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This MSc focuses on the design, creation, and operation of democratic institutions. Read more
This MSc focuses on the design, creation, and operation of democratic institutions. Students gain understanding of when a given set of institutes are appropriate for a society and what will make them function, and how scholars have thought about these matters, applying theory to examples of institution-building and design.

Degree information

Students are equipped with the theoretical tools and empirical evidence necessary for an in-depth understanding of democratic institutions and politics. They develop an understanding of the potential benefits and pitfalls of different institutional designs, reforms, and administrative practices, and are able to analyse problems raised by new and reforming democracies.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of four compulsory core modules (75 credits), optional modules (45 credits) and a research dissertation (60 credits).

Core modules
-Democracy and Constitutional Design (30)
-Democratic Political Institutions (15)
-Introduction to Qualitative Methods or Advanced Qualitative Methods (15)
-Introduction to Quantitative Methods or Advanced Quantitative Methods (15)

Optional modules - choose one of the following 15-credit modules (the other two remain available as options):
-The European Union, Globalisation and the State (15)
-Parliaments, Political Parties and Policy Making (15)
-Governing Divided Societies (15)

Choose further modules up to a value of 30 credits in total from a list available at: http://www.ucl.ac.uk/spp/teaching/masters

The following are suggestions:
-Democracy and Accountability: Holding Power to Account (15)
-Equality, Justice, and Difference (15)
-Making Policy Work (15)
-NGO, Non-Profit and Voluntary Sector Policy and Management (15)
-Agenda Setting and Public Policy (15)
-British Government and Politics (15)
-International Political Economy (15)
-Gendering the Study of Politics: Theory and Practice (15)
-Conflict Resolution and Post-War Development (15)
-Global Public Policy (15)

Dissertation/report
All MSc students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures and seminars. Assessment is through unseen examinations, long essays, coursework, and the dissertation.

Careers

Alumni of this programme work in a variety of fields. Many take on roles within their home governments, and a substantial number find jobs with non-governmental organisations (NGOs), working in their home countries or abroad. Some work for a research institutes or provide research for business, and a small number have also gone on to PhD study.

First destinations of recent graduates include:
-The Labour Party: Secretary
-Head Office Agency: Campaign Co-ordinator
-Civil Service: Civil Servant
-National Centre for Social Research: Research Assistant
-National Autistic Society: Policy and Parliamentary Officer
-Liberal Democrats: Research Assistant

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Consultant, World Bank Group
-Trainee Campaign Organiser, The Labour Party
-Parliamentary Assistant, UK Parliament
-Research Intern, Access Info Europe
-PhD Political Science, Trinity College Dublin

Employability
Graduates of the programme are equipped with the theoretical tools and empirical evidence necessary for entry into the world of government policy, non-governmental organisations, or the private sector.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL Political Science is recognised as a centre of excellence in the field and offers a uniquely stimulating environment for the study of democracy and comparative politics.

Students on the programme benefit from greater interaction with fellow students and academic staff due to small class sizes.

London features a wealth of seminars, conferences, and other events on democratic topics. These provide a means for students to expand their knowledge and to extend their professional networks prior to entering the job market.

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The LLM in Democracy, Human Security and International Law is your opportunity to engage with a broad range of subjects, such as the contribution made by governments and courts on international law; current initiatives relating to human security worldwide; and the impact of non-governmental organisations on international policy-making. Read more

About the course

The LLM in Democracy, Human Security and International Law is your opportunity to engage with a broad range of subjects, such as the contribution made by governments and courts on international law; current initiatives relating to human security worldwide; and the impact of non-governmental organisations on international policy-making.

The course balances the theory with the urgently practical – for example, combining in-depth analysis of legal principles on an international level with the study of how such law affects a range of contrasting local situations. You will also come to appreciate the necessary differences and points of difficulty between national and international legislation where factors like nationalism, protectionism and self-interest conflict with international declarations and law.

Beyond the required core modules, you will enjoy a degree of freedom in directing your own study path through the choice of option modules. You will also be able to further explore your chosen specialism through researching and writing your Masters dissertation. Our previous LLM students have reported that this can help direct future study and career pathways and provides an invaluable opportunity to establish a successful career.

As a student at Aberystwyth, you will be taught by staff who participate in national and international debates and policy-making in legal, criminological and other related fields. Under their personal tutelage, you will develop your rigorous analytical skills, your abilities in presenting clear and focused arguments and your capacity for independent thought – all traits which are prized by postgraduate employers everywhere.

The Aberystwyth Law School recently participated in the Research Excellence Framework (2014) assessment. It found that 96.5% of publications submitted were of of an internationally recognised standard and that 98% of research activity in the department was rated as internationally recognised.

This degree will suit you:

• If you wish to study an area of law with urgent contemporary significance and practical relevance
• If you want to develop a profound understanding of international law on critical subjects
• If you wish to nurture a legal career within government, non-governmental or corporate structures
• If you desire skills highly sought-after in any postgraduate workplace

Course content

Core modules:

Contemporary Issues in Food Policy and Law
Democracy and International Law
Dissertation
International Human Rights Law
Public International Law

Optional modules:

Climate Change Law and Policy
Criminology of International Conflict Personnel
Human Rights, Environment and International Business
Law and Gender
Philosophy of Human Rights Protection

Assessment

Assessment takes the form of; research proposals including a related bibliographic element, case studies, oral assessments and essays. Each student will complete a Master’s dissertation of 15,000 to 20,000 words which deals with an area of chosen study in the third semester.

Employability

Every course at Aberystwyth University is designed to enhance your vocational and general employability. Your LLM will place you in the jobs market as a rigorous legal professional appraised of the latest legal developments in three incredibly broad and marketable fields: democracy, security and international law. In addition, this course will help you to master general skills which are required in almost every postgraduate work situation. Through your studies, you will have honed your skills in planning, analysis and presentation and you will be able to tackle complex projects thoroughly and with professional independence. This balance of expertise and a rare breadth of competencies will make you a highly desirable candidate for careers in government, non-governmental and corporate contexts alike.

Study skills

You will learn to quickly assimilate, interpret and apply a wealth of legal knowledge. In doing so, you will refine your own work methodologies, improving your personal skills in research, analysis, discourse and argument-construction. You will also be confronted with the task of improving your interpersonal skills in team work and group activities including debates and presentations.

Self-Motivation and discipline

Studying at LLM level requires discipline and self-motivation from every candidate. Though you will have access to the expertise and guidance of departmental staff, you are ultimately responsible for devising and completing a sustained programme of scholarly research in pursuit of your Master’s degree. This process will strengthen your skills as an independent and self-sufficient worker, a trait prized by most employers.

Transferable skills

The LLM programme is designed to give you a range of transferable skills that you can apply in a variety of employment contexts. Upon graduation, you will have proven your abilities in structuring and communicating ideas efficiently, writing for and speaking to a range of audiences, evaluating and organizing information, working effectively with others and working within time frames and to specific deadlines.

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At the School of Geography, Politics and Sociology, we conduct research and offer MPhil supervision in all major fields of politics, including. Read more
At the School of Geography, Politics and Sociology, we conduct research and offer MPhil supervision in all major fields of politics, including: international and global politics, governance and political organisations, and political theory.

We can offer you excellent supervision for your Politics MPhil, in a vibrant and supportive research environment.

We have a Politics Postgraduate Society, which organises:
-The 'New Voices' seminar series, with both internal and external presenters
-Round table discussions on topical issues
-Professional development workshops led by politics staff

You are encouraged to attend conferences to present papers, partial funding for this is available from the School.

Our main research themes are:

The politics of difference

We examine the issues thrown up by the social and political differences of humanity from a variety of perspectives including: analytical and continental political philosophy; comparative politics and international politics; post-colonialism. Our work includes research on:
-Multiculturalism and issues of identity
-Inequality and social justice
-Disability
-Competing discourses of national identity
-Ethnic-nationalism
-Political violence
-Socio-political exclusion and discrimination
-Global norms and cultural difference
-Free speech - toleration and recognition

Popular culture and political communication

Our research addresses various key issues including:
-Representation
-Aesthetics
-Identity
-Cultural political economy
-Memory
-Control

We also assess the processes and depiction of political struggles, such as:
-Armed conflict
-Everyday life
-Political organising and identity formation
-Elections

Political participation and elections

We examine the differing forms of political participation that link society to the political systems of the world. We look at both the formal electoral process and non-electoral politics (social movements, protest groups etc). Our research on the emergence of virtual political participation means that some of our work intersects with popular culture and political communication. We investigate:
-Citizen involvement and (dis)engagement
-Social capital
-Non-participation
-The role of civil society

Political ideologies and political thought

We focus on the history of political thought as well as how these ideas are embedded in programmes for political action. Our research incorporates both historical and contemporary political thought prominent in the Western tradition as well as Asian philosophy and post-colonial thinking. This is an interdisciplinary theme, serving as a bridge between empirical political science and political theory.

Global economic and environmental challenges

We study the importance of political ideas such as sustainable development and globalisation, as well as the struggle to define the core problems that society faces. These challenges pose questions to the nature and reform of global governance, and generate tensions between the state and transnationalising forces in global politics and political economy. Our work has already led to findings on:
-The implications for global justice
-The policy challenge for governments and non-governmental actors
-The empowerment of various actors

Democracy, the modern state and political organisations

Our work examines the role of interest groups, social movements, political parties, third-sector actors and charities, community organisations and postcolonial nationalism in relation to the modern state. We draw from ancient and modern political thought to understand the interpretation of democracy (including democratic rights and the foundations of democracy). Our research interrogates the forms democracy takes, including:
-Elite theories of democracy
-Deliberative democracy
-Cosmopolitan democracy
-Democracy in divided societies

Political economy of development

Our research focuses on the interaction of economic forces and principles with political power in the development of societal economics and welfare, as well as on theories of development and post-development. We cover a range of geographic areas in Africa, the Americas, Europe and Asia. We explore questions such as:
-The impact of the ongoing financial and economic crisis
-The role of communities and individuals in the face of global political economic forces
-The impact of the emerging economies (for example Brazil and China) on the global political economy

Critical geopolitics and security

Our research focuses on thinking critically about the political dynamics, consequences and discourses of historical and contemporary geopolitics. We cover both historical and contemporary questions of security, including:
-The territorialisation/de-territorialisation of identity and political agency
-Political cartography
-The role of fear and identity in shaping geopolitics
-Sovereignty and nationalism - the role and impact of the military
-Notions of terrorism and the war on terror
-The geographies of international boundaries
-The war on the trade in illegal substances
-The city and security
-The threat of biological weapons and infectious disease
-The vertical dimension in geopolitical and security studies
-Visual culture and world politics
-Technologies and architectures of security and insecurity
-The human body and security

Theory of international relations

We take an active role in the global debate on the units, actors and structures that shape the dynamics of international politics. Our research covers the political consequences of the constitution of the international as a distinct kind of relation. We examine political concepts including:
-The world system
-International diplomacy
-Networks
-Notions of empire
-Regional integration
-Non-governmental actors
-The (nation) state

Governance in Britain and wider Europe

Our research investigates the dynamics driving public policy-making at national, EU and international levels. We focus on the challenges multi-level governance offers for concerns about legitimacy and accountability. This includes the changing relationship between the governing and the governed over matters of politics and policy. Our geographic scope includes the United Kingdom, Western Europe, Eastern Europe and Russia, and the Mediterranean

Global justice and human rights

Our work in political philosophy reflects the increasing need to tackle issues at a global rather than a state-only level. We cover issues such as:
-The formulation and justification of human rights
-The competing claims of relativism, particularism, and cultural diversity
-The extension of ideas of distributive justice from states to humanity as a whole
-Proposals to secure global democracy
-The application of just war theory to modern conflicts and to humanitarian intervention
-Environmental justice, especially climate change

We tackle questions of justice from an issue perspective as well as surveys of nationalism, statism, and various non-cosmopolitan theories of global justice.

Political research and methods

We conduct qualitative and quantitative research reflecting both empirical and critical political methodologies. We use quantitative methods, including rational choice theory and experiments, to make sense of topics as diverse as party systems and transitional justice. Our aim is to push innovation in research methods in ethnography, hermeneutics and discourse analysis. We use concepts that challenge traditional notions of politics to investigate methods for research into new challenges, including:
-The rise of life sciences
-The focus on the relationship between the human body and security
-Emergent forms of subjectivity and politics

Research skills development

The University's Humanities and Social Sciences Graduate School provides a full range of research training in the social sciences, which meets the requirements of the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC). This training includes:
-Bibliographical techniques
-Philosophy of social science
-Quantitative and qualitative methods

The Graduate School also hosts postgraduate events, including open days, and supports personal development.

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-You would like to learn from the greatest concentration of Elections scholars in the country. -You want to access teaching based on high quality data from the prestigious British Election Study that we run. Read more
-You would like to learn from the greatest concentration of Elections scholars in the country
-You want to access teaching based on high quality data from the prestigious British Election Study that we run
-You are interested in cutting edge research-led teaching by internationally renowned specialists in the area of elections and democratic engagement

The democracy and elections pathway will appeal to students interested in aspects of formal and informal politics, party and non-party engagement, the elected and electors and in the relationship between the process of government and the normative foundations of democracy.

Teaching and learning

Part-time students complete the full-time programme over two years. There are NO evening or weekend course units available on the part-time programme.

You must first check the schedule of the compulsory modules and then select your optional modules to suit your requirements.

Updated timetable information will be available from mid-August and you will have the opportunity to discuss your module choices during induction week with your Course Director.

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-You would like to learn from the greatest concentration of Elections scholars in the country. -You want to access teaching based on high quality data from the prestigious British Election Study, which we run. Read more
-You would like to learn from the greatest concentration of Elections scholars in the country
-You want to access teaching based on high quality data from the prestigious British Election Study, which we run
-You are interested in strong methods training, which makes all the difference for future employability and future study

The democracy and elections pathway will appeal to students interested in aspects of formal and informal politics, party and non-party engagement, the elected and electors and in the relationship between the process of government and the normative foundations of democracy.

Teaching and learning

Part-time students complete the full-time programme over two years. There are NO evening or weekend course units available on the part-time programme.

You must first check the schedule of the compulsory modules and then select your optional modules to suit your requirements.

Updated timetable information will be available from mid-August and you will have the opportunity to discuss your module choices during induction week with your Course Director.

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Democracy and Governance are at the heart of the social and political transformation that has characterized Estonia over the last two decades. Read more
Democracy and Governance are at the heart of the social and political transformation that has characterized Estonia over the last two decades. For years, Estonia has been ranked as one of the most dynamic reformers in Europe, while at the same time maintaining a stable democracy and social environment. It’s a leader in e-government, internet-based voting and other governance fields.

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Our MSc in Politics provides an advanced grounding in contemporary political science, focusing on empirical and normative democratic theory, political institutions, public policy and citizenship across different political systems and diverse social contexts.The MSc brings together many of the existing strengths of the department in different parts of the world. Read more
Our MSc in Politics provides an advanced grounding in contemporary political science, focusing on empirical and normative democratic theory, political institutions, public policy and citizenship across different political systems and diverse social contexts.The MSc brings together many of the existing strengths of the department in different parts of the world.

The programme can be tailored to specific regional interests through option courses in West Europe and North America, East Europe, Africa, India, and the Middle East. The degree will provide you with a firm academic foundation in the study of comparative politics and a base of knowledge for careers in fields such as policymaking, development, and NGOs.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/politicsandir/coursefinder/mscpolitics.aspx

Why choose this course?

- the Department of Politics and International Relations is a young, vibrant and rapidly-rising department and was ranked in the Top 10 small politics departments in the latest Research Assessment Exercise (RAE, 2008)

- the course is taught by world-class scholars and informed by cutting-edge research

- offers an advanced grounding in international public policy while allowing you to specialise in particular issues or regions of interest.

- taught by academics, current and retired public policy practitioners

- our international cohort of students will provide you with excellent opportunities to obtain genuinely global perspectives.

Department research and industry highlights

- The Centre for European Politics was officially launched by Lord Mandelson in September 2007, with the mission of producing research in two principal areas: the study of democracy in Europe, and Europe as an actor in world politics. Under the leadership of Co-Directors Dr Alsiter Miskimmon and Dr James Sloam, it has hosted a number of high-profile speakers, including Lord Mandelson, Professor Simon Hix (LSE), Roger Liddle (Policy Network), John Peet (The Economist), Sir Stephen Wall (former European policy advisor to Tony Blair), David Willets MP (Shadow Secretary of State for Innovations, Universities and Skills) and Dr Vince Cable. Recent funded research projects include: a European Union Committee of the Regions consultancy on EU External Relations and European Neighbourhood Policy; an EU-funded Workshop on the Review of the European Union Budget; and Teaching Democracy. Recent publications include, Bendetto and Milio (eds) European Union budget reform: institutions, policy and economic crisis (Palgrave, 2012) and James Sloam, 'New Voice, Less Equal: the Civic and political Engagement of Young People in the United States and Europe', Comparative Political Studies 2012.

- The Centre for Global and Transnational Politics is devoted to the multi-disciplinary exploration of global and transnational processes. Led by its Co-Directors Professor Chris Rumford and Professor Sandra Halperin, its central concern is to theorise and conceptualise the substance of, and connections between and among, political processes that operate at all levels or scales: the local, national, international, transnational, and global. Professor Rumford and Professor Halperin edit the Routledge Series in Global and Transnational Politics and host the Global Studies Association and a BISA Working Group of Global and Transnational Politics in the Centre.

- The New Political Communication Unit’s research agenda focuses on the impact of new media and communication technologies on politics, policy and governance. Core staff include Prof Andrew Chadwick, Prof Ben O’Loughlin and Dr Cristian Vicarri. Recent publications include Chadwick’s The Hybrid Media System (Oxford University Press, 2013) and Alister Miskimmon, Ben O’Loughlin and Laura Roselle, Strategic Narratives: Communication Power and the New World Order (Routledge, 2013). As well as hosting a large number of PhD students working in new political communication, Chadwick edited the Oxford University Press Series Oxford Studies in Digital Politics and O’Loughlin is co-editor of the journal, Media, War and Conflict.

- The Contemporary Political Theory Research Group was founded in October 2009, as a result of the development of political theory at postgraduate level and growth in academic staff numbers having created the critical mass it required. The group organizes its activities collectively, and its work focuses on issues around contemporary pluralism, liberalism, democratic theory and radical politics. It brings together staff working in contemporary Continental philosophy, normative political theory, and American pragmatism, and its postgraduate members include two students on the College’s most prestigious studentship, the Reid Award. The group also has ties to the College’s Philosophy Team and the interdepartmental Humanities and Arts Research Centre

Course content and structure

Core course units:
- The Politics of Democracy You will be provided with a sound understanding of contemporary thinking about democracy and political participation through the analysis of liberal democracy and its political institutions. The unit will draw upon a variety of contemporary and historical sources with particular reference to the political systems of Britain and the USA.

- Comparative Political Executives This unit explores the political executives of established democratic systems, focusing on institutions – presidents, prime ministers, cabinets and so on – and how they function and interact with other parts of the political system. You will gain knowledge of the ‘nuts and bolts’ of the executives in question, and will also gain useful insights into the difficulties of political leadership, the centrality of political executives and the interdependence of executives with other parts of the political system.

- European Union Politics and Policy This course provides students with an insight into the development and governance of the European Union as a political system. Particular attention is placed on the functions of the EU’s executive, legislative and judicial institutions as well as on a number of key policy areas in which the European Union’s sovereignty has developed in recent years. The course provides students with a solid theoretical background in understanding both the institutional politics and public policy of the EU.

- Political Parties
Introduction to Quantitative Research Methods in Politics and International Relations You will be introduced to quantitative methods commonly used in the study of Politics and International Relations. You will acquire the skills to understand, critically analyse, and carry out a range of quantitative techniques, using statistical software packages such as SPSS.
Introduction to Qualitative Methods in Politics and International Relations You will be provided with an introduction to core theories and qualitative approaches in politics and international relations. You will examine a number of explanatory/theoretical frameworks, their basic assumptions, strengths and weaknesses, and concrete research applications. You will consider the various qualitative techniques available for conducting search research, the range of decisions qualitative researchers face, and the trade-offs researchers must consider when designing qualitative research.

- Dissertation (MSc only) The dissertation gives you the opportunity to study an aspect of Politics in depth. You will be assigned a dissertation supervisor and the length of the piece will be 12-15,000 words.

Elective course units:
- Internet and New Media Politics Drawing predominantly upon specialist academic journal literatures, this unit focuses on a number of important contemporary debates about the role and influence of new technologies on the values, processes and outcomes of: global governance institutions; public bureaucracies; representative institutions including political parties and legislatures; pressure groups and social movements.

- Elections and Voting Behaviour

- Social Media and Politics

- Public Opinion and political participation

- Human Rights: From Theory to Practice

- Advanced Quantitative Methods

On completion of the course graduates will have:
- an advanced knowledge and critical understanding of key concepts, theoretical debates, and developments related to public policy, democracy, politics, international relations and governance

- a sound knowledge of the texts, theories and methods used to enhance understanding of the issues, processes and phenomena associated with particular fields of public policy, politics and international relations

- an advanced knowledge and critical understanding of research methods within the disciplines of politics and international relations

- a solid foundation for progression to either a politics-related career, public policy careers, research or continued academic study.

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including coursework, examinations and a dissertation.

Employability & career opportunities

Our graduates are highly employable and, in recent years, have entered many different politics and international relations-related areas, including roles as officials in local government, personnel officers and higher education lecturers. This course also equips you with a solid foundation for continued PhD studies.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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Global Politics and Communication is an interdisciplinary and innovative Master’s degree programme that addresses the key challenges of globalisation from the perspective of media and communication studies, organisation research and global political economy. Read more
Global Politics and Communication is an interdisciplinary and innovative Master’s degree programme that addresses the key challenges of globalisation from the perspective of media and communication studies, organisation research and global political economy. The programme emphasises developing your critical thinking, a necessary skill in many careers.

The specific objectives of the programme include:
-Providing you with advanced knowledge of global political economy, relationships between the media and the development of democracy, and linkages between governance, organisations and communication.
-Empowering you to assess how politics and the media are linked to the forces of globalisation.
-Equipping you with conceptual understanding and the theoretical and methodological skills needed to carry out original and relevant research on key societal issues.
-Preparing you to engage in public discussions and develop critical reasoning and argumentation skills that are equally important in academia, public organisations and the private sector.

The University of Helsinki will introduce annual tuition fees to foreign-language Master’s programmes starting on August 1, 2017 or later. The fee ranges from 13 000-18 000 euros. Citizens of non-EU/EEA countries, who do not have a permanent residence status in the area, are liable to these fees. You can check this FAQ at the Studyinfo website whether or not you are required to pay tuition fees: https://studyinfo.fi/wp2/en/higher-education/higher-education-institutions-will-introduce-tuition-fees-in-autumn-2017/am-i-required-to-pay-tuition-fees/

Programme Contents

How do global transformations affect democratic politics? What is the role of the media in the transformation of contemporary democracies? Why do economic activities result in global and national financial crises and inequality instead of in stability and democratisation? How does governance affect organisations and communication, and how do governance and organisations structure communication and political and economic activity?

The Global Politics and Communication programme offers a cutting-edge combination of political science, communication studies and global political economy. You will apply ideas, concepts and methodologies to key societal and political issues such as the changing character of democracy, the role of organisations and governance in the globalising world, and the regulation of global finance and trade.

During the first year, you will study general theoretical and methodological courses and take part in thematic courses offered by the programme’s study orientations. You will also begin to work on your Master’s thesis. In the second year, you will deepen your knowledge on your selected study orientation or orientations by participating in thematic specialisation courses. You will also attend the Master’s seminar and write your Master’s thesis.

Selection of the Major

The Master’s degree programme on Global Politics and Communication has three study orientations:
-Governance, Organisations and Communication
-Media and Democracy
-Global Political Economy

The interplay between Governance, Organisations and Communication gives this study line its name. Governance and organisational and communication practices are increasingly global but are modified locally. The foci of this study line include the global governance of knowledge, organisational communication, the changing institutions of knowledge and communication, the digitalisation of politics and communication, and changes in media policies.

Media and Democracy exposes you to the key debates about the relationship between the media and democratic processes at a time when the future of democracy remains uncertain because of authoritarian tendencies in politics and the commercialisation of the public sphere. It focuses on such questions as how the media represent and frame conflicts and war; how new forms of political participation are challenging the traditional conduct of politics; how human rights such as freedom of expression rely on media practices; and how new digital media reconfigure public communities and extend the possibilities for civic engagement.

Global Political Economy covers multidisciplinary studies drawing on economics, sociology, and political science. It explains how social practices and institutions constitute relational, complex and open systems of production, exchange and distribution. Taking into account the widely-shared aim of sustainable global development, political economy is crucial for understanding the principal current problems such as global warming; potential financial crises; disparities in income, wealth and power; or war and peace.

You will specialise in one of these three orientations. However, you can also combine them by including courses from other orientations in your elective studies.

Programme Structure

The Master's Degree Programme on Global Politics and Communication is a full-time, two-year programme. The programme fulfils the requirements of a 120 credits (ECTS, European Transfer Credit System) Master's degree in social sciences in the Faculty of Social Sciences. The programme consists of advanced studies in politics and communication, as well as other elective and compulsory studies.

Master’s Degree Programme on Global Politics and Communication: 120 credits (ECTS)

Advanced studies: 80 – 95 credits
-Theoretical studies 10-15 credits
-Methodology studies 10-15 credits
-Specialisation Studies 20-25 credits
-Master’s Seminar (10 credits) and Master’s Thesis (30 credits) 40 credits

Elective studies and other studies, including voluntary internship: 25 – 40 credits

Career Prospects

Graduates of the Discipline of Politics and Communication Studies at the University of Helsinki have gone on to work in a range of jobs as experts and consultants in Finland and internationally, in the public and the private sectors as well as in non-governmental organisations. They are mainly employed in the fields of politics, administration, the media and communication. Some graduates also continue on with academic research to pursue an academic career in universities in Finland and around the world.

Internationalization

The Global Politics and Communication programme is an international programme with students from around the world. In addition to the degree students, we receive many visiting and exchange students and scholars from Europe and further afield. In addition to providing you with a unique international learning environment, we also encourage you to participate in Erasmus and Nordplus exchange programmes for a short-term study period in Scandinavian and European universities. You will have the opportunity of doing a voluntary internship abroad with support from Erasmus.

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The Masters in International Relations and Democratic Politics provides an advanced critical and comprehensive understanding of the forces shaping state, inter-state relations and global politics. Read more
The Masters in International Relations and Democratic Politics provides an advanced critical and comprehensive understanding of the forces shaping state, inter-state relations and global politics. Drawing on key theoretical interpretations of democratic politics, the course probes into various tenets of democratic thinking (ranging from pluralism and civil society to egalitarianism and human rights), and explores the interplay between theory and practice in old and new democracies and in processes of global governance. Is democracy a concept limited to a world of territorially-bounded national communities? Can democracy still limit power in a global world? How does democratic policy making operate in the face of complexity? By raising and examining such questions the course explores the changing and contested understandings of democracy in contemporary thought as well as its application to the international sphere in our increasingly complex world.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of what you will study on this course.

Core modules
-DEMOCRATIC POLITICS: KEY DEBATES AND ISSUES
-DISSERTATION AND RESEARCH METHODS
-THE POLITICS OF GLOBAL COMPLEXITY: RETHINKING GOVERNANCE, POWER AND AGENCY

Option modules - You must choose four option modules from the following list (one of your options may be an approved free choice module hosted by another Masters course):
-CONTROVERSIES IN UNITED STATES FOREIGN POLICIES AND PROCESSES
-DEVELOPMENT THEORIES, POLICIES AND PRACTICES
-GLOBAL CHANGE: TOWARD A NEW NON-WESTERN ORDER?
-GLOBAL POLITICS OF ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL CHANGE (Subject to approval)
-GLOBALISATION, DEMOCRATISATION AND POST-AUTHORITARIAN TRANSITION
-GOVERNANCE OF THE EUROPEAN UNION
-ISLAM AND POLITICS IN THE MIDDLE EAST
-POLICY, GOVERNANCE AND DEMOCRACY: INTERNATIONAL PERSPECTIVES
-POSTCOLONIAL INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS: THEORIES AND CONCEPTS
-REGIONAL DIMENSIONS OF ENERGY SECURITY (Subject to approval)
-THE EUROPEAN UNION AS AN INTERNATIONAL ACTOR
-THE STATE, POLITICS AND VIOLENCE

Associated careers

This course will provide you with numerous key skills and knowledge that will prepare you for your future career in a variety of different fields. Our graduates hold posts within various international and national government departments and organisations. Many have also gone on to study for Doctorates within the Department and at other universities around the world.

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Like them or loathe them, political parties and elections are important. Elections constitute an essential element of modern democracy and defining moments for the distribution of political power. Read more

Overview

Like them or loathe them, political parties and elections are important. Elections constitute an essential element of modern democracy and defining moments for the distribution of political power. For their part, political parties help link politics and society, compete in elections and structure political processes within and between key political institutions. As Schattschneider famously observed in 1942, ‘Modern democracy is unthinkable save in terms of … parties’.

Yet political parties vary enormously in respect of their social rootedness, policies, size, organisation, internal distribution of power and candidate recruitment, but also, for example, in how they operate within and between legislatures and executives. Similarly there is a myriad of ways in which electoral systems can be structured, and considerable diversity in, for example, the frequency, nature, financing, style and competitiveness of elections. Moreover, both parties and elections have in recent years undergone significant change, not least as a result of technological innovation, and both remain major topics of at times heated public debate.

In short, political parties and elections significantly shape the nature, quality and legitimacy of contemporary politics. This Masters is concerned above all with investigating the rich diversity of political parties and elections in the contemporary world. Keele was the first UK university to offer a taught Maters in political parties and elections and this course benefits from Keele’s unusually high concentration of international research and teaching expertise in this area, much of it organised in the Keele European Parties Research Unit.

The course is taught over a 12 month period (September-September; January-January). It is available as a full-time and/or part-time mode of study. Students completing the course have gone on to a variety of careers in the public, private and voluntary sectors.

See the website https://www.keele.ac.uk/pgtcourses/politicalpartiesandelections/

Course Aims

The aim of the MA/MRes in Political Parties and Elections is to provide you with the factual knowledge and conceptual and analytical skills that will enable you to reflect critically on the manner in which political parties and elections operate in the modern world. In addition, it provides you with the opportunity to demonstrate originality and self-direction in generating and investigating research questions. More broadly, it aims to assist you to develop a range of cognitive and social skills relevant to your intellectual, vocational and personal development. In pursuing these aims, the course seeks to prepare you for a variety of professional careers, including those in governmental and nongovernmental organisations, the media and business, or for research beyond the Masters level.

Course Content

Taught masters programmes require satisfactory completion of at least 180 credits, made up of 6 taught module (120 credits) plus a 15,000 word dissertation (60 credits). The MA and MRes programmes differ in that the MA programme contains more subject-specific modules and less research training, while the MRes programme contains more research training, in preparation for a research career or for undertaking a research degree such as a PhD.

MA
• Power, Knowledge and the World (30 credits)
• Perspectives in Politics and International Relations (30 credits)
• Research in Action (15 credits)
• Three (15 credits) optional modules chosen from the list below
• 15,000 word dissertation on an approved topic in Political Parties and Elections (60 credits)

MRes
• Research Design and Process (20 credits)
• Two 15 credits optional modules chosen from the list below
• Perspectives in Politics and International Relations (30 credits)
• Quantitative Data Analysis I (20 credits)
• Qualitative Data Analysis (20 credits)
• 15,000 word dissertation on an approved topic in Political Parties and Elections (60 credits)

Options
Optional modules can be drawn from modules such as those listed below, although the precise list of available modules may vary from year to year.

• Approaches to European Integration: History and Practice
• Comparative Public Policy
• Comparative European Politics (recommended)
• Diplomatic Law
• Diplomatic Practice
• Dimensions of Environmental Politics
• Environmental Diplomacy
• Environmental Movements: North and South
• Parties and Democracy (recommended)
• Right-Wing Radical Parties (recommended)
• The Changing International Agenda
• The Politics of Global Security
• The Theory of Global Security
• US Environmental Politics and Policy

Teaching & Assessment

Postgraduate teaching and learning generally takes place in a combination of large seminars and smaller discussion groups. Our academics typically lead the sessions, encouraging discussion between all students. Sometimes students will give presentations, either individually or in groups.

There is a strong emphasis on independent learning and students are expected to work on their own to produce their essays and dissertation. Most modules are assessed by a diverse range of coursework (e.g., essays, critiques, reports, presentations), though some modules may also be assessed by seminar contributions and/or written exams. Students take three modules in each semester. The taught modules are completed by May, leaving the summer months for students to write their dissertation.

Additional Costs

Apart from purchasing textbooks for modules, there are no additional compulsory additional costs.

International

SPIRE is a thoroughly international school, and is particularly welcoming to international students, as well as providing plenty of opportunities for home students to broaden their horizons.

We have staff with educational backgrounds in a wide variety of countries, such as Canada, Bulgaria, Italy, Austria, Romania, and Turkey, who present their research all around the world. Students have the opportunity to hear visiting lecturers from various different countries, arranged through our ERASMUS partnerships.

International students will join established international communities at Keele, and will find plenty of support mechanisms in place to help them make the transition to study in the UK.

Find information on Scholarships here - http://www.keele.ac.uk/studentfunding/bursariesscholarships/

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The dynamic interactions between political parties and voters underpin the foundations of modern democratic politics. Read more
The dynamic interactions between political parties and voters underpin the foundations of modern democratic politics. Our new MSc in Elections, Public Opinion and Parties provides students with a thorough grounding in the empirical theories and methods used for exploring and explaining models of party competition, public opinion and voting behaviour.

The degree’s substantive component gives you insights into the reality of political representation and accountability, as well as how political leaders and the media shape and respond to public preferences. The methodological component provides you with valuable analytical and research skills that will prepare you for careers in government, political consultancy, NGOs and research organisations.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/politicsandir/coursefinder/mscelections,publicopinionandparties.aspx

Why choose this course?

the Department of Politics and International Relations is a young, vibrant and rapidly-rising department and was ranked in the Top 10 small politics departments in the latest Research Assessment Exercise (RAE, 2008)

the course is taught by world-class scholars and informed by cutting-edge research

offers an advanced grounding in public opinion and political behavior at both a theoretical and empirical level

you will acquire valuable research methods skills that will equip you to carry out independent research and appraise both qualitative and quantitative research

you will acquire genuinely transferable skills that are highly prized in the job market

our international cohort of students will provide you with excellent opportunities to obtain global perspectives.

Department research and industry highlights

- The Centre for European Politics was officially launched by Lord Mandelson in September 2007, with the mission of producing research in two principal areas: the study of democracy in Europe, and Europe as an actor in world politics. Under the leadership of Co-Directors Dr Alister Miskimmon and Dr James Sloam, it has hosted a number of high-profile speakers, including Lord Mandelson, Professor Simon Hix (LSE), Roger Liddle (Policy Network), John Peet (The Economist), Sir Stephen Wall (former European policy advisor to Tony Blair), David Willetts MP (Shadow Secretary of State for Innovations, Universities and Skills) and Dr Vince Cable. Recent funded research projects include: a European Union Committee of the Regions consultancy on EU External Relations and European Neighbourhood Policy; an EU- funded Workshop on the Review of the European Union Budget; and Teaching Democracy. Recent publications include Bendetto and Milio (eds) European Union budget reform: intuitions, policy and economic crisis (Palgrave 2012) and James Sloam 'New Voice, Less Equal: the Civic and Political Engagement of Young People in the United States and Europe', Comparative Political Studies 2012.

- The New Political Communication Unit's research agenda focuses on the impact of new media and communication technologies on politics, policy and governance. Core staff include Professor Andrew Chadwick, Professor Ben O'Loughlin, Dr Alister Miskimmon and Dr Cristian Vaccari. Recent books include Andrew Chadwick's The Hybrid Media System, Politics and Power (Oxford University Press 2013), Cristian Vaccari's Digital Politics in Western Democracies: A Comparative Study (John Hopkins University Press) and Alister Miskimmon, Ben O'Loughlin and Laura Roselle's Strategic Narratives: Communication Power and the New World Order (Routledge, 2013). Andrew Chadwick edits the Oxford University Press book series Oxford studies in Digital Politics and Ben O'Loughlin is co-editor of the journal Media, War and Conflict. The Unit hosts a large number of PhD students working in the field of new political communication.

Course content and structure

Core course units:
- Elections and Voting Behaviour You will be introduced to the main theories of voting behaviour. We will examine why people vote for different political parties and how their behaviour is shaped by the different mobilisation strategies of political parties and other institutional arrangements. We will consider how social divisions are translated in to political divisions, and how the mechanisms of accountability and representation operate in different political and economic contexts. To what extent do people vote along policy lines? To what extent do they vote along social lines? How have these changed over time?

- Public Opinion and political participation In this unit we will examine the various ways in which people try to influence the political process by participating in different types of political activity. We will examine formal types of participation, such as turnout as well as more direct forms of political action, such as participation in protests and social movements. In doing so we will look at how political behaviour has changed over time and consider the implications for representative democracy.

- Introduction to Quantitative Research Methods in Politics and International Relations You will be introduced to quantitative methods commonly used in the study of Politics and International Relations. You will acquire the skills to understand, critically analyse and carry out a range of quantitative techniques, using statistical software packages such as SPSS. No prior expertise in maths or statistics is required.

- Dissertation (MSc only) The dissertation gives you the opportunity to study an aspect of political behaviour in depth. You will be assigned a dissertation supervisor and the length of the piece will be 12-15,000 words.

Elective course units:
- British Political Parties This unit explains what British political parties stand for and how they function and interact with other parts of the political system. You will gain knowledge of the 'nuts and bolts'of the parties in question, and will also gain useful insights into the difficulties of political leadership, the centrality of political executives and the interdependence of executives with other parts of the political system.

- Public Policy This unit examines the policy making process in comparative context. You will gain knowledge about the actors involved in the policy making process: how policy is made and what impact it has on different policy domains in different institutional contexts.

- Introduction to Qualitative Methods in Politics and International Relations You will be provided with an introduction to core theories and qualitative approaches in politics and international relations. You will examine a number of explanatory/theoretical frameworks, their basic assumptions, strengths and weaknesses, and concrete research applications.You will consider the various qualitative techniques available for conducting search research, the range of decisions qualitative researchers face, and the trade-offs researchers must consider when designing qualitative research.

On completion of the course graduates will have:
- an advanced knowledge and critical understanding of key concepts, theoretical debates, and developments related to elections, public opinion, public policy and parties

- a sound knowledge of the texts, theories and methods used to enhance understanding of the issues, processes and phenomena associated with particular fields of inquiry

- an advanced knowledge and critical understanding of research methods within the disciplines of politics and international relations

- a solid foundation for progression to either a politics-related career, public policy careers, research or continued academic study.

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including coursework, examinations and a dissertation.

Employability & career opportunities

Our graduates are highly employable and, in recent years, have entered many different politics and international relations-related areas, including roles as officials in local government, personnel officers and higher education lecturers. This course also equips you with a solid foundation for continued PhD studies.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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This course focuses on the political development goals of sustainable peace, good governance and stable democracy. Read more
This course focuses on the political development goals of sustainable peace, good governance and stable democracy. Drawing on different theoretical approaches and various empirical examples throughout the degree programme, it asks students to critically assess alternative suggestions for establishing peace and inclusive, durable democracies in developing countries.

Key topics include inter alia the possible definitions, arguable causes and consequences of democracy; the political, social and economic effects of different political institutions; and the typically contested origins of violent intrastate conflicts as well as the suggestions that have been made to help overcome them.

The course adopts a unique interdisciplinary approach which is grounded in the acknowledgment that it is extremely difficult to meet international development targets in states experiencing endemic political instability, violent civil conflict, gross human rights abuses and acute crises of governance.

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The MSc in International Relations, the largest Masters stream offered by the Department of Politics and International Relations, allows you the opportunity to engage critically with broad issues in various regions around the globe. Read more
The MSc in International Relations, the largest Masters stream offered by the Department of Politics and International Relations, allows you the opportunity to engage critically with broad issues in various regions around the globe. The core of the programme introduces key themes and approaches to the study of international politics, and then allows you to bring these to bear on social, economic, and political interactions of key actors in world politics.

You will study a mixture of core units and elective options, including a generous choice of free options, and write a supervised dissertation over the summer. Option courses for the programme do vary from year to year, but normally include courses on US foreign policy, south Asian politics, EU foreign and security policy, media and war, and international law. Teaching is conducted primarily in small group seminars that meet weekly for two hours, supplemented by individual tuition for the dissertation.

This course is also offered at Postgraduate Diploma level for those who do not have the academic background necessary to begin an advanced Masters degree. The structure of the Diploma is identical except that you will not write a dissertation. If you are successful on the Diploma you may transfer to the MSc, subject to academic approval.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/politicsandir/coursefinder/mscpgdipinternationalrelations.aspx

Why choose this course?

- The Department of Politics and International Relations is a young, vibrant and rapidly-rising department and was ranked in the Top 10 small politics departments in the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise (RAE).

- The course is taught by world-class scholars and informed by cutting-edge research.

- The course offers an advanced grounding in international relations while allowing you to specialise in particular issues or regions of interest.

- Our international cohort of students will provide you with excellent opportunities to obtain genuinely global perspectives.

Department research and industry highlights

- The Centre for European Politics was officially launched by Lord Mandelson in September 2007, with the mission of producing research in two principal areas: the study of democracy in Europe, and Europe as an actor in world politics. Under the leadership of Co-Directors Dr Alister Miskimmon and Dr James Sloam, it has recently hosted a number of high-profile speakers, including Lord Mandelson, Professor Simon Hix (LSE), Roger Liddle (Policy Network), John Peet (The Economist), Sir Stephen Wall (former European policy advisor to Tony Blair), and David Willetts MP (Shadow Secretary of State for Innovations, Universities and Skills).
Recent funded research projects include: a European Union Committee of the Regions consultancy on EU External Relations and European Neighbourhood Policy; an EU-funded Workshop on the Review of the European Union Budget; and Teaching Democracy.

- The Centre for Global and Transnational Politics is devoted to the multi-disciplinary exploration of global and transnational processes. Led by its Co-Directors Dr Chris Rumford and Professor Sandra Halperin, its central concern is to theorise and conceptualise the substance of, and connections between and among, political processes that operate at all levels or scales: the local, national, international, transnational, and global.

- The Centre recently won £54,000 from NORFACE, a partnership of European Research Councils including the ESRC, for a pan-European research network on globalisation and the transformation of Europe's borders, and £20,000 from the joint AHRC/ESRC Religion and Society programme for a research network on the normative foundations of public policy in a multi-faith society.
Dr Yasmin Khan’s recent book The Great Partition: The Making of India and Pakistan (Yale University Press) won the Royal Historical Society’s Gladstone Book Prize of 2007.

- The New Political Communication Unit’s research agenda focuses on the impact of new media and communication technologies on politics, policy and governance. Dr Ben O'Loughlin and Akil N. Awan, together with colleague Andrew Hoskins at the University of Warwick, were awarded £300,000 from the ESRC for a study of terrorist networks on the internet.
Unit Co-Director Professor Andrew Chadwick is one of the founding members of the US National Science Foundation's International Working Group on Online Consultation and Public Policymaking, a three year project focusing on how political interaction on the internet can contribute to better government policy. It is funded through part of an overall grant of $1m to the State University of New York at Albany, from the NSF Digital Government Programme. Andrew Chadwick’s recent book Internet Politics (Oxford University Press) was awarded one of the American Sociological Association Best Book Prizes in 2007.

- The Contemporary Political Theory Research Group was founded in October 2009, as a result of the development of political theory at postgraduate level and growth in academic staff numbers having created the critical mass it required. The group organizes its activities collectively, focusing on issues around contemporary pluralism, liberalism, democratic theory and radical politics. It brings together staff working in contemporary Continental philosophy, normative political theory, and American pragmatism, and its postgraduate members include two students on the College’s most prestigious studentship, the Reid Award. The group also has ties to the College’s Philosophy Team and the interdepartmental Humanities and Arts Research Centre.

On completion of the course graduates will have:

- advanced knowledge and critical understanding of key concepts, theoretical debates, and developments related to international relations

- sound knowledge of the texts, theories and methods used to enhance understanding of the issues, processes and phenomena
- associated with particular fields of politics and international relations

- aadvanced knowledge and critical understanding of research methods within the disciplines of politics and international relations
a solid foundation for progression to either a politics-related career or continued academic study.

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including coursework, examinations and a dissertation.

Employability & career opportunities

Our graduates are highly employable and, in recent years, have entered many different politics and international relations-related areas, including roles as officials in local government, personnel officers and higher education lecturers. This course also equips you with a solid foundation for continued PhD studies.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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Established in 1987, this very popular programme is the oldest Masters degree in Middle East Politics in the UK. Read more
Established in 1987, this very popular programme is the oldest Masters degree in Middle East Politics in the UK.

As a student here you will examine key issues in Middle Eastern domestic and regional politics, developing a critical understanding of the patterns of state-society interaction in the region, the processes of state formation, the constitution of social and political forces, and an awareness of the different perspectives and debates within this field.

This programme particularly explores the meaning of democracy within an Arabo-Islamic setting, developing your critical awareness of debates about democracy as well as the strategies and dynamics of political liberation in the Arab world. Our discussions will be located within discourses and counter-discourses on Orientalism, Occidentalism, Islamism, secularism, and civil society; and we will apply the concepts and methodologies discussed to concrete situations through our discussion of specific case studies from the Arab Maghrib and Mashriq.

To add a further dynamic to your studies you will also have the opportunity to take a beginners level introductory course in Persian, Arabic or Kurdish as part of this Masters programme.

Further information on this programme can be found on our website: http://www.exeter.ac.uk/postgraduate/taught/politics/politics-international-relations-middle-east

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This Masters programme enables you to acquire and develop skills as an independent researcher in the field of classics. We offer a broad range of options which can either be used to construct a self-contained programme of study or act as the springboard for doctoral research. Read more
This Masters programme enables you to acquire and develop skills as an independent researcher in the field of classics. We offer a broad range of options which can either be used to construct a self-contained programme of study or act as the springboard for doctoral research.

Why this programme

◾You will have the opportunity to begin or continue the study of Latin or Greek, enabling those who have not had a ‘traditional’ classical education to acquire linguistic skills necessary for progression to higher research in classics.
◾The programme draws on the University’s rich holdings of ancient material culture (particularly coins) and manuscripts where appropriate.
◾If you have studied classics at undergraduate level and want to take your studies to a higher level; or if you have a background in other periods of history, philosophy, art or literature and want to develop your studies with reference to the ancient world; this programme is designed for you.

Programme structure

Core courses

◾Research training
◾Dissertation.

Optional courses

Options are available via both linguistic and non-linguistic pathways.
◾Thucydides
◾Explorations of the Classical Tradition
◾Ancient Drama
◾Democracy and Governance

You can also take courses in elementary and advanced Greek and Latin languages.

It is also possible to take masters-level courses offered by other subject areas in the College of Arts.

Core and optional courses

Core Courses

Research training (20 credits)

This offers a range of options taught by members of the Classics department. Some provide training in skills relevant to the disciplines such as epigraphy, papyrology or metre. Others develop skills as members of a disciplinary community: the ability to participate in seminar discussion, to respond orally and in written form to the written work of their peers and of established scholars and to present their own work to academic audiences. It runs throughout semesters one and two.

Dissertation (60 credits)

The dissertation is 12,000-15,000 words in length, and must be submitted in September of the year following the start of the course (full-time students) or two years later (part-time students). The dissertation allows students to pursue a particular topic in a depth not possible in the taught options and, whilst it is a self-contained project, may provide the starting-point for subsequent doctoral study. The exact topic will typically emerge as the outcome of a process of negotiation between the individual student and the convenor.

Optional Courses

The options available will vary from year to year depending upon operational factors such as patterns of study leave and the evolving research interests of academic staff. Most modules are available via both linguistic and non-linguistic pathways.
Courses currently available include:
◾Thucydides
◾Explorations of the Classical Tradition
◾ Ancient Drama
◾Democracy and Governance

Language courses

These offer elementary and advanced Greek and Latin language training for postgraduates. Students intending to progress to M.Phil. or PhD, who do not already hold a Level 1 qualification in Latin or Greek, should normally choose 40 credits of language modules. No more than 40 credits of language options may normally be taken as part of a student’s M.Litt. (T) curriculum.

Further topics

A range of other courses are available to MLitt students, drawing on masters courses available elsewhere in the College of Arts and on specialist options taught with the Classics Honours programme. These vary from year to year.

Career prospects

You will develop a broad range of intellectual and transferable skills that employers are looking for. Graduates have found careers in teaching, librarianship and the heritage sector. Over half of our Masters students proceed to PhD. Glasgow PhD graduates currently hold university posts in the UK, rest of Europe, US and Africa.

Positions held by recent graduates include University Teacher, Business Archive Cataloguer, Policy and Governance Manager, Market Research Coordinator and Underwriter.

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