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There are two options within our master’s program, both of which lead to the MS degree. the thesis option, and the coursework option. Read more
There are two options within our master’s program, both of which lead to the MS degree: the thesis option, and the coursework option.

Plan I (Thesis Option)

The Plan I master’s degree requires a minimum of 30 credit hours — 24 hours of coursework and 6 hours of thesis research (CH 699).

Four lecture courses (12 credit hours) are required for this degree option. At least two of these courses must be in the student’s major area, and at least one must be outside the major area.

In addition to formal coursework, students will generally register for 10 hours of advanced research technique courses in their major area. Students will also take at least 6 hours of thesis research (CH 699).

Students will present a research seminar in their second year prior to the oral defense of their thesis. Students will register for the seminar course (CH 586) in the semester that they give their seminar.

Each student will meet with their thesis committee in the first semester of their third semester (September of the second year for students starting in the fall semester) to present an initial research review (IRR). In the IRR, the student will describe the progress made on the thesis project to his or her committee. The student will also discuss the work remaining to complete the thesis research.

Upon completing their research, the student will prepare a thesis according to the UA Graduate School’s guidelines. The thesis should be distributed to the thesis committee two weeks prior to the oral defense.

The student’s research advisor and thesis committee will read the thesis and meet to hear an oral defense of the thesis. The oral defense will serve as the comprehensive exam for the MS degree.

Plan II (Coursework Option)

The Plan II option requires a minimum of 30 credit hours of coursework.

Six lecture courses (18 hours) are required. Four of these courses will be in the student’s major, and two will be outside the major area of study.

The remaining 12 hours of the program will be made up of the seminar course (CH 586) and research techniques courses in the student’s major area.

Each student in this program will present a seminar on a literature topic not related to his or her research during their second year in the program. This seminar will serve as the comprehensive exam for the Plan II master’s degree.

Students completing a terminal Plan II master’s must have either completed the IRR research review, or hold a short final defense with their graduate committee. The student will complete a short written document and discuss their research with their committee.

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Computer Science Departmental degree requirements for the master’s degree, which are in addition to those established by the College of Engineering and the Graduate School (http://graduate.ua.edu/), are as follows for Plan I and Plan II students. Read more
Computer Science Departmental degree requirements for the master’s degree, which are in addition to those established by the College of Engineering and the Graduate School (http://graduate.ua.edu/), are as follows for Plan I and Plan II students.

- Master of Science–Thesis Option (http://cs.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/#thesis)
- Master of Science–Non-Thesis Option (http://cs.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/#nonthesis)
- Timetable for the Submission of Graduate School Forms for an MS Degree (http://cs.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/#timetable)

Visit the website http://cs.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/

MASTER OF SCIENCE–THESIS OPTION (PLAN I):

30 CREDIT HOURS
Each candidate must earn a minimum of 24 semester hours of credit for coursework, plus a 6-hour thesis under the direction of a faculty member. Unlike the general College of Engineering requirements, graduate credit may not be obtained for courses at the 400-level.

Degree Requirements Effective Fall 2011

Credit Hours
The student must successfully complete 30 total credit hours, as follows:

- 24 hours of CS graduate-level course work

- 6 hours of CS 599 Master’s Thesis Research: Thesis Research.

- Completion of at least one 500-level or 600-level course in each of the four core areas (applications, software, systems and theory). These courses must be taken within the department and selected from the following:
Applications: CS 528, CS 535, CS 557, CS 560, CS 609, CS 615
Software: CS 503, CS 507, CS 515, CS 516, CS 534, CS 600, CS 603, CS 607, CS 614, CS 630
Systems: CS 526, CS 538, CS 567, CS 606, CS 613, CS 618
Theory: CS 500, CS 570, CS 575, CS 601, CS 602, CS 612

- No more than 12 hours from CS 511, CS 512, CS 591, CS 592, CS 691, CS 692 and non-CS courses may be counted towards the coursework requirements for the master’s degree. Courses taken outside of CS are subject to the approval of the student’s advisor.

- Additional Requirements -

- The student will select a thesis advisor and a thesis committee. The committee must contain at least four members, including the thesis advisor. At least two members are faculty of the Computer Science department, and at least one member must be from outside the Department of Computer Science.

- The student will develop a written research proposal. This should contain an introduction to the research area, a review of relevant literature in the area, a description of problems to be investigated, an identification of basic goals and objectives of the research, a methodology and timetable for approaching the research, and an extensive bibliography.

- The student will deliver an oral presentation of the research proposal, which is followed by a question-and-answer session that is open to all faculty members and which covers topics related directly or indirectly to the research area. The student’s committee will determine whether the proposal is acceptable based upon both the written and oral presentations.

- The student will develop a written thesis that demonstrates that the student has performed original research that makes a definite contribution to current knowledge. Its format and content must be acceptable to both the student’s committee and the Graduate School.

- The student will defend the written thesis. The defense includes an oral presentation of the thesis research, followed by a question-and-answer session. The student’s committee will determine whether the defense is acceptable.

- The student will complete an oral comprehensive exam. This exam is scheduled with the Department Head prior to the semester in which the student intends to graduate.

- Other requirements may be specified by the Graduate School (http://graduate.ua.edu/) and by the College of Engineering.

Degree Requirements Prior to Fall 2011

Credit hours

The student must successfully complete 30 total credit hours, as follows:

- 6 hours of CS 599 Master’s Thesis Research

- 24 hours of CS graduate-level course work with a grade of A or B, including the following courses completed at The University of Alabama:
At least 3 hours of theory courses (CS 500 Discrete math, CS 601 Algorithms, CS 602 Formal languages, CS 612 Data structures)

At least 3 hours of software courses (CS 600 Software engineering, CS 603 Programming languages, CS 607 Human-computer interaction, CS 614 Compilers, CS630 Empirical Software Engineering)

At least 3 hours of systems courses (CS 567 Computer architecture, CS 606 Operating systems, CS 613 Networks, CS 618 Wireless networks)

At least 3 hours of applications courses (CS 535 Graphics, CS 560 or 591 Robotics, CS 591 Security, CS 609 Databases)

- Additional Requirements -

- The student will select a thesis advisor and a thesis committee. The committee must contain at least four members, including the thesis advisor. At least two members are faculty of the Computer Science department, and at least one member must be from outside the Department of Computer Science.

- The student will develop a written research proposal. This should contain an introduction to the research area, a review of relevant literature in the area, a description of problems to be investigated, an identification of basic goals and objectives of the research, a methodology and timetable for approaching the research, and an extensive bibliography.

- The student will deliver an oral presentation of the research proposal, which is followed by a question-and-answer session that is open to all faculty members and which covers topics related directly or indirectly to the research area. The student’s committee will determine whether the proposal is acceptable based upon both the written and oral presentations.

- The student will develop a written thesis that demonstrates that the student has performed original research that makes a definite contribution to current knowledge. Its format and content must be acceptable to both the student’s committee and the Graduate School.

- The student will defend the written thesis. The defense includes an oral presentation of the thesis research, followed by a question-and-answer session. The student’s committee will determine whether the defense is acceptable.

- The student will complete an oral comprehensive exam. This exam is scheduled with the Department Head prior to the semester in which the student intends to graduate.

- Other requirements may be specified by the Graduate School (http://graduate.ua.edu/) and by the College of Engineering.

MASTER OF SCIENCE–NON-THESIS OPTION (PLAN II):

30 CREDIT HOURS
Each candidate must earn a minimum of 30 semester hours of credit for coursework, which may include a 3-hour non-thesis project under the direction of a faculty member. Unlike the general College of Engineering requirements, graduate credit may not be obtained for courses at the 400-level.

Degree Requirements Effective Fall 2011

The student must successfully complete 30 total credit hours, as follows:

- Completion of at least one 500-level or 600-level course in each of the four core areas (applications, software, systems and theory).
Applications: CS 528, CS 535, CS 557, CS 560, CS 609, CS 615
Software: CS 503, CS 507, CS 515, CS 516, CS 534, CS 600, CS 603, CS 607, CS 614, CS 630
Systems: CS 526, CS 538, CS 567, CS 606, CS 613, CS 618
Theory: CS 500, CS 570, CS 575, CS 601, CS 602, CS 612

- No more than 12 hours from CS 511, CS 512, CS 591, CS 592, CS 691, CS 692 and non-CS courses may be counted towards the coursework requirements for the master’s degree. Courses taken outside of CS are subject to the approval of the student’s advisor.

- The student may elect to replace 3 hours of course work with 3 hours of CS 598 Research Not Related to Thesis: Non-thesis Project. This course should be proposed in writing in advance, approved by the instructor, and a copy placed in the student’s file. The proposal should specify both the course content and the specific deliverables that will be evaluated to determine the course grade.

- Additional Requirements -

- The student will complete an oral comprehensive exam. This exam is scheduled with the Department Head prior to the semester in which the student intends to graduate.

- Other requirements may be specified by the Graduate School and by the College of Engineering.

Degree Requirements Prior to Fall 2011

Credit hours

The student must successfully complete 30 total credit hours of CS graduate-level course work with a grade of A or B, as follows:

- The following courses will be completed at The University of Alabama:
At least 3 hours of theory courses (CS 500 Discrete math, CS 601 Algorithms, CS 602 Formal languages, CS 612 Data structures)

At least 3 hours of software courses (CS 600 Software engineering, CS 603 Programming languages, CS 607 Human-computer interaction, CS 614 Compilers, CS630 Empirical Software Engineering)

At least 3 hours of systems courses (CS 567 Computer architecture, CS 606 Operating systems, CS 613 Networks, CS 618 Wireless networks)

At least 3 hours of applications courses (CS 535 Graphics, CS 560 or 591 Robotics, CS 591 Security, CS 609 Databases)

- The student may elect to replace 3 hours of course work with 3 hours of CS 598 Research Not Related to Thesis: Non-thesis Project. This course should be proposed in writing in advance, approved by the instructor, and a copy placed in the student’s file. The proposal should specify both the course content and the specific deliverables that will be evaluated to determine the course grade.

- Additional Requirements -

- The student will complete an oral comprehensive exam. This exam is scheduled with the Department Head prior to the semester in which the student intends to graduate.

- Other requirements may be specified by the Graduate School and by the College of Engineering.

TIMETABLE FOR THE SUBMISSION OF GRADUATE SCHOOL FORMS FOR AN MS DEGREE
This document identifies a timetable for the submission of all Graduate School paperwork associated with the completion of an M.S. degree

- For students in Plan I students only (thesis option) after a successful thesis proposal defense, you should submit the Appointment/Change of a Masters Thesis Committee form

- The semester before, or no later than the first week in the semester in which you plan to graduate, you should “Apply for Graduation” online in myBama.

- In the semester in which you apply for graduation, the Graduate Program Director will contact you about the Comprehensive Exam.

Find out how to apply here - http://graduate.ua.edu/prospects/application/

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The Master of Arts in International Affairs (MIN) takes full advantage of Paris’s multicultural dimensions and central role in international economics, politics, and social issues. Read more
The Master of Arts in International Affairs (MIN) takes full advantage of Paris’s multicultural dimensions and central role in international economics, politics, and social issues. The program’s balance of intellectual and theoretical mastery with hands-on, project-based learning prepares you for a successful professional life.

The MA in International Affairs provides:
-The opportunity to earn an American master’s degree in France.
-A mix of practical and theoretical knowledge of international affairs, conflict resolution, and civil society development.
-A global network to launch a career in the NGO sector or with an international institution, national government, or multinational corporation.

1 year full-time or 2 years part-time

The linguistic and cultural diversity of our student body is one of our biggest strengths—and the perfect community in which to study international affairs. Students in the program come from educational institutions from across the world, having earned the equivalent of a BA degree in International Affairs or a closely related field—and from the working worlds of international institutions, NGOs, and policy making.

We offer the option to follow either a one-year full-time or two-year part-time course of study. Students in the one-year program immerse themselves fully in their studies and finish the program faster. The two-year program allows Paris-based professionals the chance to invest in their futures while keeping their jobs.

Both programs offer the same rigorous curriculum with students achieving the same rewarding learning goals.

Challenging course work, compelling experiences

Coursework for the 38-credit MA is taught entirely in English at AUP. The full-time program is composed of two semesters of course work with an additional summer semester for completion and defense of the required research project. The part-time program is four semesters of course work with the additional summer semester.

The program requirements for both options include:
-Five courses (20 credits) exploring international relations, conflict management, and other subjects crucial to a well-rounded understanding of international affairs. A mix of core and elective courses ensures a solid foundation in the discipline plus the chance to investigate your own special interests.
-Five modules (10 credits) taught by visiting professionals that offer practical, hands-on training in short, workshop style seminars. These intensive experiences may include anything from a simulation of responding to a real-life conflict situation to creating plans for a virtual NGO to practice financial NGO management.
-One research methods seminar (2 credits) which will help prepare you for….
-A thesis (6 credits), a 12,000 word research project based on fieldwork or an internship experience that allows you to delve deep into a topic that interests you. A defense of your research project before a jury of experts, including the faculty’s readers, is required.

Coursework Masters

The Master of Arts in International Affairs is a 38 credit Coursework Masters consisting of 2.5 semesters taken over the course of one calendar year. Through a carefully crafted curriculum it transmits essential analytic and problem-solving skills in the discipline of international affairs.

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The joint MA degree in art history builds upon the combined resources of Alabama’s two premier institutions of higher learning. The University of Alabama and The University of Alabama at Birmingham. Read more
The joint MA degree in art history builds upon the combined resources of Alabama’s two premier institutions of higher learning: The University of Alabama and The University of Alabama at Birmingham.

One Program, Two Campuses

Students enroll on one of the two campuses and take the majority of their courses on that campus, but they also take 6 hours of art history on the other campus and have access to the library holdings (including in the visual arts) of both campuses.

An art history symposium offered each year on alternating campuses provides the students in the program with an opportunity to present a formal paper in an informal setting. A highlight of our annual symposium is the visit by a renowned art historian who participates by meeting the students and discussing the papers.

After Graduation

The MA degree in art history is an appropriate terminal degree for positions that are open in museums, galleries, libraries, and archives, and in the fields of teaching at the junior college level. Graduates of the program have secured positions in area museums, including the Birmingham Museum of Art, the Montgomery Museum of Arts and the Mobile Arts Museum, and as visual arts curators and teachers of art history in area colleges and universities, including Livingston College, Shelton State College, and Jefferson State College. Students interested in pursuing a teaching career at the University level are encouraged to continue their study of art history in a doctoral program; graduates of the joint MA program in art history have been accepted into the PhD programs of Rochester University, Emory University, Kansas University, and Florida State University.

Degree Requirements

The MA in art history requires completion of 24 semester hours in art history, a comprehensive exam, and a written thesis.

Coursework

The MA requires 24 semester hours of art history coursework, of which 6 hours may be taken in a related field, such as history, religion, or anthropology. Courses are grouped into seven general areas: Early Modern (Renaissance and Baroque), 19th-century, Modern, Contemporary, American (including African American) and South Asian.* Students must identify a major area and a minor area.

A required course, ARH 550, Literature of Art, is offered once a year on alternating campuses. A maximum of 6 hours of 400-level courses may be taken for graduate credit. Students enrolled on The University of Alabama campus must take 6 hours of coursework at the University of Alabama at Birmingham.

*Students may take classes in South Asian art, but it cannot be their major field.

Comprehensive Exam

A reading knowledge of French or German must be demonstrated before the student is eligible to take the comprehensive written exam. The language requirement may be satisfied either by completing both semesters of the graduate reading proficiency sequence offered by the Department of Modern Languages and Classics or by scheduling a written exam with the appropriate language area in the Department of Modern Languages and Classics.

The student who has completed 24 semester hours of graduate coursework and satisfied the language requirement is ready to be examined in a written comprehensive exam administered in the fall and spring semesters. The written comprehensive exam is divided into two parts: (1) a slide exam that tests the student’s broad knowledge of the history of Western art, and (2) an essay portion that tests for expertise in two fields of concentration.

The student must declare intent to take the exam in writing to the director of graduate studies in art history at least one month prior to the exam date. At that time an exam committee is formed that includes at least two art history professors from the Tuscaloosa campus and one art history professor from the Birmingham campus. The committee members represent the two areas of concentration declared by the student. The committee evaluates the written exam and notifies the candidate of the results. An exam must be judged to be of at least “B” quality in order to be considered a pass. A student who does not pass the exam may take it once more at the normally scheduled exam time.

Thesis

The MA degree also requires a written thesis submitted to the Graduate School. In consultation with a professor, the student identifies a thesis topic. (Often, a thesis topic originates with a written seminar paper.) The thesis proposal is a brief statement of the topic for research, a summary description of the individual thesis chapters, and a working bibliography. The thesis advisor circulates the thesis proposal among the committee members for their approval. The thesis committee is usually but not always identical to the student’s exam committee. The student writes the thesis while enrolled in thesis hours (ARH 599) for up to 6 hours. When the thesis is completed to the satisfaction of the thesis advisor it is distributed to the thesis committee for comments. The final step in the completion of the thesis is the oral defense. In the oral defense the student justifies the methodology and the conclusions of the thesis to the committee.

The student must complete all of the required revisions and corrections to the thesis to the satisfaction of the committee before submitting the finished thesis to the Graduate School. The final written thesis must conform to the requirements of the Graduate School for it to be accepted. The student must provide an electronic copy of the thesis for The University of Alabama at Birmingham.

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The MFA program in imaging arts emphasizes a broad interpretation of photography as a conceptual art form, with the intention of inspiring and nurturing the individuality of each student as a creative, productive artist. Read more
The MFA program in imaging arts emphasizes a broad interpretation of photography as a conceptual art form, with the intention of inspiring and nurturing the individuality of each student as a creative, productive artist. The program encourages graduate study in photography and related media as a means to personal, aesthetic, intellectual, and career development.

The curriculum provides a flexible focus of study that is continually sensitive to the needs of each student, building upon the strengths each individual brings to the program. Successful completion of the program enables students to seek careers in many fields including education, museum or gallery work, or as self-employed visual artists.

Program goals

The program provides students with the opportunity to use the still and moving image as a means to:

- pursue a professional career and earn a livelihood,
- enrich their personal lives and society as a whole, and
- create a community of creativity, scholarship, and purpose.

Plan of study

Distribution of work within these guidelines is subject to modification based upon the candidate’s background, abilities, and interests. An individualized course of study is prepared with the advice of the graduate faculty and made a matter of record. Modifications in this prescribed program thereafter must be approved and recorded.

Electives

Elective courses are available throughout the College of Imaging Arts and Sciences in areas such as but not limited to: video, printmaking, painting, sculpture, communication design, crafts, bookmaking, graphic design, new media, computer graphics, art history, and archival preservation and conservation. A complete list of graduate electives offered in the college is available through the student's adviser. There are also graduate electives offered throughout the university. Students also have opportunities to enhance their studies through independent studies and internships.

Thesis

Matriculation from the MFA program is obtained when the student has completed and mounted their graduate thesis exhibition, successfully passed their thesis defense, and completed and submitted their thesis publication. The thesis must be an original body of work appropriate to the major commitment of the degree. The thesis publication is a professional, published presentation of the thesis project, which must be submitted, in both print and digital form. It must contain an extended artist statement and a presentation of the majority of thesis artwork. It is prepared for inclusion in the Wallace Library, the School's Archive, and the Graduate Annex Space. The verbal defense requires a public address by the student, discussion of the thesis project, and exhibition in a digital presentation format.

Accreditation

The MFA program in imaging arts and the BFA program in photographic and imaging arts are accredited by the National Association of Schools of Art and Design (NASAD).

Admission requirements

To be considered for admission to the MFA program in imaging arts, candidates must fulfill the following requirements:

- Hold a baccalaureate degree (or equivalent) from an accredited college or university,

- Submit a portfolio containing a focused body of artwork that demonstrates visual sophistication, aesthetic awareness, skill, and craft, as well as a commitment to a purpose and idea.

- Submit official transcripts (in English) of all previously completed undergraduate and graduate course work.

- Submit three letters of recommendation.

- Submit a Letter of Intent, which should include a candidate's interest in obtaing an MFA, the selection of RIT for the MFA degree, and professional goals to be achieved.

- Submit an Artist Statement explaining the intention behind the portfolio submitted.

- Complete a graduate application through the Graduate Admission Website.

- Participate in an interview (optional).

Applicants who are capable of graduate level academic work, as well as artistic visual expression, and who demonstrate an interest in the exploration of new artistic ideas and experiences will be recommended.

- Portfolio

The portfolio, along with written records of achievements and recommendations, serves to inform the faculty of the applicant’s readiness for advanced graduate study. It provides understanding into the applicant’s performance to date, ability to create advanced, self-directed work and his/her aesthetic development and maturity.

Applicants should submit a portfolio of 20 images representing a cohesive body or bodies of recent work. Images must be uploaded to rit.slideroom.com, the college's portfolio website, or via a personal website. Through Slideroom, applicants will submit their Letter of Intent and an Artist’s Statement.

The application deadline is Jan 15. Admission selection for the fall semester is made in the spring from among all portfolios and completed applications received. Acceptance occurs only once a year for a fall admission.

Portfolio instructions to SlideRoom:

- Submit a portfolio of no more than 20 images to the college's portfolio website: rit.slideroom.com. (Size restrictions can be found through SlideRoom.) SlideRoom supplies space for titling and additional information about each image, such as: title of the work, date, size, and medium.
- Number images 1 to 20 in the order the applicant wishes them to be viewed.
- Include a numbered page detailing portfolio image information.
- Include a one-page Artist's Statement discussing submitted work and applicant’s creative process.
- Include a one-page Letter of Intert explaining why the applicant is interested in obtaining an MFA and specifically why RIT would be a successful fit for pursuit of a professional study degree.

Additional information

- Faculty

Thirteen full-time faculty members, all critically regarded for their artistic work in exhibition and publication, contribute to the MFA program. The faculty brings individual expertise and dedication to their work with graduate students, encouraging intellectual inquiry of contemporary art-making practices and aesthetics. The MFA program is supported by a staff of 30 full-time faculty members from the schools of Art and Photographic Arts and Sciences, faculty from the art history department, adjunct faculty members from George Eastman Museum, as well as noted regional, national, and international practitioners, critics, and historians. To learn about the MFA faculty, facilities, equipment cage, MFA events and curriculum, please visit the school's website at https://photography.rit.edu.

- Scholarships and graduate assistantships

All accepted applicants are awarded a university scholarship. Level of scholarship support is based on merit of application materials. Concurrently, the MFA program faculty grants graduate assistantships to all accepted applicants. Assistantships include a variety of positions, including team teaching, faculty assistant in the classroom and with research projects, gallery management, and working in an archive among opportunities. Upon acceptance into the MFA program, applicants are notified by the MFA director as to level of support for both the university scholarship and the graduate assistantship. Both scholarship and assistantship are renewable in the second year of graduate study.

- Transfer credit

Graduate-level course work completed prior to admission should be submitted for approval upon entrance into the program. Up to 8 semester hours of graduate work with a minimum grade of a B (3.0) or higher is transferable toward the degree, with the approval of the Graduate Director.

- Grades and maximum time limit

The average of all grades for graduate credit taken at the university must be at least a B (3.0) to qualify for the degree. University policy requires that graduate programs be completed within seven years of the student's initial registration for courses in the program.

- Policy regarding student work

The School of Photographic Arts and Sciences reserves the right to retain at least one original piece of work from a student’s MFA thesis show for inclusion in the MFA Collection, to be used for educational, promotional, and exhibition purposes. Graduates must also submit a copy of the thesis publication to the School's MFA archive.

- William Harris Gallery

William Harris Gallery (http://cias.rit.edu/spas-gallery/) supports the exhibition of graduate thesis work, student work, and the works of contemporary image-makers. It maintains a calendar of exhibitions, public lectures, and receptions. Importantly, it also provides real world experience for interested graduate students, where they learn firsthand about gallery operations, installation, and communications as a gallery manager or staff member.

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The master of science degree in game design and development explores the entertainment technology landscape, along with other related areas of software development. Read more

Program overview

The master of science degree in game design and development explores the entertainment technology landscape, along with other related areas of software development. The program has its technical roots in the computing and information science disciplines, while simultaneously covering the breadth of the game development field through course work in topics such as computer graphics, game engines, interactive narrative, and game design. The degree is specifically for students who aspire to careers within the professional gaming industry or a related field such as simulation, edutainment, or visualization.

This is a two-year, on-campus, cohort-based program in which students are admitted through a portfolio review process. During the second year, students form development teams that construct a working game engine and software title as the program capstone experience. This requirement includes both individual and group expectations. The capstone culminates in a defense before program faculty, as well as a public exhibition. Combined, these requirements provide a unique and comprehensive educational experience for individuals who aspire to a career in the game development industry.

Plan of study

The program's curriculum consists of required courses, a choice of five advanced electives, and a capstone experience.

Capstone experience

During the second year, students complete a team-based capstone experience where students present and defend their work. This presentation includes a faculty review, which constitutes the capstone defense, a public presentation, and a demonstration.

Curriculum

Game design and development, MS degree, typical course sequence:
First Year
-Game Development Processes
-Game Design
-Gameplay and Prototyping
-Colloquium in Game Design and Development
-Game Industry Themes and Perspectives
-Advanced Electives
Second Year
-Capstone Design
-Advanced Electives
-Game Industry Themes and Perspectives
-Capstone Development

See website for further details of available electives: https://www.rit.edu/programs/game-design-and-development-ms

Other admission requirements

-Submission of a portfolio and/or scores from the Graduate Record Exam (GRE) is required. If you choose to submit a portfolio it should include evidence of individual and group projects (clearly marked as such) relevant to the area you wish to study within the degree program.
-Complete a graduate application.
-International applicants whose native language is not English must submit scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). A minimum score of 570 (paper-based) or 88 (Internet-based) is required. International applicants also are required to submit scores from the Graduate Record Exam (GRE).

Due to the cohort nature of the program, students are admitted in the fall semester only. Admission to the program is highly competitive. While GRE scores are not required for domestic students, students may submit scores to strengthen their application. Those applicants with a GPA below 3.25 are required to submit GRE scores.

Additional information

Prerequisites:
Students are expected to have at least one year of significant programming experience in a current object-oriented language—preferably C++ or Java—and a solid working knowledge of website development and interactive multimedia concepts. If students do not have these prerequisites, additional course work may be recommended to bridge any educational gaps.

Maximum time limit:
University policy requires that graduate programs be completed within seven years of the student's initial registration for courses in the program. Bridge courses are excluded.

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The Department of Biomedical Sciences provides unique opportunities for translating fundamental research into practical applications that enhance animal and human health. Read more
The Department of Biomedical Sciences provides unique opportunities for translating fundamental research into practical applications that enhance animal and human health. Our expertise spans several disciplines including biomechanics, cancer biology, endocrinology, neuroscience, pharmacology and toxicology, reproductive biotechnology, cardiovascular biology, and stem cell and regenerative biology.

Programs

We offer two Master’s options and a Doctoral program. Master’s students can choose between a course-work plus a major research project/paper Master of Biomedical Sciences, MBS, (approximately three semesters) or a course-work and the preparation and defense of a research-based thesis option Master of Science, MSc (approximately six semesters). The PhD program requires the
successful completion of a qualifying exam and the completion and defense of a research-based thesis.

Faculty and Laboratories

There are currently 25 faculty and 60 graduate students in the department. Facilities include individual labs, multi-investigator labs and common equipment areas that have been renovated with the aid of funding from the Canadian Foundation for Innovation. Research equipment includes an Applied Biosystems ViiA7 and multiple Bio-Rad CFX96 RealTime PCR Detection Systems, NanoDrop Spectrophotometers, Accuri C6 System Flow cytometers, a full Proteomics suite consisting of a Typhoon scanner, spot picker and DeCyder analysis Software, ChemiDoc XRS+ Systems, a Histology core facility, Fluoview FV1200 Laser Scanning Confocal Microscope, fluorescent microscopes, a Neuronal Cell Imaging System, fluorescent plate readers, an Analytical HPLC Facility and as well as specialized laboratory equipment.

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This course is for you if you wish to prepare yourself for a broad spectrum of career opportunities, spanning the academic, commercial, industrial and healthcare applications of biomedical sciences. Read more
This course is for you if you wish to prepare yourself for a broad spectrum of career opportunities, spanning the academic, commercial, industrial and healthcare applications of biomedical sciences.

Course outline

This taught MSc Biomedical Science course is designed to provide training and experience in Biomedical Sciences. It offers an informed and critical appreciation of recent scientific developments. The specific aims are to:
-Provide a high level of scientific knowledge and understanding of disease processes from the molecular to the body/systems level
-Develop an informed and critical appreciation of recent scientific developments in relation to diagnostic laboratory pathology
-Enable students to gain, through a research project, additional specialist knowledge and practical expertise
-Prepare students for a broad spectrum of career opportunities spanning academic, commercial, industrial and healthcare applications of biomedical sciences. The course is also an excellent foundation for further studies leading to a PhD

[[What you will study
The programme is based around a core of six modules and a research project that provide detailed study and practical experience in key areas of biomedical sciences and in the development of professional skills. Modules are as follows:
-Human Diseases
-Immunology
-Toxicology
-Clinical and Molecular Endocrinology
-Human Physiology
-Research Methods
-Research Project

Learning, teaching & assesment

The course is assessed by a mixture of coursework, examinations, practical work, oral and written presentations. The research project module will be assessed on the basis of a submitted project report and an oral defense of a poster.

Your future career prospects

This course provides an ideal foundation for entering the pharmaceutical industry, the Scientific Civil Service or for further studies leading to a PhD. Many of our graduates have found this course to be a valuable qualification when applying for a PhD. Recent graduates have gained roles such as:
-Research Scholar, Symbiosis International University & Chest Research Foundation
-Biomedical Scientist, St George's Hospital (NHS)
-Administrative and Funding Coordinator, Access to Basic medical Care (ABC) Foundation
-Assistant Lecturer, Unspecified university
-Lab Technician, PROLIVFIC
-Lab Technologist/Army Officer, Military Hospital
-PhD, Institute of Inflammation and Repair, The University of Manchester
-Research Assistant, Aston University
-Research Consultant, Environmental sector
-Research Laboratory Technician, University of Birmingham

It must be emphasised that the course is NOT accredited by an outside organisation.

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This programme has been developed in collaboration with in-service professionals along the key themes of education for. Personal strategies for practice development. Read more
This programme has been developed in collaboration with in-service professionals along the key themes of education for:

• Personal strategies for practice development
• Creative decision-making and risk-taking
• Developing presence, influence and political know-how
• Evidence-based practice and research skills

The taught component is two years part-time and is concerned with critical self-assessment and the identification and development of strategies for use in the practice area. The research component is three years part-time, building on the taught component to develop evidence-based practice and introduce innovative strategies in all areas of professional practice.

Key benefits:

• Promotes an evaluative culture in your workplace to complement professional and organisational goals
• Helps you utilise an evidence-based approach to all dimensions of your practice
• Develops your leadership capability, critical and creative thinking and self-awareness

Visit the website: http://www.salford.ac.uk/pgt-courses/professional-doctorate-health-and-social-care

Suitable for

Health and social care professionals working at senior levels who have responsibility for the development of
evidence-based professional practice.

Programme details

Professional Doctorates are as rigorous as traditional PhDs but are different in focus. A traditional PhD subject can be relatively fixed, in terms of what is researched. A Professional Doctorate is more variable and adaptable to change due to developments in your profession. This is because the Professional Doctorate is linked intrinsically to your workplace.

The doctorate has run very successfully for eight years. It comprises two years taught modules which you must pass to progress onto a further three years research component during which, you write up your thesis.

During the research component you independently undertake PhD level research study, supervised by two experienced academics. Although the Professional Doctorate programme is housed within the School of Nursing, Midwifery & Social Care we have supervisors from across the Health & Social Care College. We have experts in child psychology, social care, public health, occupational therapy, radiography, physiotherapy to supervise your own area of expert knowledge.

Format

The first two years of the course are modular, with facilitated content, designed to help you refine and develop your initial research ideas. The latter three years are part-time also, focused upon the research element, and there are key milestones at the end of each year within the research element. The thesis is between 40,000- 60,000 words long and you have a viva.

This course is very flexible; with two years part-time of facilitated modules which you use to frame, explore and refine your initial research question. For example, you will use the modules to explore general philosophical and methodological ideas, examine what is known about your topic, what your research will contribute to new knowledge; best methods for undertaking the research and, critically, learn about the leadership skills you will need to lead research in practice.

All the modules are facilitated using blended learning. For example within each module there are face to face sessions led by a module facilitator. In addition specific learning activities for each module will be developed using the virtual learning environment ‘Blackboard’ and the virtual doctorate learning environment (VLS). Both enable greater flexibility about the when and where of learning, and enables you to keep in contact with your peers and the programme team, wherever they have internet access.

Module titles

• Doctoral Foundation
• Research Methods

Assessment

Within the professional doctorate the assessment processes have been developed to enable you to critically interrogate, analyse, and reflect on your research ideas, demonstrating your ability to take account of professional and methodological issues. The assessments are designed to enable confident articulation and robust exploration, justification and defense of research ideas in keeping with the principles of the doctoral viva.

With this in mind assessment processes comprise:

• Essays
• Seminars
• Verbal presentations
• You are expected to engage in critical self assessment and personal/professional development planning as a basis for developing the skills associated with doctoral level study and the leadership of research in professional practice.

Career potential

You will make a significant contribution to professional practice with transferable skills to your clinical area. You will also
study inter-professionally with peers in a collaborative environment, strengthening networking opportunities across health
and social care disciplines.

How to apply: http://www.salford.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/applying

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- Full-time programme from fall to spring in Rouen. - 100% of courses taught in English. - Interaction with working professionals with up-to-date industry. Read more

Key Points

- Full-time programme from fall to spring in Rouen
- 100% of courses taught in English
- Interaction with working professionals with up-to-date industry
- Abroad field study involving real business situations with companies such as Intel, Curver, Boeing, DCT, Sunreef Yachts as well as local start-ups
- Preparation to PRINCE2 certification in project management
- Over 10 years of experience
- A truly diverse and multi-cultural environment enriching global business skills

Objectives

The M.Sc. in International Project Development prepares future managers for evolving careers in business development and
- To deliver a project from its conception to its implementation
- To gain analytical skills and management competences in order to internationally develop growth opportunities (new markets, new ventures, etc.)
- To use project management methods to implement expansion plans
- To confront participants to diverse teamwork occasions

Programme

- Full time courses in Rouen from October to April
- Professional thesis and internship in France or abroad from May to December
- 100% of courses taught in English

- 5 core courses, along with the preparation for PRINCE2 certification in project management – October to December on our Rouen Campus
- 8 core courses, along with an abroad field study addressing real business issues from companies – January to April on our Rouen Campus
- Internship, along with the preparation and defense of a professional thesis under the supervision of an expert - May to December in France or abroad
- language courses
- Job and internship search (shaping your career workshops)

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This programme explores how conflict occurs across a variety of countries and landscapes in the late 19th and 20th centuries, and how such conflict is managed and presented through media and propaganda. Read more
This programme explores how conflict occurs across a variety of countries and landscapes in the late 19th and 20th centuries, and how such conflict is managed and presented through media and propaganda.

*This course will be taught at the Canterbury campus*

Visit the website: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/84/war-media-and-society

Course detail

This course takes in different types of conflict, from conventional trench warfare and geopolitical stand-offs to guerrilla tactics and civil defense initiatives. It also examines the application of technology, the impact of the media on public opinion, along with the increasing importance of the home front in 20th-century warfare. The core module provides a strong interpretative and conceptual backbone and introduces you to the demands of postgraduate study in history.

Format and assessment

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year:

- Methods and Interpretations of Historical Research (30 credits)
- War, Propaganda and the Media (30 credits)
- Testimonies of War: Oral History in Theory and Practice (30 credits)
- Ireland and the First World War (30 credits)
- Landscapes of the Great War: Interpretations and Representations (30 credits)
- Landscapes of the Great War: Public Histories (30 credits)
- Work Placement (30 credits)
- Geiger Counter at Ground Zero: Explorations of Nuclear America (30 credits)
- The British Army and the Great War (30 credits)
- Home Front Britain, 1914-18 (30 credits)

All courses are assessed by coursework, and the dissertation counts for half the final grade (comprising one third assessed preparation, two thirds actual dissertation).

Careers

As the job market becomes increasingly competitive, postgraduate qualifications are becoming more attractive to employers seeking individuals who have finely tuned skills and abilities, which our programmes encourage you to hone. As a result of the valuable transferable skills developed during your course of study, career prospects for history graduates are wide ranging. Our graduates go on to a variety of careers, from research within the government to teaching, politics to records management and journalism, to working within museums and galleries – to name but a few.

How to apply: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

Why study at The University of Kent?

- Shortlisted for University of the Year 2015
- Kent has been ranked fifth out of 120 UK universities in a mock Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF) exercise modelled by Times Higher Education (THE).
- In the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014, Kent was ranked 17th* for research output and research intensity, in the Times Higher Education, outperforming 11 of the 24 Russell Group universities
- Over 96% of our postgraduate students who graduated in 2014 found a job or further study opportunity within six months.
Find out more: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/why/

Postgraduate scholarships and funding

We have a scholarship fund of over £9 million to support our taught and research students with their tuition fees and living costs. Find out more: https://www.kent.ac.uk/scholarships/postgraduate/

English language learning

If you need to improve your English before and during your postgraduate studies, Kent offers a range of modules and programmes in English for Academic Purposes (EAP). Find out more here: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/international/english.html

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The program aims at preparing professionals able to design, develop, and maintain established and emerging telecommunications services and network infrastructures. Read more

Mission:

The program aims at preparing professionals able to design, develop, and maintain established and emerging telecommunications services and network infrastructures. This requires a vast body of knowledge, including signal processing, modulation, coding, networking, transmission media, and electromagnetism, as well as some aspects of electronics, automation, and computer science. The program grants a Master of Science Degree, which is a second-cycle degree equivalent to the Italian Laurea Magistrale.

Organization:

The program starts every year in September and lasts two years (four semesters), with a workload of 120 ECTS credits. All activities are in English.

Fees and Funding:

Tuition fees range from 360 to 1400 euro per year. LAZIODISU offers grants and accommodations to low-income students. International students may also obtain grants from the Italian Ministry of Foreign Affairs and the Italian Trade Commission.

Studying Abroad:

Students are encouraged to spend a period of study and/or to prepare their thesis abroad (earning up to 60 ETCS credits). The Erasmus mobility program allows students to study in partner European universities without paying additional tuition fees.

Internship:

Students are encouraged to make an internship experience so as to acquire working-oriented skills and become more aware of their professional choices (earning up to 6 ETCS credits). We offer internship programs in collaboration with partner companies and institutions. Traineeships in foreign companies and research centers are also available.

Career Opportunities:

Prospective jobs are available not only with telecommunications operators and manufacturers, but also in many other sectors where telecommunications are critical, such as finance, energy, defense, surveillance, healthcare, education, public services, commerce, traffic control, environmental monitoring, space exploration, robotics, etc. The program also paves the way to doctoral and postgraduate research studies.

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- check at www.unipd.it/en/forest-science. The Forest Science Master Degree provides interdisciplinary forest education focused on the conservation and management of Southern European and Mediterranean mountainous forest resources. Read more

Admission Notice for 2016-2017 now available

- check at http://www.unipd.it/en/forest-science

Deadline for application April 22, 2016

Forest Science

The Forest Science Master Degree provides interdisciplinary forest education focused on the conservation and management of Southern European and Mediterranean mountainous forest resources.

Programme Summary

The programme encompasses a wide range of subjects. Key course topics are forests and forest ecology, silviculture, sustainable forest management, climate change mitigation, water regulation and related management issues, conservation and management of biodiversity and other ecosystem services, sustainable forest operations, natural hazards, pest management principles and techniques, forest economics and policy, forest governance analysis and conflict management techniques. The programme is based on a multidisciplinary approach mixing theory and field practice.
The learning outcomes are oriented at educating forest professionals able to handle complex problems dealing with the conservation, sustainable management and use of Southern European and Mediterranean mountainous forest resources.
The programme has close links with other international Forest Schools as well as with international forest and environmental organizations like FAO, EFI, WWF and CIFOR, IUCN and IUFRO. Staff of these institutions and organisations make regular contribution to the course, especially supporting the preparation of thesis work.
The programme participates to three Erasmus Mundus Consortia for Master degrees, namely SUTROFOR, SUFONAMA and MEDfOR, respectively on management of tropical, temperate and Mediterranean forests.
The programme is completely taught in English.

How is the programme organised?

Forest Science is a 2-year Master programme (120 ECTS, equivalent to a Master of Science) encompassing 3 curricula of studies:
Forest Science Curriculum, which focuses on the more traditional forest science disciplines. This curriculum prepares students for the understanding and solving of most of the challenges concerning sustainable forest management of close-to nature continuous cover forests and of plantations.Land and forest conservation Curriculum, which focuses on managing silvicultural systems and planning soil conservation and is strengthened by a robust insight into environmental services, geology, watershed and natural dynamics of rivers. The overall sustainability of anthropic actions is the focus point of the curriculum.
Responsible production of goods and services Curriculum, which focuses on environmental and social concerns connected with forest resource use and management. This curriculum prepares students for the understanding and application of a wide range of economic-, policy- and governance-based tools and approaches for adopting responsible solutions in the production and commercialisation of forest goods and services

The curricula share lectures of common interest and join during a field module at the end of the first year. Requirements for graduation include courses and preparation and defense of the Master thesis. Students will be encouraged to spend a period of their studies abroad, through Erasmus+ or other local programmes and agreements. Financial support to meet part of the cost for thesis field work is granted to best students.
Visit the MSc “Forest Science” page on the Università di Padova web-site (http://www.agrariamedicinaveterinaria.unipd.it/en/forest-science-1) for more details.

Teaching methods

Teaching takes place in an international environment and is based on class engagement, problem-solving approach and case study assessment.
Lectures, seminars and independent learning are supported by field practicals, laboratory work and forest visits.
Examinations are written or oral and assess students’ participation also through reports, presentations, and group work.

Who is the MSc candidate?

The course is intended for highly-motivated national and international students and is conceived for Bachelor graduates with a main interest in mountain Mediterranean forests. The programme caters for students from a variety of backgrounds, from biology, forestry and environmental sciences to geography.

What career opportunities does the MSc provide?

The Study programme is designed to meet occupational demand arising from the mountain Southern European and Mediterranean regions, where fragile environments and specific rural socio-economic conditions require special skills into the management of forest resources and their sustainable use.
Graduates can find jobs at post graduate level in public forest administration, local development agencies, NGOs, Parks authorities and forest enterprises both in the EU and abroad. The programme is also a stepping stone towards post graduate research and has already produced qualified scientists in the fields of forest science and natural resource management.

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The American Graduate School in Paris and Arcadia University jointly offer an accelerated Dual Masters program allowing students to earn two US-accredited Master’s degrees in three years. Read more
The American Graduate School in Paris and Arcadia University jointly offer an accelerated Dual Masters program allowing students to earn two US-accredited Master’s degrees in three years:

- A Master of Arts in International Relations and Diplomacy at AGS
- A Master of Arts in International Peace and Conflict Resolution at Arcadia University - https://www.arcadia.edu

Each program followed individually normally extends over two years, which would make a total of four years to earn the two degrees separately. Thanks to curricula combinations, the accelerated dual program allows students to earn both degrees in three years.

Students in this program spend three semesters in Paris, France, at the American Graduate School in Paris, and three semesters in the United States, at Arcadia University, in the greater Philadelphia area. They may choose to start the program at either of the two institutions. Each portion of the program provides a different cultural and academic experience, while both have in common a challenging and student-dedicated learning environment.

The knowledge and skills acquired during this two-fold program can be applied to a vast array of fields in government, intergovernmental organizations and non-governmental organizations (NGOs): human rights, diplomacy, international law, humanitarian relief, environmental policymaking, sustainable development, and conflict management, among others. They are also highly transferrable to international business and other professional areas involving interaction at the international level.

Why this dual program?

The objectives of combining these two programs into one are:

- To provide an extended cross-cultural experience contributing to the students’ ability to work in diverse international environments
- To foster global and social awareness through a comprehensive graduate program in international affairs
- To develop a multidisciplinary perspective and varied methods of understanding of world affairs
- To offer students a broader range of career options in government, IGOs, NGOs and international business

Description of the M.A. in International Relations and Diplomacy

The curriculum of the M.A. in International Relations and Diplomacy teaches the cornerstone theories that explain interactions between countries, and also examines current world affairs through the various lenses of international relations: political, diplomatic, economic, environmental, cultural, and social. A range of area electives supplements this global approach allowing each student to gear the program towards his or her field of interest and professional goals.

Courses take place at AGS in Paris. They are taught in English and follow the American system of higher education while taking advantage of the school’s location in France, with guest speakers and visits to embassies, international organizations headquartered in Paris and European Union institutions. No knowledge of French language is necessary to attend. Students have the opportunity to take French courses along with the program (see more information here - http://www.ags.edu/international-relations/degree-programs/optional-french-language-courses)

Small seminar-style classrooms allow for close dialogue with professors and offer a forum for debate. The students and faculty in the program come from diverse national backgrounds, each adding a different perspective to the subjects taught.

See full M.A. in International Relations and Diplomacy program description page on this website - http://www.ags.edu/international-relations/degree-programs/master-in-international-relations


Description of the M.A. in International Peace and Conflict Resolution (IPCR) -

The International Peace and Conflict Resolution (IPCR) degree offers an innovative curriculum giving students a sophisticated understanding of today’s international issues by bridging the various sub-disciplines of this emerging field: human rights, international law and organizations, mediation and conflict transformation, public health issues, economic development, and environmental sustainability.

The coursework provides strong theoretical and analytical foundations and is complemented with hands-on experiences, including travels to key sites of the history of international conflict, and an internship allowing students to gain professional practice while developing a network of useful contacts.

Courses take place at Arcadia University in the United States, in Glenside, in the greater Philadelphia area (Pennsylvania). The faculty and staff at the International Peace and Conflict Resolution Department are committed to addressing the individual needs of each student, and work closely with them to make every component of the program fit their interests and career goals.

See full IPCR program description page on the Arcadia University website - http://www.arcadia.edu/academic/default.aspx?id=1093

Graduation Requirements

In order to complete the dual degree program and graduate with the M.A. in International Peace and Conflict Resolution and the M.A. in International Relations and Diplomacy, students are required to successfully complete 65-68 graduate credit-hours. See section on curriculum. Degree requirements include a Capstone Seminar at Arcadia University, as well as the completion and defense of a 25,000- to 35,000-word Master’s thesis at The American Graduate School in Paris.

See also:

Curriculum - http://www.ags.edu/dual-programs/international-relations-and-diplomacy-international-peace-and-conflict-resolution-curriculum

How to Apply - http://www.ags.edu/international-relations/admissions/applying/double-degree-programs

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The world is globalizing and we are in the middle of it!. This fact requires a changing profile of management skills. Our MBA course aims to provide the opportunity to junior managers to gain specific competences which are essential for successful global business today. Read more
The world is globalizing and we are in the middle of it!

This fact requires a changing profile of management skills. Our MBA course aims to provide the opportunity to junior managers to gain specific competences which are essential for successful global business today. We congratulate you for taking the opportunity and the challenge of learning together with people who share the same values although coming from different backgrounds. At the end of your studies you will feel more confident and prepared to face the challenges of a multinational business environment around the globe. The choice you make today will make a difference to your future.

Key Facts

Program duration: 3 semesters, including master thesis and oral defense
Structure: Full-time program
Start of program: October
Language of instruction: English
Tuition fee: 12,900 Euro
Class size: 30 students maximum
Degree: MBA
Application deadline: 31st May 2017

Program

The MBA in Global Management (MGM) program offered by Hochschule Bremen is a one-year full-time specialist MBA. The program is characterized by a highly qualified teaching staff, an inspiring international and diverse student body, a faculty which offers a unique environment for intellectual exchange, joint research combined with academic excellence, practical orientation and an in-company internship.

Structure -

Since the course structure is based upon different modules there is no final general exam. Students have to pass an exam in all ten modules. After passing a module students will gain the determined number of credit points. Students must achieve 60 ECTS Credit Points in total.

Exams -

The basic principle of the MBA in Global Management program is researching while learning. The systematic training of technical and social competences here plays a key role. Classes are generally held as seminars.
Lecturers use selective methods of presentation, for example discussions among the students, supervised groupwork, analysis of case-studies and project work to ensure convincing results.

Target Group

The MBA course Master in Global Management endeavours to offer junior managers the opportunity to obtain specific competencies required for successful global business today. The aim is to provide management skills as well as thought-provoking experiences focused on global business. This is an essential requirement for students interested in a career in either government, international organisations or business enterprises. The course puts students at an advantage when it comes to leadership excellence.

Goals

The MGM-programme aims to provide management skills as well as mindexpanding experiences focused on global business. This is an essential need for students interested to pursue their career in either government, international organisations and business enterprises. Thus the course gives students an edge when it comes to leadership excellence.

Degree

The MGM-programme is completed with the Master`s Examination which is taken after two semesters. Students are required to write their Master`s Thesis at the end of the second semester when all modules have been covered in full. The thesis has to be defended in an oral exam. In case a student does an internship after the second semester the oral exam takes place after the third semester. The overall grade incorporates the results obtained from exams during the course and the evaluation of the Master's Thesis. Upon successful completion of the course students are awarded the degree of "Master of Business Administration.

Admission and Fees

An academic, business-related degree (bachelor)

One year of practical professional experience
Proof of a very good standard of English shown by appropriate certificates:
(A-level English course, TOEFL paper based 560 points, TOEFL computer based 220 points, IELTS 6,0; option: English test)

Additional requirements for foreign applicants:

The approval of the academic degree achieved and its equivalence to the standard by the MGM-course director and the relevant authority.

Tuition fee -

The course is subject to a fee of 12.900€ plus ~ 325€ study fee per semester (includes free usage of public transportation in and around Bremen and Lower Saxony)

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