to supervise you in a research area of common interest.

If you wish to study on a part-time basis, you should also indicate how many hours a week you intend to devote to research, whether this will be at evenings or weekends, and for how many hours each day.

Research proposals

Along with your application and academic reference, you should also upload a research proposal at the point of application.

An approximate timeline of training and research plans and an outline of a previous research project in which you have played a leading role (for instance, a study you conducted for your undergraduate or MSc degree). The personal statement in the Departmental form will be structured in a different way to that on the College form. Please see guidelines on the form itself. Finally, your supervisor will be required to provide a statement detailing ways in which the project fits into their overall research programme and the wider research interests and facilities of the Department. Guidance on how to structure these is given on the form. Please do not exceed the word length, and DO NOT submit additional material emanating from your previous research (e.g. copies of dissertations, published papers) as this will not be read. Note that all aspects of the application are required for an application to be considered.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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As populations grow and competition for space and resources increases, society’s most pressing issues will need to be addressed by those who can work in collaboration with cognitive, occupational and social psychologists, as well as architects, educationalists, environmental scientists, engineers, landscape architects and planners. Read more
As populations grow and competition for space and resources increases, society’s most pressing issues will need to be addressed by those who can work in collaboration with cognitive, occupational and social psychologists, as well as architects, educationalists, environmental scientists, engineers, landscape architects and planners.

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW

How do individuals and groups react to different environmental situations (home, office, hospital, street, shop, and so on)? What psychological processes are triggered by our environment, and how do they affect our perception, attitude and actions?

How can individuals and groups change their environment so that it provides a more stimulating, less stressful and more enabling setting in which to live? How are our identities tied up with place? How might sustainability in environmental policy be better informed by current research?

Our MSc Environmental Psychology programme will help you gain advanced knowledge and understanding of theory and practice in environmental psychology.

You will also acquire a range of research skills that will give you the confidence and ability to undertake environmental psychology research in a professional setting.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year and part-time over two academic years. It consists of eight taught modules and a dissertation. The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.
-Ergonomics and Human Factors
-Inquiry and Design
-Dissertation
-Qualitative Research Methods
-Quantitative Research Methods
-Key Questions in Environmental Psychology: People and Place
-Psychology of Sustainable Development
-Preparation for Academic Research in Psychology
-Conducting Health Psychology Research
-Social Change and Influence
-Maintaining Health Throughout the Lifespan
-Psychological Neuroscience: Electrophysiology

FUNDING

Funding is now linked to continuation funding for a PhD – that is, successful applicants to the Economic and Social Research Council will be given a grant for the MSc year and then further support (subject to satisfactory progress) to enable them to undertake a PhD.

Occasionally students receive financial support from industry through sponsorship. This would involve students undertaking a piece of research for their dissertation which would be of interest and value to industry or commerce, in return for which they will be given a grant by the commissioning company.

In the past, this sponsorship has ranged from £500 to £6,000. This is mutually beneficial to both the student and sponsor, and allows the student to undertake a ‘real’ piece of research that has practical or policy implications, whilst receiving a sum of money to assist with fees and subsistence costs.

ENVIRONMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY AT SURREY

The School of Psychology at the University of Surrey was the first in the world to establish an MSc in Environmental Psychology, in 1973. Since then there have been well over 250 graduates of the programme from over 25 countries worldwide.

It remains one of a few such postgraduate programmes in the world and the only one in the UK.

The MSc Environmental Psychology programme is part of a larger modular programme, thereby providing a flexible teaching and learning structure. The School of Psychology has a reputation for developing professional and innovative programmes reflecting contemporary societal concerns and employment opportunities.

Environmental Psychology at Surrey has always sought to be a multidisciplinary research activity. We are driven by psychological theories and methodologies, but draw on other social sciences, as well as the environmental and design disciplines.

We investigate environment behaviour relationships at every spatial scale and environment, from personal space and office design, through neighbourhood renewal, to the public understanding of global climate change.

PSYCHOLOGY AT SURREY

The School of Psychology at the University of Surrey is one of the most active and highly regarded psychology departments in the country. We specialise in applied and policy-oriented teaching and research within a strong theoretical context. The international, interdisciplinary, policy and applied strengths of the School mean that students’ theoretical and methodological research puts them at the cutting edge of the discipline.

We are one of the highest ranked Schools in the country for graduates entering employment, and also one of the largest providers of postgraduate training in the UK.

The University of Surrey’s School of Psychology has been the centre for many cross-national studies and has attracted funding from research councils and local and national government departments, such as:
-ESF
-Defra
-The Ministry of Defence
-Home Office
-The Environment Agency
-The Countryside Agency
-Surrey County Council
-The EU

If you choose to study psychology at the University of Surrey, you will be provided with a combination of opportunities that would be hard to match elsewhere. We offer you a degree that provides a thorough grounding in the theories, methods and practice of contemporary psychology.

Our programmes lay particular emphasis on the application of psychology to real-world problems, and also consider issues related to professional practice in preparation for your career as a professional psychologist.

The basis of good postgraduate programmes is the research activity of staff, the incorporation of current research programmes in teaching material and a reciprocal relationship between theory development and applied research in everyday contemporary issues.

We believe in involving all postgraduate students in the research life of the School through active participation in one of the research groups, attendance at research seminars and, where possible, an attachment to ongoing research projects.

As a student of the School of Psychology, you will also have access to a number of conferences, seminars and workshops hosted throughout the year.

COLLABORATIONS

Environmental psychology researchers have always enjoyed collaboration with other disciplines.

Current and recent research collaborations include an EPSRC funded research project on energy technologies in homes (REDUCE) with colleagues of environmental sciences (CES) and communications technology (CCSR), a DEFRA/ESRC-funded research programme on lifestyles in transition (SLRG) and a major ESRC funded research program on sustainable lifestyles (RESOLVE: research on lifestyles, values and the environment) both with colleagues from sociology, economics and environmental sciences.

We have long-established links with national and international academic institutions including the Department of Architecture at the University of Strathclyde, the Centre for Transport Studies at the University of West England and the Department of Psychology at Bath University.

The environmental psychology community is strongly international and this is reflected in the long-term active teaching and research collaboration we enjoy with the universities of Groningen, Madrid, La Coruña, Umeå and Rome.

Students on the MSc programme are encouraged to take advantage of these links during their dissertations.

MSc students are actively encouraged to participate in ongoing research projects. Our recent research clients include:
-Building Research Establishment
-Surrey County Council
-Eden Project
-Defra
-Environment Agency
-Forestry Commission
-European Commission
-Rentokil Initial
-King Sturge

RESEARCH

The Environmental Psychology Research Group (EPRG), of which students on the MSc in Environmental Psychology are automatically members, has been undertaking research for more than 30 years and has gained an international reputation.

Research undertaken by the EPRG is both ‘fundamental’ (that is, contributing to the development of the discipline and our understanding ofpsychological processes) and ‘applied and policy-oriented’.

Both government and business are concerned with effective policy development and delivery, and it is increasingly recognised that these can only be successfully achieved by informed evidence.

Students on the MSc Environmental Psychology programme are encouraged to make their research not only useful, but useable.

CAREER PROSPECTS

Recent graduates have progressed into careers in central and local government, undertaking policy-oriented research on a variety of environment behaviour (E-B) issues. Many of our graduates have become practice consultants, using their E-B research skills.

This could be a specialist E-B practice or an architecture, planning, design or engineering practice where graduates with a sensitivity to people-environment issues and a training in E-B research can provide an important and unique set of skills and expertise.

Those who have a background in architecture, landscape architecture, planning or design often return to their profession, but with an enhanced range of skills.

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF THE PROGRAMME

The aims of the programme are as follows:
-To provide students with theoretical and qualitative/quantitative methodological expertise to conduct environmental psychological research by training them in the informed and systematic conduct of basic and applied research involving the critical reading of theories and empirical findings
-To provide students with an in depth knowledge of contemporary theoretical and methodological approaches to the discipline
-To enable students to link theoretical and empirical questions to social and environmental issues and to provide them with an in depth understanding of the practical applications and action implications of environmental psychological theories and empirical findings
-To provide students with the skills to evaluate possible interventions in a variety of environmental domains
-To offer opportunities to develop the basic interpersonal, technical and creative skills required for the effective analysis and formulation of problems into research questions and, where appropriate, testable hypotheses

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes in the following areas:
Knowledge and understanding
-Contemporary theoretical and methodological approaches to environmental psychology
-The practical applications and action implications of environmental psychological theories and empirical findings
-The principles of research design
-Quantitative and qualitative techniques and strategies to manage and analyse psychological data
-Ethical considerations when undertaking research and framing interventions

Intellectual / cognitive skills
-Critically assess and comment on sources of research relevant to environmental psychology
-Critically evaluate the contributions and limitations of environmental psychological theories and research methods in environmental behaviour issues
-Evaluate actual and potential psychologically informed interventions in a variety of environmental domains
-Design, conduct and evaluate environmental psychological research
-Apply insights from environmental psychological theory and research to other domains of psychology

Professional practical skills
-Communicate work in a professional manner for academic and non-academic audiences in written and verbal formats
-Apply problem solving techniques to environmental and psychological topics effectively
-Use effective learning strategies
-Analyse and interpret environmental psychological theoretical analyses and quantitative and qualitative empirical evidence in a competent and critical manner

Key / transferable skills
-Communicate theories and methods in relation to environmental psychology by oral and written means
-Use information technology effectively
-Manage own personal development

GLOBAL OPPORTUNITIES

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.

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This full-time taught research course gives you the opportunity to carry out in-depth original research into design practice while developing the skills to become an independent, critical thinker and effective design researcher. Read more
This full-time taught research course gives you the opportunity to carry out in-depth original research into design practice while developing the skills to become an independent, critical thinker and effective design researcher.

The taught modules provide a framework of transferable skills that apply to all researchers as well as those relevant to your chosen pathway subject of Arts, Design, English Literature, History, Social Science, or Media.

You will gain an understanding of research methods while developing expert professional skills in communication, self-management, and project planning. You will devise and deliver a significant research-based project in the form of a dissertation or practical arts based project, to demonstrate your interests and ability to think independently.

Whether you go on to further PhD study, or work as a researcher for a range of public services and professions, this course gives you the research and professional skills for a successful career.

Learn From The Best

Mark Bailey is Director of Innovation Design and leads the University’s partnership with Unilever. He spent 10 years in the Aerospace industry working on advanced passenger and business jet concepts.

After graduating from Northumbria’s School of Design, Bruce Montgomery became a designer for fashion brands including Katherine Hamnett, Moschino and Jeff Banks.

Matthew Lievesley has helped develop improved care-pathways for people with Type II Diabetes in collaboration with Newcastle University Medical School.

Dr Irini Pitsaki specialises in Design Management and Strategic Brand Management with more than 15 years of experience as a researcher and lecturer in higher education.

Dr Mersha Aftab’s current work looks at Role of Design at strategic level in multinational industries. Her passion for teaching led to a full time lectureship teaching Innovation.

Dr Stuart English is a specialist in design led innovation, and the creator of Ideas-lab. He leads a portfolio of postgraduate programmes.

Elizabeth MacLarty has a degree in Fine Art from Leeds University and her research interests include the relationship of theory to practice, particularly in Design Education teaching practice.

Teaching And Assessment

You’ll learn through a combination of discipline-specific and core framework modules that develop your research skills.

You’ll undertake a dissertation or project of 20,000 words (or 10,000 word dissertation in support of a practical project for Arts practice researchers). This can be either a specialist, in-depth study based upon a substantial body of subject-relevant sources or a you can take a broader ranging approach crossing over a number of disciplines.

You will also take two discipline-specific modules that examine the key themes, traditions, and debates in your chosen discipline.

You’ll be assessed by a mixture of traditional and innovative practices, including dissertation (or equivalent project), oral and written presentations, critical reviews, and portfolios of work.

The academic team will help you develop the skills required to plan, manage and review your learning.

Learning Environment

Northumbria's School of Design was named one of Europe’s top design schools by US Business Week magazine and has an international reputation for innovation and creativity.

It has been fitted out with state-of-the-art facilities and the latest in design technology including:

- Dedicated exhibition gallery and outdoor show spaces
- Modern presentation rooms with the latest screening facilities
- Digital photography studio
- CAD suites
- Traditional letterpress and screen printing
- The latest in computer numerically controlled machinery
- Extensive 3D prototyping workshops
- Industry standard textile, printing, knit and garment
- Construction facilities
- Sound studios and recording booths
- Interaction and animation studios
- Mobile laptop facilities
- Postgraduate, research and consultancy suites

Alongside teaching staff with experience as designers, technicians, craftsmen and journalists, you’ll also learn from visiting designers and design professionals.

Research-Rich Learning

Northumbria is in the UK top 10 for research power in Arts and Design. The School of Design hosts three research groups:

Design Issues
This research group addresses complex social and cultural issues from a design perspective. They work on themes such as social care issues with the Carers Centre Newcastle and Alzheimer’s Scotland and socio-economic challenges with Newcastle YMCA and Traidcraft.

Design Innovation and Research Methods
This group focuses on innovating and creating value across society by applying design-led innovation and better research methods to support the work of designers in context. Work involves the industrial and commercial sector, such as design's role in corporate innovation and creativity in product manufacturing and service organisations.

Design Making
This research group focuses on materials and the cultural and technology benefits of making in society. Researchers work in product, industrial, interaction, service, textile, craft, fashion and interior design disciplines.

Give Your Career An Edge

This course will give you skills for life-long learning, including critical skills and attitudes, presentation skills, and the ability to reflect and evaluate abilities. These are all attractive traits and in demand from employers.

You’ll be able to demonstrate critical awareness of research and scholarship in your chosen design discipline and show that you are self-motivated, disciplined and possess a thirst for independent learning.

Throughout the course, you’ll build on your undergraduate skills, adding intensity, complexity and depth of study as you also develop communication, time management and highly developed research and inquiry skills.

Your studies have a real world focus and you’ll have the opportunity to work with external partners and industries to develop your experience and network of contacts. We seek to nurture home-grown talent to support and grow the economic, social, cultural and intellectual capital of the region and beyond.

Your Future

Northumbria boasts an illustrious design alumni list including Sir Jonathan Ive, principal designer of the iPad, iPhone and iMac. Rob Law MBE, Founder of Trunki, Nicola Morgan, Designer, Lanvin, Paris, and Tim Brown, Chief Executive, IDEO.

As a graduate you’ll be able to demonstrate critical thinking and judgement and will leave equipped with excellent practical, communication, and transferable skills.

You will become an expert on your chosen research topic and well placed to use this as a platform to excel in your career and contribute to the community and the wider world in which you live.

On graduating, you will have a qualification which may enhance your promotion prospects in the fields of teaching, professional research, museums and archives, public policy, and project management.

There are also opportunities for you to advance your studies further, with advice in writing PhD and funding applications available to support students.

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Are you dedicated to the study of psychology and want to take your learning to the next level? The MRes Psychology will give you a practical education in psychological research training which is informed by staff research experience. Read more
Are you dedicated to the study of psychology and want to take your learning to the next level? The MRes Psychology will give you a practical education in psychological research training which is informed by staff research experience.

You will benefit from working in a professional research environment, and develop advanced research skills that will enable you to plan, execute, analyse and disseminate high-quality psychological research.

With the opportunity to work both individually and collaboratively on research projects you will gain valuable critical and transferable skills and an understanding of the professional and ethical issues relating to producing research. You will graduate ready for employment in a research context, or doctoral level training in psychological research or applied psychology.

Learn From The Best

Staff are active researchers, passionate about their subject and dedicated to the discovery of new knowledge through innovative and exciting research projects. You will learn from those at the forefront of their fields. In fact, our strength in psychology research has significantly increased, placing us second in the Alliance group of universities for world-leading research (REF 2014).

You will work alongside academics with international backgrounds in research and experience in both higher education and industry.

Teaching And Assessment

You will study advanced research skills and techniques, exploring qualitative and quantitative methods, data collection and analysis through a variety of sessions including interactive lectures, workshops and tutorials. Benefitting from studying in a professional academic research environment you will put what you have learnt into practice, leading both collaborative and individual pieces of research.

All assessments are reflective of the kinds of tasks which active researchers engage with, to provide you with experience of practical research activities which are typically carried out in professional research settings. A final thesis will cement your learning and you will work closely with a member of staff to design, develop and implement a research project that is aligned to your interests. You will learn how to disseminate your findings to a variety of audiences.

Module Overview
PY0766 - Practical Research Skills and Techniques (Core, 30 Credits)
PY0767 - Research Experience: Design and Development (Core, 20 Credits)
PY0768 - Research Experience: Implementation and Dissemination (Core, 20 Credits)
PY0769 - MRes Thesis (Core, 90 Credits)
PY0774 - Qualitative and Quantitative Methods (Core, 20 Credits)

Learning Environment

You will learn in a professional research environment with access to state-of-the-art laboratories equipped with industry standard equipment. You will be able to collect and analyse your data using the most current software tools and will benefit from technology enabled learning with use of the eLearning Portal where electronic reading lists, lecture capture and online submission and feedback tools support your learning.

You will be immersed in an active research environment with access to Northumbria’s innovative research centres including The Brain Performance and Nutrition Research Centre and The Northumbria Centre for Sleep Research. With staff working at the cutting-edge of their fields in innovative research areas, there is nowhere better to hone your research skills.

Research-Rich Learning

Research excellence is embedded at every stage of this course. Through research-orientated education and practical instruction you will develop the advanced research skills and critical evaluation techniques needed to conduct your own and collaborative research projects in the field of Psychology from initial idea to dissemination of results. The core purpose of this MRes is to make you into a confident and skilled professional researcher.

Staff are actively engaged in a wide range of research with almost three-quarters of Northumbria’s psychology research being judged to have outstanding reach and significance for its impact, placing us top 20 in the UK (REF 2014).

Give Your Career An Edge

This distinctive and specialist postgraduate course incorporates professional training and advanced study in psychological research and is designed to make you as employable as possible.

We provide you with an authentic learning experience, enabling you to work in a professional research environment. You will have the invaluable opportunity to work on a research placement with an academic researcher from the Department of Psychology, collaborating with this member of staff, their research partners and research groups to design, develop and implement a research project based on shared interests and enabling you to gain the applied research and team working skills that are desired by employers in the sector.

Your Future

The MRes Psychology provides you with the advanced research experience, critical knowledge and transferable skills to enable you to plan, execute, analyse and disseminate high-quality psychological research.

You will graduate as a trained psychological researcher fit for employment in professional research settings, enterprising and entrepreneurial activity or further study. Many of our previous graduates have continued to build on their research interests by going on to PhDs in psychological research or applied psychology, whilst others have worked as assistant psychologists or followed careers in the NHS.

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Would you like to improve your career prospects, start your own business or develop further specialist design skills?. Read more
Would you like to improve your career prospects, start your own business or develop further specialist design skills?

Offering the perfect blend of theory and practice in the context of business and society, the MA Design course will enable you to focus on your own specialist area of design practice, in disciplines such as 3D design, fashion communication, fashion design, fashion marketing, graphic design, communication design, service design, interaction design, industrial design, interior design, 3D design and transportation design.

Developed specifically for those with a design background or relevant qualification, you will undertake a series of taught modules to develop your knowledge and practical skills, before competing a final project or thesis around your chosen specialism.

In addition to the taught aspect of this course, you will also have the opportunity to undertake a series of collaborative projects with industry and, where possible, field trips to collaborative companies or exhibitions to further enhance your learning experience.

Learn From The Best

Our academic team is made up of research-active experts with extensive knowledge of the design industry. This knowledge is integrated into all aspects of their teaching to ensure that all content within this course is relevant to the workplace and current and emerging trends.

All staff within this department have a strong commitment to developing your skills and knowledge by developing your critical thinking and your ability to apply your skills to complex real-world problems.

They will be there to support you through every step of your course, ensuring you leave with confidence and full understanding of all aspects of this dynamic industry.

In addition to our teaching staff, you will also have access to specialist communities of practice that will provide the foundation for your learning journey through research networks and cross-organisational collaboration. These communities will focus on strategic innovation, performance products and service design.

Teaching And Assessment

This MA Design course incorporates practice-based learning that is informed by contemporary and contextual influences and founded on your own personal aims and professional direction.

The first two semesters of this course will focus on developing your core skills through the completion of four modules: design thinking, design practice, direction and experimentation.

Teaching is delivered via a mix of lectures, seminars and tutorials, which are assessed by coursework and design projects. You will also undertake collaborative projects and, where possible, field trips to allow you to put your skills into practise in a real-world context.

Upon completion of the taught modules, you will undertake a final project or thesis to demonstrate all of the skills you have acquired on this course. This will be undertaken under the supervision of your dedicated tutor who will provide advice and guidance at all stages.

Module Overview
DE7001 - Design Thinking (Core, 30 Credits)
DE7002 - Design Process (Core, 30 Credits)
DE7003 - Project / Thesis (Core, 60 Credits)
DE7004 - Design Practice 1: Professional Direction (Core, 30 Credits)
DE7005 - Design Practice 2 : Experimentation (Core, 30 Credits)
EF0126 - E.S.A.P. in FADSS Level 7 (Optional, 0 Credits)

Learning Environment

This course is delivered at the Northumbria School of Design, which is located at City Campus East – a dedicated learning space that is located within Newcastle city centre.

Throughout the duration of your course you will have access to state-of-the-art facilities such as our University library – which is ranked in the top three in the UK – and well equipped working space, The Hub, which is open 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Your learning experience will be enhanced though the use of technology and learning materials such as module guides, assessment information, lecture presentation slides and reading lists will be available via our innovative e-learning platform, Blackboard. You can also access student support and other key University systems through your personal account.

Research-Rich Learning

The MA Design course is taught by our team of research-active academics who incorporate their individual areas of specialism into the course’s contextual modules to ensure they reflect the realities of the design industry and today’s modern working environment.

The development of your own research skills is at the core of the MA Design course and you will develop research-informed methods of understanding the complexity inherent in real-world situations. These methods will enable you to make better decisions, advance the field of your practice and add new knowledge that will help you perfect your skills in your own particular discipline.

Supported by subject specialists and industry networks, you will also have the opportunity to join an expert-led community of practice in strategic design and innovation, performance product design or service design, as well as engaging with traditional disciplines such as fashion and industrial design.

Give Your Career An Edge

This course will allow you to enhance your practical skills and knowledge in a specialist area of design.

You will work on live industry projects that will enhance your CV and personal development through collaboration with those currently working within this dynamic industry. Some of the recent examples of industry projects include work on oral healthcare with Procter and Gamble, wearable technology projects with the CPI National Centre for Printable Electronics, person-centred healthcare services with the Academic Health Science Network and the development of innovative kitchenware with Lakeland.

You will also develop your business and employability skills, in addition to achieving a master’s level qualification in this discipline.

Your Future

Once you have completed the MA Design course you will possess the skills and ability to make an impact in the design industry, whether you are just starting out in your career or looking to enhance your professional development.

This course will prepare you for broad range of jobs within design companies, private organisations and the public sector, in addition to specialist jobs within your chosen specialism.

Completion may enhance promotion prospects in some professions, in addition to providing enhanced opportunities for management level roles.

This course will also provide you with the knowledge and experience to be able to set up your very own design company, in addition to providing a strong foundation for progression to PhD studies.

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This two year course uniquely combines a professional course; that is, an ARB/RIBA Part 2 course with a Cambridge Master’s degree in Philosophy. Read more
This two year course uniquely combines a professional course; that is, an ARB/RIBA Part 2 course with a Cambridge Master’s degree in Philosophy. It provides advanced teaching, research and practice opportunities in environmental design, including the social, political, historical, theoretical and economic aspects of architecture, cities and the global environment.

The course is a hybrid of independent research through design and a structured technical learning resource. It is designed for mature students that join the program with a distinct area of interest and provides guidelines to their scientific research, access to specialists of various fields relevant to their studies, and a matrix of deliverables that foster an informed body of work underpinned by a sophisticated set of design and presentation techniques.

The main outcome is a design thesis consisting of a detailed design proposition, supported by a written argument of up to 15,000 words. This is preceded by four essays or design exercises equivalent of 3,000 - 5,000 words. The course is closely connected with research interests within the Department’s Martin Centre for Architectural and Urban Studies. A number of the academics and researchers teach and supervise on the course.

Key benefits

- In the 2014 Research Excellent Framework, Cambridge Architecture’s research work was ranked 1st in the UK, achieving the highest proportion of combined World Leading research. 88% of the research produced by the Department was rated as World Leading or Internationally Excellent (Unit of Assessment 16: Architecture, Built Environment and Planning). This consolidates our top ranking established in the previous Research Assessment Exercise of 2008.

- Ranked 1st for Architecture by the Guardian's 2015 University Guide.

Visit the website: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/aharmpaud

Course detail

The programme propagates a twofold understanding of environmental design and mediates between its technical/architectural, and social/political aspects. Both trajectories are studied within a specific geographic area/region, its local set of conditions and global entanglements setting the parameters for each student’s research. Based on the area/region’s characteristics, students speculate on the expansion and adaptation of one of its specific traits and its environmental performance. The outcome of this first part of the course is an experimental adaptation of an indigenous typology, producing a speculative environmental prototype. This prototype is examined scientifically and tectonically, using real and virtual modelling alongside various other media and serves a particular demand and a specific set of site conditions. Complementing this tectonic first part, the design direction of the second part of the course is broader in scale and highly speculative in nature. It draws upon the technical findings of the initial research, but focuses on the socio-political conditions and cultural traditions shaping the area of focus in order to build a set of far-reaching proposals. Together, both parts of this research through design result in a heightened understanding of the performance/efficiency/specificity of a certain environmental issue and the environment it is embedded in.

Format

The course is structured by two terms focusing on design and detailed technical analysis (residence in Cambridge), an interim field work period (elsewhere), and a third term focusing on regional analysis/research (residence in Cambridge). These complementary term components, together with the practice placement, provide an opportunity to explore distinct interests within design practice in various settings, whilst offering a sound framework to pursue meaningful research.

Candidates are free to choose a geographic area/region of their interest that frames their study throughout the programme. Following an initial familiarization with their chosen specific locality and a global assessment of the given environment at hand, students are expected to identify a technical/architectural issue that is indigenous or characteristic to the area/region of interest and holds potential to develop.

The focus shall be primarily with issues of contemporary construction, not excluding the consideration of historical or traditional building methods that are still prevalent. More generally, candidates develop an understanding of the complexity of environments and their various aspects being inseparable from, and integrated with each other. More importantly, however, students will develop highly particular areas of expertise that they may draw on for the remainder of the course.

The programme positively encourages students to develop complex architectural proposals that meet RIBA/ARB criteria for Part II exemption and to acquire knowledge and develop and apply research skills in the following areas:

- role of environmental and socio-political issues in architecture and urban design
- The wider environmental, historical, socio-cultural and economic context related to architecture and cities
- The building science and socio-political theories associated with architecture and urban design
- Modelling and assessment of building and urban design
- Monitoring and surveying of buildings and urban environments
- Human behaviour, perception and comfort, and their role in building and urban characteristics
- Research methods and their application through academic and design methods.

In so doing, the candidates develop the following skills:

Intellectual Skills

- Reason critically and analytically
- Apply techniques and knowledge appropriately
- Identify and solve problems
- Demonstrate independence of mind

Research Skills

- Identify key knowledge gaps and research questions
- Retrieve, assess and identify information from a wide range of sources
- Plan, develop and apply research methods
- Apply key techniques and analytical skills to a new context
- Report clearly, accurately and eloquently on findings

Transferable Skills

- Communicate concepts effectively orally, visually and in writing
- Manage time and structure work
- Work effectively with others
- Work independently
- Retrieve information efficiently
- Assimilate, assess and represent existing knowledge and ideas

Assessment

The design thesis represents 60% of the overall mark and consists of a:

- written dissertation of not more than 15,000 words (20%). The word count includes footnotes but excludes the bibliography. Any appendices will require the formal permission of your Supervisor who may consult the Degree Committee. Students submit two hard copies and one electronic copy of their thesis for examination at the end of May.

- design project (40%) submitted for examination at the end of July in hard and electronic copy.

Candidates present their design thesis to examiners at an Exam Board held at the end of the second year. Students must remain in or be prepared to return to Cambridge to attend the examination.

- Four essays or equivalent exercises of 3,000 - 5,000 words, including footnotes/endnotes but excluding the bibliography, on topics approved by the Course Directors will be presented for examination. The first three of these essays are submitted during Year 1; one at the beginning of the Lent (Spring) Term and two at the beginning of the Easter (Summer) Term. The remaining essay is submitted at the beginning of the Easter (Summer) Term in Year 2.

The first essay constitutes an essay or equivalent (5%) and an oral presentation (5%), the second is a pilot study (10%) and the third is a design submission (10%). The final essay is a project realisation essay (10%).

- The course requires regular written, visual and oral presentations in the Studio. Effective communication of research findings and design concepts are an important criterion in all areas of the students' work, and assessed at all stages.

- A logbook of work and research carried out during the fieldwork period will be presented at the beginning of the Easter Term of Year 2 for assessment. The logbook is not awarded a mark.

Continuing

To continue to read for the PhD degree following the course, MPhil in Architecture & Urban Design students must achieve an overall average score of at least 70%. Continuation is also subject to Faculty approval of the proposed research proposal, and, the availability of an appropriate supervisor.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

Candidates for this course (which is not considered to be a 'research track' masters course) who are considered 'Home' for fees purposes are not eligible for most funding competitions managed by the University. Home students usually fund themselves and take out a loan from the Student Loans Company (see: http://www.slc.co.uk/).

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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The School of Media, Art and Design is delighted to offer a new MA by Research with a range of exciting specialisms. Read more
The School of Media, Art and Design is delighted to offer a new MA by Research with a range of exciting specialisms. As a postgraduate MA student enrolled on this programme you will join a department with over thirty years of experience delivering excellent teaching and learning, research and knowledge exchange, and award-winning professional practice. You will join a vibrant community of researchers and practitioners and play a role in contributing to the culture of research and practice-based research that exists within the department.

Visit the website: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/courses/postgraduate/media-art-and-design-by-research.aspx

Course detail

The MA by Research in Media, Art and Design provides the opportunity to undertake a supervised programme of independent study and practice in a structured and supportive environment. The programme may be undertaken either full time over one year, or part time over two years.

Suitability

This MA by Research is open to anyone who can satisfy the entry requirements. Individuals who would like to develop their research skills to a higher standard, whether they are using traditional research methods or practice-based research approaches, are particularly encouraged to apply. The MA by Research is offered both full-time and part-time, and given the emphasis placed on independent research, the course is well suited to graduates looking to continue their educational journey in a flexible fashion. The MA by Research is also a proven, and important developmental stepping-stone towards doctoral study.

Content

The MA by Research in Media, Art and Design is not a taught MA, and therefore there are no modules offered. Instead, the individual defines their own set of research questions in conversation with their supervisory team. The range of subjects available for students to research is necessarily constrained by the range of specialisms offered by the supervisors within the School. Areas of specialism include:

• Animation
• Applied Art
• Cultural Studies
• Digital Media
• Film
• Fine Art
• Graphic Design
• Journalism
• Media and Communications
• Media Studies
• Photography
• Radio
• Television
• Web Design

Format

Students are supported principally through regular tutorials from a specialist supervisor. All supervisors are members of staff within the School of Media, Art and Design who have significant research experience and have been granted supervisor status by the Graduate School. A supervisor will help the student adopting the traditional research mode to frame the research topic and provide ongoing guidance about carrying out secondary and primary research and writing up the findings.

A supervisor will help the student adopting the practice ­based mode to devise and produce their project and to set it within a critical framework. Face­to­face supervisions will take place on a regular basis during term time, and supplemented by telephone, email and Skype guidance as needed. The schedule of supervisions will be agreed by negotiation between the supervisor and the student. Tutorials can be scheduled around a student’s other commitments and meaningful distance learning can be facilitated. Work­in­progress is reviewed by a panel of supervisors half way through the registration period. Following advice from this review students complete their theses or projects.

One of the few fixed commitments is the integral research seminar programme, which MA by Research students are required to attend, typically one afternoon each fortnight through October - June. The seminar programme is built around the department’s own research seminar series and is designed to integrate the student body by addressing issues of common interest, such as aesthetics, genre, form etc. Some seminar presentations will be tutor-led, others student-led. Every Masters student will be expected to deliver a research paper during the seminar programme. Students choosing the practice ­based mode will be expected to present work-in-progress for group critique.

Students choosing the practice­based mode will have access to the department’s extensive range of specialist equipment, which they will be able to book, and to its specialist facilities at times that they are not in use for taught classes.

Assessment

The MA by Research in Media, Art and Design is offered via two modes:

A traditional research mode that consists of supervised academic study culminating in the submission of a thesis of 25,000­-30,000 words.

A practice­based mode that consists of supervised work on a body of creative practice that culminates in the submission of a project or portfolio equivalent to 20,000-25,000 words, together with a reflective analysis of no less than 5,000 words and no more than 10,000. The combined word count equivalent for a practice-based submission should not exceed 25,000-30,000 words.

The MA by Research is assessed using the Graduate School’s validated doctoral framework, which means that MA by Research students produce a single thesis (whether written or comprising both practice-based and written elements) that will be submitted at the end of their study. The thesis will then be examined both internally and externally and four possible outcomes will be achieved: Pass, Pass with Minor Corrections, Pass with Major Corrections, and Fail.

What can I do next?

The programme leads to a significant qualification in its own right but could also fast­track successful applicants to MPhil and ultimately to PhD qualifications.

The skills and specialist period knowledge developed during the programme provide additional grounding for careers in media, art and design.

How to apply

For information on how to apply, please follow this link: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/how-to-apply/how-to-apply.aspx

Funding

-Masters Loans-

From 2016/17 government loans of up to £10,000 are available for postgraduate Masters study. The loans will be paid directly to students by the Student Loans Company and will be subject to both personal and course eligibility criteria.

For more information available here: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/funding-your-degree/funding-your-postgraduate-degree.aspx

-2017/18 Entry Financial Support-

Information on alternative funding sources is available here: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/funding-your-degree/2017-18-entry-financial-support.aspx

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The Aircraft Design option of the MSc in Aerospace Vehicle Design (AVD) aims to provide a comprehensive overview of aircraft performance, structures and systems. Read more

Course Description

The Aircraft Design option of the MSc in Aerospace Vehicle Design (AVD) aims to provide a comprehensive overview of aircraft performance, structures and systems. A holistic teaching approach is taken to explore how the individual elements of an aircraft can be designed and integrated using up-to-date methods and techniques. You will learn to understand how to select specific systems such as fuel systems, and their effect on the aircraft as a whole.
This course is suitable for students with a background in aeronautical or mechanical engineering or those with relevant industrial experience.

Overview

Modern aircraft design focuses on the integration of new technologies and systems, with current and advanced configurations to lead us towards environmentally friendly and cost effective aviation in the civil arena and high performance and effective aviation in the military arena. This includes new structures, materials and manufacturing processes. New aircraft design is essential to address issues such as carbon footprint reduction, lower noise pollution and improved passenger comfort as well as contributing to national security.

Our work in this field covers all flying vehicles including civil and military aircraft, helicopters, Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Systems (UAVS), ultra-high capacity airlines and space vehicles. Current research being undertaken includes:

Advanced Configurations – such as blended wing and morphing wing aircraft design. This includes both fixed wing and rotorcraft vehicles.

Advanced Systems Integration – such as Distributed Propulsion using hydrogen or alternative fuels for power and high temperature superconducting materials technology.

Advanced Materials and Manufacturing Processes – exploring the benefits achieved through the application of advanced composite materials.

Advanced Design Methodologies – developing techniques to ensure that optimum designs are achieved.

Airworthiness Compliance – ensuring new designs demonstrate the same safety requirements as traditional aircraft.

Operational Aspects – cost, performance, reliability and maintainability are important features of aircraft design as well as advanced techniques such as Integrated Vehicle Health Management (IVHM). Vulnerability and susceptibility also have a major impact.

Biomimetics – taking lessons from nature for example insects and birds, and their application in aviation such as launch, recovery and flight.

English Language Requirements

If you are an international student you will need to provide evidence that you have achieved a satisfactory test result in an English qualification. The minimum standard expected from a number of accepted courses are as follows:

IELTS - 6.5
TOEFL - 92
Pearson PTE Academic - 65
Cambridge English Scale - 180
Cambridge English: Advanced - C
Cambridge English: Proficiency - C

In addition to these minimum scores you are also expected to achieve a balanced score across all elements of the test. We reserve the right to reject any test score if any one element of the test score is too low.

We can only accept tests taken within two years of your registration date (with the exception of Cambridge English tests which have no expiry date).

Structure

The Aircraft Design option consists of a taught component, a group design project and an individual research project.

In addition to management, communication, team work and research skills, each student will attain at least the following outcomes from this degree course:

•To build upon knowledge to enable students to enter a wide range of aerospace and related activities concerned with the design of flying vehicles such as aircraft, missiles, airships and spacecraft
•To ensure that the student is of immediate use to their employer and has sufficient breadth of understanding of multi-discipline design to position them for accelerated career progression
•To provide teaching that integrates the range of disciplines required by modern aircraft design
•To provide the opportunity for students to be immersed in a 'Virtual Industrial Environment' giving them hands-on experience of interacting with and working on an aircraft design project

Modules

The taught programme for the Aircraft Design masters is generally delivered from October to March. As well as completing the 12 compulsory taught modules, students have an extensive choice of optional modules to match their specific interests.

Core:
- Airframe System Design
- Design and Analysis of Composite Structures
- Initial Aircraft Design (including Structural Layout)
- Loading Actions
- Aircraft Stability and Control
- Aircraft Performance
- Design for Manufacture and Operation
- Fatigue Fracture Mechanics and Damage Tolerance
- Aeroelasticity
- Reliability, Safety Assessment and Certification
- Flight Experimental Methods (Jetstream Flight Labs)
- Detail Stressing

Optional:
- Computing Aided Design (CATIA)
- Aircraft Aerodynamics
- Structural Dynamics
- Structural Stability
- Aircraft Accident Investigation
- Aircraft Power Plant Installation
- Avionic System Design
- Aerospace System Development and Life Cycle Model
- Integrated Vehicle Health Management
- Sustaining Design (Structural Durability)
- Finite Element Analysis (including NASTRAN/PATRAN Workshops)
- Crashworthiness

Individual Project

The individual research project aims to provide the training necessary for you to apply knowledge from the taught element to research, and takes place from March to September. The project may be theoretical and/or experimental and drawn from a range of topics related to the course and suggested by teaching staff, your employer or focused on your own area of interest.

Recent Individual Research Projects include:
- Ultra Long Range Science UAV Structure / Systems Development
- Conceptual Design of a Hypersonic Space Launcher and Global Transportation System
- Effect of Aerodynamics on the Conceptual Design of Blended Wing Body Aircraft
- Review, Evaluation and Development of a Microlight Aircraft
- Feasibility of the Application of Low Cost Scaled Aircraft Demonstrators.

Group Project

The extensive group design project is a distinctive and unique feature of this course. This teamwork project takes place from October to March, and recreates a virtual industrial environment bringing together students with various experience levels and different nationalities into one integrated design team.

Each team member is given responsibility for the detailed design of a significant part of the aircraft, for example, forward fuselage, fuel system, or navigation system. The project will progress from the conceptual phase through to the preliminary and detail design phases. You will be required to run project meetings, produce engineering drawings and detailed analyses of your design. Problem solving and project coordination must be undertaken on a team and individual basis. At the end of the project, groups are required to report and present findings to a panel of 200 senior engineers from industry.

This element of the course is both realistic and engaging, and places the student group in a professional role as aerospace design engineers. Students testify that working as an integrated team on real problems is invaluable and prepares them well for careers in a highly competitive industry.

Assessment

The taught modules (10%) are assessed by an examination and/or assignment. The Group Project (50%) is assessed by a written technical report and oral presentations. The Individual Research Project (40%) forms the remainder of the course.

Career opportunities

The MSc in Aircraft Design is valued and respected by employers worldwide. The applied nature of this course ensures that our graduates are ready to be of immediate use to their future employer and has provided sufficient breadth of understanding of multi-discipline design to position them for accelerated career progression.

This course prepares graduates for careers as project design engineers, systems design, structural design or avionic engineers in aerospace or related industries, with the aim of progressing to technical management/chief engineer. Graduates from the MSc in Aircraft Design can therefore look forward to a varied choice of challenging career opportunities in the above disciplines.

Many of our graduates occupy very senior positions in their organisations, making valuable contributions to the international aerospace industry. Typical student destinations include BAE Systems, Airbus, Dassault and Rolls-Royce.

For further information

on this course, please visit our course webpage http://www.cranfield.ac.uk/Courses/Masters/AVD-Option-Aircraft-Design

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Do you have a keen interest in the value of creativity and design and how this can best be used as a strategic tool for organisations?. Read more
Do you have a keen interest in the value of creativity and design and how this can best be used as a strategic tool for organisations?

The MA Design Management course will allow you to harness the power of design and innovation in a corporate context.

Offering industry engagement in fashion management or design strategy and innovation, you will develop transferrable design knowledge that will enable you to recognise the value of design and provide effective leadership and management within this sector. You will also have the opportunity to undertake a series of collaborative projects with third parties or organisations currently working within this industry.

On completion of this course you will leave with an in-depth understanding of how design can contribute to leadership, sustainability and business or social innovation, in addition to possessing the necessary skills to build and manage organisational growth through the development and launch of new products, services and brands.

This course has several available start dates and study methods - for more information, please view the relevant web-page:
January full time - https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/study-at-northumbria/courses/design-management-ma-dtfdmf6/

September distance learning - https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/study-at-northumbria/courses/design-management-dl-sept-dtddmt6/

January distance learning - https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/study-at-northumbria/courses/design-management-dl-jan-dtddmf6/

Learn From The Best

Our academic team is made up of research-active experts with extensive knowledge of the design industry. This knowledge is integrated into all aspects of their teaching to ensure that all content within this course is relevant to the workplace and current and emerging trends.

All staff within this department have a strong commitment to developing your skills and knowledge by developing your critical thinking and your ability to apply your skills to complex real-world problems.

They will be there to support you through every step of your course, ensuring you leave with confidence and full understanding of all aspects of this dynamic industry.

In addition to our teaching staff, you will also have access to specialist communities of practice that will provide the foundation for your learning journey through research networks and cross-organisational collaboration. These communities will provide industry engagement in design strategy and innovation or fashion management.

Teaching And Assessment

The MA Design Management course incorporates learning through investigation and the application of design methods in a business context.

The theory-based aspect of the course covers essential elements such as creative thinking, intellectual property, inter-cultural communication, research principles, reflective practice, contemporary influences and commercialisation.

These contextual modules provide the perfect foundation for the remainder of your degree, which develop your understanding the field of design management.

Teaching is delivered via a mix of lectures, seminars and tutorials, which are assessed by coursework and design projects. You will also have the opportunity to participate in collaborative projects and, where possible, field trips to allow you to put your skills into practise in a real-world context.

Upon completion of the taught modules, you will undertake research report under the supervision of your dedicated tutor who will provide advice and guidance at all stages.

Module Overview
DE7001 - Design Thinking (Core, 30 Credits)
DE7002 - Design Process (Core, 30 Credits)
DE7003 - Project / Thesis (Optional, 60 Credits)
DE7003 - Project / Thesis (Core, 60 Credits)
DE7006 - Design Management 1: Articulating Design Value (Core, 30 Credits)
DE7007 - Design Management 2: Strategy (Core, 30 Credits)
EF0126 - E.S.A.P. in FADSS Level 7 (Optional, 0 Credits)

Learning Environment

This course is delivered at the Northumbria School of Design, which is located at City Campus East – a dedicated learning space that is located within Newcastle city centre.

Throughout the duration of your course you will have access to state-of-the-art facilities such as our University library – which is ranked in the top three in the UK – and well equipped working space, The Hub, which is open 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Your learning experience will be enhanced though the use of technology and learning materials such as module guides, assessment information, lecture presentation slides and reading lists will be available via our innovative e-learning platform, Blackboard. You can also access student support and other key University systems through your personal account.

Research-Rich Learning

The MA Design Management course is taught by our team of research-active academics who incorporate their individual areas of specialism into the course’s contextual modules to ensure they reflect the realities of the design industry and today’s modern working environment.

The development of your own research skills is at the core of the MA Design Management course content and you will develop research-informed methods of understanding the complexity inherent in real-world situations. These methods will enable you to make better decisions, advance the field of your practice and add new knowledge that will help you perfect your skills in your own particular discipline.

Supported by subject specialists and industry networks, you will also have the opportunity to join an expert-led community of practice in focussed on design strategy or fashion management to further enhance your learning experience.

Give Your Career An Edge

The MA Design Management course will allow you to develop your leadership skills and understanding of how design can be utilised by businesses to enhance opportunities and facilitate growth.

You will engage with industrial multidisciplinary projects based on real life situations, allowing you to enhance your CV and personal development through collaboration with those currently working within this dynamic industry. Some of the recent examples of industry projects include work on oral healthcare with Procter and Gamble, wearable technology projects with the CPI National Centre for Printable Electronics, person-centred healthcare services with the Academic Health Science Network and the development of innovative kitchenware with Lakeland.

You will also develop your business and employability skills, in addition to achieving a master’s level qualification in this discipline.

Your Future

Once you have completed the MA Design Management course you will possess an in-depth understanding of how to harness the power of design within a corporate context. You will also be suitably qualified to take on managerial and leadership roles within the design sector.

This course will prepare you for broad range of jobs within design companies, private organisations and the public sector, in addition to specialist jobs within your chosen specialism. Completion may also enhance promotion prospects in some professions.

This course will also provide you with a strong foundation for progression to PhD studies.

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Our unique MSc Research Methods in Psychology programme allows you to study theory while benefitting from hands-on research experience. Read more