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Masters Degrees (Decorative Arts)

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This unique MA in French and British Decorative Arts and Interiors focuses on the development of interiors and decorative arts in England and France in the “long” eighteenth century (c.1660-c.1830) and their subsequent rediscovery and reinterpretation in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Read more

Course outline

This unique MA in French and British Decorative Arts and Interiors focuses on the development of interiors and decorative arts in England and France in the “long” eighteenth century (c.1660-c.1830) and their subsequent rediscovery and reinterpretation in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

A key element of the course is the emphasis on the first-hand study of furniture, silver and ceramics, where possible in the context of historic interiors. Based in central London at the European School of Economics, it draws upon the outstanding collections of the nearby Wallace Collection and the Victoria and Albert Museum.

The MA is designed to appeal to those wishing to pursue careers in heritage organisations, antique-dealing and auctioneering, museums, conservation, interior design or university teaching and research. However, those with a strong personal interest in studying the subject for its own sake are also very welcome.

With its focus on first-hand study of decorative arts within historic interiors, the programme provides a vocational and academic training which has enabled students to pursue careers in museums, interior design, antique dealing, and auctioneering. Some of our past students now work at the Royal Collection, the National Trust and English Heritage (see What our students and alumni say).

The MA also provides an excellent spring-board for students wanting to do a PhD in art history or related disciplines.

Find out more about our School of Humanities on http://www.buckingham.ac.uk/humanities.

Teaching

Teaching is carried out through a combination of lectures supported by seminars and tutorials. A key feature of the Buckingham teaching method is the use of small tutorial groups which provide the most effective means of ensuring that the students benefit from the academic expertise at their disposal. It is also the philosophy of Buckingham’s faculty to be available to students outside the scheduled tutorial times and to encourage good working relationships between staff and students.

The MA is taught by staff from the University of Buckingham, with the participation of outside experts from the Wallace Collection, the Victoria and Albert Museum, English Heritage, the Royal Institute of British Architects, the Soane Museum. There are also a number of renowned independent scholars who give lectures and lead some of the seminars and class trips.

UK Study Trips

There are frequent trips to collections in and around London, and a study week at Buckingham exploring local country houses such as Woburn Abbey, Waddesdon Manor, Boughton and Blenheim Palace, with their important decorative arts collections.

Paris Study Week

In the second term there is a study week in Paris, where students are granted privileged access to some of the private apartments at Versailles not normally accessible to the public, as well as a number of very important eighteenth-century private houses in Paris, open by special permission.

Professional Practice Projects and Placements in Museums and Galleries

Students also have the opportunity, through the Professional Practice Project to plan an exhibition in a museum, research a project to restore an historic interior, or undertake a part-time museum placement, thereby acquiring useful vocational skills and experience. Some of our students are currently doing placements at English Heritage and Strawberry Hill.

Course Structure

The course starts each September and finishes the following September. During the first term students study the development of the decorative arts and the interior in France and England between c.1660 and the end of the eighteenth century. In the second term students examine revivalism and the practical and historical problems of reinterpreting eighteenth-century interiors and objects. This is combined with a professional practice project designed to equip students with skills and experience applicable to careers in museums and built heritage.

Teaching takes place two days a week (excluding class trips) over two terms, or one day a week for part-time students. During the third term, students research a dissertation under supervision, which is written up over the summer for submission at the end of September. Assessment is by means of coursework and the dissertation.

Subject to the agreement of the Programme Director, there are some options for part-time study, one day a week over two years, or by deferral of the dissertation.

Apply here http://www.buckingham.ac.uk/humanities/ma/decorativearts.

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The Master’s programme in Arts and Culture at Leiden University is an art history programme with a focus on global perspectives, agency and reception, and cultural responses to life sciences. Read more
The Master’s programme in Arts and Culture at Leiden University is an art history programme with a focus on global perspectives, agency and reception, and cultural responses to life sciences. You learn to consider modern art and design as links between media, cultures and communities. You also discover how sculpture, architecture and visual arts were applied together in the Renaissance and Baroque periods as a means to convince the viewer.

Visit the website: http://en.mastersinleiden.nl/programmes/arts-and-culture/en/introduction

Course detail

The Arts and Culture programme has three main overall perspectives: the study of works of art, design and buildings from a global perspective; the focus on historical and contemporary works of art, design and architecture in terms of agency and reception; and to study art and design as engaged cultural responses to life sciences. This programme is unique in the Netherlands for the interdisciplinary range of subjects offered and for the diversity of the optional tracks available.

Specialisations

- Art and Architecture before 1800
- Art of the Contemporary World and World Art Studies
- Design, Culture & Society
- Museums and Collections

Reasons to choose Arts and Culture in Leiden

1) Leiden has a unique teaching programme. Leiden is the only university in the Netherlands where you can study art in a global perspective, in the Art of the Contemporary World and World Art Studies specialisation. Leiden is also the only place where you can study design and decorative art, or art and architecture pre-1800 in their relation to one another. Art and culture are considered from their historical and their present-day perspectives: the key focus is on the impact of works of art on those who view them.

2) You have a broad range of options. The programme is very broad. It covers art from throughout the world and almost all art forms, media and disciplines from the past and the present. You will choose a specialisation that guarantees in-depth study. Both in the general and in the research master’s you will have the opportunity to structure your programme in line with your personal interests.

3) The programme is personally-tailored and small-scale. You will be assigned a personal mentor during the programme. The teaching generally takes the form of small-scale seminars, giving you a high degree of contact with lecturers and fellow students.

Career

As a graduate of the MA in Arts and Culture, you will be qualified to work within a variety of professional fields, such as museums, galleries, cultural institutions or (art) libraries and archives. You will also find employment opportunities within the publishing and general media sectors, or within the art trade, in journalism or public relations.

Recent graduates are working with companies such as Hoogsteder & Hoogsteder, Sdu Publishers, Haags Gemeentemuseum, the Repeat Group, Gavelers Auctioneers and Lyppens.

How to apply: http://en.mastersinleiden.nl/arrange/admission

Funding

For information regarding funding, please visit the website: http://prospectivestudents.leiden.edu/scholarships

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The History of Design and Material Culture MA focuses on both objects from everyday life and representations of them since the eighteenth century as a basis for research and analysis. Read more
The History of Design and Material Culture MA focuses on both objects from everyday life and representations of them since the eighteenth century as a basis for research and analysis.

The course allies theory and practice in seminar-based discussions that embrace various methodological issues and perspectives, including Marxism, discourse theory, phenomenology, semiology, museology, gender, race, class, memory and oral testimony. Depending on the material you analyse in your essays and seminars, as well as the dissertation topic you choose, you can also emphasise your own intellectual and subject-specific interests.

Since its inception in the late 1990s, the MA has garnered a national and international reputation as one of the pioneering and most successful programmes of its kind. As a research-led course, it harnesses the academic expertise of staff with a recognised wealth of teaching and research excellence in subject areas such as fashion and dress history, the history and theory of advertising, photography and the mass-reproduced image, and heritage and museum studies.

Under guidance, you will be encouraged to explore the relationship between theory and practice and to develop your own skills as an independent researcher, thinker and writer.

Course structure

The History of Design and Material Culture MA draws on the wide-ranging academic expertise of staff in the fields of the history of decorative arts and design, dress history, material culture, museology and social history.

It stimulates innovative and interdisciplinary study in the history of design and material culture in both their western and non-western contexts, considering the relationship between local, national and international patterns of production, circulation, consumption and use.

The course is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, study visits and tutorials. Considerable emphasis is placed on student involvement in the weekly seminar readings and discussions within the two thematic core modules, Exploring Objects and Mediating Objects.

Based at Pavilion Parade, a Regency building overlooking the famous Royal Pavilion, teaching takes place close to the seafront and city centre amenities.

Syllabus

• Exploring Objects

The Exploring Objects module introduces you to a series of different research methods and historiographical approaches, as you interrogate and make sense of designed objects in terms of how they are designed, produced, circulated, consumed and used in everyday life. It covers the period from the late eighteenth century to the present time and typically involves discussion and debate on the following themes, theories and methods: Marxist and post-Marxist historiography; production and consumption; gender and taste; phenomenology; object-based analysis; the use of archives; and 'good writing/bad writing'. It also introduces you to the academic rigour of postgraduate dissertation research.

• Mediating Objects

This module complements Exploring Objects by focusing on the mediation between 'this one' (the object itself) and 'that one' (the object as represented in word and image). On one level, it examines how objects are translated in various texts and contexts, from museum and private collections to photographs, advertisements, film and fiction. On another level, it examines how objects are transformed through the embodied processes of everyday rituals such as gift-giving and personal oral and collective memories. The module therefore deals with the idea of intertexualities and how the identities of things and people are phenomenologically bound up with each other. By extension, you examine objects in relation to ideas concerning sex, gender, class, generation, race and ethnicity.

• Dissertation

The centrepiece of your MA studies, the dissertation is a piece of original writing between 18,000 and 20,000 words on a research topic of your own choosing. It allows you to pursue a specific research topic related to your own academic and intellectual interests in a given area of the history of design and material culture, for example fashion and dress, textiles, ceramics and glass, product design, interior design and architecture, graphic communications, advertising and photography, film, museums, collecting and curating, and design pedagogy. The dissertation is largely based on primary research, often using specialist archives and surviving historical material.

Facilities

This course makes use of the University of Brighton Design Archives, which include the archives of the Design Council, Alison Settle, FHK Henrion and the South of England Film and Video Archive.

Close professional contact with national institutions such as the Victoria and Albert Museum, as well as with local collections and centres of historical interest (such as Brighton’s unique Royal Pavilion and Brighton Museum and Art Gallery, with its internationally famous collection of decorative art from the 1890s onwards), present research opportunities for students registered on the course.

The course is closely linked to our arts and humanities research division through a joint research lecture series, and we have successfully encouraged high achievers to register for the MPhil/PhD programme.

The student environment also includes the thriving postgraduate Design History Society as well as opportunities for conference presentation, professional contact and career development in the field.

Careers and employability

The course has an extremely healthy track record in helping students to take up careers in related areas of employment and further study. Many of our postgraduates have succeeded in finding work as lecturers, curators, journalists, designers and design consultants, while many others have pursued doctoral research, most often also securing prestigious funding from the AHRC (Arts and Humanities Research Council).

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This programme is a unique opportunity to study the History of Art and/or Archaeology of Asia, Africa and the Middle East. Students concentrate on architecture, sculpture, painting and the decorative arts and have the option of pursuing topics and approaches more archaeological in focus. Read more
This programme is a unique opportunity to study the History of Art and/or Archaeology of Asia, Africa and the Middle East. Students concentrate on architecture, sculpture, painting and the decorative arts and have the option of pursuing topics and approaches more archaeological in focus. They consider theoretical and methodological questions and are invited to question the relevance of the disciplinary distinction between History of Art and Archaeology to the study of the non-Western world. Courses cover a time period spanning from antiquity to present-day, contemporary art.

The Department of the History of Art and Archaeology contains some of the world’s leading experts in Asian and African art history and archaeology, whose ground-breaking research informs and is informed by their teaching. Students benefit from the unparalleled knowledge and enthusiasm of staff. As members of the School of Arts, they profit from the insights of scholars and students studying the Music, Film and Media of Asia, Africa and the Middle East in historical and contemporary contexts. They can also select from courses in other departments, taking advantage of SOAS’s unrivalled expertise in the languages, history, religions and cultures of Asia and Africa.

A Masters from the Department of the History of Art and Archaeology provides students with expertise in the History of Art and/or Archaeology of Asia, Africa and the Middle East. Our postgraduates progress to work in arts, culture and heritage roles, including in galleries, museums, archives, conservation, publishing and arts administration. The large portfolio of transferable skills they acquire enables them to forge careers in a range of other fields across the world. Our Masters programmes are also an excellent foundation for MPhil/PhD research.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/art/programmes/mahistartarch/

Structure

Students must complete three units (or 0.5 unit equivalent) of taught MA modules in addition to the compulsory dissertation. A minimum of two units (or equivalent) must be selected from the MA modules in the History of Art and Archaeology department listed below. Up to one unit (or equivalent) may be selected from MA options offered by other SOAS departments, also listed below. Students must complete the Dissertation in Art and Archaeology (15PARC999).

Students may be allowed to study for the MA on a part-time basis. The part-time MA may be taken over two years, in which case the student takes two taught courses in the first year, and one taught course and the dissertation in the second. Alternatively, it can be taken over three years, in which case the student takes one taught course in each year. The dissertation can be written in any year, but it is strongly recommended that this be undertaken in the final year of the programme. It is submitted in September of the year in which the student registers for it.

Teaching

Teaching consists of a combination of lectures and seminars. Classes are normally between two and three hours per week for each course. Teaching methods include lectures with discussion, seminars (at which students present papers) and museum visits. Students at all levels are expected to take an active part in class presentations. A particularly important element is the training of the student's visual memory.

In addition to their studies on the MA programme, students at SOAS can participate in a wide range of research seminars, lectures and conferences that regularly take place in the School and in the University of London.

Assessment

For each of the three taught courses, the student will be expected to submit two or three pieces of written work usually around 3,000 to 4,500 words – for a total of 9,000 words per course. The emphasis is on developing essay skills during the session in preparation for the dissertation. In some courses the assessment is 100% on written work. On other courses, assessed course work forms 75% of the student’s final grade and an additional 25% is determined by slide quizzes, projects or other forms of assessment. The 10,000 word dissertation is submitted in September.

Learning Resources

SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources.

Destinations

A Masters from the Department of the History of Art and Archaeology provides students with expertise in the History of Art and/or Archaeology of Asia, Africa and the Middle East. Our postgraduates progress to work in arts, culture and heritage roles, including in galleries, museums, archives, conservation, publishing and arts administration. The large portfolio of transferable skills they acquire enables them to forge careers in a range of other fields across the world. Our Masters programmes are also an excellent foundation for MPhil/PhD research.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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The aim of this intensive 12 month program is to train future managers of arts and cultural institutions and future entrepreneurs in the cultural industries. Read more
The aim of this intensive 12 month program is to train future managers of arts and cultural institutions and future entrepreneurs in the cultural industries.
Core teaching weaves together a range of different approaches to the cultural industries: high-level business management, creative entrepreneurship, art and culture fundraising, event management, and design and creative marketing.

This MBA program is designed to develop students’ understanding of the art and performing arts sectors and develop professional skills in arts management and business. Professional studies are underpinned by courses on the history of twentieth century art and theatre, providing students with a hands-on experience of the artistic and cultural backgrounds.

Structure

The curriculum in details:

This intensive twelve-month program is designed to develop students’ understanding of the art and performing arts sectors, while developing their professional skills in arts management and business, in order to become future managers of arts and cultural institutions and future entrepreneurs in the cultural industries. Throughout the year, students develop a professional project that they present in front of a jury, in validation of the Titre I diploma.

1st trimester (September – December):

Common courses: Marketing & Communication; International Business; Strategic Management; Finance for Managers; Digital Business

Electives: Sociology of Arts & Culture; History of the Decorative Arts

Performing arts track: History of Performing Arts
Arts track: Art history: Realism to 1945
Intensive January session:

Common courses: Research methodology; Business game; Leadership management; Computing software seminar; Career seminar

Performing arts track: European Cultural Policy & Artistic Creation; Culture Industries Survey; Event Management & Management Practices; Economics of Cultural Studies
Arts track: History of the Art Market; History of the Fine Arts; Curating Exhibitions; Economics of the Art Market
2nd trimester (February – April):

Electives: Public Relations & Branding through Social Media; Performance and Digital Arts

Performing arts track: Economics of Cultural Industries; Event Management; Performing Arts Production, Performing Arts Management; Creative Entrepreneurship; Cultural Industries Survey; Cultural Policy & Heritage Management; Legal Environment of Business Applied to the Arts
Elective: Organizing a Film Festival
Arts track: Museum Law; Intellectual Property Law; Legal Environment of the Arts: Economics of the Art Market; Financing Cultural Projects; Art History: 1945 to date; Curating Exhibitions; Mounting Exhibitions
Elective: Collecting Contemporary Art
3rd trimester (May – September): Internship, online classes; develop thesis and professional project.

The Program at a glance:

• Duration: 3 trimesters (12 months)
• Location: Paris
• Accreditation: Professional Master's degree from IESA: Titre 1 Degree recognized by the French governement. Double degree: MA in Arts & Cultural Management from PSB - Paris School of Business

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The Master’s programme in Literary Studies (research) at Leiden University includes the study of media, art history, literature and literary theory, since the study of cultural objects and cultural practices is founded on a shared theoretical and methodological framework. Read more
The Master’s programme in Literary Studies (research) at Leiden University includes the study of media, art history, literature and literary theory, since the study of cultural objects and cultural practices is founded on a shared theoretical and methodological framework. It is unique in offering a two-year programme that integrates literary studies, media studies, and theory.

Visit the website: http://en.mastersinleiden.nl/programmes/literary-studies-research/en/introduction

Course detail

The main research themes of LUCAS, the Leiden Institute for the Arts in Society, guide the themes of the courses offered. These are:

- art, agency and rhetoric
- a global approach to texts, art and media
- intermediality

Specialisations

Topics in Arts and Culture:

- Architecture
- Art and Material Culture of Asia
- Art of the Late Middle Ages and Early Modern Period
- Decorative Arts, Industrial Design and the Domestic Interior
- Modern and Contemporary Art, and World Art Studies
- Museums and Collections

Topics in Media Studies:

- Comparative Literature and Literary Theory
- Film and Photographic Studies
- Book and Digital Media Studies
- Journalism and New Media Studies

Topics in Literary Studies:

- English Literature
- German Literature
- French Literature
- Italian Literature

Why choose Literary Studies (research) at Leiden University?

- Benefit from the programme’s intense collaboration with the MA in Media Studies and the MA in Literary Studies.

- Acquire a valuable range of skills and knowledge, both disciplinary and interdisciplinary, historical and theoretical.

- Enjoy the research master’s flexible programme, encouraging you to adopt a interdisciplinary perspective, while following courses within your ‘home discipline’ as well.

- Focus on a medium, discipline or genre, or a period (Middle Ages/Early Modern resp. Modern and Contemporary).

Careers

As a graduate of the Research Master’s in Literary Studies, you are prepared for a career in a wide variety of fields, for example within journalism, or as education-centre directors or librarians. Graduates also move into the fields of archiving, publishing and other media industries, while some can be found in management positions within the cultural public domain, in art trade, and in journalism and public relations. Furthermore, you have the very real possibility of moving into a research-oriented career.

Positions you could hold after your studies:

- Policy Officer at a university
- Desk Editor at SDU Publishers, a publisher of specialist information
- Consumer Marketing Manager at Philips
- Editorial Secretary & Editor at a publishing house
- Freelance copy editor
- PhD candidate at Leiden University
- Publishing Assistant at a publishing house
- Marketing Communications Writer at a telecoms company

How to apply: http://en.mastersinleiden.nl/arrange/admission

Funding

For information regarding funding, please visit the website: http://prospectivestudents.leiden.edu/scholarships

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Glass has remarkable properties; its transparency, durability and versatility have been explored in architectural and artistic contexts for thousands of years. Read more
Glass has remarkable properties; its transparency, durability and versatility have been explored in architectural and artistic contexts for thousands of years. Recent technological advances provide continuing opportunities for creative application. Its unique properties of transparency and interaction with light gives MA Glass students the opportunity to explore new possibilities and build specialist knowledge as a material for the future.

Course Overview

The MA Glass programme within the Contemporary Dialogues portfolio offers an exciting and innovative re-thinking of Postgraduate provision that reflects the strategic thinking of Swansea College of Art. The portfolio facilitates migration between diverse thematic disciplines, exploring new ideas and conceptual approaches to allow young artists and designers to confront the issues that face society today and into the future.

The portfolio’s ethos of collaborative dialogues through material practices provides an innovative model of design, fine and applied arts education. This development allows students from all pathways to experience and share creative practices and innovative mind-sets through inter-disciplinary and trans-disciplinary dialogues. This ethos is enhanced within each programme to stimulate ‘collaborative’ practices and experimentation across a broader spectrum of specialist fields, developing graduates with the contextual awareness, creative thinking and technical skills to operate at the forefront of their discipline.

During the course of your studies you will be supported by specialist staff, leading professionals and practicing artists through lectures, seminars, workshops and tutorials. We have exceptional traditional and digital facilities, housed in spacious purpose-build workshops. Through these, we encourage creative freedom within all of our students and support you in challenging conventional thinking and established practices and facilitate new technological advances across a broad range of disciplines. We have found that through collaborative experimentation and innovative design thinking our students are able to produce work that meets the challenges and respond to the demands of the 21st century.

Facilities include:
-Firing kilns for glass and ceramics
-Printmaking, Screen Printing and Digital Textile Technologies
-Traditional and Digital Stitch
-Wood, Metal, Clay
-Cutting Etching and Engraving Technologies - Waterjet, Laser, Plotter
-3D Printing and CNC
-Chemical and Digital Darkrooms
-Specialist computer facilities with commercial standard software

Modules

-Collaborative Dialogues (20 credits)
-Co-Existent Perspectives (20 credits)
-The Thought Experiment (20 credits)
-Explorative Research Praxis (60 credits)
-Confirmative Praxis (60 credits)

Key Features

Students use the Master's Programme for all kinds of reasons; to gain an extra qualification, to achieve a higher and more sophisticated level of practice, as well as to have supported research and development time in order to elevate themselves to a more professional plateau with their artwork.

In this century, glass as a material offers a unique place in design and architecture and there are very few institutions that offer the opportunity to explore this material, with particular reference to its applications in architecture. Swansea glass department has a long established reputation for glass and strong industrial links help underpin the educational experience for students. The history of the department enables a broad spectrum of approaches that draw on the historical, cultural and technological uses of this material. Glass in its many forms; mosaic, glaze, enamel and window façade covers a broad association of surfaces, which offers for the maker a rich and varied pallet. This is a hands-on course!

The main strands of the programme are: design and philosophy, material innovation and glass design. These themes are considered in the context of glass for the environment, to fulfill the need to develop innovative, sustainable and possibly universal solutions for a variety of architectural, public and private spaces.

The programme prides itself in newly equipped workshops that provide excellent specialist facilities including sandblasters, acid etching bay, cold working machinery, screen printing facilities for glass and an extensive range of glass and ceramic kilns for casting and decorative processing. Beyond this specialist equipment, you will also have access to an extensive range of facilities including an excellent library, open-access computer suites and workshops in other areas within the art school such as wood, metal, ceramics, 3D printing and water jet and laser cutting.

The teaching team consists of highly experienced glass artists and designers who are either engaged in professional practice or are research active, supported by industrially trained technical staff. This ensures that the course delivers a qualification and experience that is highly relevant to the changing needs of the industry and wider architectural glass community.

The department works closely with the Architectural Glass Centre, which often supports and advises the students on live commissions and commercial work. We also work with the CIRIC research centre within the faculty, with 2 members of this research centre specialising in glass. This provides research opportunities and access to high technology resources giving the students opportunities to link with creative industries infrastructure in the region as a potential starting point for future employment.

With an eighty year history the glass department benefits from strong support from Alumni and the local glass community as well as networks and connections from world-renowned glass artists.

Assessment

The main modes of assessment used on this programme are; studio projects, written assignments and seminar presentations.

Assessment at postgraduate level is reflected by your ability to reformulate and use relevant methodologies and approaches to address problematic situations that involve many interacting factors. It includes taking responsibility for planning and developing courses of action that initiate or underpin substantial change or development, as well as exercising broad autonomy and judgement. It should also reflect an understanding of the relevant theoretical and methodological perspectives and how they affect your area of study or work.

Career Opportunities

Students from the Master's Programme have gone on to many varied careers within the Architectural Glass Industry, Glass Studios, teaching and lecturing positions, in community arts and the cultural industries in general. Many have continued to practice as designers and artists and some have progressed to PhD study.

Possible career pathways have included:
-Establishing yourself as an artist, designer or maker
-Setting up a studio as a sole supplier or in a partnership with others
-Employed in specialist glass studios
-Engaging in freelance work on architectural and interiors projects
-Designing for industry or working in the glass industry
-Working on private and public commissions
-Working on art projects and community projects
-Other opportunities include arts administration, curating, teaching and mentoring, community work and arts editorial
-Continuation of studies to postgraduate level on our MA programme
-Further academic research leading to MPhil, or PhD is available

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The MArch at AUB explores the possibilities of architectural practices that conceive and articulate diverse processes of community development and transformation. Read more
The MArch at AUB explores the possibilities of architectural practices that conceive and articulate diverse processes of community development and transformation.

The “construction” of the “sites” of our interventions in the public sphere includes involvement with other institutions, governmental agencies and other actors at a local, regional, national, and global level.

Where are the options?

What is at stake?

Are there really options?

How should we choose?

The MArch at AUB program is structured around the idea of architectural intervention, interrogated in relationship to its duration and effects in and around the community where it takes place – indeed, in its potential to create community.

The notion that there is any singular definition of the architectural profession is, at least on the margins, continuously questioned. But the ‘middle’ is strong, and the very fact that a multiplicity of ‘other’ agendas and their attendant methodologies are marginalised attests to this strength.

So looking for something different and fresh in your route to becoming an architect in a changing world. The new MArch at AUB (RIBA*/ARB Part2) aims to produce: performative, projective enablers and architecture, cutting into societies deepest darkest myths; building interventions in the utopias and distopias past, present and future; and launching architectural careers and journey’s via its laboratory practice, where the body and somatic practice is at the fore.

Travel with MArch at AUB and @inspiredAUB, the arts campus and its cross disciplinary docks, on the ride of a lifetime with your new highly decorative AUB baggage. Join the eclectic global and local, MArch student body, be ready to catch a big one from the Portland Stone cliffs or disappear into the Mirkwood to live like a hobbit. The AUB MArch has the arts centre in Sway by the architect, Tony Fretton as a part of its portfolio of spaces AUB to the main campus and its multiple workshops, studios and laboratories. Although the course is new there is a fascinating history of drawing and representation. In former lives architects Michael Hopkins and Peter Cook were educated in Bournemouth with bright lights and late night inflatables on the beach. The emerging, social, political, and architectural in its many frightening forms, are being professionally dissected, compressed, crafted and beaten, by brave bodies in the embryonic laboratory practice ‘ROOM 101’, based in the Enterprise Pavilion.

From the first graduating cohort there many fascinating stories – ecological strategies from Haiti, Delhi and Wessex. They are now working and researching from the local practice and making/fabricating to teaching (on the BA Hons), to developing the ‘fablab’ in AUB’s workshop. They all came from different schools and found AUB & the MArch very welcoming and encouraging. The [email protected] broadens the architect’s range of activities, and empowers its community through its members’ ability to actually make a difference.

Ed Frith, Architect, MArch Course Leader & Prof Oren Liebermann, Dean of the Faculty of Art & Design

If you would like to discuss any aspect of this course, or details on the application process, please contact Astrid MacKellar on: or 01202 363384.

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The MSt in the History of Design is a taught Master's Degree offered part-time over two years. A tea cup, be it hand-painted porcelain, studio pottery or mass produced ceramic, offers a glimpse of the rituals of everyday life and historical experience. Read more
The MSt in the History of Design is a taught Master's Degree offered part-time over two years.

A tea cup, be it hand-painted porcelain, studio pottery or mass produced ceramic, offers a glimpse of the rituals of everyday life and historical experience. A designed object or space reflects the individual, the society for which it was created, as well as its creator. It expresses aesthetic preoccupations and articulates historical and political conditions. Decoration challenges the hierarchies and contested inter-relationships between the disciplines and careers of artists, designers, crafts workers, gardeners, and architects. Such concerns reside at the heart of the study of the history of design.

This history of design course is taught on nine monthly Saturdays and one residential weekend per annum. The syllabus focuses particularly on the period from 1851 to 1951 in Europe (including Britain) and America. Combining close visual and material analysis with historical methodologies, the course explores decorative and applied art, the design of interiors and public spaces, and for performance and industry.

There will be two Open Mornings, on one Saturday in November 2016 11am - 12.30pm and on one Saturday in February 2017 11am - 12.30pm, where you can meet the Course Director, Dr Claire O'Mahony, and learn more about the course. Please contact usl if you would like to attend including which day you prefer: .

Visit the website https://www.conted.ox.ac.uk/about/mst-in-the-history-of-design

Description

Core themes of the History of Design course will include the rivalries between historicism and modernity; internationalist and nationalist tendencies; handicraft and industrial processes, as well as the analysis of critical debates about the makers and audiences of decoration in advice literature and aesthetic writing.

The programme aims to provide students with a framework of interpretative skills useful to understanding design. It provides grounding in the analysis of the techniques and materials deployed in creating objects or sites. It enables students to develop a grasp of historical context, encompassing the impact of the hierarchies within, and audiences for, the critical reception of 'decoration'. It encourages the analysis of the historiography of political and aesthetic debates articulated by designers, critics and historians about design, its forms and purposes.

Teaching and learning takes a variety of forms in this programme. In keeping with the Oxford ethos, individual tutorials and supervisions will be an important of the course, particularly whilst researching the dissertation, whilst earlier stages of the programme principally take the form of seminar group discussion, lectures and independent study. First-hand visual analysis is an essential component of the discipline of the history of design. As such each course element of the programme includes site visits, both to Oxford University's unique museum and library collections, and to those nearby in London and the regions. Formal assessment is by means of analytical essay and dissertation writing, complemented by informal assessment methods including a portfolio of research skills tasks and an oral presentation about each candidate's dissertation topic.

The monthly format of the programme should enable applicants who are employed or have caring duties to undertake postgraduate study, given they have a determined commitment to study and to undertake independent research.

The University of Oxford offers a uniquely rich programme of lectures and research seminars relevant to the study of Design History. Research specialisms particularly well represented in the Department for Continuing Education are:

- Art Nouveau and Modern French Decoration
- Modernist Design and Architecture
- The Arts and Crafts Movement
- Garden History
- The Art of the Book
- Ecclesiastical Architecture and Design

As a discipline Design History is well represented in conferences organised and academic journals and books published by The Design History Society; the Association of Art Historians; AHRC Centre for the Historic Interior at the Victoria and Albert Museum; the Modern Interior Centre at Kingston University; The Twentieth Century Society; The Garden History Society; The Textile History Society; The Wallpaper Society, The Societe des Dix-Neuviemistes.

Graduate destinations

Future research and career paths might be a DPhil programme; creative industries; museum curatorship; the art market; teaching; arts publishing.

Programme details

- Course structure
The MSt is a part-time course over two years with one residential weekend per annum. Each year comprises nine Saturdays (monthly; three in each of the three terms in the academic year) students will also have fortnightly individual tutorials and undertake research in reference libraries in Oxford between these monthly meetings. The course is designed for the needs of students wishing to study part-time, including those who are in full-time employment but will require 15 to 20 hours of study per week.

- Course content and timetable
The course is based at Rewley House, 1 Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JA. Some classes may take place at other venues in Oxford. Class details, reading lists and information about any field trips will be supplied when you have taken up your place.

Core Courses

- Materials and Techniques of Design
- Historical Methods
- Research Project in the History of Modern Design
- Dissertation

Options Courses

- Decoration in Modern France
- The Arts and Crafts Tradition in Modern Britain
- Design in the Machine Age
- Design, Body, Environment
- Visual Cultures of the World Wars
- Academic Writing and Contemporary Practice

Course aims

The MSt was devised with the aim of providing effective postgraduate-level education in history of design on a part-time basis in which case it should be possible to participate fully in the programme while remaining in full-time employment.

The programme aims to provide students with skills:

- To develop further their critical understanding of the principles and practice of the history of design

- To enhance their subject knowledge, analytical and communication skills needed for professional involvement in the history of design

- To demonstrate a grasp of primary evidence to build on their critical understanding of the types of evidence used in the historical study of designed objects and sites and how they are selected and interpreted

- To build on the appropriate skills and concepts for analysing material objects and textural sources

- To enable the student to undertake their own research to be presented in essays, oral presentations and as a dissertation

- To demonstrate an understanding of primary evidence and secondary sources through the application of appropriate analytical skills and concepts within a research context resulting in a dissertation.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/graduate/applying-to-oxford

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This is an innovative course which develops creative potential and in-depth knowledge of theories, processes and techniques. Students will use a variety of materials, manufacturing techniques and processes. Read more

Summary

This is an innovative course which develops creative potential and in-depth knowledge of theories, processes and techniques.

Students will use a variety of materials, manufacturing techniques and processes.

The scope for design is very broad and builds on knowledge in the area of personal ornaments, body signification and decorative metal objects. There are also affinities with industrial design, fashion design, fine art and sculpture and content is often informed by philosophy, conceptualisation and critical theory.

Project-based activities will develop creative, design and making skills and enhance students' professional skills. Concepts and products will also be developed. Students will analyse problems and reflect on the relationships between personal objectives, cultural values, market identities, prototyping techniques and new technologies.

This course is divided into three trimesters to allow students to work towards a Postgraduate Certificate, Postgraduate Diploma or a Master's qualification.

Modules

PgCert: Research and Applied Practice.

PgDip: Creative Exploration; Specialist Research Enquiry.

Master's: Master Design Project.

Assessment

Studies include structured, project based learning activities which develop creative, design and making skills, research and investigative abilities, evaluation and independent learning to an advanced level; it includes individual and group tutorials, tutor-led and student-led seminars, lectures, and workshops as well as report writing and project work.

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