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Our School of Hospitality and Tourism Management offers a forward-thinking approach to Air Transport Management, influenced by our world-class expertise in aviation, travel and tourism management. Read more
Our School of Hospitality and Tourism Management offers a forward-thinking approach to Air Transport Management, influenced by our world-class expertise in aviation, travel and tourism management.

Our campus is located less than 45 minutes from London Heathrow and Gatwick, two major international airports, making industry-based participation easily accessible and leverages the School’s strong links with potential employers.

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW

Drawing on the School’s research expertise, the MSc in Air Transport Management provides you with a degree that is both intellectually rigorous and up-to-date.

You will learn to critically evaluate all aspects of air transport management, and have the opportunity to analyse and debate theoretical and applied knowledge in the management, operation, organisation and provision of airlines and airports.

Built with an international perspective, the programme offers an in-depth education in the fundamental elements of air transport management. You will also study a range of relevant areas that will enhance and accelerate your career in the air transport industry.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year and part-time over two academic years. It consists of eight taught modules and a dissertation.

The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.
-Research Methods for Air Transport Management
-Air Transport Fundamentals
-Air Transport Market Analysis and Forecasting
-Aviation E-Commerce
-Aviation Finance
-Airline Fleet Planning
-Airline Consultancy Project
-Aviation Marketing Research
-Research Dissertation

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF THE PROGRAMME

The aims of the new programme are to provide:
-A high quality education, which is intellectually rigorous and up-to-date, as well as relevant to the needs of future managers, executives and professionals in the air transport industry
-A business management orientation related to the air transport industry and draw on a range of cognate areas of study to explain and analyse this particular sector
-An integrated approach so as to provide a coherent view that explores the interrelationships between the various components of the programme
-An international perspective both in scope and coverage
-Up to date information that draws on the stimulus of the School’s recent research activities
-Students with the basis for developing their own approach to learning and personal development

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes in the following areas:
-Critically evaluate the development, characteristics, issues and influences relevant to air transport management
-Analyse and debate theoretical and applied knowledge in the management, operation, organisation and provision of airlines and airports
-Evaluate critically a wide range of approaches and techniques relevant to the strategic management of airlines and airports
-Demonstrate an in-depth understanding of the fundamental elements of airline and airport business management

A student would be expected:
-To evaluate critically the complex interrelationships of regulatory, commercial, technical aspects of the air transport industry
-To demonstrate the ability to work within teams to solve practical problems pertaining to the technical, operational and commercial aspects of the air transport industry
-To evaluate outcomes and accurately assess/report on their own/others work with justification and relate them to existing knowledge structures and methodologies
-To demonstrate high level learning and problem solving skills
-To conduct research and produce a high quality report: this includes the ability to select, define and focus upon and issue at an appropriate level; to develop and apply relevant and sound methodologies; to analyse the issue; to develop recommendations and logical conclusions; to be aware of the limitations of research work
-To identify modifications to existing knowledge structures and theoretical frameworks and to propose new areas for investigations/ new problems / new or alternative applications and methodological approaches
-To display a range of skills relevant to the needs of existing and future managers, executives and professionals irrespective of their sector of operation, particularly in the areas of analysis and synthesis, communication and presentation skills, computing skills, critical reasoning, data analysis, organisation and planning, report and essay writing skills, interactive and group skills, research skills
-To handle ethical dilemmas likely to arise in management, research and professional practice and to formulate solutions in dialogue with peers, clients, mentors and others

Knowledge and understanding
-Critically evaluate the development, characteristics, issues and influences relevant to air transport management
-Analyse and debate theoretical and applied knowledge in the management, operation, organisation and provision of air transport
-Evaluate critically a wide range of approaches and techniques relevant to the management of the air transport industry
-Evaluate outcomes and accurately assess/report on their own/others work with justification and relate them to existing knowledge structures and methodologies

Intellectual / cognitive skills
-Demonstrate high level learning and problem solving skills
-Conduct research and produce a high quality report: this includes the ability to select, define and focus upon and issue at an appropriate level; to develop and apply relevant and sound methodologies; to analyse the issue; to develop recommendations and logical conclusions; to be aware of the limitations of research work
-Identify modifications to existing knowledge structures and theoretical frameworks and to propose new areas for investigations/ new problems / new or alternative applications and methodological approaches

Professional practical skills
-Handle ethical dilemmas likely to arise in management, research and professional practice and to formulate solutions in dialogue with peers, clients, mentors and others.

Key / transferable skills
-Analysis and synthesis
-Communication and presentation skills
-Computing skills
-Critical reasoning
-Data analysis
-Organisation and planning
-Report and essay writing skills
-Interactive and group skills
-Research skills

GLOBAL OPPORTUNITIES

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.

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Palaeopathology is the study of past disease in human remains; it is a sub-discipline of bioarchaeology (study of human remains from archaeological sites). Read more
Palaeopathology is the study of past disease in human remains; it is a sub-discipline of bioarchaeology (study of human remains from archaeological sites). This lecture, seminar and laboratory based MSc equips students with the theoretical and practical skills knowledge of how to study and interpret data collected from human remains. The emphasis is on health and well-being using a multidisciplinary approach, linking biological evidence for disease with cultural data (the bioarchaeological approach). This course is unique in the world and it takes a holistic view of disease, as seen in a clinical contexts today, and prepares students for undertaking significant research projects in this subject, or working in contract archaeology, and many other fields. It is aimed at graduates mainly in archaeology and anthropology with or without past experience of knowledge in this field, and for those who aspire to continue into a PhD programme or work in contract archaeology. However, past students have come from a variety of subject backgrounds, and destination data illustrate a wide range of employments take these students.

Course Structure

Two taught modules in the Epiphany term (Research and Study Skills in Archaeological Science and Identification and Analysis of the Normal Human Skeleton), and two taught modules in Michaelmas term (Palaeopathology: Theory and Method; Themes in Palaeopathology), with the double module dissertation over Easter term and the summer (submitted early September).

Core Modules

-Research and Study Skills in Archaeological Science
-Identification and Analysis of the Normal Human Skeleton
-Palaeopathology: Theory and Method
-Themes in Palaeopathology
-Dissertation (double module)

Learning and Teaching

The programme is mainly delivered through a mixture of lectures, seminars and practical classes. Typically lectures provide key information on a particular area, and identify the main areas for discussion and debate in bioarchaeology. Seminars then provide opportunities for smaller groups of students to discuss and debate particular issues or areas, based on the knowledge that they have gained through their lectures and through independent study outside the programme’s formal contact hours. Finally, practical laboratory classes allow students to gain direct practical skills in the recording and interpretation of data from skeletal remains. The latter provide an important element of the programme in allowing independent and group work, as well as hands-on experience under laboratory conditions, essential for a potential future working environment.

The balance of these types of activities changes over the course of the programme, as students develop their knowledge and ability as independent learners, giving them the opportunity to engage in research, professional practice, and developing and demonstrating research skills in a particular area of the subject.

In Term 1 students typically attend 4 hours a week of lectures and 2.5 hours of laboratory sessions, in addition to seminars over the term. Outside timetabled contact hours, students are also expected to undertake their own independent study to prepare for their classes and broaden their subject knowledge. External speakers specializing in specific subject areas from “industry” and academia are brought in to engage the students on issues in research, but also in the profession.

In Term 2 the balance shifts from learning the basic skills required for recording and interpreting skeletal data (age at death, sex, normal variation), to further developing skills for palaeopathological data recording and their interpretation and understanding the limitations. In addition, the Themes module aims to develop in students a critical approach to the evaluation of multiple forms of evidence, beyond that for human remains, for the reconstruction of specific themes. It focuses on discussion and debate of different related issues. In Term 2 students typically attend 4 hours a week of lectures and 2.5 hours of laboratory sessions, in addition to seminars over the term. Again, external speakers specializing in specific subject areas from “industry” and academia are brought in to engage the students on issues in research, but also in the profession.

The move towards greater emphasis on independent learning and research continues in Term 3 and beyond, where the research skills acquired earlier in the programme are developed through the dissertation research project. Under the supervision of a member of academic staff with whom they will typically have three one-to-one supervisory meetings, students undertake a detailed study of a particular area, resulting in a significant piece of independent research. The dissertation is regarded as a preparation for further professional or academic work. In Term 3 students are given the opportunity to attend a Careers Session in the Department where past graduates of the course talk about their career trajectories since graduating.

Throughout the programme, all students have access to an “academic adviser”, or in the case of this MSc the two Directors (Professor Charlotte Roberts and Dr Rebecca Gowland), who provide them with academic support and guidance. Typically a student meets their adviser two to three times a year, in addition to which all members of teaching staff have weekly office hours when they are available to meet with students on a ‘drop-in’ basis. The department also has an exciting programme of weekly one hour research seminars which postgraduate students are strongly encouraged to attend. Additionally, the students who attend the MSc Palaeopathology course are provided with the opportunity to attend journal paper critique sessions each term, and human bioarchaeology seminars given by PhD students.

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Our dedicated Masters programme in Science and Religion is intended for students who wish to engage in the advanced interdisciplinary study of science and religion, including those who wish to prepare for subsequent PhD work. Read more

Programme description

Our dedicated Masters programme in Science and Religion is intended for students who wish to engage in the advanced interdisciplinary study of science and religion, including those who wish to prepare for subsequent PhD work.

This degree is one of the world's very few science and religion programmes. It aims to inform and engage with the debate in depth, looking at it from scientific, philosophical, historical, ethical and theological perspectives. As such, it can be approached from a wide background of disciplines.

Much of the recent debate surrounding ‘New Atheism’ has taken place within a poorly informed view of the history and philosophy of science and its relationship with religion.

This programme aims to inform and engage with the debate in depth, looking at it from scientific, philosophical, historical, ethical and theological perspectives.

It provides a strong grounding in these issues. The history of science is studied from ancient times through the modern scientific revolution, together with philosophical trends in our understanding of reality.

The main areas of dialogue between science and religion are explored in depth, including cosmology, evolution, divine action and miracles, consciousness and the human person.

Programme structure

This programme is run over one year full time (or two years part-time).

You will be taught mainly in small groups in a seminar setting. You will be given training in research methods and will receive individual supervision for your 15,000-word dissertation.

Compulsory courses:

The History of Science and Religion in the Christian Tradition
Cosmos, Cell and Creator: Current Debates in Science and Religion
Approaches to Research in Divinity and Religious Studies

Option courses:

You will choose three further courses. Options include:

Creation and Providence
Ecology, Ethics and Spirit
Philosophical Issues in Evolution
Man and the Natural World in Enlightenment

You may also choose courses from elsewhere in the University, at the discretion of the Programme Director and subject to availability.

Career opportunities

The programme can be taken as preparation for a research degree, or can form useful preparation for a career in education, journalism, public policy, or the civil service or elsewhere.

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International Human Rights Law LLM is a unique programme designed to enable students to progress to become human rights practitioners and specialists in this dynamic area of law. Read more

About the course

International Human Rights Law LLM is a unique programme designed to enable students to progress to become human rights practitioners and specialists in this dynamic area of law.

Students will critically engage with many of the human rights issues that feature strongly in public debate today, gaining comprehensive understanding of international human rights law and its interconnection with international criminal and comparative criminal law.

This course places particular emphasis on the radical transformations that international human rights law has experienced since the beginning of the 21st century, with the genesis of the International Criminal Court, the on-going process of the United Nations reform and the post 9/11 shift to a more securitarian approach to criminal process values, especially regarding the war against terror.

The course offers:

A detailed analysis of the theory, history and development of human rights, and an examination of the main regional mechanisms of human rights protection.

An overview of a variety of contemporary human rights topics, including the examination of major developments and recent tendencies in the field of international human rights protection.

Analysis of contemporary topics and challenges of international human rights protection including:
the emergence of the right to development and the so-called third- generation rights;
human rights advocacy and global governance though NGOs and non-State actors;
the crystallisation of group rights, minorities and indigenous peoples’ rights;
the challenges posed to international human rights law by international migration and the enhanced need of protection of migrants, asylum seekers and refugees;
women’s rights and the rights of the child, including protection against victims of human trafficking;
the crystallisation of general equality and the development of human rights advocacy for sexual and gay rights.

Brunel Law School has an excellent reputation in this field. The International Human Rights Law Review - a peer-reviewed international journal - is edited at Brunel Law School. The School is able to attract a number of leading guest speakers to support further debate and learning’s around the complexity of human rights, and provides students with a wider variety of perspectives particularly in the international context.

The programme is available full-time:
September (12 months)
January (15 months due to dissertation submission requirements)

And also part-time:
September (24 months)
January (27 months due to dissertation submission requirements)

The course is aimed at graduates from all over the world who are keen to develop an expertise in the evolving discipline and develop a career in international human rights law.

Aims

You will develop an expertise in the corpus and complexities of international human rights law.

You will acquire critical and analytical skills in the complex field of international human rights law.

You will be able to demonstrate through original research the application of knowledge, practical understanding and critical appreciation that can contribute to the discourse on international human rights law.

You will gain professional skills required to develop a career in international human rights law.

You will gain detailed knowledge of the European system of human rights protection in particular, both at a theoretical and practical level, including the ability to handle cases before the European Court of Human Rights.

Course Content

The LLM consists of both compulsory and optional modules, a typical selection can be found below. Modules can vary from year to year, but these offer a good idea of what we teach.

Compulsory modules:

Term I

European System of Human Rights Protection (15 credits) 1 or 2
Foundations of International Human Rights Law (15 credits) 1 or 2

Term II

Theory and Practice of International Human Rights (15 credits) 1
Regional Systems of Human Rights Protection: America, Africa, Asia (15 credits) 1

Optional modules:

Term I

International Human Rights and Islamic Law (15 credits) 2
Public International Law (15 credits) 1 or 2
International Humanitarian Law 2
Multiculturalism and Human Rights (15 credits) 2
International Criminal Law (15 credits) 2

Term II

International Environmental Law (15 credits) 2
Corporate Governance and Corporate Social Responsibility (15 credits) 2
World Trade Organisation (WTO) abd Human Rights Law (15 credits) 2
Human Rights of Women (15 credits) 2
Counter-terrorism and Human Rights (15 credits) 2

** The superscript 1 or 2 indicates which year of study each module will normally take place in for part-time students.

Assessment

The faculty places great emphasis on the creation of a unique learning experience. In addition to attending seminars and preparing coursework and exams, students will also learn by participating in research centre activities and research trips, contributing to newsletters, making oral presentations, attending law film screenings as well as participating in debating events and reading group sessions.

Assessment methods in this programme range from coursework, seen examinations and a dissertation (15,000 words) to oral presentations and assessment by contribution in seminars.

Special Features

Research Centres
The Law School benefits from active research centres which regularly host research seminars and workshops. Many of these have been on the topic of international human rights. In the most recent Research Excellence Framework (REF2014) we were ranked 14th in the UK for REF Intensity in Law.

Extra-curricular Activities
The Law School offers students numerous opportunities to participate in extra-curricular activities, including a Reading Group, a Law Film society, mooting and debating societies and research workshops organized by the research centres based at the school. LLM students are expected to play a leading role organising and participating in these activities.

Research Skills
The Law School offers an elaborate scheme of research and writing skills sessions designed to facilitate students’ learning and to equip them with appropriate transferable skills.
Some of the modules in this programme also integrate skills training, for example on how to answer essay questions, make use of electronic legal databases and cite legal authorities.

Career Support
Students benefit from the university's award winning 'Professional Development Centre' which offers specialist workshops, interview skills, and one-to-one advice sessions to help prepare graduates for their chosen career.

Teaching Expertise
Brunel Law School has an excellent reputation in this field. The International Human Rights Law Review - a peer-reviewed international journal - is edited at Brunel Law School. The school is able to attract a number of leading guest speakers to support further debate and learnings around the complexity of human rights, and provides students with a wider variety of perspectives particularly in the international context.
This is a challenging programme that is at the forefront of thinking in International Human Rights Law. It is taught by leading academics with a wide range of expertise in human rights practice, policy, activism and governmental, international and non-governmental organisations. As a result, the programme is research-led, and some of the reading required for the programme is based on books published by our academics.

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Architectural conservation - the action of conserving built heritage while maintaining its values - is practiced differently across the world; sometimes not at all due to cultural and economic constraints. Read more

Why this course?

Architectural conservation - the action of conserving built heritage while maintaining its values - is practiced differently across the world; sometimes not at all due to cultural and economic constraints.

It is an emerging area of work which requires specialist training and knowledge to deal with its multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary nature. It also requires the development of a critical approach for the analysis and design of the intervention, informed by the shared international principles and the specific nature and context of the historic building to be conserved.

We need to attract new talent to the field of architectural conservation. To work with historic buildings is an enriching experience, which combines the creative aspects of designing a new building with the in-depth research required to understand in full the building and its context. Working with historic buildings is also a great training to improve the design of new buildings, as you learn a great deal about the importance of design ideas, innovation, durability and care. It is also a very sociable work, interacting with a variety of people from all backgrounds, joining forces in helping current generations to enjoy historic buildings, to create community identities around them, and to transmit the buildings and their values to the future.

Glasgow and its surrounding area provide an excellent location for the course, with architectural heritage from all periods, from Roman to Medieval, Georgian, Victorian and contemporary, without forgetting the better known C. R. Mackintosh and Alexander ‘Greek’ Thomson’s buildings. Strathclyde has a lively international community of staff and students and we enjoy a privileged position in the centre of Glasgow.

Study mode and duration:
- MSc: 12 months full-time; 24 months part-time
- PgDip: 9 months full-time; 18 months part-time
- PgCert: 5 months full-time; 9 months part-time

See the website https://www.strath.ac.uk/courses/postgraduatetaught/architecturaldesignfortheconservationofbuiltheritage/

You’ll study

The course is a platform for:
- collaboration with both practice and research partners
- architectural critique
- discussion and debate

All full-time students take instructional classes and a design project in the first two semesters. MSc students then complete a dissertation project.

Compulsory taught classes are delivered intensively, making them more accessible to part-time students and Continuing Professional Development (CPD). Areas explored in classes include:
- theory
- history
- survey
- investigations
- legislation
- materials
- structures

The course is informed by the outcomes of the research being carried out at the Architectural Design and Conservation Research Unit (ADCRU). It is a platform for collaboration with both practice and research partners; architectural critique, discussion and debate are fundamental parts of the course.

Open Access

Open Access modules are offered on individual modules from the MSc programme. They can be taken as stand-alone CPD options or gradually built towards a qualification.

Open Access students may transfer onto a part-time MSc or PgDip programme to complete their studies (subject to a maximum period of time).

Guest Lecturers/speakers

You’ll benefit from a large number of government, local authority and industry partners, who’ll lecture on up-to-date current practices, with a diverse point of views.

Facilities

- Studios
There are two fully-networked design studios; one dedicated to student self-study, the other to interactive design teaching.

- Library
In addition to the main University library, we have our own, on-site, reference library. Our collection is developed in direct response to the teaching delivered in the department.

- Workshop
A full range of hand and portable power tools are available (complete with instruction).

- PC Lab
Our lab computers have AutoCad and InDesign.

We also offer plotter printing, scanning and laser cutting services.

Accreditation

The course is fully recognised by the Institute of Historic Building Conservation (IHBC). The IHBC is the principal professional body for building conservation practitioners and historic environment specialists working in United Kingdom.

The course also conforms to the internationally recognised Guidelines for Education and Training in the Conservation of Monuments, Ensembles and Sites adopted by the International Council on Monuments and Sites (ICOMOS). These criteria are used by professional institutes for the assessment of evidence and professional accreditation in conservation.

Learning & teaching

The course is balanced between theory and practice. It’s delivered through:
- lectures
- workshops
- studio-based, and seminar-led learning, by staff and visiting experts from the UK and overseas

The course is a platform for collaboration with both practice and research partners; architectural critique, discussion and debate are fundamental parts of the course.

Assessment

Formative assessment will take place throughout the course.
You’ll be assessed through lectures, seminars, interim Studio Reviews and workshops, supported by student presentations, symposia and peer feedback.
Methods of teaching vary; some subjects are formally taught using lectures and seminars, others use a mix of methods which may incorporate small projects.
The main architectural conservation project is a studio based project which involves one-to-one tuition and appraisals in review seminars. Team teaching techniques are used in several projects and increasing use is made of student peer group reviews. Summative assessment will be through:
- studio reviews
- individual written essays and reports
- oral presentations
- dissertation - directly linked to the conservation project

Careers

Areas of employment for graduates are numerous. They can work as independent professionals in conservation or for architectural firms all over the worlds. The completion of the Masters will give a variety of opportunities:
- IHBC affiliate member with option to progress to full membership
- RIBA Conservation Registrant (CR) and/or RIAS Accredited Conservation Architect
- progress to RIBA Conservation architect (CA), RIBA Specialist Conservation architect (SCA) and/or RIAS Accredited or Advance Conservation Architect
- progress to Conservation Accreditation Register for Engineers (CARE), the joint register between the Institution of Civil Engineers (ICE) and Institution of Structural Engineers (IStructE)

"We work with a large number of government, local authority and industry partners, offering potential placement opportunities for students to work after their postgraduate degree study."

Heritage is recognised as a sector of international strategic importance. Local authorities and communities are also very interested in preserving their heritage. The conservation of historic buildings becomes more and more a day to day activity for architects and engineers.

Potential careers include:
- conservation architect in architectural firms
- conservation engineer in engineering firms
- conservation Officer in local authorities
- work in UK government agencies: Historic Scotland, English Heritage, CadW and the Environment and Heritage Service in Northern Ireland
- architect/conservation officer in other countries for government and local authorities
- work in UK and internationally architect/conservation officer for conservation organisations and charities such as UNESCO, ICOMOS, Council of Europe, ICCROM

Find information on Scholarships here http://www.strath.ac.uk/search/scholarships/

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-Develop your individual creative practice in Contemporary Crafts. -Knowledge and understanding of current critical debate. -Gain advanced technical and entrepreneurial skills for the successful creative practitioner. Read more
-Develop your individual creative practice in Contemporary Crafts
-Knowledge and understanding of current critical debate
-Gain advanced technical and entrepreneurial skills for the successful creative practitioner
-Work alongside practitioners working in a range of areas of practice, in stimulating and challenging environment

Why choose this course?

MA Contemporary Crafts is an award that sits within the MA Art and Design programme at the School of Creative Arts. Within this masters programme there is strong emphasis on professional practice and the real-world applications of art and design. You will develop key research skills and gain a good understanding of the work of other practitioners in your field.

The aim of the programme is to equip you with the skills, knowledge and understanding required to practice at an advanced level, to foster your creativity and enhance your employment opportunities. You will work alongside artists and designers who are involved with a wide variety of media and forms. Induction, seminars and social events for students and staff mean that you will be part of a friendly and supportive postgraduate community, which also includes film makers, musicians and professionals working in new media. Senior research staff and internationally renowned artists work with postgraduate students, helping you to develop original and challenging work.

Contemporary Crafts is an area of creative practice that has a growing reputation through the recent heightened public exposure via the media. On this course, you will explore and challenge the boundaries of your practice and, through discussion and debate with other students, explore some of the key ideas and concepts that inform contemporary applied arts practice.

We focus on helping you develop the entrepreneurial skills you need to further your career and explore funding opportunities and employment in the creative and cultural spheres. You may develop and exploit your talent across a wide range of activities and develop a practice as a maker of individual objects, a designer of batch-produced products, an artist working to commission or establish a mixed portfolio career.

You are encouraged to challenge the materials you use through practical research and sampling and refine your professional practice through the application of process, development of technical skill, material understanding and conceptual underpinning. You have the opportunity to specialize in one area or work across a wide range of disciplines and materials - jewellery, textiles, ceramics, glass, printmaking - and be actively involved in sharing ideas and taking part in critical debate.

Through working alongside artists and designers on other postgraduate courses you will explore the possibilities for the applied artist today, questioning conventions and refining your practice and design capabilities by working with and understanding materials. Our staff are experienced in research and professional practice, and you will also benefit from contributions from visiting artists, designers, makers and other arts and design professionals, as well as from involvement with our international exhibitions programme and gallery environment.

Careers

Contemporary Crafts is designed to enable you to operate successfully as a professional practitioner in your area of specialism. Graduates have gone on to establish studios, exhibit professionally, work as curators, PhD study, teaching, work towards site specific commissions.

Teaching methods

The programme is centred on individual practice and encourages critical dialogue between traditions, disciplines and media. The practice modules develop individual practice through a combination of work-in-progress seminars, tutorials and gallery visits and discussions. A sustained body of creative work forms the basis of assessment, supported by written documentation and assignments. The course is also designed to help you acquire research skills and understand what is going on now in fine and applied arts.

Structure

Core Modules
-Creative Economies
-Discourse/Reflection: Art and Design
-Major Study: Contemporary Crafts
-Practice 1: Art and Design
-Practice 2: Art and Design
-Research and Enquiry

Optional
-Creative Economies (Online)
-Research and Enquiry (Online)

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The School of Government and International Affairs has a vibrant research environment. All SGIA Masters students are welcome to the numerous events organised by the School's research centres. Read more
The School of Government and International Affairs has a vibrant research environment. All SGIA Masters students are welcome to the numerous events organised by the School's research centres. MA Politics & International Relations (Political Theory) students will particularly benefit from the activities of the Centre for Political Thought. The centre runs seminar series, workshops and reading group and actively involves Masters and PhD students in its work.

Student Profiles

Not only has the MA Politics and International Relations (Political Theory) programme allowed me to further pursue what I find to be the most interesting aspect of politics, but working so closely with such knowledgeable tutors on a weekly basis has truly opened my eyes and allowed me to delve into and examine the most fundamental concepts behind political theory. That along with the fascinating debates that I had with my classmates and the thought-provoking essays have contributed to what has been the most important step in my career in politics.” Tarek Abou-Jaoude, 2014/15

“Participating in the Politics and International Relations program at Durham University is the best academic decision I have ever made for two reasons. First, is the engaging learning environment created in the classroom by the professors who lead students in civic discussion and debate. The second reason is what makes Durham University so special, being an international student from the U.S going to school at Durham allowed me to learn international relations in the classroom, and its convenient location allowed me to travel to most places in Europe to gain practical application that cannot be taught by reading a book. You make lifelong friends from all over the world who share your core interests, and that is tailor made attribute of Durham University.” Nicholas Lennox, 2014/15

“Durham has been one of the best experiences of my life. This University teaches the meaning of community and friendship, in an environment that combines historic heritage with the latest trends. The MA in Politics and International Relations (Political Theory) was all I expected. A flexible programme that allowed me to interact both with our lecturers and fellow students of the School of Government and International Affairs. This open environment promoted what it felt a very complete learning experience.” Maria Lleras, 2014/15

Course Content

This programme provides students with systematic knowledge and the tools to critically review the complex relationships between government and society at a variety of levels and in different contexts. It also enables students to evaluate in a sophisticated and critical fashion, theories and paradigms within the broad field of politics and international relations, and to draw lessons from empirical studies involving both quantitative and qualitative investigations. It also aims to develop students' ability to deploy research strategies and methods in an appropriately advanced fashion to critically evaluate research at the current limits of theoretical understanding, and to equip students so that they have the ability to master complex political concepts and evaluate the significance of major developments in political thought in general as well as international relations theory.

Course Structure
Two core modules worth 30 credits, plus a Dissertation worth 75 credits, plus 5 optional modules to the value of 75 credits - 60 of which must be from the list A.

Core Modules:
-Methodology in the Social Sciences
-Research Methods and Dissertation Production

List A - In previous years these have included:
-Contemporary Socio-Political Issues in Muslim Religious Thought
-Issues in the Politics of Military Occupations
-International Relations Theory
-Political Ideology
-Human Rights
-Collective Identities and Political Thought in Britain since 1850
-Just War in Political Theory and Practice

List B
-European Institutions and the Policy Process
-European Security
-German Foreign Policy
-International Relations and Security in the Middle East
-Nationalism, Revolution and Reform in Contemporary China
-Political Economy and Development in Chinese Business
-The Contemporary Politics of the Middle East
-Strategic Asia: Policy and Analysis
-The European Union as a Global Actor
-The Political Economy of Development in the Middle East
-Model United Nations
-Region, Nation and Citizen in South East Asia
-A module offered by the School of Modern Languages and Cultures

Learning and Teaching

At the beginning of the academic year, students go through five-day induction events in which they are informed about University, the School, the MA/MSc programmes and the facilities available for their learning.

The 180 credits one-year MA degree programme is divided into two core and five optional modules of 15 credits each. Furthermore, students have to submit a dissertation of 75 credits of not more than 15,000 words. Most of the modules are delivered during the first two terms and students spend the remaining time to write the dissertation.

Usually a module has 18 contact hours spread over 9 weeks and 132 hours of self-directed learning. The modules are mainly delivered through weekly 2 hours sessions which can either take the form of seminars or one hour of lecture and one hour of tutorial. The form in which seminars are conducted can differ from one module to another. Typically modules would have elements of lectures, discussions, and presentations from students—the extent of each of these components would differ from one module to another.

All modules have written exercise for formative assessments. Upon getting feedback on these assignments, students can meet their lecturers to discuss their marks before then eventually completing a summative assessment. Typically summative assessments are 3000 word essays but some modules may be assessed by examination. Students can also meet their module coordinators during their weekly contact hours or by making an appointment. When students are working on their dissertations during the later half of the year, they meet their assigned supervisors for a minimum of 6 hours. Students also have access to the academic advisors whenever there is a need.

SGIA has a wide variety of resources available to students such as: computer room/work room with networked PC’s, printing facilities including scanner and photocopier, audio system, Wi-Fi and a relaxation area with satellite television system.

SGIA conducts weekly seminars and organises lectures and conferences which all postgraduate students can attend. These events provide students the opportunity to engage with, and debate, the most important issues in current political and international studies.

Towards the end of the programme students can contact the Careers Office of the University to get advice on available job prospects and get assistance on applying for these.

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The MSc in International Finance will equip you with the skills and specialist knowledge required to test the theories, practices and conventional wisdom pertaining to the function of financial institutions, instruments, and markets in the economic process. Read more

About the course

The MSc in International Finance will equip you with the skills and specialist knowledge required to test the theories, practices and conventional wisdom pertaining to the function of financial institutions, instruments, and markets in the economic process. You will be encouraged to critically evaluate the contemporary role of the financial system within domestic economies and the globalised financial environment. By mastering these subjects, you will have a truly expert understanding of the force that shapes our world today.

Teaching in the School of Management and Business is underpinned by research. Our academic staff publish their work in leading academic journals and regularly act as consultants to a range of organizations. We have significant strengths in areas such as entrepreneurship, human resource management, international business and operations and supply chain management. In the most recent Research Excellence Framework (2014) assessment the university was placed in the top 50 institutions for research power and intensity. It submitted 77% of eligible staff and 95% of the university's research was of an internationally recognised standard.

You will study topics including international finance, development, regulation, financial systems and the economic process through particular models and equations found in the core and optional study modules. For instance, in the module Financial Econometrics,, you will acquire the necessary skills to analyse your subject matter using state-of-the-art econometrics and statistical software. This will also prepare you for your final dissertation, in which you will demonstrate your enhanced skills in critical thinking and creativity, analysis, synthesis and critical appraisal.

You will study within the energetic School of Management and Business where robust debate is encouraged. Lectures and seminars will require you to develop your own ideas and to express, justify and defend them against the competing claims of your peers. You are, however, expected to take responsibility for your learning through independent reading and further study. This course runs full time for one academic year.

In addition to this first-rate financial training, you will also nurture a skill set perfect for almost any role in any business or postgraduate workplace. You will be confident in financial management and accounting; but also in planning and decision-making; and research, analysis and presentation. These traits will make you a desirable employee for financial and other institutions at national and international levels.

This degree will suit you:

- If you want to study a subject of truly global importance
- If you wish to develop a critical appreciation of financial theory, practice and environment
- If you wish to nurture a career in financial services or banking
- If you desire skills highly sought-after by any postgraduate employer

Course content

Core modules:

Comparative Corporate Governance
Dissertation
Emerging Financial Markets
Financial Assets and Markets
International Finance and Capital Markets
Research Methods in Finance

Assessment

Assessment takes the form of; research proposals including a related bibliographic element, case studies, oral assessments and essays. Each student will complete a MSc dissertation worth 60 credits, which deals with aan area of chosen study in the third semester.

Employability

Every course at Aberystwyth University is designed to enhance your vocational and general employability. Your MSc will place you in the jobs market as a highly-trained financial analyst capable of cutting to the heart of financial challenges of regulation, development and sustainability. You will also possess a wealth of postgraduate-level skills which are transferable into any workplace. Whether or not you pursue a career in financial services, banking or research, the prestige of an MSc from the AMBA-accredited School of Management and Business will open doors for you into workplaces in every industry.

Key skills and competencies

Study skills

Alongside the wealth of world-class financial expertise, you will master highly desirable skills in academic research, analysis, argument-formation, presentation and debate. You will also prove your abilities in reflection and self-improvement; you will be able to identify your academic weaknesses and remove them whilst building on your strengths.

Self-Motivation and discipline

Studying at Masters level requires discipline and self-motivation from every candidate. You will have access to the expertise and helpful guidance of departmental staff, but you are ultimately responsible for devising and completing a sustained programme of scholarly research in pursuit of your Master’s degree. This process of independent study at an extremely high level will strengthen your skills as an independent and self-sufficient worker, a trait prized by most employers.

Transferable skills

The MSc programme is designed to give you a range of transferable skills that you can apply in a variety of employment contexts. Upon graduation, you will have proven your abilities in structuring and communicating ideas efficiently, writing for and speaking to a range of audiences, evaluating and organizing information, working effectively with others and working within time frames and to specific deadlines.

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The MSc in International Finance and Banking will equip you with the skills and specialist knowledge required to test the theories, practices and conventional wisdom pertaining to banks, non-bank financial institutions, instruments and markets in the economic process. Read more

About the course

The MSc in International Finance and Banking will equip you with the skills and specialist knowledge required to test the theories, practices and conventional wisdom pertaining to banks, non-bank financial institutions, instruments and markets in the economic process. You will be encouraged to critically evaluate the contemporary role of the financial system within domestic economies and the globalised financial environment. By mastering these subjects, you will have a truly expert understanding of the force that shapes our world today.

Teaching in the Aberystwyth Business School is underpinned by research. Our academic staff publish their work in leading academic journals and regularly act as consultants to a range of organisations. We have significant strengths in areas such as entrepreneurship, human resource management, international business and operations and supply chain management. In the most recent Research Excellence Framework (2014) assessment the university was placed in the top 50 institutions for research power and intensity. It submitted 77% of eligible staff and 95% of the university's research was of an internationally recognised standard.

You will study topics including international finance, banking, regulation and the economic process and the six core study modules will provide the differing models, equations and perspectives required. For instance, in the module Research Methods in Finance, you will employ econometrics to analyse your subject matter. This will also prepare you for your final dissertation in which you will demonstrate your enhanced skills in critical thinking and creativity, analysis, synthesis and critical appraisal. There are no option modules on this course.

You will study within the energetic Business School where robust debate is encouraged. Lectures and seminars will require you to develop your own ideas and to express, justify and defend them against the competing claims of your peers. You are, however, expected to take responsibility for your learning through independent reading and further study. This course runs full time for one academic year.

In addition to this first-rate financial training, you will also nurture a skill set perfect for almost any role in any business or postgraduate workplace. You will be confident in financial management and banking; but also in planning and decision-making; and research, analysis and presentation. These traits will make you a desirable employee for financial and other institutions at national and international levels.

This degree will suit you:

- If you want to study a subject of truly global importance
- If you wish to develop a critical appreciation of financial and banking theory
- If you wish to nurture a career in financial services, banking or accounting
- If you desire skills highly sought-after by any postgraduate employer

Course content

Core modules:

Comparative Corporate Governance
Dissertation
Financial Assets and Markets
International Finance and Capital Markets
Modern Banking: Theory and Practice
Research Methods in Finance

Assessment

Assessment takes the form of; research proposals including a related bibliographic element, case studies, oral assessments and essays. Each student will complete a MSc dissertation worth 60 credits, which deals with an area of chosen study in the third semester.

Employability

Every course at Aberystwyth University is designed to enhance your vocational and general employability. Your MSc will place you in the jobs market as a highly-trained financial analyst capable of cutting to the heart of financial challenges of banking, regulation and development. You will also possess a wealth of postgraduate-level skills which are transferable into any workplace. Whether or not you pursue a career in international finance, banking or research, the prestige of an MSc from the AMBA-accredited School of Management and Business will open doors for you into workplaces in every industry.

Key Skills and Competencies

Study Skills

Alongside the wealth of world-class financial expertise, you will master highly desirable skills in academic research, analysis, argument-formation, presentation and debate. You will also prove your abilities in reflection and self-improvement; you will be able to identify your academic weaknesses and remove them whilst building on your strengths.

Self-Motivation and discipline

Studying at MSc level requires discipline and self-motivation from every candidate. You will have access to the expertise and helpful guidance of departmental staff, but you are ultimately responsible for devising and completing a sustained programme of scholarly research in pursuit of your Master’s degree. This process of independent study at an extremely high level will strengthen your skills as an independent and self-sufficient worker, a trait prized by most employers.

Transferable Skills

The MSc programme is designed to give you a range of transferable skills that you can apply in a variety of employment contexts. Upon graduation, you will have proven your abilities in structuring and communicating ideas efficiently, writing for and speaking to a range of audiences, evaluating and organizing information, working effectively with others and working within time frames and to specific deadlines.

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Our MA in International Slavery Studies is one of the few programmes in the world to offer students the chance to study forced labour and slavery in a wide variety of past and present contexts. Read more
Our MA in International Slavery Studies is one of the few programmes in the world to offer students the chance to study forced labour and slavery in a wide variety of past and present contexts. Your seminars, research and tutorials will range broadly, challenging you to analyse historical forms of slavery, to critique modern responses to human trafficking, to evaluate the legacies and memorialisation of slavery in contemporary society, and to apply critical and literary theories to surviving representations of slavery.

Drawing expertise from researchers across the University of Liverpool, students will benefit from our unique relationship with the International Slavery Museum. You will work with the Museum’s staff to study the commemoration and memorialisation of slavery, while the broader MA programme is a flagship activity for the Centre for the Study of International Slavery – a successful venture between the Museum and the University. As members of the Centre, students will meet the international cast of visitors who speak in our seminar series, presenting cutting edge research for criticism and debate.

Probing “slavery” as a category of cultural, legal, political and social analysis, students will confront the realities of un-free labour and asserted human ownership in ancient, modern and contemporary societies. However, there is plenty of potential to specialise in the areas and approaches that grab your interest. Besides the four modules concerning slavery, students will select their disciplinary training modules from a wide variety offered by historians, political scientists, literary scholars and other specialists, enabling you to select the right training for your own interests and aspirations.

All teaching takes place in small-group workshops, seminars and tutorials. Assessment tests students’ abilities through research essays, oral presentations and a 15,000 word dissertation, which is intended to be an original work of scholarship and research.

The course will appeal to you whether you want to develop the skills to work in a range of research careers, within the NGO, public and private sectors, to develop your experience in museum, political or campaigning work, or prepare for further academic research with a PhD. The distinctive choice of disciplinary training modules from across those offered in University departments provides the ideal opportunity for students to change direction from their undergraduate specialism or further their existing strengths. In approaching the topic of slavery and forced labour through a comparative, multidisciplinary perspective, this programme provides both variety and the opportunity to specialise in students’ chosen areas.

Why study International Slavery at Liverpool?

Our regular research seminars offer unparalleled opportunities to debate fresh approaches with a programme of renowned international speakers.

The unique partnership between the University and the International Slavery Museum offers students the opportunity to work with the curators of the Museum as they consider how to develop its galleries in the future.

Our library boasts a wide range of resources, many available online, with a particularly strong collection for the study of slavery, abolition and resistance.

This programme is a pioneering opportunity to choose your disciplinary skills training to suit your interests and aspirations, permitting you to pick from a wide variety of literary, historical and social science modules.

Students study two 30-credit core modules and four 15-credit research training modules, culminating in a 60-credit dissertation.

Why History?

Breadth of expertise

The interests of our staff and PhD students are extremely diverse and span the medieval, early modern and modern periods.

Their work encompasses political, social, cultural, economic, military and diplomatic history, across Europe, Africa, Asia, Australia and the Americas.

Active seminar programmes, linked to our research centres and MA programmes, enable staff and postgraduates to present their work and listen to eminent visiting speakers.

These are our on-going seminar series:

Medieval and Renaissance Studies
Eighteenth-Century Worlds
Contemporary Cultural and Social
History
International Slavery
Contemporary History and Policy
New Research (run by our postgraduate students)
Recent conferences and workshops have addressed ‘Religion in the Spanish Baroque’, ‘Text and Place in Medieval and Early Modern Europe’, ‘Re-thinking Post- Slavery’ and ‘British Nuclear Culture’.

Taught programmes that prepare you for future research

By pursuing our programmes you’ll gain the skills and knowledge you need to carry out further research towards a PhD.

Our MA programmes are taught by research-active experts who bring their knowledge of, and passion for, their subjects into the seminar room.

Teaching takes place in small-group seminars or workshops and through one-to-one tutorials, as we believe this leads to the best collaboration between students and staff.

We offer programmes in:-

Cultural History
Eighteenth-Century Worlds
International Slavery Studies
Medieval and Renaissance Studies
Twentieth-Century History
You can also pursue an MRes in History or a vocational Masters in Archives and Records Management.

Support and skills training for PhD students

As a postgraduate research student you’ll receive comprehensive skills from the Graduate School, the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences and History Department.

This will equip you with the research skills you need to successfully complete your PhD.

Our PhD programmes place a strong emphasis on independent research and study, culminating in a 100,000-word dissertation. Two supervisors (normally experts in your chosen field) who will advise and support you through the process.

Our commitment to postgraduate students

We welcome enquiries from all postgraduate students interested in studying here and will give you all the academic, practical and pastoral support we can.

Students have a voice here and are represented on the School Postgraduate Committee. There’s also a dedicated staff – student liaison committee to oversee our MA and PhD programmes.

Postgraduate studentships and bursaries are often available.

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We live in an increasingly globalised world. Nuclear proliferation, terrorism, failed states, global poverty and inequality, financial market instability, biodiversity losses, and climate change - are among the global challenges we face and which demand global cooperation if they are to be to adequately resolved. Read more
We live in an increasingly globalised world. Nuclear proliferation, terrorism, failed states, global poverty and inequality, financial market instability, biodiversity losses, and climate change - are among the global challenges we face and which demand global cooperation if they are to be to adequately resolved.

The MSc Global Politics provides students with the tools to understand and critically assess these challenges and the forms of cooperation required to address them.

The programme's core modules concentrate on the institutional drivers of global politics and offer an incisive overview of the main theoretical and applied moral debates concerning the ethics of globalization. It is also possible to choose modules from other departments with approval of the School of Government and International Affairs, for example:
-Anthropology of Global Health (ANTH43615)
-Environmental Economics and Policy (ECON40615)
-Globalisation and Global Health Politics (HEAL3031)

Student Profile

"The close-knit nature of the Global Politics MSc has allowed me to closely engage both with our lecturers, and fellow students in the program. The course has inspired us to debate economic and moral issues pertaining to World politics long after classes are over and made me feel part of an intellectual community not simply enrolled in a degree." Sam George

Course Content

The MSc Global Politics thus aims to provide students with knowledge of the political, economic, cultural and moral debates about how and to what extent the effects of globalisation can be governed.

It will provide the means for students to develop the analytical and conceptual skills necessary to understand and discuss:
-The key international and transnational structures, organisations and institutions that have developed in the era following the Second World War
-The range of the academic debates in the area of global governance
-Policy developments and innovations in the fields of economics, security, and environment

The moral justification for different and sometimes competing regimes of global governance.
Students will also benefit from the wide range of academic resources within the School of Government and International Affairs, the Law School, the Department of Geography, and the School of Economics, Business and Finance, making the MSc Global Politics a truly unique interdisciplinary programme.

The programme consists of:
Core Modules:
-Theoretical Approaches to Global Governance
-Global Governance Institutions
-Theories of Global Justice
-Ethical Aspects of Global Governance
-Dissertation: 12,000 word research dissertation providing students with the opportunity to develop an in-depth understanding of one field of global politics

Optional Modules - A choice of up to four modules from the list of elective modules both within the School of Government and International Affairs and within other Schools and Departments at Durham University.

Learning and Teaching

At the beginning of the academic year, students go through five-day induction events in which they are informed about University, the School, the MA/MSc programmes and the facilities available for their learning.

The 180 credits one-year MSc degree programme is divided into four core and four optional modules of 15 credits each. Furthermore, students have to submit a dissertation of 60 credits of not more than 12,000 words. Most of the modules are delivered during the first two terms and students spend the remaining time to write the dissertation.

Usually a module has 18 contact hours spread over 9 weeks and 132 hours of self-directed learning. The modules are mainly delivered through weekly 2 hours sessions which can either take the form of seminars or one hour of lecture and one hour of tutorial. The form in which seminars are conducted can differ from one module to another. Typically modules would have elements of lectures, discussions, and presentations from students—the extent of each of these components would differ from one module to another.

All modules have written exercise for formative assessments. Upon getting feedback on these assignments, students can meet their lecturers to discuss their marks before then eventually completing a summative assessment. Typically summative assessments are 3000 word essays but some modules may be assessed by examination. Students can also meet their module coordinators during their weekly contact hours or by making an appointment. When students are working on their dissertations during the later half of the year, they meet their assigned supervisors for a minimum of 6 hours. Students also have access to academic advisors whenever there is a need.

SGIA has a wide variety of resources available to students such as: computer room/work room with networked PC’s, printing facilities including scanner and photocopier, audio system, Wi-Fi and a relaxation area with satellite television system.

The School hosts events throughout the year which all postgraduate students are invited to attend. These events provide students the opportunity to engage with, and debate, the most important issues in current political and international studies. Global Politics students also typically benefit from participation in Global Policy Institute events.

Towards the end of the programme students can contact the Careers Office of the University to get advice on available job prospects and get assistance on applying for these.

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Are you considering a career in counselling? If you are passionate about helping people and want to make a positive difference in the lives of others, this is the course for you. Read more
Are you considering a career in counselling? If you are passionate about helping people and want to make a positive difference in the lives of others, this is the course for you.

The Master of Counselling at Monash provides a professional qualification and offers a combination of theory and professional experience, providing you with the knowledge and skills to begin a rewarding career as a counsellor.

The course is suited to people from a variety of professions, such as human resources, health, social welfare and education. It is taught by leading academics with extensive experience working as counsellors and psychologists.

The course draws on contemporary theories and approaches to counselling and psychotherapy and will develop your appreciation of the mental-health issues that arise across the lifespan.

You will examine the various forms of professional counselling, including online and distance counselling, child and adolescent counselling, and individual, couples and group counselling. You will also be introduced to the ethical and professional issues faced by counsellors. Creative approaches to counselling will be examined, including play therapy and art therapy. In addition, you will gain in-depth knowledge across a range of contemporary cognitive-behaviour therapies.

You will complete 300 hours of professional placement, where you have an opportunity to apply theory to practice under supervision in clinical settings. The placement includes 200 'contact' hours (e.g. face-to-face, telephone, group and online counselling) and 100 'non-contact' hours (e.g. observation, case notes, meetings, administration). You will also complete 50 hours of supervision (which are included in the non-contact hours) and participate in weekly online discussion groups and postings throughout the duration of the placement.

If you hold relevant qualifications from prior studies and/or relevant work experience, you may be eligible to receive up to one year of credit into this course, which reduces the duration.

Master of Counselling graduates work in a variety of fields, including careers counselling, education, child and family services, child-protection services, health policy, family counselling, health-services management and rehabilitation counselling.

This course is accredited in Australia by the Australian Counselling Association (ACA) and Psychotherapy and Counselling Federation of Australia (PACFA).
Please note: membership of PACFA requires a first degree in a relevant discipline.

Visit the website http://www.study.monash/courses/find-a-course/2016/counselling-d6003?domestic=true

Course Structure

The course is structured in three parts. Part A. Orientation to Counselling, Part B. Advanced foundations for counselling and Part C. Specialist counselling practice. All students complete Part C. Depending upon your prior qualifications, you may receive credit for Part A or Part A and Part B.

[Note that if you are eligible for credit for prior studies you may elect not to receive the credit.]

PART A. Orientation to Counselling
These studies will provide an orientation to the field of counselling at advanced undergraduate level. They examine the major lifespan theories and counselling approaches and familiarise students with the professional side of counselling including the many different ways in which counselling is offered. They are intended for students whose previous qualification is not in a cognate field.

PART B. Advanced foundations for counselling
These studies will extend your foundational knowledge for the field of counselling. They focus on counselling practice around mental health and in working with young people.

PART C. Specialist counselling practice
These studies will advance your knowledge and skill development for counselling. They cover major approaches to counselling, provide training in counselling practice and address the ethical and professional issues in undertaking counselling as a profession.

As part of this core study you will complete 300 hours of clinical placements, including a minimum of 200 hours of client contact.

For more information visit the faculty website - http://www.study.monash/media/links/faculty-websites/education

Faculty of Education

The Faculty of Education is committed to researching, communicating and applying knowledge about teaching and learning in ways that foster quality in education.

The Faculty of Education develops and provides innovative research and teaching that takes seriously the global-to-local demands of an excellent Australian public university. Our work focuses on advancing the discipline and practice of education through original research, development and partnership activities. We prepare and develop professionals and practitioners for a range of education settings and specialisations. We also engage policy and public debate on matters of importance to education and educators at all levels.

Our mission is to contribute to the public interest through high quality and ethical teaching, research, capacity building and community service. To this end, we create and pursue opportunities that strengthen and sustain a vibrant intellectual community, centred on the purposeful, critical and disciplined study of learning and teaching in a range of contexts.

Our vision is of:

- graduates who are capable, thoughtful, ethical citizens of the world, distinguished by their knowledge, intellectual engagement and professional skill, and by their commitment to lifelong learning, innovation and excellence

- research practice and scholarly output that is recognised internationally and locally for its originality, rigour and impartiality, and for providing advice and services that inform and lead professional practice, public debate, policy and community action

- an intellectual, social, physical and web environment that challenges, enthuses and supports all to learn and excel, and which sustains productive working relations characterised by mutual respect, accountability, contribution and recognition.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.study.monash/courses/find-a-course/2016/counselling-d6003?domestic=true#making-the-application

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The Master of International Affairs (MIA) is an advanced 15-month programme suited to ambitious graduates looking for a launch-pad into international affairs or policy making roles. Read more

Programme description

The Master of International Affairs (MIA) is an advanced 15-month programme suited to ambitious graduates looking for a launch-pad into international affairs or policy making roles.

Based within the Academy of Government at the University of Edinburgh, you’ll work alongside leading researchers and practitioners as you develop the skills necessary to critically evaluate policy issues, processes, and implementation.

This program is both practical and practice-oriented. As a student you’ll benefit from a series of talks and lectures from policy-makers working at the heart of government. You’ll gain hands on experience through a 3-month placement with a policy-focused organisation. And you’ll take part in a range of professional development workshops focused on skills such as negotiating, communicating with impact, and writing effectively.

The MIA is a recognised professional qualification. The combination of academic excellence and practical experience ensure that MIA graduates are well placed for careers in international organisations, research institutes, think tanks, consulting firms, NGOs, government, party politics, and advocacy/lobbying organizations, amongst others.

The University of Edinburgh is ranked within the world’s top 20. It is home to the Academy of Government which hosts some of the world’s leading researchers and analysts working on government at Scottish, UK, European and global levels. Their work covers key policy challenges our societies need to confront: on health, education and welfare, on the environment, energy and climate change, on international security and international development.

Programme structure

As a student on our MIA you will be taught and assessed in a variety of innovative ways. The focus is on providing a strong, practice-oriented programme. Teaching sessions are three hours and typically divided into three components: one academic-led, one student-led and one practitioner-led.

An academic lecture will build on readings, which students will be expected to have completed before class, and identify key issues for debate and discussion. The student-led hour will pick up on these themes and develop further debate either through a classroom discussion, presentations, group exercises, or practical activities/simulations. The practitioner-led hour will put the learning into practical context, using specific case studies where possible and appropriate.

The MIA is assessed through a variety of mechanisms, including written policy briefs, short policy memos, problem-solving tasks, individual and group presentations, written analytical reports, self and peer assessment, and crisis response simulations.

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Contemporary illustration practice has grown to encompass a broad range of ambitions and opportunities for image makers and storytellers. Read more
Contemporary illustration practice has grown to encompass a broad range of ambitions and opportunities for image makers and storytellers. The growth of online digital cultures - and the impact of digital image creation on traditional image making - requires flexible and adaptable practitioners, and it provides unique opportunities for the entrepreneurial illustrator.

Our course offers you the chance to challenge the boundaries of illustration, both in its practice and its context, and is primarily concerned with the illustrated narrative. It offers you a creative and intellectual environment in which you can rigorously pursue a project of self-directed study, and produce a body of work on a topic of your interest within the field of illustration.

Our course enjoys a long tradition of original narrative and storytelling through images, reflecting staff expertise and practice in these areas. As a student here you'll get to explore narrative storytelling, authorship, self-publishing, book production and visual narratives through the development of a personal project.

This MA course supports you to develop your own independent voice and to identify an audience. You're encouraged to take a self-directed entrepreneurial approach, developing and exploring creative opportunities and options for your work. This entrepreneurial emphasis will be supported by access to specialist facilities such as digital media suites, photography, printmaking and bookmaking.

Our course also provides you with the opportunity for extended critical debate, a high degree of critical reflection and integration of theoretical and practical concerns as part of the realisation of an ambitious body of work. It will also promote in-depth, rigorously conducted research, to ensure you're able to contextualise your own work in relation to the leading edge practice in illustration.

Visiting lecturers and practitioners inform and cultivate professional development, encouraging you to question and debate. Recent visiting lecturers have included Graham Rawle, Olivier Kugler, Nick White, Luke Best, Mathew Richardson and Posy Simmonds.

Industry Partners

Illustration at UCA has a long tradition of original narrative and storytelling through images, reflecting staff expertise and practice in these areas.

Students on MA Illustration also benefit from well-established industry connections.

Careers

Graduates from our MA Illustration course go on to establish careers in a diverse range of exciting areas, such as:
-Freelance illustration
-Self-publishing
-Artist practice
-Printmaking
-Curation
-Editing
-Animation
-Project management
-Education
-Design
-Digital imaging
-Web authoring
-Multi-media production

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https://www.kent.ac.uk/locations/medway/. The MA in Music Technology focuses on the use, development and implementation of technology within the wider musical context, exploring issues such as interactivity, audio programming, sound spatialisation and multimedia. Read more

This course will be held at the Medway Campus

https://www.kent.ac.uk/locations/medway/

The MA in Music Technology focuses on the use, development and implementation of technology within the wider musical context, exploring issues such as interactivity, audio programming, sound spatialisation and multimedia. Modules include Programming and Production Techniques and a Music Technology project.

The University of Kent has invested over £5 million in the School of Music and Fine Art, to provide you with the best possible study and research environment. A number of historic buildings in the atmospheric Chatham Historic Dockyard have been renovated to provide a new range of professional standard facilities. Our new specialist facilities include a large recording studio, a Foley recording space, surround-sound studio and post-production rooms. All have been designed to the highest standard in order to provide an excellent environment for postgraduate work.

Visit the website: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/155/music-technology

Course detail

Work is developed through individual enquiry as well as sharing and critiquing ideas through group seminars, designed to provide a forum for debate as well as practical instruction. There will also be significant opportunity for collaborative and interdisciplinary work taking into account other arts subjects at Medway and Canterbury.

Purpose

All MA programmes are designed to provide knowledge and skills in practice-based research, as well as giving you experience of current research practices in various areas of critical and analytical thinking.

Format and assessment

You take common modules in research methods and postgraduate study skills, while giving you the opportunity to foster your subject skills in specialist modules. Work is developed through individual enquiry as well as sharing and critiquing ideas through group seminars, designed to provide a forum for debate as well as practical instruction.

There will also be significant opportunity for collaborative and interdisciplinary work taking into account other subjects within the School of Music and Fine Art.

Assessment is by a range of coursework, including individual projects, skills-based tasks, seminar presentations and written work.

Careers

A postgraduate degree in the area of music and audio arts is a valuable and flexible qualification, which can lead to career opportunities within the creative industries, music recording and production, audio software development, sound for film, composition and academic careers.

These possibilities are augmented by work in video games, the Internet, live sound for theatres and festivals, audio installations for museums, sonic arts and computer music. Postgraduates interested in a research career are supported by the University’s Graduate School Research Development Programme. The University’s Employability Weeks can also provide valuable support in terms of planning future careers.

How to apply: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

Why study at The University of Kent?

- Shortlisted for University of the Year 2015
- Kent has been ranked fifth out of 120 UK universities in a mock Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF) exercise modelled by Times Higher Education (THE).
- In the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014, Kent was ranked 17th* for research output and research intensity, in the Times Higher Education, outperforming 11 of the 24 Russell Group universities
- Over 96% of our postgraduate students who graduated in 2014 found a job or further study opportunity within six months.
Find out more: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/why/

Postgraduate scholarships and funding

We have a scholarship fund of over £9 million to support our taught and research students with their tuition fees and living costs. Find out more: https://www.kent.ac.uk/scholarships/postgraduate/

English language learning

If you need to improve your English before and during your postgraduate studies, Kent offers a range of modules and programmes in English for Academic Purposes (EAP). Find out more here: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/international/english.html

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