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Introduction. In literature as in politics, Scotland’s national status ‘is both dangled before us and tantalisingly withheld’ . Read more

Introduction

In literature as in politics, Scotland’s national status ‘is both dangled before us and tantalisingly withheld’ (Don Paterson)

The Stirling Masters course views Scottish Literature in the light of this ambiguity, and embraces the many questions it invites us to explore. We explore key figures, texts and debates from the period of Regal Union (1603) to the present, often placing literary writing at the heart of cultural and political debate. Class discussion examines the complex means by which national literary identity is sustained, renewed and re-considered – not forgetting the role of novelists and poets in integrating Scottish identity into the project of Britishness.

This is the only Masters course of its kind. As debate intensifies over Scotland’s cultural and political identity, the time is ripe to examine the role of writing in shaping the image and reality of the nation.

Key information

- Degree type: MLitt, Postgraduate Certificate, Postgraduate Diploma

- Study methods: Full-time, Part-time

- Duration: Full-time: MLitt-12 months, PG Diploma-9 months, PG Certificate 4 months Part-time: MLitt 27 months, PG Diploma-21 months, PG Certificate-9 months

- Start date: September

- Course Director: Dr Scott Hames and Dr Suzanne Gilbert

Course objectives

Ranging across four centuries of the Scottish literary imagination, this course explores key figures, texts and debates from the period of Regal Union (1603) to the present, often placing literary writing at the heart of cultural and political debate.

We examine a full range of writers, texts and debates from the early modern period to the present, including the works of Robert Burns, Walter Scott and James Hogg, right through to contemporary authors such as James Kelman, Janice Galloway and Kathleen Jamie (and not forgetting Robert Louis Stevenson, Nan Shepherd, Muriel Spark, and too many others to mention). The programme has an emphasis on critical debate, and questions some of the assumptions that go along with studying a national literary tradition.

No previous experience in studying Scottish Literature is required. Leading Scottish writers and critics feature prominently in assigned reading, alongside key insights from book history, literary criticism and political theory.

English language requirements

If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills:

- IELTS: 6.0 with 5.5 minimum in each skill

- Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C

- Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade C

- Pearson Test of English (Academic): 54 with 51 in each component

- IBT TOEFL: 80 with no subtest less than 17

For more information go to English language requirements https://www.stir.ac.uk/study-in-the-uk/entry-requirements/english/

If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. View the range of pre-sessional courses http://www.intohigher.com/uk/en-gb/our-centres/into-university-of-stirling/studying/our-courses/course-list/pre-sessional-english.aspx .

Delivery and assessment

Dissertation

The most significant piece of work on the course will be a dissertation of 15,000 words, written during the summer on a subject of your choosing in consultation with a member of teaching staff. You may choose to develop work initiated on one of the modules you have studied. Those who do not embark on the dissertation may be awarded a Diploma. The work of the best students completing the course may be deemed worthy of an MLitt with Distinction.

REF2014

In REF2014 Stirling was placed 6th in Scotland and 45th in the UK with almost three quarters of research activity rated either world-leading or internationally excellent.

Rating

Over half of our submissions in the latest Research Assessment Exercise (RAE) were found to be ‘Internationally Excellent’ or ‘World-leading’.



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Why this course?. Architectural conservation - the action of conserving built heritage while maintaining its values - is practiced differently across the world; sometimes not at all due to cultural and economic constraints. . Read more

Why this course?

Architectural conservation - the action of conserving built heritage while maintaining its values - is practiced differently across the world; sometimes not at all due to cultural and economic constraints. 

It is an emerging area of work which requires specialist training and knowledge to deal with its multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary nature. It also requires the development of a critical approach for the analysis and design of the intervention, informed by the shared international principles and the specific nature and context of the historic building to be conserved.

We need to attract new talent to the field of architectural conservation. To work with historic buildings is an enriching experience, which combines the creative aspects of designing a new building with the in-depth research required to understand in full the building and its context. Working with historic buildings is also a great training to improve the design of new buildings, as you learn a great deal about the importance of design ideas, innovation, durability and care. It is also a very sociable work, interacting with a variety of people from all backgrounds, joining forces in helping current generations to enjoy historic buildings, to create community identities around them, and to transmit the buildings and their values to the future.

Glasgow and its surrounding area provide an excellent location for the course, with architectural heritage from all periods, from Roman to Medieval, Georgian, Victorian and contemporary, without forgetting the better known C. R. Mackintosh and Alexander ‘Greek’ Thomson’s buildings. Strathclyde has a lively international community of staff and students and we enjoy a privileged position in the centre of Glasgow.

You’ll study

The course is a platform for:

  • collaboration with both practice and research partners
  • architectural critique
  • discussion and debate

All full-time students take instructional classes and a design project in the first two semesters. MSc students then complete a dissertation project.

Compulsory taught classes are delivered intensively, making them more accessible to part-time students and Continuing Professional Development (CPD). Areas explored in classes include:

  • theory
  • history
  • survey
  • investigations
  • legislation
  • materials
  • structures

The course is informed by the outcomes of the research being carried out at the Architectural Design and Conservation Research Unit (ADCRU). It is a platform for collaboration with both practice and research partners; architectural critique, discussion and debate are fundamental parts of the course.

Open Access

Open Access modules are offered on individual modules from the MSc programme. They can be taken as stand-alone CPD options or gradually built towards a qualification.

Open Access students may transfer onto a part-time MSc or PgDip programme to complete their studies (subject to a maximum period of time).

Guest Lecturers/speakers

You’ll benefit from a large number of government, local authority and industry partners, who’ll lecture on up-to-date current practices, with a diverse point of views.

Facilities

Studios 

There are two fully-networked design studios; one dedicated to student self-study, the other to interactive design teaching.

Library 

In addition to the main University library, we have our own, on-site, reference library. Our collection is developed in direct response to the teaching delivered in the department. 

Workshop 

A full range of hand and portable power tools are available (complete with instruction).

PC Lab 

Our lab computers have AutoCad and InDesign.

We also offer plotter printing, scanning and laser cutting services.

Accreditation

The course is fully recognised by the Institute of Historic Building Conservation (IHBC). The IHBC is the principal professional body for building conservation practitioners and historic environment specialists working in United Kingdom.

The course also conforms to the internationally recognised Guidelines for Education and Training in the Conservation of Monuments, Ensembles and Sites adopted by the International Council on Monuments and Sites (ICOMOS). These criteria are used by professional institutes for the assessment of evidence and professional accreditation in conservation.

Learning & teaching

The course is balanced between theory and practice. It’s delivered through:

  • lectures
  • workshops
  • studio-based, and seminar-led learning, by staff and visiting experts from the UK and overseas

The course is a platform for collaboration with both practice and research partners; architectural critique, discussion and debate are fundamental parts of the course.

Assessment

Formative assessment will take place throughout the course.

You’ll be assessed through lectures, seminars, interim Studio Reviews and workshops, supported by student presentations, symposia and peer feedback.

Methods of teaching vary; some subjects are formally taught using lectures and seminars, others use a mix of methods which may incorporate small projects.

The main architectural conservation project is a studio based project which involves one-to-one tuition and appraisals in review seminars. Team teaching techniques are used in several projects and increasing use is made of student peer group reviews. Summative assessment will be through:

  • studio reviews
  • individual written essays and reports
  • oral presentations
  • dissertation - directly linked to the conservation project

Careers

Areas of employment for graduates are numerous. They can work as independent professionals in conservation or for architectural firms all over the worlds. The completion of the Masters will give a variety of opportunities:

  • IHBC affiliate member with option to progress to full membership
  • RIBA Conservation Registrant (CR) and/or RIAS Accredited Conservation Architect
  • progress to RIBA Conservation architect (CA), RIBA Specialist Conservation architect (SCA) and/or RIAS Accredited or Advance Conservation Architect
  • progress to Conservation Accreditation Register for Engineers (CARE), the joint register between the Institution of Civil Engineers (ICE) and Institution of Structural Engineers (IStructE)

We work with a large number of government, local authority and industry partners, offering potential placement opportunities for students to work after their postgraduate degree study.

Heritage is recognised as a sector of international strategic importance. Local authorities and communities are also very interested in preserving their heritage. The conservation of historic buildings becomes more and more a day to day activity for architects and engineers.



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-Develop your individual creative practice in Contemporary Crafts. -Knowledge and understanding of current critical debate. -Gain advanced technical and entrepreneurial skills for the successful creative practitioner. Read more
-Develop your individual creative practice in Contemporary Crafts
-Knowledge and understanding of current critical debate
-Gain advanced technical and entrepreneurial skills for the successful creative practitioner
-Work alongside practitioners working in a range of areas of practice, in stimulating and challenging environment

Why choose this course?

MA Contemporary Crafts is an award that sits within the MA Art and Design programme at the School of Creative Arts. Within this masters programme there is strong emphasis on professional practice and the real-world applications of art and design. You will develop key research skills and gain a good understanding of the work of other practitioners in your field.

The aim of the programme is to equip you with the skills, knowledge and understanding required to practice at an advanced level, to foster your creativity and enhance your employment opportunities. You will work alongside artists and designers who are involved with a wide variety of media and forms. Induction, seminars and social events for students and staff mean that you will be part of a friendly and supportive postgraduate community, which also includes film makers, musicians and professionals working in new media. Senior research staff and internationally renowned artists work with postgraduate students, helping you to develop original and challenging work.

Contemporary Crafts is an area of creative practice that has a growing reputation through the recent heightened public exposure via the media. On this course, you will explore and challenge the boundaries of your practice and, through discussion and debate with other students, explore some of the key ideas and concepts that inform contemporary applied arts practice.

We focus on helping you develop the entrepreneurial skills you need to further your career and explore funding opportunities and employment in the creative and cultural spheres. You may develop and exploit your talent across a wide range of activities and develop a practice as a maker of individual objects, a designer of batch-produced products, an artist working to commission or establish a mixed portfolio career.

You are encouraged to challenge the materials you use through practical research and sampling and refine your professional practice through the application of process, development of technical skill, material understanding and conceptual underpinning. You have the opportunity to specialize in one area or work across a wide range of disciplines and materials - jewellery, textiles, ceramics, glass, printmaking - and be actively involved in sharing ideas and taking part in critical debate.

Through working alongside artists and designers on other postgraduate courses you will explore the possibilities for the applied artist today, questioning conventions and refining your practice and design capabilities by working with and understanding materials. Our staff are experienced in research and professional practice, and you will also benefit from contributions from visiting artists, designers, makers and other arts and design professionals, as well as from involvement with our international exhibitions programme and gallery environment.

Careers

Contemporary Crafts is designed to enable you to operate successfully as a professional practitioner in your area of specialism. Graduates have gone on to establish studios, exhibit professionally, work as curators, PhD study, teaching, work towards site specific commissions.

Teaching methods

The programme is centred on individual practice and encourages critical dialogue between traditions, disciplines and media. The practice modules develop individual practice through a combination of work-in-progress seminars, tutorials and gallery visits and discussions. A sustained body of creative work forms the basis of assessment, supported by written documentation and assignments. The course is also designed to help you acquire research skills and understand what is going on now in fine and applied arts.

Structure

Core Modules
-Creative Economies
-Discourse/Reflection: Art and Design
-Major Study: Contemporary Crafts
-Practice 1: Art and Design
-Practice 2: Art and Design
-Research and Enquiry

Optional
-Creative Economies (Online)
-Research and Enquiry (Online)

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Cities are core to human political, social, and economic life (Storber, 2013) and there is significant and growing academic debate and empirical research around the role and effect of city living. Read more

Cities are core to human political, social, and economic life (Storber, 2013) and there is significant and growing academic debate and empirical research around the role and effect of city living. There are also significant questions raised in real world governance, planning and public policy around cities, both in the developed world (for instance, policy debate around the devolution agenda in the UK, specifically in terms of Greater Manchester) and in BRICS (for example, spatial planning issues for growing Chinese cities (reflected in the international conference being held this year in China urban development at the Bartlett School of Architecture, UCL).

The programme aims to contribute to this debate, drawing our key research strengths, and maximising our position in Manchester and within the devolution agenda. The programme will be interdisciplinary, teaching will be research led (drawing on our best research areas), and will include practical and vocational opportunities through a proposed project-based element in partnership with Manchester City Council. The programme design recognises that international students, particular those with an interest in urban policy from BRIC countries, may need language and academic skills support before they join the main programme. It also provides data analysis modules, using real big data available to the university through the Big Data Centre. 

Urban studies is a growing area for PGT programmes in the UK and the USA. Such programmes are either located in town planning (leading to professional certification, and not directly relevant to this proposal), or in the social sciences (geography, public policy/administration, sociology). A small number of these are interdisciplinary, though typically do not include architecture and social sciences as proposed here, positioning this course as one of the leading courses in its field. Additionally, the University of Mancheser has recently launched the Manchester Urban Institute, drawing together a number of research centres looking at the urban as a unit of analysis/focus of empirical research, and placing Manchester as a leading city in the area of Urban Studies. This does link to a number of existing PGT programmes, largely single disciplinary and/or in town planning/architecture.



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"O this learning, what a thing it is!". The Taming of the Shrew.  (1.2.130). Read more

"O this learning, what a thing it is!"

The Taming of the Shrew (1.2.130)

If you have a passion for the works of William Shakespeare, this MA gives you the space to study the full range of Shakespeare’s works more closely and comprehensively than you could as an undergraduate – approaching Shakespeare as a maker of theatre on page and stage. The course focuses closely on the works themselves, looking at what they say about our world today, as well as what they reveal about Shakespeare’s. We've designed the course so that you'll discover the critical, historical and theoretical issues in his plays and poetry as you encounter them, rather than providing you with prescribed routes to take. 

The MA is designed to provide you with both breadth of coverage and depth of focus, and the course is ideal whether you wish to pursue research at PhD level or simply wish to develop your knowledge of Shakespeare and your critical skills. You will be taught by the people creating and animating current critical debates on manuscript, print and performance.

Join a department that's joint 2nd in the UK for outstanding and world-leading research environments. You'll benefit from our incredible research: over two thirds of our research was judged ‘world leading and internationally excellent’ in REF 2014. All staff in the department are highly regarded scholars, writers and critics who are engaged in research, writing ground-breaking books, talking to or writing in the national media, and providing expert advice to organisations including the Royal Shakespeare Company, the Department for Education and other national and international bodies.

Designed to be flexible, this course can be studied full-time for one year or part-time over two years.

Course structure

Core modules

The Works - Plays and Poetry

This module spans Shakespeare’s entire career as a playwright and poet, analysing in detail his nineteen major plays – including histories, comedies, tragedies, romances and problem plays – and the Sonnets. The theatrical, historical and theoretical issues raised by the works will be addressed as they emerge out of individual response and class discussion.

King Lear and The Tempest - Critical Debate and Creative Response

This course aims to engage you in a sustained, intensive study of Shakespeare’s supreme tragic masterpiece, the controversies it has provoked, and the diverse ways in which it has been adapted and transformed by poets, dramatists, novelists, and by film and theatre directors, since Shakespeare’s time. You will begin with detailed discussion of the play itself before turning to critical debate and then exploring the creative impact of King Lear on later poetry, drama and fiction. The second term is devoted to studying the creative response to King Lear in the theatre and the cinema, tracking its performance history on stage and screen through in-depth analysis of landmark productions and film adaptations. 

Methods and Materials of Research

This module is designed to introduce you to a number of key topics related to the methods of postgraduate research, and to some of the resources and materials that will be useful to your studies.

Dissertation

This will be a piece of original written work, of between 12,000 and 15,000 words. The topic of the dissertation will be agreed between you and whichever member of staff is allotted as supervisor and is normally required to be submitted by the beginning of September in the year of the completion of the programme.

Teaching & assessment

This course comprises of 120 units:

  • The Works - Plays and Poetry (60 units)
  • King Lear and The Tempest - Critical Debate and Creative Response (30 units)
  • Shakespeare and Dramaturgy (30 units)
  • Methods and Materials of Research (unweighted)
  • Dissertation (60 units)

You will attend seminars and be expected to read texts, conduct achival research on the internet or in libraries, and attend performances.

You will be assessed through essays and your final Dissertation.

Your future career

Our postgraduates have gone into academic roles at the Universities of Edinburgh, Sussex and Leeds, Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre and the National University of Ireland.

We will prepare you for careers in other areas too, such as teaching, librarianship, marketing, and theatre administration.



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Palaeopathology is the study of past disease in human remains; it is a sub-discipline of bioarchaeology (study of human remains from archaeological sites). Read more

Palaeopathology is the study of past disease in human remains; it is a sub-discipline of bioarchaeology (study of human remains from archaeological sites). This lecture, seminar and laboratory based MSc equips you with the theoretical and practical skills knowledge of how to study and interpret data collected from human remains. The emphasis is on health and well-being using a multidisciplinary approach, linking biological evidence for disease with cultural data (the bioarchaeological approach). This course is unique in the world and it takes a holistic view of disease, as seen in a clinical contexts today, and will prepare you for undertaking significant research projects in this subject, or working in contract/commercial archaeology, and many other fields. It is aimed at graduates mainly in archaeology and anthropology with or without past experience of knowledge in this field, and for those who aspire to continue into a PhD programme or work in contract archaeology. However, past students have come from a variety of subject backgrounds, and destination data illustrate a wide range of employments take these students.

Course Structure

Two taught modules in the Epiphany term (Research and Study Skills in Archaeological Science and Identification and Analysis of the Normal Human Skeleton), and two taught modules in Michaelmas term (Palaeopathology: Theory and Method; Themes in Palaeopathology), with the double module dissertation over Easter term and the summer (submitted early September).

Core Modules

  • Research and Study Skills in Archaeological Science
  • Identification and Analysis of the Normal Human Skeleton
  • Palaeopathology: Theory and Method
  • Themes in Palaeopathology
  • Dissertation (double module).

Course Learning and Teaching

The programme is mainly delivered through a mixture of lectures, seminars and practical classes. Typically lectures provide key information on a particular area, and identify the main areas for discussion and debate in bioarchaeology. Seminars then provide opportunities for smaller groups of you to discuss and debate particular issues or areas, based on the knowledge that you have gained through your lectures and through independent study outside the programme’s formal contact hours. Finally, practical laboratory classes allow you to gain direct practical skills in the recording and interpretation of data from skeletal remains. The latter provide an important element of the programme in allowing independent and group work, as well as hands-on experience under laboratory conditions, essential for a potential future working environment.

The balance of these types of activities changes over the course of the programme, as you develop your knowledge and ability as independent learners, giving them the opportunity to engage in research, professional practice, and developing and demonstrating research skills in a particular area of the subject.

In Term 1 you will typically attend 4 hours a week of lectures and 2.5 hours of laboratory sessions, in addition to seminars over the term. Outside timetabled contact hours, you are also expected to undertake your own independent study to prepare for your classes and broaden your subject knowledge. External speakers specialising in specific subject areas from “industry” and academia are brought in to engage the students on issues in research, but also in the profession.

In Term 2 the balance shifts from learning the basic skills required for recording and interpreting skeletal data (age at death, sex, normal variation), to further developing skills for palaeopathological data recording and their interpretation and understanding the limitations. In addition, the Themes module aims to develop in students a critical approach to the evaluation of multiple forms of evidence, beyond that for human remains, for the reconstruction of specific themes. It focuses on discussion and debate of different related issues. In Term 2 you will typically attend 4 hours a week of lectures and 2.5 hours of laboratory sessions, in addition to seminars over the term. Again, external speakers specialising in specific subject areas from “industry” and academia are brought in to engage the students on issues in research, but also in the profession.

The move towards greater emphasis on independent learning and research continues in Term 3 and beyond, where the research skills acquired earlier in the programme are developed through the dissertation research project. Under the supervision of a member of academic staff with whom they will typically have three one-to-one supervisory meetings, you will undertake a detailed study of a particular area, resulting in a significant piece of independent research. The dissertation is regarded as a preparation for further professional or academic work. In Term 3 students are given the opportunity to attend a Careers Session in the Department where past graduates of the course talk about their career trajectories since graduating.

Throughout the programme, you will have access to an “academic adviser”, or in the case of this MSc the two Directors (Professor Charlotte Roberts and Dr Rebecca Gowland), who provide you with academic support and guidance. Typically a student meets their adviser two to three times a year, in addition to which all members of teaching staff have weekly office hours when they are available to meet with students on a ‘drop-in’ basis. The department also has an exciting programme of weekly one hour research seminars which postgraduate students are strongly encouraged to attend. Additionally, the students who attend the MSc Palaeopathology course are provided with the opportunity to attend journal paper critique sessions each term, and human bioarchaeology seminars given by PhD students.

Career Opportunities

Many of our postgraduates move into an academic career, either teaching or by taking up post-doctoral research positions in universities. Others join museums or national and regional heritage organisations. Some work in professional archaeology, in national or local planning departments, while others elect to use their analytical and presentation skills to gain positions in industry, commerce and government.



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International Human Rights Law LLM is a unique programme designed to enable students to progress to become human rights practitioners and specialists in this dynamic area of law. Read more

About the course

International Human Rights Law LLM is a unique programme designed to enable students to progress to become human rights practitioners and specialists in this dynamic area of law.

Students will critically engage with many of the human rights issues that feature strongly in public debate today, gaining comprehensive understanding of international human rights law and its interconnection with international criminal and comparative criminal law.

This course places particular emphasis on the radical transformations that international human rights law has experienced since the beginning of the 21st century, with the genesis of the International Criminal Court, the on-going process of the United Nations reform and the post 9/11 shift to a more securitarian approach to criminal process values, especially regarding the war against terror.

The course offers:

A detailed analysis of the theory, history and development of human rights, and an examination of the main regional mechanisms of human rights protection.

An overview of a variety of contemporary human rights topics, including the examination of major developments and recent tendencies in the field of international human rights protection.

Analysis of contemporary topics and challenges of international human rights protection including:
the emergence of the right to development and the so-called third- generation rights;
human rights advocacy and global governance though NGOs and non-State actors;
the crystallisation of group rights, minorities and indigenous peoples’ rights;
the challenges posed to international human rights law by international migration and the enhanced need of protection of migrants, asylum seekers and refugees;
women’s rights and the rights of the child, including protection against victims of human trafficking;
the crystallisation of general equality and the development of human rights advocacy for sexual and gay rights.

Brunel Law School has an excellent reputation in this field. The International Human Rights Law Review - a peer-reviewed international journal - is edited at Brunel Law School. The School is able to attract a number of leading guest speakers to support further debate and learning’s around the complexity of human rights, and provides students with a wider variety of perspectives particularly in the international context.

The programme is available full-time:
September (12 months)
January (15 months due to dissertation submission requirements)

And also part-time:
September (24 months)
January (27 months due to dissertation submission requirements)

The course is aimed at graduates from all over the world who are keen to develop an expertise in the evolving discipline and develop a career in international human rights law.

Aims

You will develop an expertise in the corpus and complexities of international human rights law.

You will acquire critical and analytical skills in the complex field of international human rights law.

You will be able to demonstrate through original research the application of knowledge, practical understanding and critical appreciation that can contribute to the discourse on international human rights law.

You will gain professional skills required to develop a career in international human rights law.

You will gain detailed knowledge of the European system of human rights protection in particular, both at a theoretical and practical level, including the ability to handle cases before the European Court of Human Rights.

Course Content

The LLM consists of both compulsory and optional modules, a typical selection can be found below. Modules can vary from year to year, but these offer a good idea of what we teach.

Compulsory modules:

Term I

European System of Human Rights Protection (15 credits) 1 or 2
Foundations of International Human Rights Law (15 credits) 1 or 2

Term II

Theory and Practice of International Human Rights (15 credits) 1
Regional Systems of Human Rights Protection: America, Africa, Asia (15 credits) 1

Optional modules:

Term I

International Human Rights and Islamic Law (15 credits) 2
Public International Law (15 credits) 1 or 2
International Humanitarian Law 2
Multiculturalism and Human Rights (15 credits) 2
International Criminal Law (15 credits) 2

Term II

International Environmental Law (15 credits) 2
Corporate Governance and Corporate Social Responsibility (15 credits) 2
World Trade Organisation (WTO) abd Human Rights Law (15 credits) 2
Human Rights of Women (15 credits) 2
Counter-terrorism and Human Rights (15 credits) 2

** The superscript 1 or 2 indicates which year of study each module will normally take place in for part-time students.

Assessment

The faculty places great emphasis on the creation of a unique learning experience. In addition to attending seminars and preparing coursework and exams, students will also learn by participating in research centre activities and research trips, contributing to newsletters, making oral presentations, attending law film screenings as well as participating in debating events and reading group sessions.

Assessment methods in this programme range from coursework, seen examinations and a dissertation (15,000 words) to oral presentations and assessment by contribution in seminars.

Special Features

Research Centres
The Law School benefits from active research centres which regularly host research seminars and workshops. Many of these have been on the topic of international human rights. In the most recent Research Excellence Framework (REF2014) we were ranked 14th in the UK for REF Intensity in Law.

Extra-curricular Activities
The Law School offers students numerous opportunities to participate in extra-curricular activities, including a Reading Group, a Law Film society, mooting and debating societies and research workshops organized by the research centres based at the school. LLM students are expected to play a leading role organising and participating in these activities.

Research Skills
The Law School offers an elaborate scheme of research and writing skills sessions designed to facilitate students’ learning and to equip them with appropriate transferable skills.
Some of the modules in this programme also integrate skills training, for example on how to answer essay questions, make use of electronic legal databases and cite legal authorities.

Career Support
Students benefit from the university's award winning 'Professional Development Centre' which offers specialist workshops, interview skills, and one-to-one advice sessions to help prepare graduates for their chosen career.

Teaching Expertise
Brunel Law School has an excellent reputation in this field. The International Human Rights Law Review - a peer-reviewed international journal - is edited at Brunel Law School. The school is able to attract a number of leading guest speakers to support further debate and learnings around the complexity of human rights, and provides students with a wider variety of perspectives particularly in the international context.
This is a challenging programme that is at the forefront of thinking in International Human Rights Law. It is taught by leading academics with a wide range of expertise in human rights practice, policy, activism and governmental, international and non-governmental organisations. As a result, the programme is research-led, and some of the reading required for the programme is based on books published by our academics.

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Drawing on the School’s research expertise, the MSc in Air Transport Management provides you with a degree that is both intellectually rigorous and up-to-date. Read more

Drawing on the School’s research expertise, the MSc in Air Transport Management provides you with a degree that is both intellectually rigorous and up-to-date.

You will learn to critically evaluate all aspects of air transport management, and have the opportunity to analyse and debate theoretical and applied knowledge in the management, operation, organisation and provision of airlines and airports.

Built with an international perspective, the programme offers an in-depth education in the fundamental elements of air transport management. You will also study a range of relevant areas that will enhance and accelerate your career in the air transport industry.

Programme structure

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year and part-time over two academic years. It consists of eight taught modules and a dissertation.

Example module listing

The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.

Educational aims of the programme

The aims of the new programme are to provide:

  • A high quality education, which is intellectually rigorous and up-to-date, as well as relevant to the needs of future managers, executives and professionals in the air transport industry
  • A business management orientation related to the air transport industry and draw on a range of cognate areas of study to explain and analyse this particular sector
  • An integrated approach so as to provide a coherent view that explores the interrelationships between the various components of the programme
  • An international perspective both in scope and coverage
  • Up to date information that draws on the stimulus of the School’s recent research activities
  • Students with the basis for developing their own approach to learning and personal development

Programme learning outcomes

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes in the following areas:

  • Critically evaluate the development, characteristics, issues and influences relevant to air transport management
  • Analyse and debate theoretical and applied knowledge in the management, operation, organisation and provision of airlines and airports
  • Evaluate critically a wide range of approaches and techniques relevant to the strategic management of airlines and airports
  • Demonstrate an in-depth understanding of the fundamental elements of airline and airport business management

A student would be expected:

  • To evaluate critically the complex interrelationships of regulatory, commercial, technical aspects of the air transport industry
  • To demonstrate the ability to work within teams to solve practical problems pertaining to the technical, operational and commercial aspects of the air transport industry
  • To evaluate outcomes and accurately assess/report on their own/others work with justification and relate them to existing knowledge structures and methodologies
  • To demonstrate high level learning and problem solving skills
  • To conduct research and produce a high quality report: this includes the ability to select, define and focus upon and issue at an appropriate level; to develop and apply relevant and sound methodologies; to analyse the issue; to develop recommendations and logical conclusions; to be aware of the limitations of research work
  • To identify modifications to existing knowledge structures and theoretical frameworks and to propose new areas for investigations/ new problems / new or alternative applications and methodological approaches
  • To display a range of skills relevant to the needs of existing and future managers, executives and professionals irrespective of their sector of operation, particularly in the areas of analysis and synthesis, communication and presentation skills, computing skills, critical reasoning, data analysis, organisation and planning, report and essay writing skills, interactive and group skills, research skills
  • To handle ethical dilemmas likely to arise in management, research and professional practice and to formulate solutions in dialogue with peers, clients, mentors and others

Knowledge and understanding

  • Critically evaluate the development, characteristics, issues and influences relevant to air transport management
  • Analyse and debate theoretical and applied knowledge in the management, operation, organisation and provision of air transport
  • Evaluate critically a wide range of approaches and techniques relevant to the management of the air transport industry
  • Evaluate outcomes and accurately assess/report on their own/others work with justification and relate them to existing knowledge structures and methodologies

Intellectual / cognitive skills

  • Demonstrate high level learning and problem solving skills
  • Conduct research and produce a high quality report: this includes the ability to select, define and focus upon and issue at an appropriate level; to develop and apply relevant and sound methodologies; to analyse the issue; to develop recommendations and logical conclusions; to be aware of the limitations of research work
  • Identify modifications to existing knowledge structures and theoretical frameworks and to propose new areas for investigations/ new problems / new or alternative applications and methodological approaches

Professional practical skills

Handle ethical dilemmas likely to arise in management, research and professional practice and to formulate solutions in dialogue with peers, clients, mentors and others.

Key / transferable skills

Display a range of skills relevant to the needs of existing and future managers, executives and professionals irrespective of their sector of operation, particularly in the areas of:

  • Analysis and synthesis
  • Communication and presentation skills
  • Computing skills
  • Critical reasoning
  • Data analysis
  • Organisation and planning
  • Report and essay writing skills
  • Interactive and group skills
  • Research skills

Global opportunities

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.



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The M.A. program provides for two options. The minimum credit requirement for either option is 30. 1. 27 credits of course work in FREN numbered above 500, up to 6 of which may be drawn from 400-level undergraduate courses in literature or linguistics given in French. Read more

M.A. Program in French

The M.A. program provides for two options. The minimum credit requirement for either option is 30.

M.A. without Thesis

1. 27 credits of course work in FREN numbered above 500, up to 6 of which may be drawn from 400-level undergraduate courses in literature or linguistics given in French.
2. French 548 (3), a Graduating Essay written in French. The length of the graduating essay should be approximately 40 pages, including the bibliography. It may be based on a paper submitted for a graduate course, but thoroughly revised and expanded.
3. A one-hour oral examination, normally conducted in the target language, based on the graduating essay and the student's overall graduate program.
4. Regular attendance in the French Research Seminar is mandatory and active participation and debate are expected.

M.A. with Thesis

1. 24 credits of course work in FREN numbered above 500, up to 6 of which may be drawn from 400-level undergraduate courses in literature or linguistics given in French.
2. French 599 (6) a Master’s Thesis written in either French or English. The length of the M.A. thesis should be approximately 80 pages including the bibliography.
3. A one-and-a-half hour oral thesis defence normally conducted in the target language.
4. Regular attendance in the French Research Seminar is mandatory and active participation and debate are expected.

M.A. candidates in French who are interested primarily in Linguistics may write a thesis on an aspect of French Linguistics and will be permitted, after consultation with the Graduate Advisor, to supplement the Linguistics courses offered in the Department itself by taking courses elsewhere at UBC (in the Department of Linguistics or the Faculty of Education, for example), or at other universities under the Western Deans' Agreement.
Only a concentration in linguistics is possible, however, and students specializing in this area will be required to take some courses in French Literature to complete their Master’s program.

Time for Completion of Program

The maximum time permitted for the completion of a Master’s Program is five years. In certain circumstances, it is possible to complete the M.A. in a twelve-month period. The maximum period of financial support for full-time study in the M.A. program is two years. The program is available to students on either a full-time or a part-time basis. There is no formal residence requirement.

Quick Facts

- Degree: Master of Arts
- Specialization: French
- Subject: Arts, Social Sciences and Humanities
- Mode of delivery: On campus
- Program components: Coursework + Options
- Faculty: Faculty of Arts

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The graduate program in Hispanic Studies offers opportunities for advanced study in the literatures of Spain and Spanish America, leading to the Ph.D and to the M.A. Read more

Program Overview

The graduate program in Hispanic Studies offers opportunities for advanced study in the literatures of Spain and Spanish America, leading to the Ph.D and to the M.A. (with or without thesis).

The UBC Library has extensive holdings in all areas of Hispanic studies, with particularly strong holdings in periodicals and Latin-American studies, in both Spanish and Portuguese. The Department has a reading room for graduate students, containing basic texts, scholarly collections, and reference works.

The program makes available a list of courses to be offered as early as possible, usually in February of the preceding academic year.

The M.A. program provides for two options. The minimum credit requirement for either option is 30.

M.A. without Thesis
1. 27 credits of course work in SPAN numbered above 500, up to 6 of which may be drawn from 400-level undergraduate courses in Spanish.
2. Spanish 548 (3), a Graduating Essay written in Spanish. The length of the graduating essay should be approximately 40 pages, including the bibliography. It may be based on a paper submitted for a graduate course, but thoroughly revised and expanded.
3. A one-hour oral examination, normally conducted in the target language, based on the graduating essay and the student’s overall graduate program.
4. Regular attendance in the Hispanic Studies Research Seminar is mandatory and active participation and debate are expected.

M.A. with Thesis
1. 24 credits of course work in SPAN numbered above 500, up to 6 of which may be drawn from 400-level undergraduate courses in Spanish.
2. Spanish 549 (6), a Master’s Thesis written in Spanish, English or French. The length of the M.A. thesis should be approximately 80 pages including the bibliography.
3. A one-and-a-half hour oral thesis defence normally conducted in the target language.
4. Regular attendance in the Hispanic Studies Research Seminar is mandatory and active participation and debate are expected.

Quick Facts

- Degree: Master of Arts
- Specialization: Hispanic Studies
- Subject: Arts, Social Sciences and Humanities
- Mode of delivery: On campus
- Program components: Coursework + Options
- Faculty: Faculty of Arts

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As a student on this programme you will develop your practical and professional skills through the use of live projects, contemporary case studies and a strategic marketing planning simulation. Read more

As a student on this programme you will develop your practical and professional skills through the use of live projects, contemporary case studies and a strategic marketing planning simulation. In addition, there will be regular inputs from industry experts and leading academics in the field, which will ensure that you are exposed to the latest industry and academic thinking – all of which lead to career readiness.

Throughout the programme you will be encouraged to practise the marketing skills you have developed and also to apply the latest international marketing knowledge to a range of live projects and through simulation activity. One of the major pedagogic differences of the York St John University International Marketing programme is that on the module Project Management you will be challenged to apply what you have learnt throughout your studies within a multidisciplinary team of students whilst working with an organisation.

You will complete a module of independent study which is titled the Research Investigation. This module provides you with the opportunity to investigate in depth an area of particular interest to you that links with your programme of study. You will be supported in conducting this research by an academic from your field of interest. To support you in being able to conduct this work there is a module called Researching Contemporary Business Issues. This module provides you with the opportunity to engage with current academic and practitioner business debate and encourages you to explore a range of relevant business topics. The module has been designed in such a way that it promotes a multi-disciplinary approach, for example, you will receive input from a variety of disciplines (business and non-business) thus allowing you to see business issues from a variety of perspectives.

Course structure

This programme aims to:

  • develop your knowledge of key areas in marketing, centring on strategic marketing, brand management, consumer behaviour, marketing communications and digital marketing, to provide the knowledge and skills necessary to develop and implement a strategic marketing plan / digital marketing strategy
  • develop a critical, reflective and integrated understanding of contemporary issues in marketing, policies and practices relating to the principles of responsible leadership, management, corporate social responsibility and sustainability
  • offer in depth insights into marketing activities and strategies of international organisations from the private, public and third sectors
  • provide advanced study of the key concepts of marketing, the management of customers, consumers, competition and communication within a changing global context
  • understand the importance of strategic marketing and its overall contribution to the strategic shape of the organisation, within a complex global environment
  • enable you to critically appraise key academic research in marketing and consumer research.

Modules may include:

  • Researching Contemporary Business Issues
  • Business & Sustainability
  • Consumer Behaviour
  • Strategic Brand Management
  • Strategic Marketing Planning
  • Marketing Communications
  • Digital Marketing
  • Project Management
  • Research Investigation

Teaching, learning and assessment

All modules are delivered utilising a range of teaching, learning and assessment strategies including lectures, seminars, a guest speaker programme, tutorials, workshops and global café style learning activities. Each module tutor will adopt the best practices to facilitate your learning and development.

All taught contact sessions at York Business School are supported by a wide range of materials such as online resources. Study beyond the classroom reinforces and prepares you for the classroom delivered contact sessions, as well as directing and encouraging supported open learning and independent learning. Each module has a Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) where you and other Masters level students will be encouraged to be involved with online debate and collaborative approaches to learning.

All modules listed above are assessed through a programme of work undertaken whilst studying for the MSc International Marketing programme. A range of assessment tools are used including presentations, critical essays, portfolios, live projects, reflective journals and case study work. Each module tutor will provide opportunities for formative assessment feedback to inform your work prior to submission.

You will receive detailed feedback on assessment to help you develop and continuously improve your performance whilst on the programme. Advice will be provided in relation to development, further areas for research and guidance on how to enhance your knowledge of business and practice.

All students of York Business School receive the opportunity for study support including academic writing and research skills to enhance employability and career development in the field of business management.

Programme specification

Further information on this course is available in the programme specification. Please note that the programme specification relates to course content that is currently being studied by students at the University. For new programmes, the programme specification will be made available online prior to the start of the course.

Learning support

York St John University works hard to create an inclusive environment for all our students. We offer a range of learning support services to assist students throughout their studies.



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The MA in Visual Arts and Culture at Durham is a distinctive interdisciplinary programme that invites students to develop their knowledge and understanding of the visual arts and of visual culture. Read more

The MA in Visual Arts and Culture at Durham is a distinctive interdisciplinary programme that invites students to develop their knowledge and understanding of the visual arts and of visual culture. To study visual arts and culture is a way of paying attention to phenomena that are literally everywhere. The concept of ‘visual culture’ acknowledges the pervasive nature of visual phenomena, and signals openness towards both the breadth of objects and images, and the range of theoretical and methodological perspectives needed to understand them adequately. Drawing upon research strengths across the departments that contribute to the programme, the MA in Visual Arts and Culture encourages you to take a broad view of geographical and chronological scope, while allowing you to engage with a wide range of visual phenomena, including fine art, film, photography, architecture, and scientific and medical imaging practices.

The importance of critical visual literacy in the contemporary world cannot be exaggerated. ‘The illiterate of the future’, wrote the Bauhaus artist and theoretician László Moholy-Nagy, ‘will be the person ignorant of the camera as well as of the pen’. This observation was made in the 1920s, when photography was first used in the periodical press and in political propaganda. The rich visual world of the early twentieth century pales in comparison with the visual saturation that now characterises everyday experience throughout the developed societies and much of the developing world. But the study of visual culture is by no means limited to the twentieth century. Turning our attention to past cultures with a particular eye to the significance of visual objects of all kinds yields new forms of knowledge and understanding.

Our programme facilitates the development of critical visual literacy in three main ways. First, it attends to the specificity of visual objects, images and events, encouraging you to develop approaches that are sensitive to the individual works they encounter. Second, it investigates the nature of perception, asking how it is that we make meaning out of that which we see. Finally, it investigates how our relationships with other people, and with things, are bound up in the act of looking.

Course structure

The course consists of one core module, two optional modules and a dissertation. The core module sets out the intellectual framework for the programme, offering a broad overview of key conceptual debates in the field of Visual Culture, together with training in analysis of visual objects of different kinds, an advanced introduction to understanding museum practice, and key research skills in visual arts and culture. The optional modules provide further specialised areas of study in related topics of interest to individual students, and the 12,000-15,000 word dissertation involves detailed study of a particular aspect of a topic related to the broad area of visual culture.

Optional modules

Previously, optional modules have included:

  • Critical Curatorship
  • History, Knowledge and Visual Culture
  • Representing Otherness
  • Negotiating the Human
  • Digital Imaging
  • Cultural Heritage, Communities and Identities
  • Current Issues in Aesthetics and Theory of Art
  • Ethics of Cultural Heritage
  • Monumental architecture of the Roman Empire in the Antonine and Severan periods
  • Art in Ecological Perspective
  • Texts and Cultures I: Visual and Verbal Cultures (Early Modern)
  • Energy, Society and Energy Practices
  • German Reading Skills for Research
  • French Reading Skills for Research

The Centre for Visual Arts and Culture (CVAC) brings together scholars from across and beyond Durham University in order to provide a dynamic setting for wide-ranging interdisciplinary research and debates about visual culture, a field that entails the study of vision and perception, the analysis of the social significance of images and ways of seeing, and the attentive interpretation of a range of visual objects, from artworks to scientific images. 

Centre for Visual Arts and Culture

The Centre brings together scholars from across and beyond Durham University in order to provide a vibrant and dynamic setting for wide-ranging interdisciplinary research and debates about visual culture. The Centre provides a focus for cutting-edge research on visual arts and cultures: it aspires to train new generations of scholars through innovative postgraduate programmes, it fosters informed debate both nationally and internationally, and it offers an engaging, open environment for researchers at all levels.

CVAC takes a generous view of what constitutes visual culture and it is broad in both geographical and chronological scope, encouraging debate about the range of approaches, methods and theories that are most generative for research on visual phenomena. Durham’s current visual culture research includes the study of word and image, art and religion, medicine and visual representation, film, the history of photography, architecture, urban culture, heritage and philosophical aesthetics. It also includes the development of pioneering visual research methods and the study of vision.

Durham’s location itself provides a rich and inspiring environment for this field of research. It is part of the UNESCO World Heritage Site that also includes Durham Cathedral; its acclaimed Oriental Museum is a significant asset which houses three Designated Collections, recognised by the Arts Council as nationally and internationally pre-eminent; alongside an outstanding collection of twentieth-century and contemporary art. CVAC has many established relationships with major national and international cultural organisations, and aims to develop further its links with museums, galleries and heritage sites.

For further information on the Centre see http://www.durham.ac.uk/cvac



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ANALYSING AND TACKLING SOCIAL ISSUES CONCERNING YOUTH, EDUCATION AND SOCIETY. Read more

ANALYSING AND TACKLING SOCIAL ISSUES CONCERNING YOUTH, EDUCATION AND SOCIETY

In our overscheduled society is there still enough time for childrearing? How do families and childrearing change through the use of social media? How can we tackle polarization in multi-ethnic classrooms? What leads to game addiction and inactivity in our society? How do we make our schools inclusive? What do children need to find their own solutions to bullying at school? How do parenting support programs developed in Western countries fit into non-Western communities? How should the new frameworks for youth care in the Netherlands be structured? What can we learn from foreign approaches to education and youth services?

INNOVATION IN PEDAGOGIC SERVICES

Do you want to make a contribution to these contemporary social challenges involving the relationship between children and youth and their guardians/educators? Do you want to help draft new policies that can improve the position, welfare and development of children, youth and their parents? Are you interested in making international comparisons? Youth, Education and Society (Dutch: Maatschappelijke opvoedingsvraagstukken) is the only Master’s programme in the Netherlands that specifically focuses on innovating pedagogical policy and practice, both nationally and internationally.

This one-year, intensive programme will teach you about:

  • the quality of pedagogical and educational services, such as childcare, youth care, schools and sports clubs;
  • how to look at pedagogy from a social perspective;
  • the role of cultural diversity in the transfer of pedagogical knowledge;
  • professional practice in relation to initiatives undertaken by civil society and youth themselves.

DEVELOPING AN INTERNATIONAL VISION

We will also be looking beyond our borders. After all, global developments (such as globalisation, poverty and migration) have had a major impact on the quality of life for children and youth. And we will also be analysing pedagogical services through an international lens:

  • What frameworks are used in setting up youth care in the Netherlands compared to countries outside of Europe?
  • How can the UN’s Convention on the Rights of the Child be given shape in youth policy worldwide?

This programme also devotes attention to international humanitarian cooperation. 

EDUCATION DRIVEN BY RESEARCH AND THE WORK FIELD

This Master’s programme will be led by the professors of Pedagogy, Dr Mariëtte de HaanDr Micha de Winter and Dr Paul Leseman. Together with a team of lecturers representing a variety of expertise in the area of pedagogy, they will teach classes and guide students during their internship and research. Contacts with the field constitute an important seedbed for the programme.

See, for example, a report on the current affairs programme Eenvandaag on Wednesday, 21 January 2015 about young Dutch jihadists in which Micha de Winter (pedagogy professor) is asked why we cannot seem to get a handle on these youth in the Netherlands.

MASTER'S IN YOUTH STUDIES OR SOCIAL CHILDREARING ISSUES?

This Master’s programme has similarities with the Youth Studies Master’s programme (Dutch: Jeugstudies), but mainly considers children and youth from a childrearing and educational perspective, for example at home, at school or via the media. This Master’s is also distinguished from the Master’s in Youth Studies by its so-called community approach. Alongside attention to the role of professionals, this programme focuses on the role of civil society. Critical analysis of the societal debate also typifies this Master’s programme. You will graduate as an educationalist, while those completing the Youth Studies programme will graduate within Interdisciplinary Social Sciences.

MASTER'S IN CLINICAL CHILD, FAMILY AND EDUCATION STUDIES (ORTHOPEDAGOGY)

This programme somewhat overlaps the Master’s programme in Clinical Child, Family and Education Studies (Dutch:Orthopedagogiek) but is distinguished by a broader, more socially-oriented interdisciplinary view on pedagogy. You will graduate as an educationalist and acquire the NVO registration as a general educationalist. Unlike the programme in Clinical Child, Family and Education Studies, you will not focus on clinical issues, diagnostics or deviant behaviour from a need-based perspective but on pedagogy as a broader field oriented to society. This Master’s is also distinguished from the Master’s in Clinical Child, Family and Education Studies due to its so-called community approach. Alongside a focus on the role of professionals and policy, the programme centres on the role of society in childrearing and education. Critical analysis of the societal debate also typifies this Master’s programme.

OBJECTIVE OF THE PROGRAMME

This Master’s will enable you to develop yourself into an academic professional. You will learn to analyse, evaluate and solve practical problems in a theoretical and empirical way.



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We support innovative art research across a range of modes and practices that seek to contribute to wider cultural and artistic fields through original, critical work. Read more

We support innovative art research across a range of modes and practices that seek to contribute to wider cultural and artistic fields through original, critical work.

The Department of Art at Goldsmiths has an international reputation for creativity, innovation, and cultural diversity. Our aim is to facilitate artists, curators and writers to make work and to reflect upon, debate and disseminate individual and collaborative practices, thus contributing to wider artistic culture and debate.

As an MPhil/PhD researcher, you will be contributing to the Department's research culture as well as to the wider Goldsmiths tradition: one that values interdisciplinary approaches to knowledge and understanding, supports inventive new practice and critical work, and contributes to the creation of a dynamic research environment both nationally and internationally.

MPhil/PhD research

The Department of Art supports the development of art research in and through Fine Art, Curating, Art Writing and across disciplines. We consider all elements of the MPhil/PhD to be sites of rigorous experimentation and encourage you to develop your research through processes of making, collaboration, investigation, study, inquiry, trial and error, analysis and speculation.

We understand that your research may change shape and subject matter as you make intertextual and interdisciplinary connections and as relevant modes of artistic, cultural, social, scientific and philosophical production become important to you throughout the course of your research. We work with you as you find the appropriate practice for pursuing your research and related form for consolidating and disseminating your findings.

It is important to note that the MPhil/PhD is not an extension of the MFA. The MFA is a professional degree geared specifically at the development of your art practice. Distinct from this, the MPhil/PhD is a 3-4 year (full-time) or 6-8 year (part-time) research project, the pursuit of which may involve your already-established practice, or require the development new modes of practice specific to the research project.

The PhD is also distinct from ongoing studio practice or a residency in that it asks you to place your work in relation to that of other practitioners, be they artists and other cultural workers, philosophers, sociologists, anthropologists, political scientists, or others; be they in a contemporary and/or historical context. In this respect, the model of the PhD encourages you to follow your curiosity for – and make connections with and between – the thought and action of others.

Another major distinguishing quality of art research is the need to document process. For this, our researchers are encouraged to think expansively about how to do so. How might a process of documentation become a space for reflecting on decisions, however intuitive they are in the first instance? How might this process communicate something of the mode of enquiry that is pursued, as much as of the findings? How might this process, as much as the outcome of the research, reflect the complexity inherent in thinking, making, questioning and communicating art?

MARs

Based in the Department of Art, and linked to the MPhil/PhD Programme, is the Mountain of Art Research (MARs). MARs supports and promotes the development of innovative art research across a range of art practices including - but not limited to - studio, performance, film and video, curatorial, critical, art-writing, situated, participatory and interdisciplinary practice.

Committed to rigorous formal experimentation, maverick conceptual exploration and socially-engaged articulation, MARs emphasises the material ‘stuff’ of art research as much as its speculative possibilities and political imperative.

As both platform and ethos, the aim of MARs is to challenge received ideas and habits; to promote new ways of thinking and being both in and out of this world.

Through MARs we bring together researchers within Art, across disciplines, between institutions and beyond higher education for intentional, concentrated discussion and sharing of research.

Applications 

You will apply with a well-developed idea for an individual research project that you have begun to plan artistically as well as to contextualise with reference to contemporary and historical examples of artworks, exhibitions, designs, social, political and philosophical ideas, etc. 

Programme pathways

Within the overarching programme of MPhil/PhD in Art there are three different pathways for undertaking doctoral research, including:

Pathway 1: Thesis by Practice 

The thesis comprises a substantial body of studio practice, curatorial practice and/or art writing practice, presented as an integrated whole. This is accompanied by a considered form of documentation, as appropriate to the project, and a written component of approximately 20,000-40,000 words for PhD (10,000-20,000 words for MPhil) offering a critical account of the research.

Pathway 2: Thesis by Practice and Written Dissertation 

The thesis comprises a body of studio practice, curatorial practice and/or art writing practice AND a written dissertation of 40,000-80,000 words for PhD (20,000-40,000 for MPhil), presented together as an integrated whole. The thesis will be accompanied by a considered form of documentation, as appropriate to the project.

Pathway 3: Thesis by written dissertation

The thesis comprises a written dissertation of 80,000-100,000 words for PhD (40,000-50,000 words for MPhil), presented as an integrated whole.

Researchers will start on one of these three pathways when they apply and may change to a different option only up until the time of Upgrade.

Skills

Our art programmes aim to equip you with the necessary skills to develop independent thought and confidence in your practice. In addition, these skills are of use in other career paths you may wish to follow.

Careers

Our researchers have been successful in many fields including media, museums, galleries, education, the music business and academia. Many have continued to be successful, practising artists long after graduating, and have won major prizes and exhibited around the world.



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Why study an MA by Dissertation in Art & Design?. MA by Dissertation in Art & Design is designed to help students review, develop and progress their practice as an artist or designer. Read more

Why study an MA by Dissertation in Art & Design?

MA by Dissertation in Art & Design is designed to help students review, develop and progress their practice as an artist or designer. The course has been created to enhance the breadth and depth of students’ artistic abilities and capacities for self-direction and professionalism. It will allow students to develop an individual practice and engender the required excellence to successfully become a creative professional.

Who is the course for?

The MA by Dissertation in Art and Design is for those with art and/or design degrees or related Honours qualifications. These include, for example: fine art, graphic design, illustration, interactive media, networked media, architecture, interior, landscape and garden design, and art history. Students may choose to progress straight from their undergraduate studies or return to their studies after a period of work. As a non-taught postgraduate degree, the MA by Dissertation offers students the opportunity to identify and refine an area of research within an open studio culture of debate and practice led by established practicing artists, curators, theorists and art historians. A portfolio of work and CV are required, together with a letter addressing research interests and reasons for applying.

Course aims

Giving students an intellectually-stimulating and creative environment in which they can further develop their potential as an artist or designer.

Providing teaching and peer-group learning that is both challenging and responsive to student needs.

Providing a place for debate that aids students in becoming increasingly articulate and professional in questioning and improving their works and goals.

Providing practical support and the necessary technical resources for creating works in a range of different media.

Developing a range of transferable skills and the knowledge of how to apply them in the art and design industries.

Delivery and assessment

While the MA by Dissertation is a non-taught postgraduate degree, students benefit from, and contribute to, the dynamism of the studio-based Art and Design courses at Writtle School of Design. Students attend a weekly seminar in which they present their research findings and practice to tutors and fellow students.

Assessment is in three parts: a dissertation, portfolio of practice-based research and an exhibition or final major project that embodies the results of the research carried out.

Dissertation:

The dissertation comprises a written thesis (of up to 10,000 words) which sets out the relationship between the student’s work and the wider field of knowledge/the subject area, addressing the theoretical, historical and critical context of their work.

The Portfolio of Research:

The portfolio of research is a comprehensive body of developmental work that demonstrates an exploratory and reflective approach to an appropriate breadth of media, tools and techniques. The format of this portfolio is agreed with supervisors but may include a blog, journal, sketchbook and/or a collection of sketches and models.

The Final Exhibition:

The public presentation of art and design work is an important aspect of creative professional life and students will be supported in planning, promoting and implementing a public presentation of their work to a professional standard at the end of the course.

Throughout the programme students will engage with the following activities:

Semester one:

• Introduction to Research Methods

• Discussion of texts

• Exhibition visits

• Exploration and reflection on tools, techniques, materials

• Seminars

Semester two:

• Development of work towards final exhibition or major project

• Discussion of texts

• Exhibition visits

• Seminars

Spring-Summer:

• Dissertation – supported by seminars and tutorials

Career prospects

Career possibilities for art and design graduates have increased over recent years, reflecting the burgeoning opportunities within the cultural sector in the UK and internationally. Graduates work as professional artists, filmmakers, graphic designers, game designers, curators, and gallery professionals in public and private galleries. They also write for magazines, newspapers and journals on a whole variety of cultural topics. Other career opportunities for MA graduates include residency programmes, community-led outreach work and teaching art or design. Students who are on our MA programme may already be professional artists or designers who wish to reinvigorate and refocus their practice.

To find out more about our careers guidance, please see here: http://www.writtle.ac.uk/Careers



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