• University of Edinburgh Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Bristol Featured Masters Courses
  • Swansea University Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Southampton Featured Masters Courses
  • Jacobs University Bremen gGmbH Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Oxford Featured Masters Courses
  • Goldsmiths, University of London Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Derby Online Learning Featured Masters Courses
Nottingham Trent University Featured Masters Courses
Cass Business School Featured Masters Courses
University of Reading Featured Masters Courses
Nottingham Trent University Featured Masters Courses
University of the West of England, Bristol Featured Masters Courses
"defense"×
0 miles

Masters Degrees (Defense)

We have 84 Masters Degrees (Defense)

  • "defense" ×
  • clear all
Showing 1 to 15 of 84
Order by 
There are two options within our master’s program, both of which lead to the MS degree. the thesis option, and the coursework option. Read more
There are two options within our master’s program, both of which lead to the MS degree: the thesis option, and the coursework option.

Plan I (Thesis Option)

The Plan I master’s degree requires a minimum of 30 credit hours — 24 hours of coursework and 6 hours of thesis research (CH 699).

Four lecture courses (12 credit hours) are required for this degree option. At least two of these courses must be in the student’s major area, and at least one must be outside the major area.

In addition to formal coursework, students will generally register for 10 hours of advanced research technique courses in their major area. Students will also take at least 6 hours of thesis research (CH 699).

Students will present a research seminar in their second year prior to the oral defense of their thesis. Students will register for the seminar course (CH 586) in the semester that they give their seminar.

Each student will meet with their thesis committee in the first semester of their third semester (September of the second year for students starting in the fall semester) to present an initial research review (IRR). In the IRR, the student will describe the progress made on the thesis project to his or her committee. The student will also discuss the work remaining to complete the thesis research.

Upon completing their research, the student will prepare a thesis according to the UA Graduate School’s guidelines. The thesis should be distributed to the thesis committee two weeks prior to the oral defense.

The student’s research advisor and thesis committee will read the thesis and meet to hear an oral defense of the thesis. The oral defense will serve as the comprehensive exam for the MS degree.

Plan II (Coursework Option)

The Plan II option requires a minimum of 30 credit hours of coursework.

Six lecture courses (18 hours) are required. Four of these courses will be in the student’s major, and two will be outside the major area of study.

The remaining 12 hours of the program will be made up of the seminar course (CH 586) and research techniques courses in the student’s major area.

Each student in this program will present a seminar on a literature topic not related to his or her research during their second year in the program. This seminar will serve as the comprehensive exam for the Plan II master’s degree.

Students completing a terminal Plan II master’s must have either completed the IRR research review, or hold a short final defense with their graduate committee. The student will complete a short written document and discuss their research with their committee.

Read less
Computer Science Departmental degree requirements for the master’s degree, which are in addition to those established by the College of Engineering and the Graduate School (http://graduate.ua.edu/), are as follows for Plan I and Plan II students. Read more
Computer Science Departmental degree requirements for the master’s degree, which are in addition to those established by the College of Engineering and the Graduate School (http://graduate.ua.edu/), are as follows for Plan I and Plan II students.

- Master of Science–Thesis Option (http://cs.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/#thesis)
- Master of Science–Non-Thesis Option (http://cs.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/#nonthesis)
- Timetable for the Submission of Graduate School Forms for an MS Degree (http://cs.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/#timetable)

Visit the website http://cs.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/

MASTER OF SCIENCE–THESIS OPTION (PLAN I):

30 CREDIT HOURS
Each candidate must earn a minimum of 24 semester hours of credit for coursework, plus a 6-hour thesis under the direction of a faculty member. Unlike the general College of Engineering requirements, graduate credit may not be obtained for courses at the 400-level.

Degree Requirements Effective Fall 2011

Credit Hours
The student must successfully complete 30 total credit hours, as follows:

- 24 hours of CS graduate-level course work

- 6 hours of CS 599 Master’s Thesis Research: Thesis Research.

- Completion of at least one 500-level or 600-level course in each of the four core areas (applications, software, systems and theory). These courses must be taken within the department and selected from the following:
Applications: CS 528, CS 535, CS 557, CS 560, CS 609, CS 615
Software: CS 503, CS 507, CS 515, CS 516, CS 534, CS 600, CS 603, CS 607, CS 614, CS 630
Systems: CS 526, CS 538, CS 567, CS 606, CS 613, CS 618
Theory: CS 500, CS 570, CS 575, CS 601, CS 602, CS 612

- No more than 12 hours from CS 511, CS 512, CS 591, CS 592, CS 691, CS 692 and non-CS courses may be counted towards the coursework requirements for the master’s degree. Courses taken outside of CS are subject to the approval of the student’s advisor.

- Additional Requirements -

- The student will select a thesis advisor and a thesis committee. The committee must contain at least four members, including the thesis advisor. At least two members are faculty of the Computer Science department, and at least one member must be from outside the Department of Computer Science.

- The student will develop a written research proposal. This should contain an introduction to the research area, a review of relevant literature in the area, a description of problems to be investigated, an identification of basic goals and objectives of the research, a methodology and timetable for approaching the research, and an extensive bibliography.

- The student will deliver an oral presentation of the research proposal, which is followed by a question-and-answer session that is open to all faculty members and which covers topics related directly or indirectly to the research area. The student’s committee will determine whether the proposal is acceptable based upon both the written and oral presentations.

- The student will develop a written thesis that demonstrates that the student has performed original research that makes a definite contribution to current knowledge. Its format and content must be acceptable to both the student’s committee and the Graduate School.

- The student will defend the written thesis. The defense includes an oral presentation of the thesis research, followed by a question-and-answer session. The student’s committee will determine whether the defense is acceptable.

- The student will complete an oral comprehensive exam. This exam is scheduled with the Department Head prior to the semester in which the student intends to graduate.

- Other requirements may be specified by the Graduate School (http://graduate.ua.edu/) and by the College of Engineering.

Degree Requirements Prior to Fall 2011

Credit hours

The student must successfully complete 30 total credit hours, as follows:

- 6 hours of CS 599 Master’s Thesis Research

- 24 hours of CS graduate-level course work with a grade of A or B, including the following courses completed at The University of Alabama:
At least 3 hours of theory courses (CS 500 Discrete math, CS 601 Algorithms, CS 602 Formal languages, CS 612 Data structures)

At least 3 hours of software courses (CS 600 Software engineering, CS 603 Programming languages, CS 607 Human-computer interaction, CS 614 Compilers, CS630 Empirical Software Engineering)

At least 3 hours of systems courses (CS 567 Computer architecture, CS 606 Operating systems, CS 613 Networks, CS 618 Wireless networks)

At least 3 hours of applications courses (CS 535 Graphics, CS 560 or 591 Robotics, CS 591 Security, CS 609 Databases)

- Additional Requirements -

- The student will select a thesis advisor and a thesis committee. The committee must contain at least four members, including the thesis advisor. At least two members are faculty of the Computer Science department, and at least one member must be from outside the Department of Computer Science.

- The student will develop a written research proposal. This should contain an introduction to the research area, a review of relevant literature in the area, a description of problems to be investigated, an identification of basic goals and objectives of the research, a methodology and timetable for approaching the research, and an extensive bibliography.

- The student will deliver an oral presentation of the research proposal, which is followed by a question-and-answer session that is open to all faculty members and which covers topics related directly or indirectly to the research area. The student’s committee will determine whether the proposal is acceptable based upon both the written and oral presentations.

- The student will develop a written thesis that demonstrates that the student has performed original research that makes a definite contribution to current knowledge. Its format and content must be acceptable to both the student’s committee and the Graduate School.

- The student will defend the written thesis. The defense includes an oral presentation of the thesis research, followed by a question-and-answer session. The student’s committee will determine whether the defense is acceptable.

- The student will complete an oral comprehensive exam. This exam is scheduled with the Department Head prior to the semester in which the student intends to graduate.

- Other requirements may be specified by the Graduate School (http://graduate.ua.edu/) and by the College of Engineering.

MASTER OF SCIENCE–NON-THESIS OPTION (PLAN II):

30 CREDIT HOURS
Each candidate must earn a minimum of 30 semester hours of credit for coursework, which may include a 3-hour non-thesis project under the direction of a faculty member. Unlike the general College of Engineering requirements, graduate credit may not be obtained for courses at the 400-level.

Degree Requirements Effective Fall 2011

The student must successfully complete 30 total credit hours, as follows:

- Completion of at least one 500-level or 600-level course in each of the four core areas (applications, software, systems and theory).
Applications: CS 528, CS 535, CS 557, CS 560, CS 609, CS 615
Software: CS 503, CS 507, CS 515, CS 516, CS 534, CS 600, CS 603, CS 607, CS 614, CS 630
Systems: CS 526, CS 538, CS 567, CS 606, CS 613, CS 618
Theory: CS 500, CS 570, CS 575, CS 601, CS 602, CS 612

- No more than 12 hours from CS 511, CS 512, CS 591, CS 592, CS 691, CS 692 and non-CS courses may be counted towards the coursework requirements for the master’s degree. Courses taken outside of CS are subject to the approval of the student’s advisor.

- The student may elect to replace 3 hours of course work with 3 hours of CS 598 Research Not Related to Thesis: Non-thesis Project. This course should be proposed in writing in advance, approved by the instructor, and a copy placed in the student’s file. The proposal should specify both the course content and the specific deliverables that will be evaluated to determine the course grade.

- Additional Requirements -

- The student will complete an oral comprehensive exam. This exam is scheduled with the Department Head prior to the semester in which the student intends to graduate.

- Other requirements may be specified by the Graduate School and by the College of Engineering.

Degree Requirements Prior to Fall 2011

Credit hours

The student must successfully complete 30 total credit hours of CS graduate-level course work with a grade of A or B, as follows:

- The following courses will be completed at The University of Alabama:
At least 3 hours of theory courses (CS 500 Discrete math, CS 601 Algorithms, CS 602 Formal languages, CS 612 Data structures)

At least 3 hours of software courses (CS 600 Software engineering, CS 603 Programming languages, CS 607 Human-computer interaction, CS 614 Compilers, CS630 Empirical Software Engineering)

At least 3 hours of systems courses (CS 567 Computer architecture, CS 606 Operating systems, CS 613 Networks, CS 618 Wireless networks)

At least 3 hours of applications courses (CS 535 Graphics, CS 560 or 591 Robotics, CS 591 Security, CS 609 Databases)

- The student may elect to replace 3 hours of course work with 3 hours of CS 598 Research Not Related to Thesis: Non-thesis Project. This course should be proposed in writing in advance, approved by the instructor, and a copy placed in the student’s file. The proposal should specify both the course content and the specific deliverables that will be evaluated to determine the course grade.

- Additional Requirements -

- The student will complete an oral comprehensive exam. This exam is scheduled with the Department Head prior to the semester in which the student intends to graduate.

- Other requirements may be specified by the Graduate School and by the College of Engineering.

TIMETABLE FOR THE SUBMISSION OF GRADUATE SCHOOL FORMS FOR AN MS DEGREE
This document identifies a timetable for the submission of all Graduate School paperwork associated with the completion of an M.S. degree

- For students in Plan I students only (thesis option) after a successful thesis proposal defense, you should submit the Appointment/Change of a Masters Thesis Committee form

- The semester before, or no later than the first week in the semester in which you plan to graduate, you should “Apply for Graduation” online in myBama.

- In the semester in which you apply for graduation, the Graduate Program Director will contact you about the Comprehensive Exam.

Find out how to apply here - http://graduate.ua.edu/prospects/application/

Read less
The Master of Arts in International Affairs (MIN) takes full advantage of Paris’s multicultural dimensions and central role in international economics, politics, and social issues. Read more
The Master of Arts in International Affairs (MIN) takes full advantage of Paris’s multicultural dimensions and central role in international economics, politics, and social issues. The program’s balance of intellectual and theoretical mastery with hands-on, project-based learning prepares you for a successful professional life.

The MA in International Affairs provides:
-The opportunity to earn an American master’s degree in France.
-A mix of practical and theoretical knowledge of international affairs, conflict resolution, and civil society development.
-A global network to launch a career in the NGO sector or with an international institution, national government, or multinational corporation.

1 year full-time or 2 years part-time

The linguistic and cultural diversity of our student body is one of our biggest strengths—and the perfect community in which to study international affairs. Students in the program come from educational institutions from across the world, having earned the equivalent of a BA degree in International Affairs or a closely related field—and from the working worlds of international institutions, NGOs, and policy making.

We offer the option to follow either a one-year full-time or two-year part-time course of study. Students in the one-year program immerse themselves fully in their studies and finish the program faster. The two-year program allows Paris-based professionals the chance to invest in their futures while keeping their jobs.

Both programs offer the same rigorous curriculum with students achieving the same rewarding learning goals.

Challenging course work, compelling experiences

Coursework for the 38-credit MA is taught entirely in English at AUP. The full-time program is composed of two semesters of course work with an additional summer semester for completion and defense of the required research project. The part-time program is four semesters of course work with the additional summer semester.

The program requirements for both options include:
-Five courses (20 credits) exploring international relations, conflict management, and other subjects crucial to a well-rounded understanding of international affairs. A mix of core and elective courses ensures a solid foundation in the discipline plus the chance to investigate your own special interests.
-Five modules (10 credits) taught by visiting professionals that offer practical, hands-on training in short, workshop style seminars. These intensive experiences may include anything from a simulation of responding to a real-life conflict situation to creating plans for a virtual NGO to practice financial NGO management.
-One research methods seminar (2 credits) which will help prepare you for….
-A thesis (6 credits), a 12,000 word research project based on fieldwork or an internship experience that allows you to delve deep into a topic that interests you. A defense of your research project before a jury of experts, including the faculty’s readers, is required.

Coursework Masters

The Master of Arts in International Affairs is a 38 credit Coursework Masters consisting of 2.5 semesters taken over the course of one calendar year. Through a carefully crafted curriculum it transmits essential analytic and problem-solving skills in the discipline of international affairs.

Read less
The joint MA degree in art history builds upon the combined resources of Alabama’s two premier institutions of higher learning. The University of Alabama and The University of Alabama at Birmingham. Read more
The joint MA degree in art history builds upon the combined resources of Alabama’s two premier institutions of higher learning: The University of Alabama and The University of Alabama at Birmingham.

One Program, Two Campuses

Students enroll on one of the two campuses and take the majority of their courses on that campus, but they also take 6 hours of art history on the other campus and have access to the library holdings (including in the visual arts) of both campuses.

An art history symposium offered each year on alternating campuses provides the students in the program with an opportunity to present a formal paper in an informal setting. A highlight of our annual symposium is the visit by a renowned art historian who participates by meeting the students and discussing the papers.

After Graduation

The MA degree in art history is an appropriate terminal degree for positions that are open in museums, galleries, libraries, and archives, and in the fields of teaching at the junior college level. Graduates of the program have secured positions in area museums, including the Birmingham Museum of Art, the Montgomery Museum of Arts and the Mobile Arts Museum, and as visual arts curators and teachers of art history in area colleges and universities, including Livingston College, Shelton State College, and Jefferson State College. Students interested in pursuing a teaching career at the University level are encouraged to continue their study of art history in a doctoral program; graduates of the joint MA program in art history have been accepted into the PhD programs of Rochester University, Emory University, Kansas University, and Florida State University.

Degree Requirements

The MA in art history requires completion of 24 semester hours in art history, a comprehensive exam, and a written thesis.

Coursework

The MA requires 24 semester hours of art history coursework, of which 6 hours may be taken in a related field, such as history, religion, or anthropology. Courses are grouped into seven general areas: Early Modern (Renaissance and Baroque), 19th-century, Modern, Contemporary, American (including African American) and South Asian.* Students must identify a major area and a minor area.

A required course, ARH 550, Literature of Art, is offered once a year on alternating campuses. A maximum of 6 hours of 400-level courses may be taken for graduate credit. Students enrolled on The University of Alabama campus must take 6 hours of coursework at the University of Alabama at Birmingham.

*Students may take classes in South Asian art, but it cannot be their major field.

Comprehensive Exam

A reading knowledge of French or German must be demonstrated before the student is eligible to take the comprehensive written exam. The language requirement may be satisfied either by completing both semesters of the graduate reading proficiency sequence offered by the Department of Modern Languages and Classics or by scheduling a written exam with the appropriate language area in the Department of Modern Languages and Classics.

The student who has completed 24 semester hours of graduate coursework and satisfied the language requirement is ready to be examined in a written comprehensive exam administered in the fall and spring semesters. The written comprehensive exam is divided into two parts: (1) a slide exam that tests the student’s broad knowledge of the history of Western art, and (2) an essay portion that tests for expertise in two fields of concentration.

The student must declare intent to take the exam in writing to the director of graduate studies in art history at least one month prior to the exam date. At that time an exam committee is formed that includes at least two art history professors from the Tuscaloosa campus and one art history professor from the Birmingham campus. The committee members represent the two areas of concentration declared by the student. The committee evaluates the written exam and notifies the candidate of the results. An exam must be judged to be of at least “B” quality in order to be considered a pass. A student who does not pass the exam may take it once more at the normally scheduled exam time.

Thesis

The MA degree also requires a written thesis submitted to the Graduate School. In consultation with a professor, the student identifies a thesis topic. (Often, a thesis topic originates with a written seminar paper.) The thesis proposal is a brief statement of the topic for research, a summary description of the individual thesis chapters, and a working bibliography. The thesis advisor circulates the thesis proposal among the committee members for their approval. The thesis committee is usually but not always identical to the student’s exam committee. The student writes the thesis while enrolled in thesis hours (ARH 599) for up to 6 hours. When the thesis is completed to the satisfaction of the thesis advisor it is distributed to the thesis committee for comments. The final step in the completion of the thesis is the oral defense. In the oral defense the student justifies the methodology and the conclusions of the thesis to the committee.

The student must complete all of the required revisions and corrections to the thesis to the satisfaction of the committee before submitting the finished thesis to the Graduate School. The final written thesis must conform to the requirements of the Graduate School for it to be accepted. The student must provide an electronic copy of the thesis for The University of Alabama at Birmingham.

Read less
The master of science degree in game design and development explores the entertainment technology landscape, along with other related areas of software development. Read more

Program overview

The master of science degree in game design and development explores the entertainment technology landscape, along with other related areas of software development. The program has its technical roots in the computing and information science disciplines, while simultaneously covering the breadth of the game development field through course work in topics such as computer graphics, game engines, interactive narrative, and game design. The degree is specifically for students who aspire to careers within the professional gaming industry or a related field such as simulation, edutainment, or visualization.

This is a two-year, on-campus, cohort-based program in which students are admitted through a portfolio review process. During the second year, students form development teams that construct a working game engine and software title as the program capstone experience. This requirement includes both individual and group expectations. The capstone culminates in a defense before program faculty, as well as a public exhibition. Combined, these requirements provide a unique and comprehensive educational experience for individuals who aspire to a career in the game development industry.

Plan of study

The program's curriculum consists of required courses, a choice of five advanced electives, and a capstone experience.

Capstone experience

During the second year, students complete a team-based capstone experience where students present and defend their work. This presentation includes a faculty review, which constitutes the capstone defense, a public presentation, and a demonstration.

Curriculum

Game design and development, MS degree, typical course sequence:
First Year
-Game Development Processes
-Game Design
-Gameplay and Prototyping
-Colloquium in Game Design and Development
-Game Industry Themes and Perspectives
-Advanced Electives
Second Year
-Capstone Design
-Advanced Electives
-Game Industry Themes and Perspectives
-Capstone Development

See website for further details of available electives: https://www.rit.edu/programs/game-design-and-development-ms

Other admission requirements

-Submission of a portfolio and/or scores from the Graduate Record Exam (GRE) is required. If you choose to submit a portfolio it should include evidence of individual and group projects (clearly marked as such) relevant to the area you wish to study within the degree program.
-Complete a graduate application.
-International applicants whose native language is not English must submit scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). A minimum score of 570 (paper-based) or 88 (Internet-based) is required. International applicants also are required to submit scores from the Graduate Record Exam (GRE).

Due to the cohort nature of the program, students are admitted in the fall semester only. Admission to the program is highly competitive. While GRE scores are not required for domestic students, students may submit scores to strengthen their application. Those applicants with a GPA below 3.25 are required to submit GRE scores.

Additional information

Prerequisites:
Students are expected to have at least one year of significant programming experience in a current object-oriented language—preferably C++ or Java—and a solid working knowledge of website development and interactive multimedia concepts. If students do not have these prerequisites, additional course work may be recommended to bridge any educational gaps.

Maximum time limit:
University policy requires that graduate programs be completed within seven years of the student's initial registration for courses in the program. Bridge courses are excluded.

Read less
The MFA program in photography and related media emphasizes a broad interpretation of photography as a conceptual art form, with the intention of inspiring and nurturing the individuality of each student as a creative, productive artist. Read more

The MFA program in photography and related media emphasizes a broad interpretation of photography as a conceptual art form, with the intention of inspiring and nurturing the individuality of each student as a creative, productive artist. The program encourages graduate study in photography and related media as a means to personal, aesthetic, intellectual, and career development.

The curriculum provides a focus of study that is continually sensitive to the needs of each student, building upon the strengths each individual brings to the program. Successful completion of the program enables students to seek careers in fields including education, museum or gallery work, or as self-employed visual artists.

PROGRAM GOALS

The program provides students with the opportunity to use the still and moving image as a means to:

  • pursue a professional career and earn a livelihood
  • enrich their personal lives and society as a whole
  • create a community of creativity, scholarship, and purpose 

PLAN OF STUDY

Distribution of work within these guidelines is subject to modification based upon the candidate’s background, abilities, and interests. An individualized course of study is prepared with the advice of the graduate faculty and made a matter of record. Modifications in this prescribed program thereafter must be approved and recorded.

Electives

Elective courses are available in areas such as, but not limited to, video, printmaking, painting, sculpture, communication design, crafts, bookmaking, graphic design, new media, computer graphics, art history, and archival preservation and conservation. A complete list of graduate electives is available through the student's adviser. There are also graduate electives offered throughout the university. Students also have opportunities to enhance their studies through independent studies and internships.

Thesis

Matriculation from the MFA program is obtained when the student has completed and mounted their graduate thesis exhibition, successfully passed their thesis defense, and submitted their thesis publication. The thesis must be an original body of work appropriate to the major commitment of the degree. The thesis publication is a professional, published presentation of the thesis project, which must be submitted, in both print and digital form. It must contain an extended artist statement and a presentation of the majority of thesis artwork. It is prepared for inclusion in the Wallace Library, the School's Archive, and the Graduate Annex Space. The verbal defense requires a public address by the student, discussion of the thesis project, and exhibition in a digital presentation format.

ACCREDITATION

The MFA program in photography and related media and the BFA program in photographic and imaging arts are accredited by the National Association of Schools of Art and Design (NASAD).



Read less
This course is for you if you wish to prepare yourself for a broad spectrum of career opportunities, spanning the academic, commercial, industrial and healthcare applications of biomedical sciences. Read more
This course is for you if you wish to prepare yourself for a broad spectrum of career opportunities, spanning the academic, commercial, industrial and healthcare applications of biomedical sciences.

Course outline

This taught MSc Biomedical Science course is designed to provide training and experience in Biomedical Sciences. It offers an informed and critical appreciation of recent scientific developments. The specific aims are to:
-Provide a high level of scientific knowledge and understanding of disease processes from the molecular to the body/systems level
-Develop an informed and critical appreciation of recent scientific developments in relation to diagnostic laboratory pathology
-Enable students to gain, through a research project, additional specialist knowledge and practical expertise
-Prepare students for a broad spectrum of career opportunities spanning academic, commercial, industrial and healthcare applications of biomedical sciences. The course is also an excellent foundation for further studies leading to a PhD

[[What you will study
The programme is based around a core of six modules and a research project that provide detailed study and practical experience in key areas of biomedical sciences and in the development of professional skills. Modules are as follows:
-Human Diseases
-Immunology
-Toxicology
-Clinical and Molecular Endocrinology
-Human Physiology
-Research Methods
-Research Project

Learning, teaching & assesment

The course is assessed by a mixture of coursework, examinations, practical work, oral and written presentations. The research project module will be assessed on the basis of a submitted project report and an oral defense of a poster.

Your future career prospects

This course provides an ideal foundation for entering the pharmaceutical industry, the Scientific Civil Service or for further studies leading to a PhD. Many of our graduates have found this course to be a valuable qualification when applying for a PhD. Recent graduates have gained roles such as:
-Research Scholar, Symbiosis International University & Chest Research Foundation
-Biomedical Scientist, St George's Hospital (NHS)
-Administrative and Funding Coordinator, Access to Basic medical Care (ABC) Foundation
-Assistant Lecturer, Unspecified university
-Lab Technician, PROLIVFIC
-Lab Technologist/Army Officer, Military Hospital
-PhD, Institute of Inflammation and Repair, The University of Manchester
-Research Assistant, Aston University
-Research Consultant, Environmental sector
-Research Laboratory Technician, University of Birmingham

It must be emphasised that the course is NOT accredited by an outside organisation.

Read less
This programme has been developed in collaboration with in-service professionals along the key themes of education for. Personal strategies for practice development. Read more
This programme has been developed in collaboration with in-service professionals along the key themes of education for:

• Personal strategies for practice development
• Creative decision-making and risk-taking
• Developing presence, influence and political know-how
• Evidence-based practice and research skills

The taught component is two years part-time and is concerned with critical self-assessment and the identification and development of strategies for use in the practice area. The research component is three years part-time, building on the taught component to develop evidence-based practice and introduce innovative strategies in all areas of professional practice.

Key benefits:

• Promotes an evaluative culture in your workplace to complement professional and organisational goals
• Helps you utilise an evidence-based approach to all dimensions of your practice
• Develops your leadership capability, critical and creative thinking and self-awareness

Visit the website: http://www.salford.ac.uk/pgt-courses/professional-doctorate-health-and-social-care

Suitable for

Health and social care professionals working at senior levels who have responsibility for the development of
evidence-based professional practice.

Programme details

Professional Doctorates are as rigorous as traditional PhDs but are different in focus. A traditional PhD subject can be relatively fixed, in terms of what is researched. A Professional Doctorate is more variable and adaptable to change due to developments in your profession. This is because the Professional Doctorate is linked intrinsically to your workplace.

The doctorate has run very successfully for eight years. It comprises two years taught modules which you must pass to progress onto a further three years research component during which, you write up your thesis.

During the research component you independently undertake PhD level research study, supervised by two experienced academics. Although the Professional Doctorate programme is housed within the School of Nursing, Midwifery & Social Care we have supervisors from across the Health & Social Care College. We have experts in child psychology, social care, public health, occupational therapy, radiography, physiotherapy to supervise your own area of expert knowledge.

Format

The first two years of the course are modular, with facilitated content, designed to help you refine and develop your initial research ideas. The latter three years are part-time also, focused upon the research element, and there are key milestones at the end of each year within the research element. The thesis is between 40,000- 60,000 words long and you have a viva.

This course is very flexible; with two years part-time of facilitated modules which you use to frame, explore and refine your initial research question. For example, you will use the modules to explore general philosophical and methodological ideas, examine what is known about your topic, what your research will contribute to new knowledge; best methods for undertaking the research and, critically, learn about the leadership skills you will need to lead research in practice.

All the modules are facilitated using blended learning. For example within each module there are face to face sessions led by a module facilitator. In addition specific learning activities for each module will be developed using the virtual learning environment ‘Blackboard’ and the virtual doctorate learning environment (VLS). Both enable greater flexibility about the when and where of learning, and enables you to keep in contact with your peers and the programme team, wherever they have internet access.

Module titles

• Doctoral Foundation
• Research Methods

Assessment

Within the professional doctorate the assessment processes have been developed to enable you to critically interrogate, analyse, and reflect on your research ideas, demonstrating your ability to take account of professional and methodological issues. The assessments are designed to enable confident articulation and robust exploration, justification and defense of research ideas in keeping with the principles of the doctoral viva.

With this in mind assessment processes comprise:

• Essays
• Seminars
• Verbal presentations
• You are expected to engage in critical self assessment and personal/professional development planning as a basis for developing the skills associated with doctoral level study and the leadership of research in professional practice.

Career potential

You will make a significant contribution to professional practice with transferable skills to your clinical area. You will also
study inter-professionally with peers in a collaborative environment, strengthening networking opportunities across health
and social care disciplines.

How to apply: http://www.salford.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/applying

Read less
- Full-time programme from fall to spring in Rouen. - 100% of courses taught in English. - Interaction with working professionals with up-to-date industry. Read more

Key Points

- Full-time programme from fall to spring in Rouen
- 100% of courses taught in English
- Interaction with working professionals with up-to-date industry
- Abroad field study involving real business situations with companies such as Intel, Curver, Boeing, DCT, Sunreef Yachts as well as local start-ups
- Preparation to PRINCE2 certification in project management
- Over 10 years of experience
- A truly diverse and multi-cultural environment enriching global business skills

Objectives

The M.Sc. in International Project Development prepares future managers for evolving careers in business development and
- To deliver a project from its conception to its implementation
- To gain analytical skills and management competences in order to internationally develop growth opportunities (new markets, new ventures, etc.)
- To use project management methods to implement expansion plans
- To confront participants to diverse teamwork occasions

Programme

- Full time courses in Rouen from October to April
- Professional thesis and internship in France or abroad from May to December
- 100% of courses taught in English

- 5 core courses, along with the preparation for PRINCE2 certification in project management – October to December on our Rouen Campus
- 8 core courses, along with an abroad field study addressing real business issues from companies – January to April on our Rouen Campus
- Internship, along with the preparation and defense of a professional thesis under the supervision of an expert - May to December in France or abroad
- language courses
- Job and internship search (shaping your career workshops)

Read less
This programme explores how conflict occurs across a variety of countries and landscapes in the late 19th and 20th centuries, and how such conflict is managed and presented through media and propaganda. Read more

This programme explores how conflict occurs across a variety of countries and landscapes in the late 19th and 20th centuries, and how such conflict is managed and presented through media and propaganda.

Visit the website: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/84/war-media-and-society

Course detail

This course takes in different types of conflict, from conventional trench warfare and geopolitical stand-offs to guerrilla tactics and civil defense initiatives. It also examines the application of technology, the impact of the media on public opinion, along with the increasing importance of the home front in 20th-century warfare. The core module provides a strong interpretative and conceptual backbone and introduces you to the demands of postgraduate study in history.

Format and assessment

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year:

- Methods and Interpretations of Historical Research (30 credits)

- War, Propaganda and the Media (30 credits)

- Testimonies of War: Oral History in Theory and Practice (30 credits)

- Ireland and the First World War (30 credits)

- Landscapes of the Great War: Interpretations and Representations (30 credits)

- Landscapes of the Great War: Public Histories (30 credits)

- Work Placement (30 credits)

- Geiger Counter at Ground Zero: Explorations of Nuclear America (30 credits)

- The British Army and the Great War (30 credits)

- Home Front Britain, 1914-18 (30 credits)

All courses are assessed by coursework, and the dissertation counts for half the final grade (comprising one third assessed preparation, two thirds actual dissertation).

Careers

As the job market becomes increasingly competitive, postgraduate qualifications are becoming more attractive to employers seeking individuals who have finely tuned skills and abilities, which our programmes encourage you to hone. As a result of the valuable transferable skills developed during your course of study, career prospects for history graduates are wide ranging. Our graduates go on to a variety of careers, from research within the government to teaching, politics to records management and journalism, to working within museums and galleries – to name but a few.

How to apply: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

Postgraduate scholarships and funding

We have a scholarship fund of over £9 million to support our taught and research students with their tuition fees and living costs. Find out more: https://www.kent.ac.uk/scholarships/postgraduate/

English language learning

If you need to improve your English before and during your postgraduate studies, Kent offers a range of modules and programmes in English for Academic Purposes (EAP). Find out more here: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/international/english.html



Read less
Taught in English over one year from September through August, the International Graduate Program in National Security Studies is designed for students and professionals who are seriously interested in the field of national security in the broadest sense of the term. Read more

Taught in English over one year from September through August, the International Graduate Program in National Security Studies is designed for students and professionals who are seriously interested in the field of national security in the broadest sense of the term. Students will examine the complex interrelationship between the social, political, ethical, diplomatic, economic and military dimensions of national security to create a comprehensive picture of the state of the nation.

Facing a long-standing challenge at the center of a mostly hostile regional environment, even decades before its establishment, Israel has accumulated the experience in dealing with national security issues and has developed a comprehensive approach in this field, combining academic theory with real-world constraints.

What you will study

We strive to introduce students to the real-time dilemmas and choices of Israeli decision makers as well as high-ranking officials, in addition to examples of national security dilemmas from other national and regional conflicts.The curriculum also accentuates the broader fields of diplomacy, foreign policy, human rights and international crises management. The program targets mid-career officials, academics and students from Israel and around the world, as well as retired and active members of defense and foreign affairs establishments.For a full list of courses please click here.

Opportunities

Read about the 2015 NSS class visit to NATO, Brussels! View the interview with our students on YoutubeRead stories on student experiences and more. 

Courses

Core Courses

  • The National Security of Israel
  • Legal and Ethical Aspects of National Security
  • Approaches to Political Science
  • Intelligence and National Security
  • The Foreign Policy of Israel
  • Political Demography of the Middle East
  • Communications and National Security
  • Society and Security in Israel
  • Economics and National Security
  • Managing the Democratic State: Dilemmas of Policy and Security

For more information on curriculum courses please see the website.

Faculty

Professor Gabriel Ben-Dor is the head of the International MA Program in National Security Studies. Ben-Dor is a professor in the Department of Government and Political Theory and head of the National Security academic program at the University of Haifa. Dr. Dan Schueftan is a senior lecturer in the Department of Government and Political Theory and the Director of the National Security Studies Center. Both figures have published extensively in the field of security and international relations, and are well connected with Israel’s security establishment. For more information on faculty staff please visit here.

Scholarships

For more information on scholarships, please click here. Students of the program may also be eligible for a Masa scholarship.



Read less
The program aims at preparing professionals able to design, develop, and maintain established and emerging telecommunications services and network infrastructures. Read more

Mission:

The program aims at preparing professionals able to design, develop, and maintain established and emerging telecommunications services and network infrastructures. This requires a vast body of knowledge, including signal processing, modulation, coding, networking, transmission media, and electromagnetism, as well as some aspects of electronics, automation, and computer science. The program grants a Master of Science Degree, which is a second-cycle degree equivalent to the Italian Laurea Magistrale.

Organization:

The program starts every year in September and lasts two years (four semesters), with a workload of 120 ECTS credits. All activities are in English.

Fees and Funding:

Tuition fees range from 360 to 1400 euro per year. LAZIODISU offers grants and accommodations to low-income students. International students may also obtain grants from the Italian Ministry of Foreign Affairs and the Italian Trade Commission.

Studying Abroad:

Students are encouraged to spend a period of study and/or to prepare their thesis abroad (earning up to 60 ETCS credits). The Erasmus mobility program allows students to study in partner European universities without paying additional tuition fees.

Internship:

Students are encouraged to make an internship experience so as to acquire working-oriented skills and become more aware of their professional choices (earning up to 6 ETCS credits). We offer internship programs in collaboration with partner companies and institutions. Traineeships in foreign companies and research centers are also available.

Career Opportunities:

Prospective jobs are available not only with telecommunications operators and manufacturers, but also in many other sectors where telecommunications are critical, such as finance, energy, defense, surveillance, healthcare, education, public services, commerce, traffic control, environmental monitoring, space exploration, robotics, etc. The program also paves the way to doctoral and postgraduate research studies.

Read less
The American Graduate School in Paris and Arcadia University jointly offer an accelerated Dual Masters program allowing students to earn two US-accredited Master’s degrees in three years. Read more
The American Graduate School in Paris and Arcadia University jointly offer an accelerated Dual Masters program allowing students to earn two US-accredited Master’s degrees in three years:

- A Master of Arts in International Relations and Diplomacy at AGS
- A Master of Arts in International Peace and Conflict Resolution at Arcadia University - https://www.arcadia.edu

Each program followed individually normally extends over two years, which would make a total of four years to earn the two degrees separately. Thanks to curricula combinations, the accelerated dual program allows students to earn both degrees in three years.

Students in this program spend three semesters in Paris, France, at the American Graduate School in Paris, and three semesters in the United States, at Arcadia University, in the greater Philadelphia area. They may choose to start the program at either of the two institutions. Each portion of the program provides a different cultural and academic experience, while both have in common a challenging and student-dedicated learning environment.

The knowledge and skills acquired during this two-fold program can be applied to a vast array of fields in government, intergovernmental organizations and non-governmental organizations (NGOs): human rights, diplomacy, international law, humanitarian relief, environmental policymaking, sustainable development, and conflict management, among others. They are also highly transferrable to international business and other professional areas involving interaction at the international level.

Why this dual program?

The objectives of combining these two programs into one are:

- To provide an extended cross-cultural experience contributing to the students’ ability to work in diverse international environments
- To foster global and social awareness through a comprehensive graduate program in international affairs
- To develop a multidisciplinary perspective and varied methods of understanding of world affairs
- To offer students a broader range of career options in government, IGOs, NGOs and international business

Description of the M.A. in International Relations and Diplomacy

The curriculum of the M.A. in International Relations and Diplomacy teaches the cornerstone theories that explain interactions between countries, and also examines current world affairs through the various lenses of international relations: political, diplomatic, economic, environmental, cultural, and social. A range of area electives supplements this global approach allowing each student to gear the program towards his or her field of interest and professional goals.

Courses take place at AGS in Paris. They are taught in English and follow the American system of higher education while taking advantage of the school’s location in France, with guest speakers and visits to embassies, international organizations headquartered in Paris and European Union institutions. No knowledge of French language is necessary to attend. Students have the opportunity to take French courses along with the program (see more information here - http://www.ags.edu/international-relations/degree-programs/optional-french-language-courses)

Small seminar-style classrooms allow for close dialogue with professors and offer a forum for debate. The students and faculty in the program come from diverse national backgrounds, each adding a different perspective to the subjects taught.

See full M.A. in International Relations and Diplomacy program description page on this website - http://www.ags.edu/international-relations/degree-programs/master-in-international-relations


Description of the M.A. in International Peace and Conflict Resolution (IPCR) -

The International Peace and Conflict Resolution (IPCR) degree offers an innovative curriculum giving students a sophisticated understanding of today’s international issues by bridging the various sub-disciplines of this emerging field: human rights, international law and organizations, mediation and conflict transformation, public health issues, economic development, and environmental sustainability.

The coursework provides strong theoretical and analytical foundations and is complemented with hands-on experiences, including travels to key sites of the history of international conflict, and an internship allowing students to gain professional practice while developing a network of useful contacts.

Courses take place at Arcadia University in the United States, in Glenside, in the greater Philadelphia area (Pennsylvania). The faculty and staff at the International Peace and Conflict Resolution Department are committed to addressing the individual needs of each student, and work closely with them to make every component of the program fit their interests and career goals.

See full IPCR program description page on the Arcadia University website - http://www.arcadia.edu/academic/default.aspx?id=1093

Graduation Requirements

In order to complete the dual degree program and graduate with the M.A. in International Peace and Conflict Resolution and the M.A. in International Relations and Diplomacy, students are required to successfully complete 65-68 graduate credit-hours. See section on curriculum. Degree requirements include a Capstone Seminar at Arcadia University, as well as the completion and defense of a 25,000- to 35,000-word Master’s thesis at The American Graduate School in Paris.

See also:

Curriculum - http://www.ags.edu/dual-programs/international-relations-and-diplomacy-international-peace-and-conflict-resolution-curriculum

How to Apply - http://www.ags.edu/international-relations/admissions/applying/double-degree-programs

Read less
The University of Haifa’s International Master’s Program in Global Health Leadership and Administration is dedicated to providing students with a strong foundation from which to critically examine current global health challenges. Read more

The University of Haifa’s International Master’s Program in Global Health Leadership and Administration is dedicated to providing students with a strong foundation from which to critically examine current global health challenges. The next generation of health care leaders will require a comprehensive understanding of society’s many facets and how they each relate to public health issues. They will also need to have sophisticated leadership skills in order to serve an ever more complex society, and to manage cross-cutting, multi-sectoral, top-down and bottom-up comprehensive programs, within and beyond the health services. In an increasingly integrated world marked by growing disparity, public health leaders will also need to be aware of how global and national forces affect health within and between national borders.

The Global Health Leadership and Administration program nurtures the required high levels of sophistication, excellent leadership and communication skills, and a deep knowledge of public and global health in order to prepare future practitioners and researchers for leadership roles in settings across the globe. The one-year program is taught in English over three consecutive semesters, from October through September.

What you will study

The curriculum is made up of a variety of courses that cover all facets of the field of Global Health and Administration including core courses in introducing the field, epidemiology, biostatistics and research methods. A full range of elective courses can be viewed here. The course also includes a capstone project and a structured and supervised professional practicum.

Career opportunities

Global public health is a multidisciplinary specialty, leaving graduates of the program with a broad range of career options. Graduates will be well placed to pursue careers in ministries of health, non-governmental organizations, multi-lateral agencies (such as WHO), governmental agencies (USAID, in-country ministry of health, etc.), advocacy groups, disaster relief organizations, or research and academic institutions in positions such as Public Health Analysts and Public Health Advisors, Disease Control Consultants, and Health and Wellness Managers.

Courses

Core Courses

  • Introduction to Global Public Health (including Social Determinants of Health)
  • Theories and Models of Health Behavior
  • Environmental & Occupational Health
  • Epidemiology & Analysis of Epidemiological Data
  • Biostatistics & SAS
  • Introduction to Public Health Policy, Administration & The Israeli Health System

Concentration Courses

  • Research Methods & Epidemiological Investigation
  • Global Health Systems
  • Health Economics
  • Organization & Management
  • Leadership & Management 
  • Finance & Accounting
  • Leadership Seminar Series

Elective courses, a practicum, a Capstone Course also part of the curriculum.

For more information on the course curriculum and course description please click here

Faculty

Manfred Green, MD, PhD, MPH is currently the director of the Global Health Leadership and Administration MPH program and previously served as head of the University of Haifa School of Public Health, where he is a professor in the Department of Epidemiology. He also serves as an adjunct professor at the University of Georgia, College of Public Health in the United States. He received his medical degree at the University of Cape Town in South Africa, his MPH and PhD at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, and his BSc in mathematical statistics at the University of Witwatersrand. He previously served as head of the public health branch for the Israel Defense Forces, as well as founding director of the Israel Center for Disease Control.

For a full list of faculty members and their specialisations please visit here.

Scholarships

This program is eligible for Masa scholarship. For more scholarship information please visit the International school's Scholarships page



Read less
The Master of Science in Finance is designed for students who want to enhance their understanding of financial analysis in a very practical environment. Read more
The Master of Science in Finance is designed for students who want to enhance their understanding of financial analysis in a very practical environment.

The program is fully taught in English, making of its international perspective one of its major strengths. Through the observation of professional practices, students are given a unique opportunity to learn the ethical norms of the profession.

Theory is put into practice in the financial markets lab, where students may also earn professional certifications.

Accredited with the French National Association of Grandes Ecoles (La Conférence des Grandes Ecoles).

Program Advantages:
- Privileged use of the financial markets lab, where students get full access to the Bloomberg Professional services
- Professional seminars bridging the gap between theory and market practices
- Extensive integration of real-life examples in a blended-learning approach

Career Opportunities:
- The program prepares students for jobs in the financial analysis and investment management industries.

Program

The Master of Science in Finance is offered on a full-time basis and the curriculum is developed around core courses, including Bloomberg certifications, as well as electives courses and French or other foreign language courses.

Curriculum -

Core and elective courses are spread over two terms of courses. Students gain experience and put theory to practice through an internship or a consulting project in the final term.

Admission & fees

The choice to study abroad is not only an academic decision, but also a financial one. Students need to be aware of the various cost involved in pursuing a master’s at IÉSEG.

Application process -

Admission is based on students’ online application available at https://application.ieseg.fr/ and the examination of the required documents. Admission is offered on an ongoing basis to qualified students. Decision release date: from Mid-October 2015.

Application deadlines:
May 26th 2017

Tuition 2017-2018:
€ 16,000 for domestic and international students.
International merit-based scholarships are available.

Funding and Scholarships -

IÉSEG has a merit-based International Scholarship Program with a tuition waiver of 15 to 50% per year. Selection is based on the applicant’s previous academic performance and overall application portfolio.

The scholarship application is automatic; students do not need to apply separately.

All international students are encouraged to check with Campus France and their own government to see if there are any scholarships available. For American students please check with Sallie Mae for private loan options.

Testimonials

"This will be the first time I am studying abroad and IÉSEG was the best choice for me to expand my knowledge in finance both for the location of the campus and from the point of view of my career. It offers me the chance to attend classes that have real practical value because of the access to the Bloomberg financial markets lab. It will also help me prepare for professional certifications, which are my next steps in my career. Apart from that, at IÉSEG I am confident I will have a multi-cultural experience because we will be a mixed group from all the continents of the globe."

Gabriela TEISU, Romania, MFIN 2015

"I chose IÉSEG for many reasons. I know that IÉSEG provides an excellent education for its students, as evidenced by its EQUIS and AACSB accreditations. I was also confident in the quality of education at IÉSEG, as it is a partner school of the Ateneo de Manila University, my alma mater in the Philippines. Moreover, I was very much attracted to IÉSEG’s MSc in Finance course, which includes Bloomberg and Thomson Reuters training — these modules, along with the other MSc in Finance classes, are perfect for the kind of career I am interested in pursuing (research or portfolio management). What’s more, the IÉSEG community is full of international students and faculty, and for me, studying in an international setting is key to being a world-class individual. Finally, what makes IÉSEG the perfect choice is that it has a campus right in Paris, so studying here means that you will live at the heart of one of the most beautiful cities — and countries! — in the world."

Marguerite Amanda TY, Philippines, MFIN 2015

"The reason why I choose the MSc in Finance at IESEG School of Management is because I wanted a school that would give me significant exposure to the international business. With the opening of its Paris campus in La Defense IÉSEG is directly connected with the world’s leading enterprises. Success in a global economic environment requires the combination of academic competence and an active professional network; by studying in an international business hub we will have the invaluable opportunity to make those professional connections on a daily basis. I am excited to join IÉSEG and look forward to benefiting from its future growth while also giving back in whatever possible way I can."

Ricardo Chavez, El Salvador, MFIN 2015

Read less

Show 10 15 30 per page



Cookie Policy    X