• Northumbria University Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Bristol Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Leeds Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Derby Online Learning Featured Masters Courses
  • Aberystwyth University Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Edinburgh Featured Masters Courses
  • Jacobs University Bremen gGmbH Featured Masters Courses

Postgrad LIVE! Study Fair

Birmingham | Bristol | Sheffield | Liverpool | Edinburgh

Nottingham Trent University Featured Masters Courses
University of Bedfordshire Featured Masters Courses
Durham University Featured Masters Courses
Nottingham Trent University Featured Masters Courses
London School of Economics and Political Science Featured Masters Courses
"democratisation"×
0 miles

Masters Degrees (Democratisation)

We have 64 Masters Degrees (Democratisation)

  • "democratisation" ×
  • clear all
Showing 1 to 15 of 64
Order by 
Modern democracies are increasingly shaped by the relationships between politicians, mass media and citizens. This interdisciplinary programme applies ideas from a range of approaches to give you an insight into the context and production of political journalism and communication. Read more

Modern democracies are increasingly shaped by the relationships between politicians, mass media and citizens. This interdisciplinary programme applies ideas from a range of approaches to give you an insight into the context and production of political journalism and communication.

Core modules will introduce you to political communication in established and emerging democracies worldwide, exploring the ethics and power dynamics at play. You’ll ask questions around media freedom, the responsibilities of journalists, ‘spin doctors’, the impact of emerging technologies and whether elections really are decided on TV.

You’ll also tailor the programme to suit your personal and career interests, choosing from optional modules on topics such as digital media, PR and the role of the media in democratisation. Supported by our Media Industries Research Centre, leading researchers and experienced practitioners, you’ll be well equipped for a career in this challenging field.

Our School has a range of fantastic facilities to support your studies. The 58-seat Phil Taylor Cinema is equipped with Dolby Digital sound and high-definition projection facilities, as well as projectors for 16mm and 35mm film.

You can also work on your own projects in our 44 editing suites, equipped with Avid Media Composer editing software and Adobe Creative Cloud. The fully equipped TV studio also has a large green screen area, lighting and photo-flash facilities. We also have a track and dolly, sliders, Glidecam and various cranes, and you’ll have access to a new photographic dark room.

We also run a loans service where you can borrow a range of HD digital camcorders and various Canon stills cameras to help with your project work.

Course content

Throughout the year you’ll study two core modules that cover the foundations of the programme, exploring the role of communications in contemporary politics.

You’ll look at different models of contemporary democracy and compare the relations between political actors, the media and citizens. From there you’ll move onto recent innovations sparked by cultural, technological and political change. With this in mind, you’ll then design a political campaign that incorporates some of these developments.

On top of this, you’ll build specialist knowledge through your choice of optional modules. These vary every year, but can include topics such as television narrative, media and globalisation, urban narratives, and media and democratisation. The optional modules allow you to focus on topics that suit your own interests or perhaps reflect your career plans.

Throughout the year, you’ll also be preparing for your dissertation through the Dissertation and Research Methods module. Your dissertation is a major independent research project on a topic of your choice, which you submit at the end of the year.

If you choose to study part-time, you’ll complete the MA over two years, instead of one, taking fewer modules each year.

Course structure

These are typical modules/components studied and may change from time to time. Read more in our Terms and conditions.

Compulsory modules

  • Dissertation and Research Methods 60 credits
  • Innovations in Political Communication 30 credits
  • Politics and the Media 30 credits

Optional modules

  • Technology, Media and Critical Literacy 30 credits
  • Communication and International Affairs 30 credits
  • Feminism, Identity and Media 30 credits
  • Media, Culture and Globalisation 30 credits
  • The Media and Democratisation: Global Perspectives 30 credits
  • Communication and Public Opinion 30 credits
  • Multimedia Journalism 30 credits
  • Communication and Development 30 credits
  • The Cultural History of Promotional Communication 30 credits
  • Identity, Culture and Technology 30 credits
  • Rhetoric and Public Speaking 15 credits
  • Managing Business Across Cultures 15 credits
  • International Organisations: Context, Theory and Practice 15 credits
  • Writing for Professional Purposes 15 credits
  • 'Race', Identity and Culture in the Black Atlantic 30 credits
  • Researching Inequality in the Media 30 credits
  • Reality TV: Truth or Fiction?30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Political Communication MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Political Communication MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

MA modules will use a range of teaching and learning methods including lectures, group learning and project work, seminars, tutorials and workshops. Independent study is also crucial to this degree, as an opportunity to deepen your knowledge of the subjects introduced in lectures and seminars, and to develop your skills in analysis and research. You should anticipate spending at least 20 hours per week on independent study associated with your modules.

Assessment

Assessments also take different forms so you can develop diverse skills. These are likely to include essays and exams as well as group presentations, projects and reports, as well as campaign analyses and case studies.

Career opportunities

This programme isn’t a practical training course, but it does give you an in-depth understanding of the role and importance of political communication – a sector which is constantly growing.

Our graduates have entered a wide range of related careers in political journalism, government communications, communications analysis and advisory roles for political parties. Others have gone on to work for international organisations and pressure groups.

You’ll also be prepared to continue with further research at PhD level and pursue an academic career.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



Read less
If you are interested in contemporary European affairs such as nationalism, security, governance and policymaking, democratisation in Eastern Europe and the external relations of the EU, you will enjoy this course's attention to themes such as nationalism and citizenship, integration, transition and security. Read more

Why take this course?

If you are interested in contemporary European affairs such as nationalism, security, governance and policymaking, democratisation in Eastern Europe and the external relations of the EU, you will enjoy this course's attention to themes such as nationalism and citizenship, integration, transition and security. The course is very much informed by research undertaken in the highly regarded Centre for European and International Studies Research, which was rated in the top 4 universities in the UK for research power in Area Studies in REF2014.

We are the only university in the UK that offers an internship with the BBC Afrique World Service in Senegal. This opportunity is available to students with French language skills on MA International Relations or MA European Politics.

What will I experience?

On this course you can:

Enhance your employability by extending your area of expertise beyond that of your first degree
Deepen your existing knowledge of European Studies and specialise in particular areas such as security or policymaking
Make yourself stand out in an increasingly competitive job market by acquiring skills which show an ability to research independently and study a contemporary topic at an advanced level
Go on to more advanced research and doctoral study

What opportunities might it lead to?

This course provides an excellent basis for careers where a knowledge of European affairs is required, and provides advanced training in a range of transferable skills.

Former students have gone on to work in various areas including:

Local government
The UK civil service
Foreign government and European institutions
Teaching and further research

Module Details

The units on the course are designed to provide a wide range of approaches to the study of Europe. The interdisciplinary nature of the degree means that students can combine political and contemporary history perspectives with those from international relations and area studies. While students can choose to specialise in the study of the EU the course also encourages the study of Europe in its wider sense including the former Soviet Union and Europe’s relations with the wider world.


The structure of core units and options on the degree is designed to maximise the ability of students to fashion a course which best suits their needs and interests. For example, if you wish you can choose to specialise in the area of European politics and governance or you can concentrate on Europe’s external relations and foreign and security perspectives. However, you can also design a more mixed selection.

All students take the following core units:-

Challenges to EU Politics and Governance
Dissertation/Major Project

You will also choose 3 out of the following:-

Europe: Integration and Democratisation
Global Governance
Nation and Identity in Europe
Europe and the World
Negotiation and Lobbying in the EU: A simulation game
Contemporary Security in International Relations: Providers and Challenges
Independent Project
Work-based Learning

Programme Assessment

Teaching is conducted through a combination of lectures and seminars. In addition, you will have access to staff on an individual tutorial basis. You will also be assigned a dissertation supervisor to support you in the research and writing of your dissertation.

Classes are timetabled in the afternoons and evenings. Depending on their option choices part-time students are usually able to structure their course so as to concentrate their studies on one and no more than two afternoons/evenings.

Assessment is normally in the form of an extended essay on a specific topic within a unit, allowing you to specialise on a subject that particularly interests you within the broad topic area of the unit.

Student Destinations

The current processes of enlargement of the EU to the East and the further integration of the EU have meant that more than ever there is a demand for people with an advanced knowledge of European affairs and the workings of the EU. This applies to a whole range of areas such as business, local and central government and international institutions.

This course therefore provides an excellent basis for those seeking careers in such areas where a knowledge of European affairs is required. It can be used by students coming from a different background to gain the necessary expertise in European Studies or it can be used by those with an existing background to deepen their area of expertise with a particular career focus on European affairs in mind.

In addition the course provides advanced training in a range of transferable skills which can be applied in different areas of employment.

Read less
The objective of the course is to develop students' knowledge of international politics with a comprehensive empirical approach to understanding many prominent problems in contemporary world politics, especially topics where domestic and international politics cannot be understood in isolation from each other. Read more
The objective of the course is to develop students' knowledge of international politics with a comprehensive empirical approach to understanding many prominent problems in contemporary world politics, especially topics where domestic and international politics cannot be understood in isolation from each other. These topics include democratisation, international cooperation, development and foreign aid, international conflict as well as the politics of many environmental issues and their implications for the politics of developing countries. Students will also receive training in research methods.

This course aims to provide students with the necessary skills for a range of research-related careers in the fields of applied policy research, business, government, law, media, international aid, and international governmental and non-governmental organizations. It also will provide a solid foundation for progress to research PhDs.

The course is of twelve months duration, on a full time basis. Teachings starts in September and the M.Sc. concludes with the submission of a dissertation the following August.

The M.Sc. course consists of the following modules: International Politics, Democratisation, Development Policy, Principles of Research Design, International Environmental Policy, International Political Economy, International Organisation, International Conflict and Introduction to Quantitative Research Methods. In addition, students will complete a dissertaion of approximately 10,000 words in length. Students who fail to achieve a satisfactory mark for the dissertation element may be eligible for the award of a Postgraduate Diploma in Political Science.

Admission Requirements

Candidates should normally have achieved an upper second class honour degree, or higher from an established university. GPA scores of at least 3.3 out of 4, or equivalent, will be expected from international applicants. A background in a social science will be an advantage but not a necessity. Applications are expected from candidates with a single or joint honours degree in Political Science, Economics, European Studies, History, Sociology, Business and Law.

Applicants must, in addition to the College requirement to provide academic transcripts and two letters of recommendation, provide a motivation letter and one piece of written work (for example an undergraduate dissertation or essay).

Read less
This interdisciplinary course offers you the rare opportunity to study how cultures translate across a wide range of fields. Read more
This interdisciplinary course offers you the rare opportunity to study how cultures translate across a wide range of fields. Critically combining the disciplines of translation and cultural studies, it breaks new ground both practically and theoretically in exploring a variety of different issues across the humanities and social sciences. It gives you the opportunity to shape the emerging field of translating cultures through independent in-depth research, and will appeal if you aspire to work at the cutting edge of debates and practices dealing with cultural interaction and transformation in the contemporary world.

Modules are taught and supervision given by expert staff who are specialists in a number of languages and disciplines, offering you the chance to follow particular themes in areas that most interest you. Recent work by staff includes books and articles on issues in translation, literature, migration, gender, religion, visual culture and museum studies to name a few, in Chinese, French, German, Russian, Spanish and other cultures.

We explicitly welcome applications for collaborative research projects and are happy to exploit our links with public and third sector partners to assist students in developing projects that fit with both the partners’ research needs and the demands and expectations of a Masters dissertation. The student will take the lead in the development of any such collaborative research project, but will be guided and assisted by the supervisory team and, where appropriate, other members of the course team.

Course content

You will take two core modules: Translating Cultures, which establishes frameworks for the close analysis of transcultural and translation concepts; and the Research Dissertation module, which provides training and personal supervision for the writing of an in-depth dissertation on an appropriate topic of your choice. The Research Dissertation module offers you the innovative possibility to develop your research project through an internship with a relevant external organisation. You will also choose an option module that matches your interests from a selection of modules offering advanced study in specialised areas, including translation, intercultural communication, diaspora, cultural identity, globalisation, democratisation and restorative justice. You are encouraged to attend the research seminars in the Faculty of Social Sciences and Humanities, particularly the Translating Cultures series run by the Department of Modern Languages and Cultures, at which visiting speakers, creative practitioners and teaching staff present their current work.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of what you will study on this course.

Core modules
-RESEARCH DISSERTATION
-TRANSLATING CULTURES

Option modules - Choose one from:
-CAPITALISM AND CULTURE
-DEMOCRACY AND ISLAM
-GLOBALISATION, DEMOCRATISATION AND POST-AUTHORITARIAN TRANSITION
-INTERCULTURAL COMMUNICATION
-READING THE NATION
-REPRESENTING WORLD CULTURES
-RESTORATIVE JUSTICE: CULTURES, INTEGRATION AND LAW
-THE CHINESE MEDIA
-TRANSLATION STUDIES

Read less
The media, communications and information landscapes have changed beyond recognition and continue to evolve. This programme will give you an understanding of how messages flow across borders in a globalised world – and how they relate to political, economic and cultural affairs. Read more

The media, communications and information landscapes have changed beyond recognition and continue to evolve. This programme will give you an understanding of how messages flow across borders in a globalised world – and how they relate to political, economic and cultural affairs.

You’ll explore the concept of ‘global media’ and whether mass media inspire or simply report events. You’ll look at the role of social media in communications and how audiences around the world understand and consume global media products.

Core modules will give you the context and theoretical knowledge to consider these questions, and you’ll choose from optional modules to focus on the areas that suit your interests or career aspirations.

You could study war reporting, identity in the media, public relations and more, to gain the skills to thrive in a fast-paced and challenging sector.

Our School has a range of fantastic facilities to support your studies. The 58-seat Phil Taylor Cinema is equipped with Dolby Digital sound and high-definition projection facilities, as well as projectors for 16mm and 35mm film.

You can also work on your own projects in our 44 editing suites, equipped with Avid Media Composer editing software and Adobe Creative Cloud. The fully equipped TV studio also has a large green screen area, lighting and photo-flash facilities. We also have a track and dolly, sliders, Glidecam and various cranes, and you’ll have access to a new photographic dark room.

We also run a loans service where you can borrow a range of HD digital camcorders and various Canon stills cameras to help with your project work.

Course content

You’ll study core modules throughout the course that give you the contextual knowledge and research skills to support your studies.

These will explore the relationships between communications and international systems: how communications networks can function as a source of power, how they are regulated and how new technologies are changing the landscape. You’ll also think about the economic and cultural impacts of globalised communication.

On top of this, you’ll build specialist knowledge through your choice of optional modules. These vary every year, but can include topics such as the media and globalisation, urban narratives, public relations, and media and democratisation. The optional modules allow you to focus on topics that suit your own interests or perhaps reflect your career plans.

Throughout the year, you’ll also be preparing for your dissertation through the Dissertation and Research Methods module. Your dissertation is a major independent research project on a topic of your choice, which you submit at the end of the year.

If you choose to study part-time, you’ll complete the MA over two years, instead of one, taking fewer modules each year.

Course structure

These are typical modules/components studied and may change from time to time. Read more in our Terms and conditions.

Compulsory modules

  • Communication and International Affairs 30 credits
  • Media, Culture and Globalisation 30 credits
  • Dissertation and Research Methods 60 credits

Optional modules

  • Technology, Media and Critical Literacy 30 credits
  • International Film Industries 30 credits
  • The Media and Democratisation: Global Perspectives 30 credits
  • Innovations in Political Communication 30 credits
  • Politics and the Media 30 credits
  • Communication and Public Opinion 30 credits
  • Multimedia Journalism 30 credits
  • Communication and Development 30 credits
  • The Cultural History of Promotional Communication 30 credits
  • Radio Technologies, Industries and Cultures 30 credits
  • Identity, Culture and Technology 30 credits
  • Urban Narratives 30 credits
  • Cultures of Contemporary Photography 30 credits
  • Cinematics and Photography 30 credits
  • Rhetoric and Public Speaking 15 credits
  • Managing Business Across Cultures 15 credits
  • International Organisations: Context, Theory and Practice 15 credits
  • Writing for Professional Purposes 15 credits
  • Critical Debates in Culture and Place 30 credits
  • 'Race', Identity and Culture in the Black Atlantic 30 credits
  • Researching Inequality in the Media 30 credits
  • Reality TV: Truth or Fiction?30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read International Communication MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read International Communication MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

MA modules will use a range of teaching and learning methods including lectures, group learning and project work, seminars, tutorials and workshops. Independent study is also crucial to this degree, as an opportunity to deepen your knowledge of the subjects introduced in lectures and seminars, and to develop your skills in analysis and research. You should anticipate spending at least 20 hours per week on independent study associated with your modules.

Assessment

Assessments can also take a variety of forms depending on the modules you choose. These will include exams and essays as well as group and individual presentations and project work, reports and case studies.

Career opportunities

This programme will give you an in-depth understanding of different aspects of international communication. It will also equip you with sophisticated skills in research, analysis, interpretation and communication. You’ll also have good political, cultural and social awareness, which are valuable in a wide range of sectors and industries.

Graduates have gone onto succeed in roles for a range of international organisations and agencies that have international objectives. Others have launched careers in journalism, with a focus on international affairs – and some also use the programme to prepare for further research at PhD level.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



Read less
This course offers a thorough grounding in journalism studies and introduces debates in the field. It covers a range of topics including the impact of digital technologies on journalism practice and the relationship between journalism and politics. Read more

This course offers a thorough grounding in journalism studies and introduces debates in the field. It covers a range of topics including the impact of digital technologies on journalism practice and the relationship between journalism and politics. You will also be introduced to the practice of research, undertaking an independent research project. You will also have the opportunity to choose optional modules from across the School.

The course is designed to cater for international students who wish to study journalism at MA level, perhaps for the first time, and graduates who have a background in journalism.

Our School has a range of fantastic facilities to support your studies. The 58-seat Phil Taylor Cinema is equipped with Dolby Digital sound and high-definition projection facilities, as well as projectors for 16mm and 35mm film. 

You can also work on your own projects in our 44 editing suites, equipped with Avid Media Composer editing software and Adobe Creative Cloud. The fully equipped TV studio also has a large green screen area, lighting and photo-flash facilities. We also have a track and dolly, sliders, Glidecam and various cranes, and you’ll have access to a new photographic dark room. 

We also run a loans service where you can borrow a range of HD digital camcorders and various Canon stills cameras to help with your project work.

Course content

Core modules will lay the foundations for your understanding of the theory and ongoing research in the world of global journalism, and how journalism shapes – and is shaped by – global political, social, economic and cultural issues. Then you’ll explore how this affects journalistic practice, considering issues like regulation and ethics as you build skills in news research and writing.

On top of this, you’ll build specialist knowledge through your choice of optional modules. These vary every year, but can include topics such as television narrative, media and globalisation, urban narratives, and media and democratisation. The optional modules allow you to focus on topics that suit your own interests or perhaps reflect your career plans.

Throughout the year, you’ll also be preparing for your dissertation through the Dissertation and Research Methods module. Your dissertation is a major independent research project on a topic of your choice, which you submit at the end of the year.

If you choose to study part-time, you’ll complete the MA over two years, instead of one, taking fewer modules each year.

Course structure

These are typical modules/components studied and may change from time to time. Read more in our Terms and conditions.

Compulsory modules

  • Dissertation and Research Methods 60 credits
  • Journalism Theory and Research 30 credits
  • Journalism Practice and Policy 30 credits

Optional modules

  • Technology, Media and Critical Literacy 30 credits
  • Communication and International Affairs 30 credits
  • Feminism, Identity and Media 30 credits
  • Media, Culture and Globalisation 30 credits
  • The Media and Democratisation: Global Perspectives 30 credits
  • Innovations in Political Communication 30 credits
  • Politics and the Media 30 credits
  • Communication and Public Opinion 30 credits
  • Multimedia Journalism 30 credits
  • Communication and Development 30 credits
  • The Cultural History of Promotional Communication 30 credits
  • Radio Technologies, Industries and Cultures 30 credits
  • Identity, Culture and Technology 30 credits
  • Integrated Communication 30 credits
  • Rhetoric and Public Speaking 15 credits
  • Managing Business Across Cultures 15 credits
  • International Organisations: Context, Theory and Practice 15 credits
  • Writing for Professional Purposes 15 credits
  • 'Race', Identity and Culture in the Black Atlantic 30 credits
  • Researching Inequality in the Media 30 credits
  • Reality TV: Truth or Fiction?30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read International Journalism MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read International Journalism MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

MA modules will use a range of teaching and learning methods including lectures, group learning and project work, seminars, tutorials and workshops. Independent study is also crucial to this degree, as an opportunity to deepen your knowledge of the subjects introduced in lectures and seminars, and to develop your skills in analysis and research. You should anticipate spending at least 20 hours per week on independent study associated with your modules.

Assessment

We also use different forms of assessment including essays, exams, news stories and reports. Optional modules may also use methods such as case studies and source analysis, depending on the modules you choose.

Career opportunities

This programme will give you a wide range of knowledge, as well as advanced skills in research, analysis and communication that will serve you well in a wide range of careers.

Graduates have found success in a range of careers. These have included national and international journalism, as well as public relations roles for government, international and not-for-profit organisations.

You’ll also be well prepared to continue with research in this rapidly evolving field at PhD level and in an academic career.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



Read less
This distinctive programme offers an in-depth analysis of this vital region, delivered by an expert academic team. Read more

This distinctive programme offers an in-depth analysis of this vital region, delivered by an expert academic team. You’ll directly address the complex nature of the politics and international relations of the Middle East to gain an oversight of internal dimensions of the region and their links with regional and extra-regional relations.

Covering a range of approaches from Politics, Comparative Politics and International Relations, it addresses the security, economic, identity and political dynamics of the region. The programme will be of interest to you if you’re wishing to study these issues in more depth and to make comparisons across the region.

You’ll benefit from our specific expertise and research interests in a diverse range of areas relating to the Middle East - with particular focus on security issues, regional relations and the interest of the outside powers in the Middle East, as well as our in-depth research and experience in specific sub-regional areas.

Our academics are widely recognised as leading experts in their field. They boast specialisms in a range of areas: the politics of Islamism; the Persian Gulf; the Israel-Palestine conflict; the international organisations of the Middle East; democratisation in the region and issues of terrorism and insurgency. Teaching on the programme draws upon a network of Middle East specialists based at the University. They come from a range of disciplines and participate in the Middle East Research Group (MERG).

Our rich research culture within the School of Politics and International Studies is specifically focused on the Middle East. It also draws on other regions and cross-cutting themes such as the prevalence of authoritarianism and the problems of democratisation, meaning that there is a combination of focus on the Middle East which is also influenced by wider insights and research focus.

Course content

The compulsory modules will give you the opportunity to:

  • gain an advanced understanding of the issues of security, economy and society across the Middle East
  • undertake a comprehensive analysis of the ever-changing dynamics of this complex region
  • examine the pressing contemporary issues facing the Middle East
  • gain an insight into the internal dimensions of the region and their links with regional and extra-regional relations
  • study in-depth the ongoing peace negotiations in Israel-Palestine.

You’ll also be able to hone your research and writing skills in your compulsory dissertation – an independent piece of research on your chosen topic.

The wide-ranging list of optional modules means that you can explore a diverse range of related subjects of interest to you.

Each semester you will take 60 credits amounting to 120 credits across the whole year. In semester one you will study Contemporary Politics of the Middle East and in semester two you will study The Politics of the Israel-Palestine Conflict, along with your chosen optional modules.

If you’re a part-time student, you’ll take one compulsory module and study some optional modules in your first year. You’ll then take the second compulsory module, the dissertation module and other optional modules in your second year to complete your programme.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • Contemporary Politics of the Middle East 30 credits
  • The Politics of the Israel-Palestine Conflict 30 credits
  • POLIS MA Dissertation 60 credits

Optional modules

  • Debating the Middle East: Islam, Politics and Culture 30 credits
  • Conflict, Complex Emergencies and Global Governance 30 credits
  • Contemporary Issues in Nuclear Non-Proliferation and WMD 15 credits
  • Insurgency 15 credits
  • Hezbollah: From Islamic Resistance to Government 15 credits
  • Policing Post-Conflict Cities 15 credits
  • Terrorism 15 credits
  • Counterterrorism 15 credits
  • Theoretical Approaches in International Relations 30 credits
  • Civil War and Intrastate Conflict 30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read International Relations and Politics of the Middle East MA Full Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

Teaching is through a combination of lectures, lively seminar discussions and weekly readings. We expect you to participate fully in taught sessions and to study independently, developing your skills and preparing for lectures and seminars. You’ll also be able to benefit from an impressive range of research talks and seminars led by outside speakers or colleagues from within the department and University.

Assessment

Within modules, assessment consists of a mixture of essays, exams and group presentations. At the end of your studies, a 12,000 word dissertation will allow you to pursue your own research interest under close supervision by one of our expert colleagues.

Career opportunities

The programme is both academically cutting-edge and policy relevant at a time when the Middle East is undergoing radical change. It will produce graduates who are able to fill the growing need for experts on the region in a variety of industries from oil and investment to security and services. The Middle East is a growing market for many firms who all want to understand the risks and opportunities of working in the region better.

There is a growing market from employers for graduates with expertise in Middle Eastern politics, including NGOs and international institutions; ministries of foreign affairs, trade and defence; as well as consultancy and risk-management/analysis firms engaged in the region.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



Read less
This interdisciplinary course offers you the rare opportunity to study how cultures translate across a wide range of fields. Read more
This interdisciplinary course offers you the rare opportunity to study how cultures translate across a wide range of fields. Critically combining the disciplines of translation and cultural studies, it breaks new ground both practically and theoretically in exploring a variety of different issues across the humanities and social sciences. It gives you the opportunity to shape the emerging field of translating cultures through independent in-depth research, and will appeal if you aspire to work at the cutting edge of debates and practices dealing with cultural interaction and transformation in the contemporary world.

Modules are taught and supervision given by expert staff who are specialists in a number of languages and disciplines, offering you the chance to follow particular themes in areas that most interest you. Recent work by staff includes books and articles on issues in translation, literature, migration, gender, religion, visual culture and museum studies to name a few, in Chinese, French, German, Russian, Spanish and other cultures.

We explicitly welcome applications for collaborative research projects and are happy to exploit our links with public and third sector partners to assist students in developing projects that fit with both the partners’ research needs and the demands and expectations of a Masters dissertation. The student will take the lead in the development of any such collaborative research project, but will be guided and assisted by the supervisory team and, where appropriate, other members of the course team.

Course content

You will take two core modules: Translating Cultures, which establishes frameworks for the close analysis of transcultural and translation concepts; and the Research Dissertation module, which provides training and personal supervision for the writing of an in-depth dissertation on an appropriate topic of your choice. The Research Dissertation module offers you the innovative possibility to develop your research project through an internship with a relevant external organisation. You will also choose an option module that matches your interests from a selection of modules offering advanced study in specialised areas, including translation, intercultural communication, diaspora, cultural identity, globalisation, democratisation and restorative justice. You are encouraged to attend the research seminars in the Faculty of Social Sciences and Humanities, particularly the Translating Cultures series run by the Department of Modern Languages and Cultures, at which visiting speakers, creative practitioners and teaching staff present their current work.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of what you will study on this course.

Core modules
-RESEARCH DISSERTATION
-TRANSLATING CULTURES

Option modules - Choose one from:
-CAPITALISM AND CULTURE
-DEMOCRACY AND ISLAM
-GLOBALISATION, DEMOCRATISATION AND POST-AUTHORITARIAN TRANSITION
-INTERCULTURAL COMMUNICATION
-READING THE NATION
-REPRESENTING WORLD CULTURES
-RESTORATIVE JUSTICE: CULTURES, INTEGRATION AND LAW
-THE CHINESE MEDIA
-TRANSLATION STUDIES

Read less
This MRes degree is designed to provide you with an advanced theoretical and practical understanding of policy processes and to offer a grounding in research methods up to PhD level. Read more
This MRes degree is designed to provide you with an advanced theoretical and practical understanding of policy processes and to offer a grounding in research methods up to PhD level. The programme is focused around current debates on policy-making and public management in both developed and developing
countries.

How are policy decisions made and implemented?
What are the implications of adopting an �evidence-based� approach to policy evaluation?
How reliable is the data that comprises most public policy research?
What research methods are appropriate for policy analysis in an environment of cultural diversity and value conflict?
These are the sorts of questions that you will explore in both theoretical and practical terms. If you wish to develop skills in policy analysis and to further a research career in academia, in the civil service or the private and voluntary sectors then this programme is designed with your interests in mind.

This programme is for recent graduates looking for transferable skills relevant to the public, voluntary or private consultancy sectors as well as practitioners looking for enhanced skills and knowledge in public management.

Programme outline
The programme draws on the wide expertise of staff members from across the department. You will take the core modules Theories of the Policy-Making Process, and Quantitative and Qualitative Research Methods. You will also take one further module from the options listed below. You will prepare an independent dissertation between 12,000 to 15,000 words on a public policy topic of your choice. You will be assigned a personal supervisor to give advice and assistance for this part of the programme.

Core modules:

Theories of the Policy-Making process (30 credits)
Qualitative and Quantitative Research Methods (60 credits)
Dissertation (60 credits)
Module options include:

International Public Management
Policy Analysis for the Developing World
Implementation and Evaluation
Case Studies in British Policy Making
Issues in Democratisation
Globalisation and International Political Economy of Development
International Security: War and Peace in a Global Context
Themes and Cases in US Foreign Relations
Sovereignty and Intervention in International Politics
Please note availability of module options are confirmed at the start of the academic year.

Read less
This course offers you an innovative, disciplined and intellectually challenging framework for studying issues and perspectives within international relations. Read more
This course offers you an innovative, disciplined and intellectually challenging framework for studying issues and perspectives within international relations. You will consider various aspects of international order and politics, including the dynamics of international social and political power relationships and conflicts, and state building. These topics are studied comparatively in relation to governmental, political and social processes, and in the contexts of various historical continuities, discontinuities and contrasts.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of what you will study on this course.

Core modules
-BEYOND INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS
-DISSERTATION AND RESEARCH METHODS
-INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS: THEORETICAL PERSPECTIVES

Option modules - You must choose four option modules from the following list (one of your options may be an approved free choice module hosted by another Masters course):
-CONTROVERSIES IN UNITED STATES FOREIGN POLICIES AND PROCESSES
-DEMOCRATIC POLITICS: KEY DEBATES AND ISSUES
-DEVELOPMENT THEORIES, POLICIES AND PRACTICES
-GLOBAL CHANGE: TOWARD A NEW NON-WESTERN ORDER?
-GLOBAL POLITICS OF ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL CHANGE (Subject to approval)
-GLOBALISATION, DEMOCRATISATION AND POST-AUTHORITARIAN TRANSITION
-GOVERNANCE OF THE EUROPEAN UNION
-ISLAM AND POLITICS IN THE MIDDLE EAST
-POLICY, GOVERNANCE AND DEMOCRACY: INTERNATIONAL PERSPECTIVES
-POSTCOLONIAL INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS: THEORIES AND CONCEPTS
-REGIONAL DIMENSIONS OF ENERGY SECURITY (Subject to approval)
-THE EUROPEAN UNION AS AN INTERNATIONAL ACTOR
-THE POLITICS OF GLOBAL COMPLEXITY: RETHINKING GOVERNANCE, POWER AND AGENCY
-THE STATE, POLITICS AND VIOLENCE

Associated careers

This course will provide you with numerous key skills and knowledge that will prepare you for your future career in a variety of different fields. Our graduates hold posts within various international and national government departments and organisations. Many have also gone on to study for Doctorates within the Department and at other universities around the world.

Read less
Interrogate the status quo with leading academics who don’t just talk and write about politics, but actively campaign to create change in the world. Read more

Interrogate the status quo with leading academics who don’t just talk and write about politics, but actively campaign to create change in the world

All around us governments are in crisis, protests are on the increase, dissent and mobilisation is widespread and relayed across the world instantaneously on a screen. Communication is at the very heart of the structures, institutions and actors that give meaning to politics in governments, in parties and on the street. 

The questions we ask

How do we live our politics on a daily basis? Who holds the power to influence political decisions that structure our lives? How might democracy be done better? What is the relationship between politics, the individual, institutions and the media? These are the kinds of questions we’re asking on this programme.

And we take an expansive view, so you’ll learn about politics and communications not just as a singular discipline, but as a subject that’s much more nuanced, moving across everything from governments and parties to NGOs and activists; from economic and environmental policy and conflict representation, to issues of race, gender, social theory and popular culture. 

The processes we use

Alongside traditional lectures and seminars we also do workshops and research exercises to reflect on how political communications are part of the rituals and rhythms of our daily lives and how this is influenced by others.

As part of the programme you may also be tasked with designing and pitching your own political campaign. We use these kinds of exercises because we think it’s only by actively engaging with political communications that we can better understand how it is part of our everyday lives. 

The approach we take

We’re active not passive so this course isn’t just about having our heads in books, it’s about applying ideas to the real world. We’ll expect you to be reading the news every day because we want you to engage with what’s happening and unravel it.

There are also opportunities to interact with industry experts, get involved in live campaigns and collaborate with people coming from all over the world. We pride ourselves on fostering a supportive environment and offering an open door throughout your time with us. At Goldsmiths the conversations are always just starting. 

Modules & structure

The programme’s core curriculum will address a range of contemporary issues, debates and theory in political communication, including work on:

  • comparative media systems
  • theories of communication and democratisation
  • global media, international governance and transnational communication
  • economic, financial and industrial policy
  • digital media and online politics
  • media sociology and news production
  • political parties, party ideologies and party-member dynamics
  • public relations, political marketing and spin
  • government communication systems and media management
  • media audiences, effects and agenda-setting
  • public opinion and public sphere debates
  • interest groups, social movements and alternative media
  • advocacy, civil society and public affairs
  • new technologies and the information society
  • citizenship and public engagement
  • the policy process and government decision-making
  • politics and culture
  • social theories of power, culture and communications

Theory is usually applied to a number of case study areas on, for example: conflict and war; elections; social and environmental debates; foreign affairs; the economy, finance and business; crime and disorder. Theory and discussion is always related to current events and debates.

Structure

The MA in Political Communications is built up of modules that must count up to 180 credits. The programme comprises:

  • Two core modules taught in the Department of Media and Communications (60 credits in total)
  • A research skills module
  • 60 credits' worth of modules chosen from the Department of Politics or Department of Media and Communications. These can be a combination of 30 and 15 credit modules
  • Up to 30 of the 60 credits of options may be chosen from the departments of Sociology, Anthropology, English and Comparative Literature, and the Centre for Cultural Studies

Core modules

We offer a wide range of option modules each year. Please view the website for more information.

Assessment

The MA is assessed primarily through coursework essays and written projects. Practical modules may require audiovisual elements to be submitted. It will also include a dissertation of approximately 12,000 words.

Skills & careers

We know that political organisations relish thinking graduates. It’s why we focus on delivering a programme that’s rooted in a critical perspective. By the time you leave we want you to feel transformed so that you can go forward and transform the world. 

Our graduates go on to work within government organisations, political parties, NGOs and news media and across the public and private sectors - from the Houses of Parliament and BBC World Service to Google, Greenpeace and the UN. 

Find out more about employability at Goldsmiths.



Read less
This ESRC-recognised research-training programme gives you a broad and rigorous grounding in the study and methodologies of political communication. Read more
This ESRC-recognised research-training programme gives you a broad and rigorous grounding in the study and methodologies of political communication.

Why this programme

◾If you want to work as a researcher, develop academic research skills or embark on a PhD in political communication and related subjects, this programme is designed for you.
◾The programme draws on very strong staff expertise in political communication, as well as recognised strength on comparative politics and international relations.
◾Through the Political Communication seminars you can benefit from a truly unique opportunity to meet with top practitioners in the profession to informally discuss the practical aspects of political communication as well as career options.
◾The programme is an excellent preparation for doctoral work, and is eligible for the ESRC 1+3 scheme.
◾Research methods courses are are taught by staff with specialist expertise in quantitative and qualitative research methods.
◾The programme covers the same topics as the MSc in Political Communication but has been tailored to provide appropriate training for those who are intending to pursue doctoral studies or research-intensive careers.

Programme structure

You will take five core and one optional course. You will also write a dissertation on a topic of your choice, under the supervision of a specialist member of staff.

Core courses
◾Media and democracy
◾Political institutions and communication
◾Qualitative research methods
◾Quantitative data analysis
◾Research design.

Optional courses
◾China's international politics
◾Chinese politics and society
◾Crime, media and popular culture
◾Critical perspectives on human rights
◾Environmental problems in China
◾European Union in international politics and development
◾Generalised linear models
◾Global security: Theories and concepts
◾Human rights and global politics
◾Humanitarian intervention
◾International organisations
◾International relations and development
◾International relations research
◾International relations theory
◾International security and strategic thought
◾Introduction to social theory for researchers
◾Internet and civil society
◾Media and democratisation in Central and Eastern Europe
◾Media, security and war
◾Researching audiences and the media.

Career prospects

Career opportunities include positions in research organisations such as think-tanks; public relations and communications in government agencies, political parties, charities and international organisations; politics and political consultancy; political journalism; media policy makers; and higher education, including doctoral studies.

Read less
This programme is an advanced study of historical and contemporary developments in the economy, politics, culture and society of Russia and the countries of Eastern Europe and Eurasia. Read more
This programme is an advanced study of historical and contemporary developments in the economy, politics, culture and society of Russia and the countries of Eastern Europe and Eurasia.

Why this programme

-This programme is for those planning careers in major public, commercial and voluntary institutional settings who wish to acquire a specialised knowledge of Central and Eastern Europe and proficiency in one of the region's languages.
-Language and other study trips to the region are available. You will be offered the opportunity to spend a month in Russia. Some financial support is available to help you fund these trips.
-Choose between three specialist pathways: Central and East European Studies, Russian Studies, and Eurasian Studies.
-You will examine the history of communism and why it collapsed. You will learn about the impact of international organisations (e.g. the European Union, NATO) and of major world powers on the region as well as retaining an appreciation of the region’s internal diversity in a variety of spheres (cultural, economic, ethnic, political and social).
-You can participate in our extensive range of conferences, workshops, business days, seminars and networking activities involving representatives of the business, policy-making and third sector communities.
-The University Library holds one of the best Russian, Central and East European collections in the world.

Programme structure

You will take four core and one optional course, as well as complete a dissertation as a piece of independent research. You will select a specialist pathway, which includes a specialist core courses and a language. (choices vary depending on pathway).

Core courses
All pathways
-Issues in Russian, East European, and Eurasian studies
-Research methods for studying Russia, Eastern Europe & Eurasia

Central and East European Studies
-Geopolitics of Central and Eastern Europe OR Statehood and nationality in Central and Eastern Europe
-Language options: Czech, Estonian, Hungarian, Latvian OR Polish

Russian Studies
-Gender and identity in Soviet & Post-Soviet Russia OR Russian foreign policy
-Language: Russian

Eurasian Studies
-Contested states: The South Caucasus after 1991 OR Rethinking Central Asian security
-Language options: Russian OR Chinese

Optional courses
-Contested states: The South Caucasus since 1991
-De facto states in the Post-Soviet space
-Developments in Czech society since 1989
-Gender and identity in Soviet and Post-Soviet Russia
-Media and democratisation in Central and Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union
-Political modernisation: The Georgian case
-Post-Soviet Russia: Renegotiating global and local identities
-Post-Soviet Ukraine: a case study in socio-economic and political transformation
-Rethinking Central Asian security
-Russian foreign policy
-Statehood and nationality in Russia, Central and Eastern Europe
-The geopolitics of Central Europe

Career prospects

Many of our graduates have gone on to establish careers as lecturers and researchers at universities in the UK, Norway, Greece, Italy, and Poland or have become secondary school teachers. Our graduates have also been very successful in establishing careers with organisations such as BBC World Service, British Army, British Civil Service, British Council, Centre for Defence Information (Moscow), Coalition to Stop the Use of Child Soldiers, European Policies Research Centre, University of Strathclyde (Glasgow), European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (London), Jamestown Foundation (Washington D.C), KPMG, Ministry of Defence, UK, Open Society Foundation (Bratislava), Open Society Institute (Budapest), Operation Mobilisation, Czech Republic and the Trust for Civil Society in Central & Eastern Europe (Warsaw).

Read less
About the MSc programme. Comparative politics is the comparative study of political systems. The MSc Comparative Politics looks for sophisticated analytical answers to basic political questions. Read more

About the MSc programme

Comparative politics is the comparative study of political systems. The MSc Comparative Politics looks for sophisticated analytical answers to basic political questions: Why are some countries democratic while others are not? Why are some countries torn by ethnic conflict? Do constitutions matter?

The programme is methodologically eclectic yet rigorous, with an emphasis on historical approaches. It offers courses in the fields of democracy and democratisation, nationalism and ethnicity, comparative political economy and political institutions, popular politics, and politics of the developing world as well as a wide range of country- and area-specific options. Regional foci include Latin America, Sub-Saharan Africa, the Middle East, India, China and South-East Asia. You can choose a specialism allowing you to develop deeper expertise on any of these subject areas within comparative politics.

The programme is good preparation for further research work or for a career in media, political consultancy, international organisations, public administration or the private sector.

Graduate destinations

Graduates from our MSc have gone on to successful careers in politics, media, NGOs, Foreign Service, finance and academia.

Further information on graduate destinations for this programme



Read less
This course looks at international development through a communications lens and the role media play in development and policy making. Read more
This course looks at international development through a communications lens and the role media play in development and policy making.

Who is it for?

This course is for students looking for an opportunity to explore the impact of media and communications on international policy and within sociological context.

The course will appeal to students with a general interest in communication studies and cross-disciplinary interests in development studies, sociology and politics.

Objectives

Communication is integral to development programmes. At a time when ideas about freedom of expression, democracy, human rights and access to natural and material resources guide development projects across the world, the question about the role of media and communications for social change becomes ever more pertinent.

Development is taken as a contested concept that translates into courses for advocating democratic forms of participation, policy initiatives and training activities in media and communications sectors in different geographical regions.

The International Communications and Development MA provides you with an interdisciplinary framework for understanding and critically assessing the role of communications for and in development projects.

It also gives you a broad interdisciplinary overview of developments in broadcasting, telecommunications, the press and information technology drawing on economics, political science, international relations, development theory, sociology and law.

On the course you will develop an ability to participate in policy making and evaluation in the context of changing national and global economic and political relations.

The Department of Sociology at City offers you an extensive range of module options. This enables you to specialise in your particular areas of interest, developing your critical skills and advancing your knowledge, culminating with you undertaking an extended piece of original research.

Teaching and learning

The educational aims are achieved through a combination of lectures, interactive sessions, practical workshops and small group classes supported by a personal tutorial system. You are encouraged to undertake extensive reading in order to understand the topics covered in lectures and classes and to broaden and deepen their knowledge of the subject. In the course of self-directed hours you are expected to read from the set module bibliography, prepare your class participation, collect and organize source material for your coursework, to plan and write your coursework.

The Department also runs a personal tutorial system which provides support for teaching and learning and any problems can be identified and dealt with early.

During the second term the Department offers a Dissertation Workshop to guide you on your dissertation outline.

Modules

The course focuses on the relationship between communication, development and democracy. Over the course of the year you will develop your knowledge of media and communication studies within the context of globalisation, Political communication and the work of international organisations and nongovernmental organisations in development communication.

Your will also cover more specific areas such as media representation (national and trans-national) and audiences and the communications policies that affect them.

You will take three 30-credit core modules and either two 15-credit modules or one 30-credit module elective modules.

Core modules
-Democratisation and Networked Communication SGM311 (30 credits)
-Research Workshop SGM302 (30 dredits)
-Communication, Culture and Development SGM312 (30 credits)

You must also complete a 60 credit dissertation in order to be awarded the Master's qualification. You are normally required to pass all taught modules before progressing to the dissertation.

Elective modules
-Developments in Communication Policy SGM309 (15 credits)
-Transnational Media and Communication SGM308 (15 credits)
-Celebrity SGM314 (15 credits)
-Development and World Politics IPM104 (15 credits)
-Religion in Global Politics (IPM119) (15 credits)
-Human Rights and the Transformation of World Politics IPM118 (30 credits)
-Global Political Economy - Contemporary Approaches IPM116 (30 credits)
-Evaluation Politics and Advocacy AMM420 (15 credits)
-Analysing Crime SGM301 (30 credits)
-Criminal Justice Policy and Practice (SGM303) (30 credits)
-Victims: Policy and Politics SGM305 (15 credits)
-Criminal Minds SGM304 (15 credits)

NB. Elective modules choices are subject to availability.

Career prospects

Graduates have entered a wide variety of careers in the civil service, broadcasting, press and telecoms networks, NGOs, the development sector and consultancies, advertising, marketing, politics, journalism, PR, media management and regulatory agencies. Recent graduate positions include; Fundraising and Communications Officer at Alone in London, Communications Specialist at Government Division of Health and Social Services and Civil Servant at Seoul Metropolitan Government.

Jessica Perrin who recently graduated with an MA in International Communications and Development is now Head of NGOs at Thomson Reuters Foundation.

Students have access to the expert services of our Careers, Student Development and Outreach Office. They regularly receive information about internship and job opportunities and are invited to participate in media fairs and panel discussions with alumni.

Read less

Show 10 15 30 per page



Cookie Policy    X