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The MSt in the History of Design is a taught Master's Degree offered part-time over two years. A tea cup, be it hand-painted porcelain, studio pottery or mass produced ceramic, offers a glimpse of the rituals of everyday life and historical experience. Read more
The MSt in the History of Design is a taught Master's Degree offered part-time over two years.

A tea cup, be it hand-painted porcelain, studio pottery or mass produced ceramic, offers a glimpse of the rituals of everyday life and historical experience. A designed object or space reflects the individual, the society for which it was created, as well as its creator. It expresses aesthetic preoccupations and articulates historical and political conditions. Decoration challenges the hierarchies and contested inter-relationships between the disciplines and careers of artists, designers, crafts workers, gardeners, and architects. Such concerns reside at the heart of the study of the history of design.

This history of design course is taught on nine monthly Saturdays and one residential weekend per annum. The syllabus focuses particularly on the period from 1851 to 1951 in Europe (including Britain) and America. Combining close visual and material analysis with historical methodologies, the course explores decorative and applied art, the design of interiors and public spaces, and for performance and industry.

There will be two Open Mornings, on one Saturday in November 2016 11am - 12.30pm and on one Saturday in February 2017 11am - 12.30pm, where you can meet the Course Director, Dr Claire O'Mahony, and learn more about the course. Please contact usl if you would like to attend including which day you prefer: .

Visit the website https://www.conted.ox.ac.uk/about/mst-in-the-history-of-design

Description

Core themes of the History of Design course will include the rivalries between historicism and modernity; internationalist and nationalist tendencies; handicraft and industrial processes, as well as the analysis of critical debates about the makers and audiences of decoration in advice literature and aesthetic writing.

The programme aims to provide students with a framework of interpretative skills useful to understanding design. It provides grounding in the analysis of the techniques and materials deployed in creating objects or sites. It enables students to develop a grasp of historical context, encompassing the impact of the hierarchies within, and audiences for, the critical reception of 'decoration'. It encourages the analysis of the historiography of political and aesthetic debates articulated by designers, critics and historians about design, its forms and purposes.

Teaching and learning takes a variety of forms in this programme. In keeping with the Oxford ethos, individual tutorials and supervisions will be an important of the course, particularly whilst researching the dissertation, whilst earlier stages of the programme principally take the form of seminar group discussion, lectures and independent study. First-hand visual analysis is an essential component of the discipline of the history of design. As such each course element of the programme includes site visits, both to Oxford University's unique museum and library collections, and to those nearby in London and the regions. Formal assessment is by means of analytical essay and dissertation writing, complemented by informal assessment methods including a portfolio of research skills tasks and an oral presentation about each candidate's dissertation topic.

The monthly format of the programme should enable applicants who are employed or have caring duties to undertake postgraduate study, given they have a determined commitment to study and to undertake independent research.

The University of Oxford offers a uniquely rich programme of lectures and research seminars relevant to the study of Design History. Research specialisms particularly well represented in the Department for Continuing Education are:

- Art Nouveau and Modern French Decoration
- Modernist Design and Architecture
- The Arts and Crafts Movement
- Garden History
- The Art of the Book
- Ecclesiastical Architecture and Design

As a discipline Design History is well represented in conferences organised and academic journals and books published by The Design History Society; the Association of Art Historians; AHRC Centre for the Historic Interior at the Victoria and Albert Museum; the Modern Interior Centre at Kingston University; The Twentieth Century Society; The Garden History Society; The Textile History Society; The Wallpaper Society, The Societe des Dix-Neuviemistes.

Graduate destinations

Future research and career paths might be a DPhil programme; creative industries; museum curatorship; the art market; teaching; arts publishing.

Programme details

- Course structure
The MSt is a part-time course over two years with one residential weekend per annum. Each year comprises nine Saturdays (monthly; three in each of the three terms in the academic year) students will also have fortnightly individual tutorials and undertake research in reference libraries in Oxford between these monthly meetings. The course is designed for the needs of students wishing to study part-time, including those who are in full-time employment but will require 15 to 20 hours of study per week.

- Course content and timetable
The course is based at Rewley House, 1 Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JA. Some classes may take place at other venues in Oxford. Class details, reading lists and information about any field trips will be supplied when you have taken up your place.

Core Courses

- Materials and Techniques of Design
- Historical Methods
- Research Project in the History of Modern Design
- Dissertation

Options Courses

- Decoration in Modern France
- The Arts and Crafts Tradition in Modern Britain
- Design in the Machine Age
- Design, Body, Environment
- Visual Cultures of the World Wars
- Academic Writing and Contemporary Practice

Course aims

The MSt was devised with the aim of providing effective postgraduate-level education in history of design on a part-time basis in which case it should be possible to participate fully in the programme while remaining in full-time employment.

The programme aims to provide students with skills:

- To develop further their critical understanding of the principles and practice of the history of design

- To enhance their subject knowledge, analytical and communication skills needed for professional involvement in the history of design

- To demonstrate a grasp of primary evidence to build on their critical understanding of the types of evidence used in the historical study of designed objects and sites and how they are selected and interpreted

- To build on the appropriate skills and concepts for analysing material objects and textural sources

- To enable the student to undertake their own research to be presented in essays, oral presentations and as a dissertation

- To demonstrate an understanding of primary evidence and secondary sources through the application of appropriate analytical skills and concepts within a research context resulting in a dissertation.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/graduate/applying-to-oxford

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MA IN URBAN HISTORY AT THE CENTRE FOR URBAN HISTORY. GENERAL INFORMATION. This course, designed by leading academics in the field, is an exciting and challenging programme, unique in Britain and abroad. Read more
MA IN URBAN HISTORY AT THE CENTRE FOR URBAN HISTORY

GENERAL INFORMATION
This course, designed by leading academics in the field, is an exciting and challenging programme, unique in Britain and abroad. It offers a broad, interdisciplinary introduction to the study of the city from classical antiquity to modern times, enabling students to concentrate on specialist fields including urban archaeology, the history of English towns, Victorian cities, urban topography, the development of town planning, and modern urban problems. The MA uses the unifying theme of the city to explore the social, cultural, political and economic changes brought about by urban growth.

The course will have a strong appeal to historians, archaeologists, local historians, geographers, art historians and all those with an interest in the study of the city and of individual communities.

The MA offers you the opportunity to:
· Study the history of urban society in depth using a multi-disciplinary approach
· Gain training in research methods
· Work with leading researchers in the field of urban history
· Enhance your historical understanding and encourage you to develop your own area of expertise

The skills acquired in research and in presentation are invaluable in many career fields.

DURATION
One year full-time study or two years part-time.

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS
A minimum of a second class honours degree or its equivalent.

COURSE STRUCTURE
Semester 1:
Students take four common courses including a comprehensive survey of European urbanisation - ‘Ancient to Modern European Urban Historiography’, Economic Theory for Historians; and training in research methods and archival research.

Semester 2:
Students take one common module – ‘Introduction to Social Theory’ and two optional modules which (subject to availability)include:


· Victorian Cities looks at some of the following themes: strategies for survival in the city; social segregation, the role of the town council, neighbourhood and community, culture in the city, architecture and decoration, knowledge and power in the city. It makes use of various on-line data sets and involves field trips and a suburban walk.

· Images and Realities: Urban Topography 1540-1840: This module surveys the changing ways in which towns have been depicted and represented through a variety of media such as maps, engravings, travel literature. The course includes a field trip to Bath.

· Vices and Virtues: Behaving and Misbehaving in British Society: This module looks at changing attitudes towards behaviour between 1880 and 1980. It covers a number of vices and virtues including drinking, smoking, cleanliness and manners. A variety of sources are consulted during the course, in particular oral history and autobiography.

· Planning the City – Domesticating the Urban Environment in Europe 1840-1914 explores the major stages by which urban planning developed to regulate and order urban growth, to domesticate the city as a human environment.

· Colonial Cities in British Asia and Africa 1850-1950 focuses on the economic, political and cultural forces that shaped urban life in colonial cities of.
In focusing on the making of urban modernity in the colonial context, it seeks to draw out the comparative dimension of historical processes and ideas that may have originated in Europe but became truly global in reach and scope during the age of empire.


Modules are complemented by field trips to relevant historic sites.

For Further information on the modules see http://www.le.ac.uk/urbanhist/courses.html


DISSERTATION
You will also produce a dissertation. This is an important opportunity for students to develop their own research expertise while working on an approved topic under the direction of a supervisor. The dissertation consists of a maximum of 20,000 words.


TEACHING AND ASSESSMENT
Teaching at the Centre for Urban History is innovative and high quality and conducted by enthusiastic and experienced staff. Each of the course modules is taught primarily in small group seminars. Assessment for modules varies between options. Some are assessed by coursework alone and others by a mixture of coursework and written ‘open’ examination.

FUNDING
The Centre has again received confirmation of its excellence in research training from the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) which means that
students can apply for an ESRC 1+3 studentship.
These awards fees plus maintenance for eligible students to undertake a one-year MA degree followed by a PhD. Students may also apply for studentships from the AHRC which operate on a similar basis.

OTHER MA DEGREES OFFERED BY THE CENTRE
The Centre for Urban History also offers a part-time MA in Social History and a full-time MA in European Urbanisation which involves a semester abroad in an European University.

FURTHER INFORMATION
More information about the Centre for Urban History, its facilities and resources, the postgraduate environment and the broad range of workshops, seminars, field trips and summer schools can be seen at http://www.le.ac.uk/urbanhist/
For application forms contact Kate Crispin

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Students on this course cultivate an innovative view of surface design. They are challenged to ruthlessly explore pattern and decoration, reflecting on the social, cultural and aesthetic context for surface pattern design in the 21st century. Read more
Students on this course cultivate an innovative view of surface design. They are challenged to ruthlessly explore pattern and decoration, reflecting on the social, cultural and aesthetic context for surface pattern design in the 21st century. New relationships like that of surfaces and light are being investigated, while new materials and technologies continually challenge designers to develop fresh ideas and methods. Students get to research and experiment with lots of materials and new technology to decorate ceramics, plastics, cloth, glass, wood, metal and paper. They use our cutting edge digital equipment to develop designs for wallpaper, tableware, floor coverings, interior products, garments and jewellery. We help our students find their own creative process and to develop their own direction and style which enables them to choose a rewarding career.

LEARNING ENVIRONMENT AND ASSESSMENT

Practical work is carried out within our extensive and very well equipped studios and workshops. A programme of guest lecturers and visits to exhibitions, workshops, manufacturers, etc. further supports study.

A special feature of this course is the blend of practice and theory which underpins the student projects. As a student on a MA course in the School of Art, Design and Performance you will belong to a postgraduate design community. You will study some modules alongside students from other design disciplines. Through participation in a common programme, you will experience a strong sense of community, sharing of knowledge and access to a wide range of staff skills and resources.

Practical and theoretical elements will be assessed both during and at the end of each module. Assessment strategies for the Practice modules will usually involve portfolio assessment, presentations, summaries of reflective journals and the learning agreement. There are intermediate exit awards at appropriate stages.

FURTHER INFORMATION

Surface pattern designers work with many different products, processes and materials. They may practice within conventional design studios in traditional industries as well as in the smaller creative industries. The student will be expected to develop a personal focus of research and design or craft practice, which should lead to a package of research activities (live projects, placements, competitions, attendance at exhibitions and trade fairs, etc.) appropriate to their field of study. Throughout the course, students are encouraged to pursue a critical enquiry alongside the physical development of work. They should move toward developing concepts and understanding context.

The core belief of the MA degree is that understanding for the Design Practitioner can only be achieved through doing, making and creating. Thus a central theme of the course is that of 'Reflective Practice' where academic and theoretical issues arise out of Practice itself and where the Practice is informed by the theoretical considerations. Students will be asked to keep a reflective journal to record their thoughts, ideas and discoveries.

The MA exists in the framework of the University modular scheme. The first step for every new student is a two to three week induction block in which the student's proposed area of study is discussed, negotiated and formulated with their supervisor into a learning agreement. Following this induction and diagnostic phase, students continue to develop their physical work in Surface Pattern Practice 1. In Semester 2, they undertake Practice 2, which involves the opportunity for field study or external placement. Running parallel with, and complementary to the practice modules, are two Research for Creative Design Practice modules, one studied in semester 1 and the other in Semester 2.

The course is concluded in Semester 3 with the Postgraduate Project/Dissertation and Surface Pattern Practice 3 modules. In the Practice module, students continue their investigation into a particular personal area of study, leading to a final assessment presentation or public body of work.

Fundamental to the philosophy of the course is providing the opportunity for students to explore and realise their individual aspirations and potential, creating a framework for developing as skilled and informed professional practitioners.

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Take your love of ceramics to the next level through our highly engaging programme! We are perfect for both newly qualified and long-time professional ceramics artists, helping you develop new skills within your subject. Read more
Take your love of ceramics to the next level through our highly engaging programme! We are perfect for both newly qualified and long-time professional ceramics artists, helping you develop new skills within your subject. Our strong creative community works with artists from multiple specialisms to promote cross discipline approaches to art, helping to inspire your work to new places.

We will help you extend your practical techniques, material research, firing and glaze development, digital design and traditional methods of working. You'll study both the historical and contemporary context of the clay as an artefact within society and decorative material. You'll gain experience of exhibition proposals, design and execution, which will open up valuable networking opportunities that will help you gain success as an artist in ceramics!

Course outline

We focus on three studio-based practice modules which allow you to manage the practical elements of your research. Through an initial proposal, you'll set your practical MA curriculum dependant on your experience, research focus and practice based career goals. The course is taught by academic practitioners and supported by highly trained technicians in ceramics, wood and metal and digital print. Access to all three dimensional workshops is a major advantage of this programme.

You'll look at the design and production of attachments, utilising other materials or combinations of materials to create form. This can include functional wares (both hand-built or moulded), architectural ceramic, and sculpture. This is done alongside material research which looks at surface development, glaze production, body development al and firing techniques.

It is likely you will produce three or two dimensional objects with a focus on form, vessel, and surface or applied decoration. You may though wish to follow a purely material based research project, extending the subject knowledge and playing a significant role in extending the material science of this subject.

Graduate destinations

An MA in Ceramics can prepare you for a wide range of careers, including work as a ceramics maker/producer/designer, pattern maker, mould maker, sculptor or architectural designer for surface or brickwork to name just a few.

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Do you have a talent for turning textiles into works of art? Then why not make the most of your skills by working towards an MA in Fashion Textiles? We can help you explore your technique through applied print design (both traditional silk screen and digital) and surface decoration through applied machine embroidery, needle felting and garment construction. Read more
Do you have a talent for turning textiles into works of art? Then why not make the most of your skills by working towards an MA in Fashion Textiles? We can help you explore your technique through applied print design (both traditional silk screen and digital) and surface decoration through applied machine embroidery, needle felting and garment construction. You can also develop your millinery skills thanks to our wide range of fabrics, materials and haberdashery.

With the outstanding facilities we have available, as well as our expert teaching staff, you'll quickly develop the knowledge and skills to produce truly beautiful patterns. We believe strongly in cross-discipline approaches, which is why we allow students from all art subjects to work together in inspiring designs and opening up to new methods. Make sure you have the skills to make a profession out of your passion by taking your love of fashion textiles to the next level.

Course outline

We actively encourage mixing different approaches, materials and techniques to create innovative fabric, such as print combined with embroidery, with opportunities to utilise laser cutting to create new fabrics and potential applique techniques. Our strong links with traditional Fine Art print techniques allow students to research and explore the graphic and textural potential of these alongside contemporary fashion and textile design.

There will be three studio modules throughout the first two terms. The first will look at researching aspects of fashion textile, experiencing the range of processes and materials available. This will lead to creation of a range of studio project proposals, equipped with a comprehensive understanding of the creative potential within the department. Finally, there will be practical MA Project Module which will culminate in an exhibition of work in an appropriate media.

The course allows great flexibility within the project proposals. These may range from full garment collections to fabric creation for clothing, printed fashion fabrics or accessories.

Graduate destinations

You'll be prepared for a range of careers in fashion and textile design, including working with pattern cutting and pattern design in all garment trades as well as film and theatre costume production. You might wish to enter garment manufacturing or textile fabric design, working in samples for mass manufacture. No matter what you decide to do, from interior surface designs to textile and fashion prints, your qualification will ensure you are ready for it.

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This postgraduate course is an opportunity to discover the fact that "accessibility is not only a requirement for people with disabilities, but also benefits all citizens." It seeks to address accessibility from the beginning of the project, in an inconspicuous way and at little or no cost once it is incorporated into the original design solutions. Read more
This postgraduate course is an opportunity to discover the fact that "accessibility is not only a requirement for people with disabilities, but also benefits all citizens." It seeks to address accessibility from the beginning of the project, in an inconspicuous way and at little or no cost once it is incorporated into the original design solutions. Achieving standardised solutions which are comfortable and safe is also important. Also, if necessary, technical help and new technologies can be incorporated in order to improve the comfort and quality of the services provided to the public.

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