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Masters Degrees (Defense)

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There are two options within our master’s program, both of which lead to the MS degree. the thesis option, and the coursework option. Read more
There are two options within our master’s program, both of which lead to the MS degree: the thesis option, and the coursework option.

Plan I (Thesis Option)

The Plan I master’s degree requires a minimum of 30 credit hours — 24 hours of coursework and 6 hours of thesis research (CH 699).

Four lecture courses (12 credit hours) are required for this degree option. At least two of these courses must be in the student’s major area, and at least one must be outside the major area.

In addition to formal coursework, students will generally register for 10 hours of advanced research technique courses in their major area. Students will also take at least 6 hours of thesis research (CH 699).

Students will present a research seminar in their second year prior to the oral defense of their thesis. Students will register for the seminar course (CH 586) in the semester that they give their seminar.

Each student will meet with their thesis committee in the first semester of their third semester (September of the second year for students starting in the fall semester) to present an initial research review (IRR). In the IRR, the student will describe the progress made on the thesis project to his or her committee. The student will also discuss the work remaining to complete the thesis research.

Upon completing their research, the student will prepare a thesis according to the UA Graduate School’s guidelines. The thesis should be distributed to the thesis committee two weeks prior to the oral defense.

The student’s research advisor and thesis committee will read the thesis and meet to hear an oral defense of the thesis. The oral defense will serve as the comprehensive exam for the MS degree.

Plan II (Coursework Option)

The Plan II option requires a minimum of 30 credit hours of coursework.

Six lecture courses (18 hours) are required. Four of these courses will be in the student’s major, and two will be outside the major area of study.

The remaining 12 hours of the program will be made up of the seminar course (CH 586) and research techniques courses in the student’s major area.

Each student in this program will present a seminar on a literature topic not related to his or her research during their second year in the program. This seminar will serve as the comprehensive exam for the Plan II master’s degree.

Students completing a terminal Plan II master’s must have either completed the IRR research review, or hold a short final defense with their graduate committee. The student will complete a short written document and discuss their research with their committee.

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Computer Science Departmental degree requirements for the master’s degree, which are in addition to those established by the College of Engineering and the Graduate School (http://graduate.ua.edu/), are as follows for Plan I and Plan II students. Read more
Computer Science Departmental degree requirements for the master’s degree, which are in addition to those established by the College of Engineering and the Graduate School (http://graduate.ua.edu/), are as follows for Plan I and Plan II students.

- Master of Science–Thesis Option (http://cs.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/#thesis)
- Master of Science–Non-Thesis Option (http://cs.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/#nonthesis)
- Timetable for the Submission of Graduate School Forms for an MS Degree (http://cs.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/#timetable)

Visit the website http://cs.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/

MASTER OF SCIENCE–THESIS OPTION (PLAN I):

30 CREDIT HOURS
Each candidate must earn a minimum of 24 semester hours of credit for coursework, plus a 6-hour thesis under the direction of a faculty member. Unlike the general College of Engineering requirements, graduate credit may not be obtained for courses at the 400-level.

Degree Requirements Effective Fall 2011

Credit Hours
The student must successfully complete 30 total credit hours, as follows:

- 24 hours of CS graduate-level course work

- 6 hours of CS 599 Master’s Thesis Research: Thesis Research.

- Completion of at least one 500-level or 600-level course in each of the four core areas (applications, software, systems and theory). These courses must be taken within the department and selected from the following:
Applications: CS 528, CS 535, CS 557, CS 560, CS 609, CS 615
Software: CS 503, CS 507, CS 515, CS 516, CS 534, CS 600, CS 603, CS 607, CS 614, CS 630
Systems: CS 526, CS 538, CS 567, CS 606, CS 613, CS 618
Theory: CS 500, CS 570, CS 575, CS 601, CS 602, CS 612

- No more than 12 hours from CS 511, CS 512, CS 591, CS 592, CS 691, CS 692 and non-CS courses may be counted towards the coursework requirements for the master’s degree. Courses taken outside of CS are subject to the approval of the student’s advisor.

- Additional Requirements -

- The student will select a thesis advisor and a thesis committee. The committee must contain at least four members, including the thesis advisor. At least two members are faculty of the Computer Science department, and at least one member must be from outside the Department of Computer Science.

- The student will develop a written research proposal. This should contain an introduction to the research area, a review of relevant literature in the area, a description of problems to be investigated, an identification of basic goals and objectives of the research, a methodology and timetable for approaching the research, and an extensive bibliography.

- The student will deliver an oral presentation of the research proposal, which is followed by a question-and-answer session that is open to all faculty members and which covers topics related directly or indirectly to the research area. The student’s committee will determine whether the proposal is acceptable based upon both the written and oral presentations.

- The student will develop a written thesis that demonstrates that the student has performed original research that makes a definite contribution to current knowledge. Its format and content must be acceptable to both the student’s committee and the Graduate School.

- The student will defend the written thesis. The defense includes an oral presentation of the thesis research, followed by a question-and-answer session. The student’s committee will determine whether the defense is acceptable.

- The student will complete an oral comprehensive exam. This exam is scheduled with the Department Head prior to the semester in which the student intends to graduate.

- Other requirements may be specified by the Graduate School (http://graduate.ua.edu/) and by the College of Engineering.

Degree Requirements Prior to Fall 2011

Credit hours

The student must successfully complete 30 total credit hours, as follows:

- 6 hours of CS 599 Master’s Thesis Research

- 24 hours of CS graduate-level course work with a grade of A or B, including the following courses completed at The University of Alabama:
At least 3 hours of theory courses (CS 500 Discrete math, CS 601 Algorithms, CS 602 Formal languages, CS 612 Data structures)

At least 3 hours of software courses (CS 600 Software engineering, CS 603 Programming languages, CS 607 Human-computer interaction, CS 614 Compilers, CS630 Empirical Software Engineering)

At least 3 hours of systems courses (CS 567 Computer architecture, CS 606 Operating systems, CS 613 Networks, CS 618 Wireless networks)

At least 3 hours of applications courses (CS 535 Graphics, CS 560 or 591 Robotics, CS 591 Security, CS 609 Databases)

- Additional Requirements -

- The student will select a thesis advisor and a thesis committee. The committee must contain at least four members, including the thesis advisor. At least two members are faculty of the Computer Science department, and at least one member must be from outside the Department of Computer Science.

- The student will develop a written research proposal. This should contain an introduction to the research area, a review of relevant literature in the area, a description of problems to be investigated, an identification of basic goals and objectives of the research, a methodology and timetable for approaching the research, and an extensive bibliography.

- The student will deliver an oral presentation of the research proposal, which is followed by a question-and-answer session that is open to all faculty members and which covers topics related directly or indirectly to the research area. The student’s committee will determine whether the proposal is acceptable based upon both the written and oral presentations.

- The student will develop a written thesis that demonstrates that the student has performed original research that makes a definite contribution to current knowledge. Its format and content must be acceptable to both the student’s committee and the Graduate School.

- The student will defend the written thesis. The defense includes an oral presentation of the thesis research, followed by a question-and-answer session. The student’s committee will determine whether the defense is acceptable.

- The student will complete an oral comprehensive exam. This exam is scheduled with the Department Head prior to the semester in which the student intends to graduate.

- Other requirements may be specified by the Graduate School (http://graduate.ua.edu/) and by the College of Engineering.

MASTER OF SCIENCE–NON-THESIS OPTION (PLAN II):

30 CREDIT HOURS
Each candidate must earn a minimum of 30 semester hours of credit for coursework, which may include a 3-hour non-thesis project under the direction of a faculty member. Unlike the general College of Engineering requirements, graduate credit may not be obtained for courses at the 400-level.

Degree Requirements Effective Fall 2011

The student must successfully complete 30 total credit hours, as follows:

- Completion of at least one 500-level or 600-level course in each of the four core areas (applications, software, systems and theory).
Applications: CS 528, CS 535, CS 557, CS 560, CS 609, CS 615
Software: CS 503, CS 507, CS 515, CS 516, CS 534, CS 600, CS 603, CS 607, CS 614, CS 630
Systems: CS 526, CS 538, CS 567, CS 606, CS 613, CS 618
Theory: CS 500, CS 570, CS 575, CS 601, CS 602, CS 612

- No more than 12 hours from CS 511, CS 512, CS 591, CS 592, CS 691, CS 692 and non-CS courses may be counted towards the coursework requirements for the master’s degree. Courses taken outside of CS are subject to the approval of the student’s advisor.

- The student may elect to replace 3 hours of course work with 3 hours of CS 598 Research Not Related to Thesis: Non-thesis Project. This course should be proposed in writing in advance, approved by the instructor, and a copy placed in the student’s file. The proposal should specify both the course content and the specific deliverables that will be evaluated to determine the course grade.

- Additional Requirements -

- The student will complete an oral comprehensive exam. This exam is scheduled with the Department Head prior to the semester in which the student intends to graduate.

- Other requirements may be specified by the Graduate School and by the College of Engineering.

Degree Requirements Prior to Fall 2011

Credit hours

The student must successfully complete 30 total credit hours of CS graduate-level course work with a grade of A or B, as follows:

- The following courses will be completed at The University of Alabama:
At least 3 hours of theory courses (CS 500 Discrete math, CS 601 Algorithms, CS 602 Formal languages, CS 612 Data structures)

At least 3 hours of software courses (CS 600 Software engineering, CS 603 Programming languages, CS 607 Human-computer interaction, CS 614 Compilers, CS630 Empirical Software Engineering)

At least 3 hours of systems courses (CS 567 Computer architecture, CS 606 Operating systems, CS 613 Networks, CS 618 Wireless networks)

At least 3 hours of applications courses (CS 535 Graphics, CS 560 or 591 Robotics, CS 591 Security, CS 609 Databases)

- The student may elect to replace 3 hours of course work with 3 hours of CS 598 Research Not Related to Thesis: Non-thesis Project. This course should be proposed in writing in advance, approved by the instructor, and a copy placed in the student’s file. The proposal should specify both the course content and the specific deliverables that will be evaluated to determine the course grade.

- Additional Requirements -

- The student will complete an oral comprehensive exam. This exam is scheduled with the Department Head prior to the semester in which the student intends to graduate.

- Other requirements may be specified by the Graduate School and by the College of Engineering.

TIMETABLE FOR THE SUBMISSION OF GRADUATE SCHOOL FORMS FOR AN MS DEGREE
This document identifies a timetable for the submission of all Graduate School paperwork associated with the completion of an M.S. degree

- For students in Plan I students only (thesis option) after a successful thesis proposal defense, you should submit the Appointment/Change of a Masters Thesis Committee form

- The semester before, or no later than the first week in the semester in which you plan to graduate, you should “Apply for Graduation” online in myBama.

- In the semester in which you apply for graduation, the Graduate Program Director will contact you about the Comprehensive Exam.

Find out how to apply here - http://graduate.ua.edu/prospects/application/

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The joint MA degree in art history builds upon the combined resources of Alabama’s two premier institutions of higher learning. The University of Alabama and The University of Alabama at Birmingham. Read more
The joint MA degree in art history builds upon the combined resources of Alabama’s two premier institutions of higher learning: The University of Alabama and The University of Alabama at Birmingham.

One Program, Two Campuses

Students enroll on one of the two campuses and take the majority of their courses on that campus, but they also take 6 hours of art history on the other campus and have access to the library holdings (including in the visual arts) of both campuses.

An art history symposium offered each year on alternating campuses provides the students in the program with an opportunity to present a formal paper in an informal setting. A highlight of our annual symposium is the visit by a renowned art historian who participates by meeting the students and discussing the papers.

After Graduation

The MA degree in art history is an appropriate terminal degree for positions that are open in museums, galleries, libraries, and archives, and in the fields of teaching at the junior college level. Graduates of the program have secured positions in area museums, including the Birmingham Museum of Art, the Montgomery Museum of Arts and the Mobile Arts Museum, and as visual arts curators and teachers of art history in area colleges and universities, including Livingston College, Shelton State College, and Jefferson State College. Students interested in pursuing a teaching career at the University level are encouraged to continue their study of art history in a doctoral program; graduates of the joint MA program in art history have been accepted into the PhD programs of Rochester University, Emory University, Kansas University, and Florida State University.

Degree Requirements

The MA in art history requires completion of 24 semester hours in art history, a comprehensive exam, and a written thesis.

Coursework

The MA requires 24 semester hours of art history coursework, of which 6 hours may be taken in a related field, such as history, religion, or anthropology. Courses are grouped into seven general areas: Early Modern (Renaissance and Baroque), 19th-century, Modern, Contemporary, American (including African American) and South Asian.* Students must identify a major area and a minor area.

A required course, ARH 550, Literature of Art, is offered once a year on alternating campuses. A maximum of 6 hours of 400-level courses may be taken for graduate credit. Students enrolled on The University of Alabama campus must take 6 hours of coursework at the University of Alabama at Birmingham.

*Students may take classes in South Asian art, but it cannot be their major field.

Comprehensive Exam

A reading knowledge of French or German must be demonstrated before the student is eligible to take the comprehensive written exam. The language requirement may be satisfied either by completing both semesters of the graduate reading proficiency sequence offered by the Department of Modern Languages and Classics or by scheduling a written exam with the appropriate language area in the Department of Modern Languages and Classics.

The student who has completed 24 semester hours of graduate coursework and satisfied the language requirement is ready to be examined in a written comprehensive exam administered in the fall and spring semesters. The written comprehensive exam is divided into two parts: (1) a slide exam that tests the student’s broad knowledge of the history of Western art, and (2) an essay portion that tests for expertise in two fields of concentration.

The student must declare intent to take the exam in writing to the director of graduate studies in art history at least one month prior to the exam date. At that time an exam committee is formed that includes at least two art history professors from the Tuscaloosa campus and one art history professor from the Birmingham campus. The committee members represent the two areas of concentration declared by the student. The committee evaluates the written exam and notifies the candidate of the results. An exam must be judged to be of at least “B” quality in order to be considered a pass. A student who does not pass the exam may take it once more at the normally scheduled exam time.

Thesis

The MA degree also requires a written thesis submitted to the Graduate School. In consultation with a professor, the student identifies a thesis topic. (Often, a thesis topic originates with a written seminar paper.) The thesis proposal is a brief statement of the topic for research, a summary description of the individual thesis chapters, and a working bibliography. The thesis advisor circulates the thesis proposal among the committee members for their approval. The thesis committee is usually but not always identical to the student’s exam committee. The student writes the thesis while enrolled in thesis hours (ARH 599) for up to 6 hours. When the thesis is completed to the satisfaction of the thesis advisor it is distributed to the thesis committee for comments. The final step in the completion of the thesis is the oral defense. In the oral defense the student justifies the methodology and the conclusions of the thesis to the committee.

The student must complete all of the required revisions and corrections to the thesis to the satisfaction of the committee before submitting the finished thesis to the Graduate School. The final written thesis must conform to the requirements of the Graduate School for it to be accepted. The student must provide an electronic copy of the thesis for The University of Alabama at Birmingham.

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The master of science degree in game design and development explores the entertainment technology landscape, along with other related areas of software development. Read more

Program overview

The master of science degree in game design and development explores the entertainment technology landscape, along with other related areas of software development. The program has its technical roots in the computing and information science disciplines, while simultaneously covering the breadth of the game development field through course work in topics such as computer graphics, game engines, interactive narrative, and game design. The degree is specifically for students who aspire to careers within the professional gaming industry or a related field such as simulation, edutainment, or visualization.

This is a two-year, on-campus, cohort-based program in which students are admitted through a portfolio review process. During the second year, students form development teams that construct a working game engine and software title as the program capstone experience. This requirement includes both individual and group expectations. The capstone culminates in a defense before program faculty, as well as a public exhibition. Combined, these requirements provide a unique and comprehensive educational experience for individuals who aspire to a career in the game development industry.

Plan of study

The program's curriculum consists of required courses, a choice of five advanced electives, and a capstone experience.

Capstone experience

During the second year, students complete a team-based capstone experience where students present and defend their work. This presentation includes a faculty review, which constitutes the capstone defense, a public presentation, and a demonstration.

Curriculum

Game design and development, MS degree, typical course sequence:
First Year
-Game Development Processes
-Game Design
-Gameplay and Prototyping
-Colloquium in Game Design and Development
-Game Industry Themes and Perspectives
-Advanced Electives
Second Year
-Capstone Design
-Advanced Electives
-Game Industry Themes and Perspectives
-Capstone Development

See website for further details of available electives: https://www.rit.edu/programs/game-design-and-development-ms

Other admission requirements

-Submission of a portfolio and/or scores from the Graduate Record Exam (GRE) is required. If you choose to submit a portfolio it should include evidence of individual and group projects (clearly marked as such) relevant to the area you wish to study within the degree program.
-Complete a graduate application.
-International applicants whose native language is not English must submit scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). A minimum score of 570 (paper-based) or 88 (Internet-based) is required. International applicants also are required to submit scores from the Graduate Record Exam (GRE).

Due to the cohort nature of the program, students are admitted in the fall semester only. Admission to the program is highly competitive. While GRE scores are not required for domestic students, students may submit scores to strengthen their application. Those applicants with a GPA below 3.25 are required to submit GRE scores.

Additional information

Prerequisites:
Students are expected to have at least one year of significant programming experience in a current object-oriented language—preferably C++ or Java—and a solid working knowledge of website development and interactive multimedia concepts. If students do not have these prerequisites, additional course work may be recommended to bridge any educational gaps.

Maximum time limit:
University policy requires that graduate programs be completed within seven years of the student's initial registration for courses in the program. Bridge courses are excluded.

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The Master of Arts in International Affairs (MIN) takes full advantage of Paris’s multicultural dimensions and central role in international economics, politics, and social issues. Read more
The Master of Arts in International Affairs (MIN) takes full advantage of Paris’s multicultural dimensions and central role in international economics, politics, and social issues. The program’s balance of intellectual and theoretical mastery with hands-on, project-based learning prepares you for a successful professional life.

The MA in International Affairs provides:
-The opportunity to earn an American master’s degree in France.
-A mix of practical and theoretical knowledge of international affairs, conflict resolution, and civil society development.
-A global network to launch a career in the NGO sector or with an international institution, national government, or multinational corporation.

1 year full-time or 2 years part-time

The linguistic and cultural diversity of our student body is one of our biggest strengths—and the perfect community in which to study international affairs. Students in the program come from educational institutions from across the world, having earned the equivalent of a BA degree in International Affairs or a closely related field—and from the working worlds of international institutions, NGOs, and policy making.

We offer the option to follow either a one-year full-time or two-year part-time course of study. Students in the one-year program immerse themselves fully in their studies and finish the program faster. The two-year program allows Paris-based professionals the chance to invest in their futures while keeping their jobs.

Both programs offer the same rigorous curriculum with students achieving the same rewarding learning goals.

Challenging course work, compelling experiences

Coursework for the 38-credit MA is taught entirely in English at AUP. The full-time program is composed of two semesters of course work with an additional summer semester for completion and defense of the required research project. The part-time program is four semesters of course work with the additional summer semester.

The program requirements for both options include:
-Five courses (20 credits) exploring international relations, conflict management, and other subjects crucial to a well-rounded understanding of international affairs. A mix of core and elective courses ensures a solid foundation in the discipline plus the chance to investigate your own special interests.
-Five modules (10 credits) taught by visiting professionals that offer practical, hands-on training in short, workshop style seminars. These intensive experiences may include anything from a simulation of responding to a real-life conflict situation to creating plans for a virtual NGO to practice financial NGO management.
-One research methods seminar (2 credits) which will help prepare you for….
-A thesis (6 credits), a 12,000 word research project based on fieldwork or an internship experience that allows you to delve deep into a topic that interests you. A defense of your research project before a jury of experts, including the faculty’s readers, is required.

Coursework Masters

The Master of Arts in International Affairs is a 38 credit Coursework Masters consisting of 2.5 semesters taken over the course of one calendar year. Through a carefully crafted curriculum it transmits essential analytic and problem-solving skills in the discipline of international affairs.

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The MFA program in photography and related media emphasizes a broad interpretation of photography as a conceptual art form, with the intention of inspiring and nurturing the individuality of each student as a creative, productive artist. Read more

The MFA program in photography and related media emphasizes a broad interpretation of photography as a conceptual art form, with the intention of inspiring and nurturing the individuality of each student as a creative, productive artist. The program encourages graduate study in photography and related media as a means to personal, aesthetic, intellectual, and career development.

The curriculum provides a focus of study that is continually sensitive to the needs of each student, building upon the strengths each individual brings to the program. Successful completion of the program enables students to seek careers in fields including education, museum or gallery work, or as self-employed visual artists.

PROGRAM GOALS

The program provides students with the opportunity to use the still and moving image as a means to:

  • pursue a professional career and earn a livelihood
  • enrich their personal lives and society as a whole
  • create a community of creativity, scholarship, and purpose 

PLAN OF STUDY

Distribution of work within these guidelines is subject to modification based upon the candidate’s background, abilities, and interests. An individualized course of study is prepared with the advice of the graduate faculty and made a matter of record. Modifications in this prescribed program thereafter must be approved and recorded.

Electives

Elective courses are available in areas such as, but not limited to, video, printmaking, painting, sculpture, communication design, crafts, bookmaking, graphic design, new media, computer graphics, art history, and archival preservation and conservation. A complete list of graduate electives is available through the student's adviser. There are also graduate electives offered throughout the university. Students also have opportunities to enhance their studies through independent studies and internships.

Thesis

Matriculation from the MFA program is obtained when the student has completed and mounted their graduate thesis exhibition, successfully passed their thesis defense, and submitted their thesis publication. The thesis must be an original body of work appropriate to the major commitment of the degree. The thesis publication is a professional, published presentation of the thesis project, which must be submitted, in both print and digital form. It must contain an extended artist statement and a presentation of the majority of thesis artwork. It is prepared for inclusion in the Wallace Library, the School's Archive, and the Graduate Annex Space. The verbal defense requires a public address by the student, discussion of the thesis project, and exhibition in a digital presentation format.

ACCREDITATION

The MFA program in photography and related media and the BFA program in photographic and imaging arts are accredited by the National Association of Schools of Art and Design (NASAD).



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The Master Program in Internet and Multimedia Engineering provides advanced education on signal, image, and video processing, networking and telematics, mobile and fixed communications systems, and applied electromagnetics. Read more

The Program in a Nutshell

The Master Program in Internet and Multimedia Engineering provides advanced education on signal, image, and video processing, networking and telematics, mobile and fixed communications systems, and applied electromagnetics.

We build high-level ICT professionals in Internet, Multimedia, and Telecommunication Engineering, with vision and knowledge on the current technology evolution, and ready to face the challenges of the Internet-of-Things, Big Data, Smart Systems and Machine Learning era.

Our program has a strong characterization toward Internet engineering on one side, and toward signal processing and multimedia systems, either networked or stand-alone, on the other side.
Students learn how to address the design, management, and operation of distributed communication and processing architectures and multimedia applications, in mobility and over heterogeneous networks, with diverse levels of smartness and interactivity.

The program has 2-year duration, includes 120 ECTS, and finishes with the defense of a master thesis. Classes start in the second half of September.

The University of Genoa offers scholarships and accommodation to its students through the ALFA Liguria regional authority. Dedicated grants for the students of this program may be provided in each academic year.
Visit our website to learn more about the scholarships and the services that the University of Genoa can provide: http://www.ime.politecnica.unige.it

For Your Job and Career

Graduates’ professional opportunities include all companies needing ICT expertise for development, deployment, production, and management. The high-level scientific and technological background we offer also allows graduates to be strong candidates in Ph.D. and 2nd-level master applications.

Owing to the extensive research activity of the faculty people involved in the program, the courses are always up to date with the latest scientific and technological achievements. Professors and Research Staff are strongly involved in research projects funded by the European Commission, the European Space Agency, the Italian Space Agency, universities around the world, and many other institutions and private companies.

How to apply?

If you have a Bachelor (or equivalent) degree in ICT and wish to pursue your studies, you are very welcome.

For all foreign students: you are strongly advised to upload your curriculum, titles, and qualifications to the program website (http://www.ime.politecnica.unige.it) for a pre-evaluation, and contact the program coordinator, , asap.
Visas are generally required for non-EU students. No visa is necessary for EU students.

For students coming from outside EU: you MUST also pre-enroll to this program at the Italian embassy/consulate in your country. This step is MANDATORY for non-EU students.
DEADLINE FOR PRE-ENROLLMENT IS JULY 20, 2017.
Consular and visa procedures may be time-consuming, and acting ahead is strongly advisable.

Learn more on

http://www.ime.politecnica.unige.it

Contacts

Prof. Franco Davoli, , Master Program Coordinator
Management Office:
Admin Foreign Students Office of the University of Genoa:

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All graduate students in chemical and biological engineering are required to pass the following core graduate courses. - CHE 551 Advanced Thermodynamics I. Read more
All graduate students in chemical and biological engineering are required to pass the following core graduate courses:

- CHE 551 Advanced Thermodynamics I
- CHE 552 Transport Phenomena
- CHE 553 Computation in Chemical Engineering
- CHE 554 Chemical Reaction Engineering

Visit the website http://che.eng.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/

MASTER OF SCIENCE–THESIS OPTION (PLAN I):

30 CREDIT HOURS
Candidates for the master’s degree under Plan I must earn a minimum of 24 semester hours of credit in coursework and write a thesis (a minimum of 6 semester hours of thesis research required).

- A minimum of 24 credit hours of coursework is required.
- A minimum of 6 hours of thesis research is required.
- A student’s curriculum and thesis must be approved by the student’s graduate advisory committee. The student must pass a final comprehensive examination, which is typically a presentation and defense of the thesis. In addition, the student must satisfy all University requirements defined in the current edition of The University of Alabama Graduate Catalog.

MASTER OF SCIENCE–NON-THESIS OPTION (PLAN II):

30 CREDIT HOURS
Candidates for the master’s degree under Plan II must earn a minimum of 30 semester hours of credit and complete a culminating or “capstone experience” as described below.

- A minimum of 30 credit hours of coursework is required.
- A student’s curriculum must be approved by the student’s graduate advisory committee. The graduate advisory committee must also approve the submission of a manuscript, authored or co-authored by the candidate, to a refereed journal or conference proceeding. This publication submission shall constitute The University of Alabama Graduate School culminating experience requirement for an MS Plan II degree in chemical and biological engineering.

Find out how to apply here - http://graduate.ua.edu/prospects/application/

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UA’s Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering offers dynamic programs for students interested in a traditional electrical engineering degree or those who desire a specialization in computer engineering. Read more
UA’s Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering offers dynamic programs for students interested in a traditional electrical engineering degree or those who desire a specialization in computer engineering.

MISSION

UA’s Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering will

- provide high-quality and broad-based undergraduate and graduate education in electrical and computer engineering
- conduct high-quality research programs that will advance the state of knowledge
- contribute to the engineering profession and to society through service activities

Visit the website http://ece.eng.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/

Master of Science–Thesis Option (PLAN I):

30 Credit Hours
A minimum of 24 credit hours of coursework is required. Constraints on these 24 hours shall include:
- A minimum of 12 hours of closely related Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) designated courses in the student’s area of concentration, as defined by the advisory committee.

- A minimum of 9 hours of courses in an elective area approved by the advisory committee.

- A minimum of 3 hours of Mathematics (MATH or GES) or Science (Physics, Chemistry, or Biology) courses at the 500 level or above.

- No more than 6 hours may be from courses at the 400 level. In order to receive degree credit, 400-level courses require written application and approval by the Graduate School (http://graduate.ua.edu/) prior to the semester in which any 400-level course is to be takentaken.

A minimum of 6 hours of thesis research (ECE 599) is required.

A student’s curriculum and thesis must be approved by the student’s graduate advisory committee. The student must pass a final comprehensive examination, which is typically a presentation and defense of the thesis. In addition, the student must satisfy all University requirements defined in the current edition of The University of Alabama Graduate Catalog (http://graduate.ua.edu/catalog/index.html).

[[Master of Science–Non-Thesis Option (PLAN II):]
30 Credit Hours
A minimum of 30 credit hours of coursework is required. Constraints on these 30 hours shall include:
- A minimum of 15 hours of closely related Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) designated courses in the student’s area of concentration, as defined by the advisory committee.

- A minimum of 12 hours of courses in an elective area approved by the advisory committee.

- A minimum of 3 hours of Mathematics (MATH or GES) or Science (Physics, Chemistry, or Biology) courses at the 500 level or above.

- No more than six (6) hours may be courses at the 400 level. In order to receive degree credit, 400-level courses require written application and approval by the Graduate School prior to the semester in which any 400-level course is to be taken taken.

A student’s curriculum must be approved by the student’s graduate advisory committee. The graduate advisory committee must also approve the submission of a manuscript, authored or co-authored by the candidate, to a refereed journal or conference proceeding. This publication submission shall constitute The University of Alabama Graduate School culminating experience requirement for an MS Plan II degree in electrical and computer engineering.

Find out how to apply here - http://graduate.ua.edu/prospects/application/

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The master of arts programs in advertising and public relations are intended for those who wish to acquire advanced understanding of and skills in the development of highly effective persuasive communication. Read more
The master of arts programs in advertising and public relations are intended for those who wish to acquire advanced understanding of and skills in the development of highly effective persuasive communication. The programs focus on prevailing communication theories, current research findings, and advanced practical techniques. The faculty seeks to educate highly competent, focused students who will be recognized for their leadership qualities: the ability to discern issues both in the practice of their profession and in their role in society; the ability to develop and execute successful communication programs; and the ability to lead others effectively.

Two programs are offered: (1) a two-year thesis program with specialization in advertising or public relations (Plan I), and (2) a one-year professional program combining advertising and public relations (Plan II).

Visit the website https://apr.ua.edu/gradinfo/

Degree Requirements

- Plan I, the Two-Year Research Program -

The two-year master's degree program is intended for students seeking a strong research emphasis in their study of advertising and public relations. The Plan I program focuses on important problems and questions, gathering evidence, and setting standards for inference. The program specifically prepares students in the areas of (a) mastering the body of scholarly knowledge of advertising and public relations, and (b) contributing to the advancement of knowledge in these fields through basic and applied research. Students may decide to continue their studies, pursuing doctorates in advertising or public relations. Students in the Plan I program specialize in either advertising or public relations, learn the concepts and methods involved in productive scholarship, and collaborate with faculty members in conducting research.

Plan I requirements. Plan I is normally a two-year program and requires (a) a minimum of 30 hours of approved graduate courses, (b) demonstration of proficiency in research skills, (c) passing of a comprehensive written examination, and (d) completion and successful defense of a master's thesis. Students admitted to the program with little or no previous coursework in advertising or public relations may be required to take one or more undergraduate courses in the department to supplement their graduate studies.

Plan II, the One-Year Professional Program

The professional program is an intensive, professionally oriented, one-year program that combines advertising and public relations. Recognizing the increasingly close links between the advertising and public relations professions, the Plan II program provides advanced preparation in both disciplines. The program provides intensive training to meet specific objectives. Graduates will be prepared to:

- develop a thorough understanding of the institutions and processes involved in advertising and public relations, through a combined program of study

- use research both to generate communication strategies and to evaluate the success of communication programs

- write idea-driven persuasive communication

- plan, implement, and evaluate media plans for advertising and public relations programs and campaigns

The Plan II program is for recent college graduates who see the advantages of having advanced skills in advertising and public relations. The students will recognize that preparation in the liberal arts, business administration, or communication has provided them with important knowledge but has not sufficiently prepared them in the communication concepts and skills needed to be a leader.

Speaking and writing skills are emphasized in all courses, with frequent papers and presentations. One course each semester emphasizes writing skills involved in the advertising and public relations professions.

Plan II requirements. The one-year Plan II program requires (a) completion of a specific 33-hour program of graduate courses, (b) demonstration of proficiency in research skills, (c) passing of a comprehensive written examination, and (d) completion of a master's project in the course APR 598 Communication Workshop. Students admitted to the program will receive a list of critical readings and will be expected to become familiar with these materials before beginning the program. The program starts with a series of orientation sessions aimed at evaluating each student's grasp of the critical readings and ability to proceed with the program without further background study.

APR Graduate Course Descriptions

Note: Plan I and Plan II programs have different course requirements.

ADVERTISING & PUBLIC RELATIONS COURSES

APR 522. Media Planning: Three hours. Development of media objectives, strategies, and budgets and implementation of media plans for advertising and public relations. Each student prepares and presents a media plan.

APR 550. Communication Research Methods: Three hours. A survey of qualitative and quantitative methods in communication research.

APR 551. Seminar in Communication Theory*: Three hours. A study of the development of selected theories of communication as they pertain to interpersonal, public, and mass communication.

APR 570. Contemporary Advertising and Public Relations: Three hours. An advanced survey of the academic and professional literature underlying the contemporary practice of advertising and public relations.

APR 572. Persuasive Communication: Three hours. The practice of creating, writing, editing, and producing persuasive communication for advertising and public relations. Writing skills are exercised extensively in this course.

APR 582. Advertising and Public Relations Management: Three hours. Problems and decision-making processes involved in the management of advertising and public relations programs and organizations.

APR 583. Research Applications in Advertising and Public Relations: Three hours. Prerequisite: MC 550. Application of research methods and procedures for problem solving and impact assessment in advertising and public relations programs.

APR 590. Visual Communication: Three hours. The practice of developing ideas and creative strategies for professional evaluations about design and its application. Each student prepares a portfolio.

APR 592. Integrated Communication Project. A message-oriented course. Students conceptualize and execute integrated communication programs. Topics vary.

APR 596. Independent Study or Research: One to three hours. Prerequisite: consent of the academic adviser and instructor.

597. Communication Campaign Workshop I: Three hours. Research to develop an advertising and public relations campaign for a specific organization. This is the preparation stage for the major case study prepared by the student in APR 598.

598. Communication Campaign Workshop II (Master’s Project): Three hours. Development and presentation of a complete advertising and public relations plan and proposal for the specific organization studied in APR 597. Integration of theory, concepts, and techniques in a complete communication program.

599. Thesis Research: Three hours. Prerequisite: consent of the academic adviser.

Find out how to apply here - https://apr.ua.edu/gradinfo/applicationadmission/

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The department offers programs leading to the master of arts (M.A.) and master of public administration (M.P.A.) degrees. As a graduate student in Political Science, you are considered an important part of Department life. Read more
The department offers programs leading to the master of arts (M.A.) and master of public administration (M.P.A.) degrees.

As a graduate student in Political Science, you are considered an important part of Department life. Our graduate programs are designed to bridge the gap between your undergraduate education and your future professional life as a political scientist or public administrator. In that sense, you have made an important leap in your academic career. No longer will your classes consist merely of taking notes, writing papers, and passing exams. As a pre-professional, you are expected to contribute to the learning environment by participating actively in seminars, learning the research methods and theoretical perspectives that are relevant to your program of study, and, where appropriate, contribute original research to your field. In return, we promise to work with you to help you achieve your goals.

Master of Arts

Admission Requirements

Applicants for admission to the M.A. program must submit scores from the Graduate Record Examination general test. Additional information is in the “Academic Policies” section of this catalog.

Degree Requirements

Plans I and II. M.A. students may follow either Plan I, requiring 30 semester hours of coursework, a written comprehensive examination, a thesis, and an oral examination in defense of the thesis; or Plan II, requiring 36 hours of coursework and a written comprehensive examination.

Course requirements. Under either plan, students must take courses in three of five fields, including a core seminar in each. The available fields are American politics, comparative politics, international relations, public policy and administration, and political theory. Plan I students take 9 hours in the major field and 6 in each of two minor fields; Plan II students take 12 hours in the major field and 6 in each of two minor fields. The core seminars are PSC 610 Core Seminar in American Politics, PSC 631 Seminar in Comparative Politics, PSC 642 Concepts and Theories of International Relations, PSC 651 Political Theory Seminar, and PSC 565 Survey of Public Administration.

All students must complete PSC 521 Research Design and PSC 522 Quantitative Methods in Political Science I (or approved substitutes).

Comprehensive examination. The written comprehensive examination will cover the student’s major field and will require integration of material across courses in the field.

Thesis. After passing the written examination, a student following Plan I should prepare a thesis prospectus, which should describe the substance and methods of the thesis research, outline the thesis itself, and provide a preliminary bibliography. Once the prospectus has been approved, the chairperson will formally appoint a committee of three faculty members to supervise the thesis. The student must submit four copies of the completed thesis and must take a final oral examination to defend it and show competence in the field in which it lies. Except in unusual circumstances, the final oral examination must be taken during the fall or spring semester and before final course examinations begin. After the examination, the student must deposit two copies of the approved thesis with the Graduate School and two copies with the department.

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The department offers programs leading to the master of arts (M.A.) and master of public administration (M.P.A.) degrees. Admission Requirements. Read more
The department offers programs leading to the master of arts (M.A.) and master of public administration (M.P.A.) degrees.

Master of Public Administration

Admission Requirements

The M.P.A. is a professional degree program designed primarily for those who plan a career in federal, state, or local government. Applicants for admission to the M.P.A. program must submit scores from the Graduate Record Examination general test. Scores from the Miller Analogies Test may be submitted as supplementary information, but not as a substitute for the GRE. Additional information is in the “Academic Policies” section of this catalog.

Degree Requirements

Plans I and II. M.P.A. students may follow either Plan I, requiring 30 hours of coursework, a written comprehensive examination, a thesis, and an oral examination in defense of the thesis; or Plan II, requiring 36 hours of coursework and a written comprehensive examination. Students following Plan II may receive up to 6 hours of credit for an internship, and students following Plan I may receive up to 3 hours.

Course requirements. M.P.A. students must complete at least three of the following four courses: PSC 565Survey of Public Administration, PSC 662 Organization Theory, PSC 667 Public Budgeting, and PSC 562 Public Personnel Administration. Including the preceding, at least 18 hours must be taken from the courses listed under “Public Policy and Administration.” Student must also complete PSC 522 Quantitative Methods in Political Science I.

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The master of science degree in chemistry is offered on a full- or part-time basis. The program is designed to fill the needs of the traditional student or the practicing chemist who is employed full time and wishes to pursue a graduate degree on a part-time basis. Read more

Program overview

The master of science degree in chemistry is offered on a full- or part-time basis. The program is designed to fill the needs of the traditional student or the practicing chemist who is employed full time and wishes to pursue a graduate degree on a part-time basis. The School of Chemistry and Materials Science has research- and teaching-oriented faculty, as well as excellent equipment and facilities that enable full-time graduate students to carry on a program of independent study and develop the ability to attack scientific problems at the fundamental level. The research can result in either a thesis or a project report.Through course work and research activities, the program strives to increase the breadth and depth of the student’s background in chemistry. Students develop the ability to attack scientific problems with minimal supervision.

Plan of study

The program offers two options: a thesis option and a project option. Concentrations are available in organic chemistry, analytical chemistry, inorganic chemistry, physical chemistry, polymer chemistry, materials science, and biochemistry. Customized concentrations are available to accommodate specific student interests and needs relating to graduate study in chemistry. Each student, together with an adviser, chooses courses to create a customized curriculum that best meets their interests, needs, and career aspirations. Each student's curriculum is subject to the approval of the director of the graduate program. A deliberate effort is made to strengthen any areas of weakness indicated by the student’s undergraduate records and the placement examinations. The MS degree consists of the following requirements:

1. A minimum of 30 semester credit hours beyond the bachelor’s degree.
Courses in chemistry consist of core and focus area courses. Core courses are designed to increase a student’s breadth of chemical knowledge, while focus area courses increase depth. Core courses include four semester credit hours in Graduate Chemistry Seminar (CHEM-771, 772, 773, 774) and one credit hour in Chemistry Writing (CHEM-670). Focus area courses are chosen to address the student’s career goals and any undergraduate deficiencies in chemistry. Focus area courses must be at the graduate level and are chosen in consultation between the student and graduate adviser. Focus area courses outside of chemistry are acceptable provided they are approved by the student’s graduate adviser.

2. Research
Ten semester credit hours of research are required with the thesis option. For students who opt for the project option, four semester hours of project research are required.

3. Capstone
Students enrolled in the thesis option are expected to complete an independent research thesis and pass an oral defense. Typically, all requirements are met within two years. Students enrolled in the project option have numerous ways of satisfying the capstone requirement for their project. These include but are not limited to conference presentations, papers, journal articles, patents, and seminars.

Curriculum

Thesis and project options for the Chemistry MS degree differ in course sequence, see website for details.

Other admission requirements

-Submit official transcripts (in English) for all previously completed undergraduate or graduate course work.
-Submit scores from the Graduate Record Exam (GRE). It is recommended that candidates also submit scores from the chemistry GRE.
-Submit two letters of reference.
-Complete a graduate application.
-International applicants whose native language is not English must submit scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). International English Language Testing System (IELTS) scores will be accepted in place of the TOEFL exam. Minimum scores will vary; however, the absolute minimum score required for unconditional acceptance is 6.5. For additional information about the IELTS, please visit http://www.ielts.org. This requirement may be waived for students submitting transcripts from American universities, or those at which the language of instruction is English. Foreign students with English language deficiencies may be required to take the Michigan Test of English Language Proficiency, given by the RIT English Language Center. If a student’s score is below standard, additional course work may be recommended. Successful completion of this work is a requirement of the program. This may mean that the student will need additional time and financial resources to complete the degree program.
-As a supplement to the normal application process, it is strongly recommended that students visit RIT.

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See the department website - http://www.rit.edu/kgcoe/program/microelectronic-engineering-0. Read more
See the department website - http://www.rit.edu/kgcoe/program/microelectronic-engineering-0

The objective of the master of science degree in microelectronic engineering is to provide an opportunity for students to perform graduate-level research as they prepare for entry into either the semiconductor industry or a doctoral program. The degree requires strong preparation in the area of microelectronics and requires a thesis.

Program outcomes

- Understand the fundamental scientific principles governing solid-state devices and their incorporation into modern integrated circuits.

- Understand the relevance of a process or device, either proposed or existing, to current manufacturing practices.

- Develop in-depth knowledge in existing or emerging areas of the field of microelectronics, such as device engineering, circuit design, lithography, materials and processes, and yield and manufacturing.

- Apply microelectronic processing techniques to the creation/investigation of new process/device structures.

- Communicate technical material effectively through oral presentations, written reports, and publications.

Plan of study

The MS degree is awarded upon the successful completion of a minimum of 33 semester credit hours, including a 6 credit hour thesis.

The program consists of eight core courses, two graduate electives, 3 credits of graduate seminar and a thesis. The curriculum is designed for students who do not have an undergraduate degree in microelectronic engineering. Students who have an undergraduate degree in microelectronic engineering develop a custom course of study with their graduate adviser.

- Thesis

A thesis is undertaken once the student has completed approximately 20 semester credit hours of study. Planning for the thesis, however, should begin as early as possible. Generally, full-time students should complete their degree requirements, including thesis defense, within two years (four academic semesters and one summer term).

Curriculum

- First Year

Microelectronic Fabrication
Lithographic Materials and Processes
Thin Films
Microelectronics Research Methods
Microelectronic Man.
VLS Process Modeling
Graduate Elective*
Microelectronics Research Methods

- Second Year

Graduate Elective*
MS Thesis
Microelectronics Research Methods

* With adviser approval.
Physical Modeling of Semiconductor Devices

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This course is for you if you wish to prepare yourself for a broad spectrum of career opportunities, spanning the academic, commercial, industrial and healthcare applications of biomedical sciences. Read more
This course is for you if you wish to prepare yourself for a broad spectrum of career opportunities, spanning the academic, commercial, industrial and healthcare applications of biomedical sciences.

Course outline

This taught MSc Biomedical Science course is designed to provide training and experience in Biomedical Sciences. It offers an informed and critical appreciation of recent scientific developments. The specific aims are to:
-Provide a high level of scientific knowledge and understanding of disease processes from the molecular to the body/systems level
-Develop an informed and critical appreciation of recent scientific developments in relation to diagnostic laboratory pathology
-Enable students to gain, through a research project, additional specialist knowledge and practical expertise
-Prepare students for a broad spectrum of career opportunities spanning academic, commercial, industrial and healthcare applications of biomedical sciences. The course is also an excellent foundation for further studies leading to a PhD

[[What you will study
The programme is based around a core of six modules and a research project that provide detailed study and practical experience in key areas of biomedical sciences and in the development of professional skills. Modules are as follows:
-Human Diseases
-Immunology
-Toxicology
-Clinical and Molecular Endocrinology
-Human Physiology
-Research Methods
-Research Project

Learning, teaching & assesment

The course is assessed by a mixture of coursework, examinations, practical work, oral and written presentations. The research project module will be assessed on the basis of a submitted project report and an oral defense of a poster.

Your future career prospects

This course provides an ideal foundation for entering the pharmaceutical industry, the Scientific Civil Service or for further studies leading to a PhD. Many of our graduates have found this course to be a valuable qualification when applying for a PhD. Recent graduates have gained roles such as:
-Research Scholar, Symbiosis International University & Chest Research Foundation
-Biomedical Scientist, St George's Hospital (NHS)
-Administrative and Funding Coordinator, Access to Basic medical Care (ABC) Foundation
-Assistant Lecturer, Unspecified university
-Lab Technician, PROLIVFIC
-Lab Technologist/Army Officer, Military Hospital
-PhD, Institute of Inflammation and Repair, The University of Manchester
-Research Assistant, Aston University
-Research Consultant, Environmental sector
-Research Laboratory Technician, University of Birmingham

It must be emphasised that the course is NOT accredited by an outside organisation.

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