• University of Edinburgh Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Oxford Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Bristol Featured Masters Courses
  • Goldsmiths, University of London Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Derby Online Learning Featured Masters Courses
  • Swansea University Featured Masters Courses
  • Jacobs University Bremen gGmbH Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Southampton Featured Masters Courses
Nottingham Trent University Featured Masters Courses
Cass Business School Featured Masters Courses
Vlerick Business School Featured Masters Courses
Leeds Beckett University Featured Masters Courses
Bath Spa University Featured Masters Courses
"debate"×
0 miles

Masters Degrees (Debate)

We have 844 Masters Degrees (Debate)

  • "debate" ×
  • clear all
Showing 1 to 15 of 844
Order by 
Introduction. In literature as in politics, Scotland’s national status ‘is both dangled before us and tantalisingly withheld’ . Read more

Introduction

In literature as in politics, Scotland’s national status ‘is both dangled before us and tantalisingly withheld’ (Don Paterson)

The Stirling Masters course views Scottish Literature in the light of this ambiguity, and embraces the many questions it invites us to explore. We explore key figures, texts and debates from the period of Regal Union (1603) to the present, often placing literary writing at the heart of cultural and political debate. Class discussion examines the complex means by which national literary identity is sustained, renewed and re-considered – not forgetting the role of novelists and poets in integrating Scottish identity into the project of Britishness.

This is the only Masters course of its kind. As debate intensifies over Scotland’s cultural and political identity, the time is ripe to examine the role of writing in shaping the image and reality of the nation.

Key information

- Degree type: MLitt, Postgraduate Certificate, Postgraduate Diploma

- Study methods: Full-time, Part-time

- Duration: Full-time: MLitt-12 months, PG Diploma-9 months, PG Certificate 4 months Part-time: MLitt 27 months, PG Diploma-21 months, PG Certificate-9 months

- Start date: September

- Course Director: Dr Scott Hames and Dr Suzanne Gilbert

Course objectives

Ranging across four centuries of the Scottish literary imagination, this course explores key figures, texts and debates from the period of Regal Union (1603) to the present, often placing literary writing at the heart of cultural and political debate.

We examine a full range of writers, texts and debates from the early modern period to the present, including the works of Robert Burns, Walter Scott and James Hogg, right through to contemporary authors such as James Kelman, Janice Galloway and Kathleen Jamie (and not forgetting Robert Louis Stevenson, Nan Shepherd, Muriel Spark, and too many others to mention). The programme has an emphasis on critical debate, and questions some of the assumptions that go along with studying a national literary tradition.

No previous experience in studying Scottish Literature is required. Leading Scottish writers and critics feature prominently in assigned reading, alongside key insights from book history, literary criticism and political theory.

English language requirements

If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills:

- IELTS: 6.0 with 5.5 minimum in each skill

- Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C

- Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade C

- Pearson Test of English (Academic): 54 with 51 in each component

- IBT TOEFL: 80 with no subtest less than 17

For more information go to English language requirements https://www.stir.ac.uk/study-in-the-uk/entry-requirements/english/

If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. View the range of pre-sessional courses http://www.intohigher.com/uk/en-gb/our-centres/into-university-of-stirling/studying/our-courses/course-list/pre-sessional-english.aspx .

Delivery and assessment

Dissertation

The most significant piece of work on the course will be a dissertation of 15,000 words, written during the summer on a subject of your choosing in consultation with a member of teaching staff. You may choose to develop work initiated on one of the modules you have studied. Those who do not embark on the dissertation may be awarded a Diploma. The work of the best students completing the course may be deemed worthy of an MLitt with Distinction.

REF2014

In REF2014 Stirling was placed 6th in Scotland and 45th in the UK with almost three quarters of research activity rated either world-leading or internationally excellent.

Rating

Over half of our submissions in the latest Research Assessment Exercise (RAE) were found to be ‘Internationally Excellent’ or ‘World-leading’.



Read less
Palaeopathology is the study of past disease in human remains; it is a sub-discipline of bioarchaeology (study of human remains from archaeological sites). Read more

Palaeopathology is the study of past disease in human remains; it is a sub-discipline of bioarchaeology (study of human remains from archaeological sites). This lecture, seminar and laboratory based MSc equips you with the theoretical and practical skills knowledge of how to study and interpret data collected from human remains. The emphasis is on health and well-being using a multidisciplinary approach, linking biological evidence for disease with cultural data (the bioarchaeological approach). This course is unique in the world and it takes a holistic view of disease, as seen in a clinical contexts today, and will prepare you for undertaking significant research projects in this subject, or working in contract/commercial archaeology, and many other fields. It is aimed at graduates mainly in archaeology and anthropology with or without past experience of knowledge in this field, and for those who aspire to continue into a PhD programme or work in contract archaeology. However, past students have come from a variety of subject backgrounds, and destination data illustrate a wide range of employments take these students.

Course Structure

Two taught modules in the Epiphany term (Research and Study Skills in Archaeological Science and Identification and Analysis of the Normal Human Skeleton), and two taught modules in Michaelmas term (Palaeopathology: Theory and Method; Themes in Palaeopathology), with the double module dissertation over Easter term and the summer (submitted early September).

Core Modules

  • Research and Study Skills in Archaeological Science
  • Identification and Analysis of the Normal Human Skeleton
  • Palaeopathology: Theory and Method
  • Themes in Palaeopathology
  • Dissertation (double module).

Course Learning and Teaching

The programme is mainly delivered through a mixture of lectures, seminars and practical classes. Typically lectures provide key information on a particular area, and identify the main areas for discussion and debate in bioarchaeology. Seminars then provide opportunities for smaller groups of you to discuss and debate particular issues or areas, based on the knowledge that you have gained through your lectures and through independent study outside the programme’s formal contact hours. Finally, practical laboratory classes allow you to gain direct practical skills in the recording and interpretation of data from skeletal remains. The latter provide an important element of the programme in allowing independent and group work, as well as hands-on experience under laboratory conditions, essential for a potential future working environment.

The balance of these types of activities changes over the course of the programme, as you develop your knowledge and ability as independent learners, giving them the opportunity to engage in research, professional practice, and developing and demonstrating research skills in a particular area of the subject.

In Term 1 you will typically attend 4 hours a week of lectures and 2.5 hours of laboratory sessions, in addition to seminars over the term. Outside timetabled contact hours, you are also expected to undertake your own independent study to prepare for your classes and broaden your subject knowledge. External speakers specialising in specific subject areas from “industry” and academia are brought in to engage the students on issues in research, but also in the profession.

In Term 2 the balance shifts from learning the basic skills required for recording and interpreting skeletal data (age at death, sex, normal variation), to further developing skills for palaeopathological data recording and their interpretation and understanding the limitations. In addition, the Themes module aims to develop in students a critical approach to the evaluation of multiple forms of evidence, beyond that for human remains, for the reconstruction of specific themes. It focuses on discussion and debate of different related issues. In Term 2 you will typically attend 4 hours a week of lectures and 2.5 hours of laboratory sessions, in addition to seminars over the term. Again, external speakers specialising in specific subject areas from “industry” and academia are brought in to engage the students on issues in research, but also in the profession.

The move towards greater emphasis on independent learning and research continues in Term 3 and beyond, where the research skills acquired earlier in the programme are developed through the dissertation research project. Under the supervision of a member of academic staff with whom they will typically have three one-to-one supervisory meetings, you will undertake a detailed study of a particular area, resulting in a significant piece of independent research. The dissertation is regarded as a preparation for further professional or academic work. In Term 3 students are given the opportunity to attend a Careers Session in the Department where past graduates of the course talk about their career trajectories since graduating.

Throughout the programme, you will have access to an “academic adviser”, or in the case of this MSc the two Directors (Professor Charlotte Roberts and Dr Rebecca Gowland), who provide you with academic support and guidance. Typically a student meets their adviser two to three times a year, in addition to which all members of teaching staff have weekly office hours when they are available to meet with students on a ‘drop-in’ basis. The department also has an exciting programme of weekly one hour research seminars which postgraduate students are strongly encouraged to attend. Additionally, the students who attend the MSc Palaeopathology course are provided with the opportunity to attend journal paper critique sessions each term, and human bioarchaeology seminars given by PhD students.

Career Opportunities

Many of our postgraduates move into an academic career, either teaching or by taking up post-doctoral research positions in universities. Others join museums or national and regional heritage organisations. Some work in professional archaeology, in national or local planning departments, while others elect to use their analytical and presentation skills to gain positions in industry, commerce and government.



Read less
International Human Rights Law LLM is a unique programme designed to enable students to progress to become human rights practitioners and specialists in this dynamic area of law. Read more

About the course

International Human Rights Law LLM is a unique programme designed to enable students to progress to become human rights practitioners and specialists in this dynamic area of law.

Students will critically engage with many of the human rights issues that feature strongly in public debate today, gaining comprehensive understanding of international human rights law and its interconnection with international criminal and comparative criminal law.

This course places particular emphasis on the radical transformations that international human rights law has experienced since the beginning of the 21st century, with the genesis of the International Criminal Court, the on-going process of the United Nations reform and the post 9/11 shift to a more securitarian approach to criminal process values, especially regarding the war against terror.

The course offers:

A detailed analysis of the theory, history and development of human rights, and an examination of the main regional mechanisms of human rights protection.

An overview of a variety of contemporary human rights topics, including the examination of major developments and recent tendencies in the field of international human rights protection.

Analysis of contemporary topics and challenges of international human rights protection including:
the emergence of the right to development and the so-called third- generation rights;
human rights advocacy and global governance though NGOs and non-State actors;
the crystallisation of group rights, minorities and indigenous peoples’ rights;
the challenges posed to international human rights law by international migration and the enhanced need of protection of migrants, asylum seekers and refugees;
women’s rights and the rights of the child, including protection against victims of human trafficking;
the crystallisation of general equality and the development of human rights advocacy for sexual and gay rights.

Brunel Law School has an excellent reputation in this field. The International Human Rights Law Review - a peer-reviewed international journal - is edited at Brunel Law School. The School is able to attract a number of leading guest speakers to support further debate and learning’s around the complexity of human rights, and provides students with a wider variety of perspectives particularly in the international context.

The programme is available full-time:
September (12 months)
January (15 months due to dissertation submission requirements)

And also part-time:
September (24 months)
January (27 months due to dissertation submission requirements)

The course is aimed at graduates from all over the world who are keen to develop an expertise in the evolving discipline and develop a career in international human rights law.

Aims

You will develop an expertise in the corpus and complexities of international human rights law.

You will acquire critical and analytical skills in the complex field of international human rights law.

You will be able to demonstrate through original research the application of knowledge, practical understanding and critical appreciation that can contribute to the discourse on international human rights law.

You will gain professional skills required to develop a career in international human rights law.

You will gain detailed knowledge of the European system of human rights protection in particular, both at a theoretical and practical level, including the ability to handle cases before the European Court of Human Rights.

Course Content

The LLM consists of both compulsory and optional modules, a typical selection can be found below. Modules can vary from year to year, but these offer a good idea of what we teach.

Compulsory modules:

Term I

European System of Human Rights Protection (15 credits) 1 or 2
Foundations of International Human Rights Law (15 credits) 1 or 2

Term II

Theory and Practice of International Human Rights (15 credits) 1
Regional Systems of Human Rights Protection: America, Africa, Asia (15 credits) 1

Optional modules:

Term I

International Human Rights and Islamic Law (15 credits) 2
Public International Law (15 credits) 1 or 2
International Humanitarian Law 2
Multiculturalism and Human Rights (15 credits) 2
International Criminal Law (15 credits) 2

Term II

International Environmental Law (15 credits) 2
Corporate Governance and Corporate Social Responsibility (15 credits) 2
World Trade Organisation (WTO) abd Human Rights Law (15 credits) 2
Human Rights of Women (15 credits) 2
Counter-terrorism and Human Rights (15 credits) 2

** The superscript 1 or 2 indicates which year of study each module will normally take place in for part-time students.

Assessment

The faculty places great emphasis on the creation of a unique learning experience. In addition to attending seminars and preparing coursework and exams, students will also learn by participating in research centre activities and research trips, contributing to newsletters, making oral presentations, attending law film screenings as well as participating in debating events and reading group sessions.

Assessment methods in this programme range from coursework, seen examinations and a dissertation (15,000 words) to oral presentations and assessment by contribution in seminars.

Special Features

Research Centres
The Law School benefits from active research centres which regularly host research seminars and workshops. Many of these have been on the topic of international human rights. In the most recent Research Excellence Framework (REF2014) we were ranked 14th in the UK for REF Intensity in Law.

Extra-curricular Activities
The Law School offers students numerous opportunities to participate in extra-curricular activities, including a Reading Group, a Law Film society, mooting and debating societies and research workshops organized by the research centres based at the school. LLM students are expected to play a leading role organising and participating in these activities.

Research Skills
The Law School offers an elaborate scheme of research and writing skills sessions designed to facilitate students’ learning and to equip them with appropriate transferable skills.
Some of the modules in this programme also integrate skills training, for example on how to answer essay questions, make use of electronic legal databases and cite legal authorities.

Career Support
Students benefit from the university's award winning 'Professional Development Centre' which offers specialist workshops, interview skills, and one-to-one advice sessions to help prepare graduates for their chosen career.

Teaching Expertise
Brunel Law School has an excellent reputation in this field. The International Human Rights Law Review - a peer-reviewed international journal - is edited at Brunel Law School. The school is able to attract a number of leading guest speakers to support further debate and learnings around the complexity of human rights, and provides students with a wider variety of perspectives particularly in the international context.
This is a challenging programme that is at the forefront of thinking in International Human Rights Law. It is taught by leading academics with a wide range of expertise in human rights practice, policy, activism and governmental, international and non-governmental organisations. As a result, the programme is research-led, and some of the reading required for the programme is based on books published by our academics.

Read less
Drawing on the School’s research expertise, the MSc in Air Transport Management provides you with a degree that is both intellectually rigorous and up-to-date. Read more

Drawing on the School’s research expertise, the MSc in Air Transport Management provides you with a degree that is both intellectually rigorous and up-to-date.

You will learn to critically evaluate all aspects of air transport management, and have the opportunity to analyse and debate theoretical and applied knowledge in the management, operation, organisation and provision of airlines and airports.

Built with an international perspective, the programme offers an in-depth education in the fundamental elements of air transport management. You will also study a range of relevant areas that will enhance and accelerate your career in the air transport industry.

Programme structure

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year and part-time over two academic years. It consists of eight taught modules and a dissertation.

Example module listing

The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.

Educational aims of the programme

The aims of the new programme are to provide:

  • A high quality education, which is intellectually rigorous and up-to-date, as well as relevant to the needs of future managers, executives and professionals in the air transport industry
  • A business management orientation related to the air transport industry and draw on a range of cognate areas of study to explain and analyse this particular sector
  • An integrated approach so as to provide a coherent view that explores the interrelationships between the various components of the programme
  • An international perspective both in scope and coverage
  • Up to date information that draws on the stimulus of the School’s recent research activities
  • Students with the basis for developing their own approach to learning and personal development

Programme learning outcomes

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes in the following areas:

  • Critically evaluate the development, characteristics, issues and influences relevant to air transport management
  • Analyse and debate theoretical and applied knowledge in the management, operation, organisation and provision of airlines and airports
  • Evaluate critically a wide range of approaches and techniques relevant to the strategic management of airlines and airports
  • Demonstrate an in-depth understanding of the fundamental elements of airline and airport business management

A student would be expected:

  • To evaluate critically the complex interrelationships of regulatory, commercial, technical aspects of the air transport industry
  • To demonstrate the ability to work within teams to solve practical problems pertaining to the technical, operational and commercial aspects of the air transport industry
  • To evaluate outcomes and accurately assess/report on their own/others work with justification and relate them to existing knowledge structures and methodologies
  • To demonstrate high level learning and problem solving skills
  • To conduct research and produce a high quality report: this includes the ability to select, define and focus upon and issue at an appropriate level; to develop and apply relevant and sound methodologies; to analyse the issue; to develop recommendations and logical conclusions; to be aware of the limitations of research work
  • To identify modifications to existing knowledge structures and theoretical frameworks and to propose new areas for investigations/ new problems / new or alternative applications and methodological approaches
  • To display a range of skills relevant to the needs of existing and future managers, executives and professionals irrespective of their sector of operation, particularly in the areas of analysis and synthesis, communication and presentation skills, computing skills, critical reasoning, data analysis, organisation and planning, report and essay writing skills, interactive and group skills, research skills
  • To handle ethical dilemmas likely to arise in management, research and professional practice and to formulate solutions in dialogue with peers, clients, mentors and others

Knowledge and understanding

  • Critically evaluate the development, characteristics, issues and influences relevant to air transport management
  • Analyse and debate theoretical and applied knowledge in the management, operation, organisation and provision of air transport
  • Evaluate critically a wide range of approaches and techniques relevant to the management of the air transport industry
  • Evaluate outcomes and accurately assess/report on their own/others work with justification and relate them to existing knowledge structures and methodologies

Intellectual / cognitive skills

  • Demonstrate high level learning and problem solving skills
  • Conduct research and produce a high quality report: this includes the ability to select, define and focus upon and issue at an appropriate level; to develop and apply relevant and sound methodologies; to analyse the issue; to develop recommendations and logical conclusions; to be aware of the limitations of research work
  • Identify modifications to existing knowledge structures and theoretical frameworks and to propose new areas for investigations/ new problems / new or alternative applications and methodological approaches

Professional practical skills

Handle ethical dilemmas likely to arise in management, research and professional practice and to formulate solutions in dialogue with peers, clients, mentors and others.

Key / transferable skills

Display a range of skills relevant to the needs of existing and future managers, executives and professionals irrespective of their sector of operation, particularly in the areas of:

  • Analysis and synthesis
  • Communication and presentation skills
  • Computing skills
  • Critical reasoning
  • Data analysis
  • Organisation and planning
  • Report and essay writing skills
  • Interactive and group skills
  • Research skills

Global opportunities

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.



Read less
Architectural conservation - the action of conserving built heritage while maintaining its values - is practiced differently across the world; sometimes not at all due to cultural and economic constraints. Read more

Why this course?

Architectural conservation - the action of conserving built heritage while maintaining its values - is practiced differently across the world; sometimes not at all due to cultural and economic constraints.

It is an emerging area of work which requires specialist training and knowledge to deal with its multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary nature. It also requires the development of a critical approach for the analysis and design of the intervention, informed by the shared international principles and the specific nature and context of the historic building to be conserved.

We need to attract new talent to the field of architectural conservation. To work with historic buildings is an enriching experience, which combines the creative aspects of designing a new building with the in-depth research required to understand in full the building and its context. Working with historic buildings is also a great training to improve the design of new buildings, as you learn a great deal about the importance of design ideas, innovation, durability and care. It is also a very sociable work, interacting with a variety of people from all backgrounds, joining forces in helping current generations to enjoy historic buildings, to create community identities around them, and to transmit the buildings and their values to the future.

Glasgow and its surrounding area provide an excellent location for the course, with architectural heritage from all periods, from Roman to Medieval, Georgian, Victorian and contemporary, without forgetting the better known C. R. Mackintosh and Alexander ‘Greek’ Thomson’s buildings. Strathclyde has a lively international community of staff and students and we enjoy a privileged position in the centre of Glasgow.

Study mode and duration:
- MSc: 12 months full-time; 24 months part-time
- PgDip: 9 months full-time; 18 months part-time
- PgCert: 5 months full-time; 9 months part-time

See the website https://www.strath.ac.uk/courses/postgraduatetaught/architecturaldesignfortheconservationofbuiltheritage/

You’ll study

The course is a platform for:
- collaboration with both practice and research partners
- architectural critique
- discussion and debate

All full-time students take instructional classes and a design project in the first two semesters. MSc students then complete a dissertation project.

Compulsory taught classes are delivered intensively, making them more accessible to part-time students and Continuing Professional Development (CPD). Areas explored in classes include:
- theory
- history
- survey
- investigations
- legislation
- materials
- structures

The course is informed by the outcomes of the research being carried out at the Architectural Design and Conservation Research Unit (ADCRU). It is a platform for collaboration with both practice and research partners; architectural critique, discussion and debate are fundamental parts of the course.

Open Access

Open Access modules are offered on individual modules from the MSc programme. They can be taken as stand-alone CPD options or gradually built towards a qualification.

Open Access students may transfer onto a part-time MSc or PgDip programme to complete their studies (subject to a maximum period of time).

Guest Lecturers/speakers

You’ll benefit from a large number of government, local authority and industry partners, who’ll lecture on up-to-date current practices, with a diverse point of views.

Facilities

- Studios
There are two fully-networked design studios; one dedicated to student self-study, the other to interactive design teaching.

- Library
In addition to the main University library, we have our own, on-site, reference library. Our collection is developed in direct response to the teaching delivered in the department.

- Workshop
A full range of hand and portable power tools are available (complete with instruction).

- PC Lab
Our lab computers have AutoCad and InDesign.

We also offer plotter printing, scanning and laser cutting services.

Accreditation

The course is fully recognised by the Institute of Historic Building Conservation (IHBC). The IHBC is the principal professional body for building conservation practitioners and historic environment specialists working in United Kingdom.

The course also conforms to the internationally recognised Guidelines for Education and Training in the Conservation of Monuments, Ensembles and Sites adopted by the International Council on Monuments and Sites (ICOMOS). These criteria are used by professional institutes for the assessment of evidence and professional accreditation in conservation.

Learning & teaching

The course is balanced between theory and practice. It’s delivered through:
- lectures
- workshops
- studio-based, and seminar-led learning, by staff and visiting experts from the UK and overseas

The course is a platform for collaboration with both practice and research partners; architectural critique, discussion and debate are fundamental parts of the course.

Assessment

Formative assessment will take place throughout the course.
You’ll be assessed through lectures, seminars, interim Studio Reviews and workshops, supported by student presentations, symposia and peer feedback.
Methods of teaching vary; some subjects are formally taught using lectures and seminars, others use a mix of methods which may incorporate small projects.
The main architectural conservation project is a studio based project which involves one-to-one tuition and appraisals in review seminars. Team teaching techniques are used in several projects and increasing use is made of student peer group reviews. Summative assessment will be through:
- studio reviews
- individual written essays and reports
- oral presentations
- dissertation - directly linked to the conservation project

Careers

Areas of employment for graduates are numerous. They can work as independent professionals in conservation or for architectural firms all over the worlds. The completion of the Masters will give a variety of opportunities:
- IHBC affiliate member with option to progress to full membership
- RIBA Conservation Registrant (CR) and/or RIAS Accredited Conservation Architect
- progress to RIBA Conservation architect (CA), RIBA Specialist Conservation architect (SCA) and/or RIAS Accredited or Advance Conservation Architect
- progress to Conservation Accreditation Register for Engineers (CARE), the joint register between the Institution of Civil Engineers (ICE) and Institution of Structural Engineers (IStructE)

"We work with a large number of government, local authority and industry partners, offering potential placement opportunities for students to work after their postgraduate degree study."

Heritage is recognised as a sector of international strategic importance. Local authorities and communities are also very interested in preserving their heritage. The conservation of historic buildings becomes more and more a day to day activity for architects and engineers.

Potential careers include:
- conservation architect in architectural firms
- conservation engineer in engineering firms
- conservation Officer in local authorities
- work in UK government agencies: Historic Scotland, English Heritage, CadW and the Environment and Heritage Service in Northern Ireland
- architect/conservation officer in other countries for government and local authorities
- work in UK and internationally architect/conservation officer for conservation organisations and charities such as UNESCO, ICOMOS, Council of Europe, ICCROM

Find information on Scholarships here http://www.strath.ac.uk/search/scholarships/

Read less
-Develop your individual creative practice in Contemporary Crafts. -Knowledge and understanding of current critical debate. -Gain advanced technical and entrepreneurial skills for the successful creative practitioner. Read more
-Develop your individual creative practice in Contemporary Crafts
-Knowledge and understanding of current critical debate
-Gain advanced technical and entrepreneurial skills for the successful creative practitioner
-Work alongside practitioners working in a range of areas of practice, in stimulating and challenging environment

Why choose this course?

MA Contemporary Crafts is an award that sits within the MA Art and Design programme at the School of Creative Arts. Within this masters programme there is strong emphasis on professional practice and the real-world applications of art and design. You will develop key research skills and gain a good understanding of the work of other practitioners in your field.

The aim of the programme is to equip you with the skills, knowledge and understanding required to practice at an advanced level, to foster your creativity and enhance your employment opportunities. You will work alongside artists and designers who are involved with a wide variety of media and forms. Induction, seminars and social events for students and staff mean that you will be part of a friendly and supportive postgraduate community, which also includes film makers, musicians and professionals working in new media. Senior research staff and internationally renowned artists work with postgraduate students, helping you to develop original and challenging work.

Contemporary Crafts is an area of creative practice that has a growing reputation through the recent heightened public exposure via the media. On this course, you will explore and challenge the boundaries of your practice and, through discussion and debate with other students, explore some of the key ideas and concepts that inform contemporary applied arts practice.

We focus on helping you develop the entrepreneurial skills you need to further your career and explore funding opportunities and employment in the creative and cultural spheres. You may develop and exploit your talent across a wide range of activities and develop a practice as a maker of individual objects, a designer of batch-produced products, an artist working to commission or establish a mixed portfolio career.

You are encouraged to challenge the materials you use through practical research and sampling and refine your professional practice through the application of process, development of technical skill, material understanding and conceptual underpinning. You have the opportunity to specialize in one area or work across a wide range of disciplines and materials - jewellery, textiles, ceramics, glass, printmaking - and be actively involved in sharing ideas and taking part in critical debate.

Through working alongside artists and designers on other postgraduate courses you will explore the possibilities for the applied artist today, questioning conventions and refining your practice and design capabilities by working with and understanding materials. Our staff are experienced in research and professional practice, and you will also benefit from contributions from visiting artists, designers, makers and other arts and design professionals, as well as from involvement with our international exhibitions programme and gallery environment.

Careers

Contemporary Crafts is designed to enable you to operate successfully as a professional practitioner in your area of specialism. Graduates have gone on to establish studios, exhibit professionally, work as curators, PhD study, teaching, work towards site specific commissions.

Teaching methods

The programme is centred on individual practice and encourages critical dialogue between traditions, disciplines and media. The practice modules develop individual practice through a combination of work-in-progress seminars, tutorials and gallery visits and discussions. A sustained body of creative work forms the basis of assessment, supported by written documentation and assignments. The course is also designed to help you acquire research skills and understand what is going on now in fine and applied arts.

Structure

Core Modules
-Creative Economies
-Discourse/Reflection: Art and Design
-Major Study: Contemporary Crafts
-Practice 1: Art and Design
-Practice 2: Art and Design
-Research and Enquiry

Optional
-Creative Economies (Online)
-Research and Enquiry (Online)

Read less
The course embraces the truth that true creative spirit is born out of a radical review of the interior design process. Read more

Summary

The course embraces the truth that true creative spirit is born out of a radical review of the interior design process.

Students will be inspired by creative experiences that act as a catalyst for reflection, exploration, debate and the strategic management of the multi-facetted aspects that determine interior design processes.

The existing boundaries of interior design will be explored, pushing the international platform for the profession forward in new and versatile directions

This course is divided into three trimesters to allow students to work towards a Postgraduate Certificate, Postgraduate Diploma or a Master's qualification.

Modules

PgCert: Design Systems; Design Culture.

PgDip: Appreciative Design Inquiry; Collaborative Practice

Master's: Major Project - Practice.

Assessment

Informal reflection and debate are at the heart of the seminars and group tutorials where peer reviews, active learning exercises and self-appraisal help our students to shape their assignments towards self-determined outcomes. Project work is always professionally presented and will be assessed formally by a team made up of internal and external experts and academics.

Read less
The MA in Digital Media is unique in its combination of practical and theoretical approaches to contemporary media and technology- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-digital-media-technology-cultural-form/. Read more
The MA in Digital Media is unique in its combination of practical and theoretical approaches to contemporary media and technology- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-digital-media-technology-cultural-form/

The established and exciting degree is designed to help you understand digital transformations in media, culture and society and apply this understanding in practice, in the media and creative industries and in further research. You will be equipped with skills that can be applied to current and future developments in digital media, social media, computing and other aspects of technology.

The MA in Digital Media educates aspiring media practitioners and academics as well as early and mid-career professionals who seek to reflect on their roles in a structured and stimulating learning environment designed to give all students up-to-the-minute knowledge of digital media and the skills to apply that knowledge to future developments.

The MA offers two pathways:

-Pathway 1 is a theory programme where you learn about developments in digital media and technology from a wide range of perspectives

-Pathway 2 is a theory and practice programme where you improve your skills, understanding and experience in one of the following areas:

Documentary
Image making
Journalism
Writing

Acclaimed academics and practitioners

Benefit from the experience and expertise of one of the world’s leading media and communications departments. You'll be taught by theorists and practitioners of international standing: Sarah Kember, Joanna Zylinska, Graham Young, Tony Dowmunt, Angela Phillips, Julian Henriques and David Morley.

Work placements and internships

The MA in Digital Media regularly attracts offers of work placements and internships. Recently these have come from Google, The Science Museum and N1creative.com.

Facilities

Our students have access to state-of-the-art facilities including well-equipped lecture and seminar rooms, exhibition spaces, computer facilities and digital media suites.

The department is also currently host to the renowned philosopher of media and technology, Bernard Stiegler and students will have access to his modulein Media Philosophy as well as priority access to the innovative and popular option After New Media. Designed to complement the MA in Digital Media, this course provides a framework for thinking about the current media environment as well as future forms of human and computer interaction.

An established record

The MA in Digital Media has been redefining media theory and practice since 2004. Our students become proficient in:

the history, sociology and philosophy of digital media
the application of critical conceptual skills to specialist areas and future forms of media
multimedia skills in image making (photography, video, animation, graphic art) script writing, journalism and documentary
MA Digital Media students have access the pioneering option ‘After New Media’, a non-assessed online module which explores the themes of self mediation, ethical mediation and intelligent mediation, and develops a framework for thinking about 'life' after new media. As befits a course of this kind we will be combining media, and exploring their pedagogic potential – uniting digital-online technologies with more traditional teaching formats, such as reading groups, seminars and an end of year symposium.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Dr Sarah Kember.

Modules & Structure

The programme consists of:

Two compulsory core modules
Pathway 1 - between two and four option modules (worth 60 credits) OR
Pathway 2 - a two-term practice block (worth 30 credits) and either one or two option modules (worth 30 credits)
The dissertation or the practice/theory project

Assessment

Seen take-home paper; essays; dissertation or practice/theory project and other production work in the area of documentary, image-making, journalism or fiction.

Programme overview

This is an exciting programme which offers a critical, contextual and practical approach to digital media and technology. It problematises approaches to the 'new' media in academic and professional debate, especially those which overemphasise the potential for radical social change led by a homogenised technology itself.

The programme is defined by its resistance to technological determinism and its insistence on the importance of addressing the social and historical contexts within which a range of media technologies are employed. In order to provide a contextual framework and facilitate the conceptualisation of digital media and technologies as fully cultural forms and processes, the programme will draw on a range of disciplines including: media and cultural studies, sociology, anthropology and philosophy. However, the programme will remain focused on key contemporary concerns about the potential role of digital media in society and on refiguring the contours of the 'new' media debate.

The programme offers two pathways. Pathway 1 addresses central theoretical and conceptual concerns relating to digital media. Pathway 2 combines theoretical analysis and practical work, offering students the opportunity to explore new media theories and concepts in practice. Pathway 2 is primarily aimed at students who already have some experience in one of the areas on offer: documentary; digital photography and image making; journalism; writing. It is meant to appeal to media industry professionals who are keen to reflect critically on their practice within a structured learning environment, graduates of practice-based courses but also those who have gained their practical experience in documentary; digital photography and image making; journalism or writing in informal settings.

Programme structure

The first compulsory core course is Digital Media - critical perspectives and this is taught in a small workshop format in the Autumn term. This course functions as a foundation for the second core course and offers students a map of the key debates in digital media. The course is taught in ten two hour workshop sessions and is supported by the provision of one-to-one tutorials.

The second compulsory core course is Technology and Cultural Form - debates, models, dialogues and this develops questions of technology, power, politics and subjectivity which were introduced in the first core course. The first part of this course highlights the key conceptual concerns of a contextualised approach to digital media plus the relevant debates and models formulated by key figures in the field. The second part of this course aims to generate a dialogue between theoreticians and practitioners around some of the most intellectually stimulating, contentious and contemporary ideas in the field without necessarily seeking a resolution. This course is taught in ten two hour workshop sessions during the Spring term and is supported by the weekly provision of one-to-one tutorials.

Students are required to take options from the lists provided by the Media and Communications, Anthropology, Comparative Literature and Sociology Departments as well as the Centre for Cultural Studies. Examples might include: After New Media, Nature and Culture, Cultural Theory, Globalisation, Risk and Control, Embodiment and Experience, Political Communications. Options are taught primarily through lectures and seminars and take place in the Autumn or Spring terms.

Each student's option profile is discussed with the programme convenor in order to ensure that the balance of subject-specific topics is appropriate for the individual concerned. Option courses are taught primarily through lectures, seminars and tutorials and take place in the Autumn or Spring terms.

All students are required to produce either a 12,000 word dissertation on a topic agreed by the student and supervisor or a practice/theory project in the area of documentary, photography and image making, journalism or fiction. The length of the practical element is dependent on the media and the form used and will be agreed in advance with the supervisor. It will, however, be comparable with practical projects undertaken in practice MA programmes in the relevant field. Students undertaking the practice/theory project will also be expected to submit a 3-4000 word analysis of their practice which locates it within the theoretical debates explored in the MA as a whole. This essay may be presented as a separate document or as an integral part of the project depending on the nature of the project and by a agreement with both theory and practice supervisors.

Programme outcomes

The programme's subject specific learning outcomes require students to analyse and contextualise developments in digital media and technology with reference to key debates in the history, sociology, anthropology and philosophy of the media. Students who opt for the practice/theory pathway will also be required to produce material of publishable or broadcast standard and to evaluate the ways in which theoretical and practical insights intersect. All students will develop a wide range of transferable qualities and skills necessary for employment in related or unrelated areas. These are described by the Quality Assurance Agency as: 'the exercise of initiative and personal responsibility, decision-making in complex and unpredictable situations, and the independent learning ability required for continuing professional development'.

By the end of the programme students will be able to:

-Map and critically evaluate key debates in the field of new media
-Analyse and contextualise current and future developments in digital media and technology
-Evaluate and articulate key historical, sociological, anthropological and philosophical approaches to the study of digital media and technology
-Demonstrate in-depth knowledge of at least four differing areas of inquiry
-Demonstrate an advanced level of conceptual knowledge and (where relevant) practical skill appropriate for a sustained piece of work in the field
-Prepare and deliver clearly argued and informed work
-Locate, retrieve and present relevant information for a specific project
-Manage a complex array of competing demands and work effectively to a deadline
-Work resourcefully and independently
-Think critically and/or work practically within a given context

Skills

We provide graduates with skills that are cutting edge: in the critical analysis and/or creative production of digital media; in the disciplinary knowledge and conceptual frameworks necessary for current and future forms of media and technology; in the awareness of how digital media and technologies are re-shaping society from the ways we communicate (through social media and web 2.0) to the increasingly ‘smart’ environments in which we live.

Careers

Our programme provides a theory and practice pathway and prepares students for work in the following areas:

-media and creative industries; advertising, marketing and PR (graduates of the MA Digital Media have found work with Virgin Media, Google, the BBC and other leading organisations worldwide)
-research and academia (graduates from this programme have gone on to study for PhD degrees in higher education institutions around the world and also here with us)
-media production and new media art (graduates have exhibited, published and produced work in photography, journalism, TV, documentary, film and multimedia)

Graduate Ekaterina discusses her career:

"I work for a company, called Visual DNA, which already sounds like life happening After New Media. The company is the largest data provider in Europe and is totally multinational. We actually try to analyse human visual DNA, you memories, feelings, thoughts about the future, anticipations, etc by creating personality quizzes where instead of verbal answers we tend to use images.

My role is as Creative Developer. It involves working with images from concept to finding/shooting and post-production. My qualifications perfectly matched what they’ve been looking for, Digital Media rocks!

My tip for the new-to-be-graduates is this: physically go to places and companies and talk to people. It really opens up loads of possibilities, and when I tell someone where I’ve graduated from they look impressed, and there is some sort of respect coming from them."

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

Read less
The overall aim of the MSc in Public Health and Health Promotion is for students to gain advanced skills, principles and knowledge in public health and health promotion whilst also developing a critical and multidisciplinary approach to the complexities of public health and health promotion challenges and possibilities. Read more

About the course

The overall aim of the MSc in Public Health and Health Promotion is for students to gain advanced skills, principles and knowledge in public health and health promotion whilst also developing a critical and multidisciplinary approach to the complexities of public health and health promotion challenges and possibilities.

The programme reflects the multidisciplinary nature of public health and health promotion and includes:

health promotion
global public health
health policy
politics, sociology
psychology, communication
advanced academic and research skills.

You will develop your knowledge in public health and health promotion as well as build your research skills.The programme has an active learning and research-led approach.

Aims

The MSc programme in Public Health and Health Promotion allows students to:

Investigate the scope and nature of contemporary public health and health promotion at the local, national and global levels, focusing on its development, current priorities and future challenges.

Explore the major determinants of health and explore ways to promote public health and health promotion that address social and economic inequalities, are culturally sensitive, and promote values of social justice.

Build knowledge and skills in reflective practice, research, communication, transferable skills and working in groups.

Develop knowledge and skills in the principles and complexities of using evidence, including researching, analysing and evaluating health information and policy.

Explore a multidisciplinary approach to public health and health promotion.

Examine ethical, political, societal and cultural dilemmas that arise in public health and health promotion.

Provide the opportunity to conduct an empirical research project in a contemporary issue associated with public health and health promotion.

Course Content

The MSc Public Health and Health Promotion has been specially designed to give you up-to-date knowledge and the necessary skills to be able to understand and apply your learning in analysing evidence, assessing need, planning, implementation and the evaluation of public health and health promotion in a range of contexts.

A key focus is the development of a theoretical, conceptual, historical and critical understandings of public health and health promotion.
This understanding will be applied to an analysis of ethical, political and policy debates informing health promotion and public health practice.

You will need to complete eight study blocks that lead to six assessments and a 15,000 - 18,000 word dissertation to achieve the MSc Public Health and Health Promotion.

Compulsory modules:

Global Public Health
Health Promotion
Health and Society
Evidence and Communication
Health Policy, Politics and Social Justice
Implementing Change in Public Health and Health Promotion
Research in Practice
Approaches to Research
Dissertation

Teaching

Experts at the forefront
The programme draws upon lecturers within public health and health promotion, the wider university and external specialist experts. The teaching team are research active and engage in scholarly activity that informs the curriculum. There are interactions between research and teaching and learning throughout the programme.

How you will be taught
Most study and study blocks will be delivered via a combination of lectures, seminars, online resources, peer led learning, group activities and/or practical workshops, with personal study expected throughout. Typically, lecturers set out the key context, which provide underpinning theory, identify issues of debate and point to further evidence, resources and critical debate. Seminars are structured to facilitate discussion, explore further learning and promote critical thinking, including sound, evidence-based reasoning.

Self-study component
You will be expected to increasingly become self-directed in researching topics. This combination ensures that learning requires active engagement from you, in which debates are often illustrated and explored with examples from policy and practice, so that theory is clearly linked in a relevant and meaningful way to learning goals.

Active learning is recognised as essential to the development of understanding, the ability to apply theory to practice, and to the development of reflective skills. The programme incorporates online teaching and learning tools such as Blackboard Learn.

Assessment

A variety of assessment modes are employed, such as case studies, essays, presentations, written examinations and a research dissertation. Assessment techniques match the intended learning outcomes. At the start of the programme students are provided with the assessment schedule including assessment and feedback dates.

Special Features

Links between research and teaching throughout the programme.

The opportunity to undertake an empirical piece of research.

The course is one of the longest established in the UK.

The programme is highly rated for its excellence in teaching and learning.

Read less
MA Textile Design at Chelsea College of Arts explores creative approaches to sustainable textiles and surface design. What students can expect from the course. Read more

Introduction

MA Textile Design at Chelsea College of Arts explores creative approaches to sustainable textiles and surface design.

Content

What students can expect from the course:

- A studio-based, practice-led course

- Numerous opportunities for developing and collaborating on pioneering work within the textile industry

- Study to be underpinned by a supportive theoretical framework, as well as instruction in professional contemporary practice

- Focus and debate about environmental issues as well as the designer’s role in acting responsibly to these

- To participate in and develop skills through individual and group tutorials, workshops, online resources and postgraduate talks designed to introduce students to a range of visiting artists, designers and other practitioners

Structure

Phase 1: Analysis of practice and exploration of methodologies

Phase 2: Development and consolidation

Phase 3: Resolution

These phases are set within a credit framework of three assessed units:

- Studio practice and Advanced studio practice, which run sequentially

- Theoretical studies, which runs throughout the course.

Studio practice involves evolving and developing a personal programme of studio work and related research. Theoretical Studies provides a framework for students to develop a critical research paper, enabling them to locate their ideas and practice in relation to contemporary debate on cultural and theoretical issues.

Throughout the course students participate in individual and group tutorials, developing their skills through Personal Professional Development workshops and on-line resources while the postgraduate talks are organised that introduce them to a range of visiting artists and practitioners.

Work experience and opportunities

The Textile Environment Design (TED) project is a unique research unit based at the College that investigates the role designers play in the field of eco design and is a resource students, researchers and designers all benefit from and contribute to. Recent students have used TED's extensive library of contacts to establish a unique and sustainable craft design project based in Thailand.

Read less
This programme gives you a solid grounding in issues key to the sustainable development debate. The views of stakeholders such as business groups, environmentalists, government agencies and development institutions will be considered. Read more

This programme gives you a solid grounding in issues key to the sustainable development debate. The views of stakeholders such as business groups, environmentalists, government agencies and development institutions will be considered.

You will acquire the necessary skills to evaluate existing frameworks, inquire into environmental issues in organisations and industries, and develop sensitive business practices.

The programme provides excellent preparation for any corporate-focused environmental career. It provides a route to graduate membership of the Institute of Environmental Management & Assessment. We encourage you to read about the past and present student experiences of our environment and sustainability programmes.

Programme structure

This programme is studied full-time over 12 months and part-time for up to 60 months. It consists of eight taught modules and a dissertation.

Example module listing

The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.

Educational aims of the programme

  • Provide participants with a solid grounding in the sustainable development debate from the wide-range of perspectives, i.e. business groups, environmentalists, government agencies, development institutions, etc.
  • Equip participants to evaluate existing political, socio-economic, ethical, cultural and regulatory frameworks to inform decisions regarding environmental practice
  • Equip participants to develop a sensitive business practice towards environmental and social issues
  • To equip students with the necessary skills for critical inquiry related to environmental issues in organisations and industries

Programme learning outcomes

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes in the following areas:

Knowledge and understanding

  • Intra and inter-organisational contexts in which corporate environmental strategies are developed
  • Concepts of sustainable development and their usefulness to business ethics
  • Evolving regulatory and policy framework as part of engendering an anticipatory view of environmental management
  • Knowledge of a range of corporate environmental management strategies and control mechanisms
  • Accessing and using environmental data

Intellectual / cognitive skills

  • Absorb complex environmental information and communicate them effectively through logically constructed argumentsCreatively formulate new ideas (MSc, PGDip and PGCert)
  • Learn the value of teamwork to solve problems that require multi-disciplinary engagement
  • Independent learning and study through self-directed assignments and dissertation
  • Critical reading and analysis of environmental policy and regulation
  • Inductive reasoning: using specific examples/observations and forming a more general principal
  • Deductive reasoning: use stated general premise to reason about specific examples

Professional practical skills

  • Comprehend how corporations build, implement and maintain an Environmental Management System (EMS)
  • To perform an EMS Audit according to the ISO standards
  • Give coherent presentations
  • Lead discussions on complex subject areas
  • See the other side of the argument given that there are varying and often conflicting perspectives in the environment field
  • Competently handle environment information
  • Self-motivation, self-regulation and self-assurance

Key / transferable skills

  • Acquire knowledge and skills to prepare and deliver a structured and successful presentation
  • Write effectively as a means of communicating important ideas
  • Communication of findings and presentation of research to a non-specialist audience
  • Lead discussion of small/large groups
  • Organise and manage a research project
  • Basic to advanced IT skills, depending on type of electives and dissertation topic
  • Willingness to learn

Academics

Several high-profile guest lecturers have assisted with the delivery of some of the modules. CES modules make maximum use of guest lecturers, drawing on the practical skills and experience of key experts from government and industry to complement the theoretical components of the modules offered.

For example, Jonathon Porritt, former chairman of the Sustainable Development Commission, gives a guest lecture on the Sustainable Development Applications module, analysing the standing of sustainable development in business and policy making.

The extensive expertise of CES academics and researchers is also drawn upon in modules. Professor Tim Jackson, advisor to the government and international bodies and author of the seminal book, Prosperity without Growth – economics for a finite planet–also lectures on some CES modules.

Industrial placement

Full-time students are able to undertake an industrial placement module which enables them to spend six to twelve weeks working for a company or NGO, doing the type of work they will aim to find on graduation.

Examples of organisations at which recent industrial placements have taken place include:

  • Minimise Solutions
  • Portsmouth City Council
  • GAP
  • Diocese of London
  • The Radisson
  • LC Energy
  • AECOM
  • Solar Aid
  • NUS

Careers

Graduates go on to a diverse range of careers implementing sustainable development and dealing with the real environmental challenges facing humanity.

Recent examples include working as an energy efficiency officer for a local government, an environmental officer in multi-national chemical company, a sustainability advisor for a national television / radio station, an environmental consultant for an engineering consultancy, and a programme officer with a sustainability charity.

Other graduates use the research skills they developed to go on and do PhDs.

Global opportunities

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.



Read less
The MA International Relations equips you with the theoretical and empirical research tools to understand the forces that shape global politics. Read more
The MA International Relations equips you with the theoretical and empirical research tools to understand the forces that shape global politics. A postgraduate degree in International Relations is a pathway to a range of careers, from NGOs to International Organisations such as the EU. Our teaching methods are innovative and working with a group of world-leading researchers will ensure your degree is cutting edge and highly sought after.

Flexibility to follow your interests with world-leading researchers

To understand something as complex as the contemporary world order, theory is invaluable. This foundation will be a benchmark and guide to investigating the complex security and public policy issues of the 21st century. These include:

* Terrorism
* Global resistance movements
* The politics of the Middle East
* US foreign policy
* Global ethics and human rights
* International law and governance
* International political theory

There is considerable scope to study specific topics of interest to you alongside world-leading researchers in their field. Your learning will be led by staff associated with the Centre for Advanced International Studies, who have contributed to contemporary public debates through newspaper articles, television appearances and through social media.

Innovative teaching

Teaching in the department is research-led, ensuring that what you learn will be cutting edge and at the heart of contemporary public debate. This will be broadly seminar-based, giving you the chance to debate the ideas and policies that are shaping the world around us with high-achieving students and experts in the field. Content is delivered through a range of innovative teaching methods, including:

* Debates
* Role-plays and simulations
* Field trips
* Graduate-level conferences

You will benefit from a dedicated personal tutor and have the time and freedom to direct your own learning to meet the requirements of the modules.

Extra-curricular events

Extra-curricular events, like stand-alone talks given by policy makers, activists and scholars, are hugely beneficial to giving added perspective of contemporary world politics. Recent contributors have included:

* Aid workers from conflict and post conflict zones
* Ex-special forces soldier who served in Afghanistan
* David Miliband
* The Head of the Islamic Revival Party of Tajikistan
* The Head of MI6
* BBC journalist now turned documentary-maker.

Our active student societies also regularly organise events, such as trips to Brussels to visit NATO and European Union institutions.

Developing your career

While this is a challenging degree, which attracts students hoping to go on to PhD research, International Relations is also a highly sought after postgraduate degree for a range of professions other than academia. The MA in International Relations gives you a global perspective on contemporary politics, trains you to express yourself clearly and persuasively and will develop you into an independent and critical thinker. These skills are highly sought after, particularly in:

* Government
* Non-governmental organisations
* Aid agencies and pressure groups
* Law and finance
* Publishing and the media
* International organisations like the European Union and the United Nations
* Academia

Please visit our website for further information on this programme: http://www.exeter.ac.uk/postgraduate/taught/politics/intrelma

Read less
This dynamic MBA course will be of interest if you are in, or aspire to, a managerial position and will build the vision needed in today’s business climate. Read more

This dynamic MBA course will be of interest if you are in, or aspire to, a managerial position and will build the vision needed in today’s business climate. It builds on a strong ethos of helping managers to solve real problems, and is designed for professionals who will make a strategic difference to the organisations in which they operate. Whether you work in a public or private sector organisation, you will learn how to integrate cutting-edge research and practice across all key business areas to achieve business transformation.

During the MBA course, you will develop key leadership skills such as creativity, innovation, collaboration and problem solving and be introduced to innovative business theory in a practical context. There are also MBA pathways available in marketing, human resource management and public service management, so you can specialise in a particular area which will lead to a named MBAaward. The University is host to a vibrant, multicultural environment that provides an excellent opportunity for you to gain an international perspective on business and different cultures and practices.

What you will study

The MBA will expose you to core areas of business with an emphasis on the strategic nature of decision-making through a diverse range of modules.

Modules:

Leadership and Management Theories

Develop your knowledge and understanding of a range of leadership and management theories and their contemporary application in a range of organisational settings.

Strategic Financial Management

Gain an understanding of the issues and techniques of strategic financial management from both an internal and external stakeholder viewpoint.

Strategic Analysis Tools and Techniques

Evaluate the strategic environment of an organisation; internally and externally. Also gain the skills to direct and manage the development of business and corporate strategy in the contexts of complexity and change.

Strategic Systems Thinking

Go beyond the study of theory and become an active participant in a debate that is at the leading edge of strategic thinking and practice. On completion of this module you will be able to contribute to strategic thinking within an organisational setting.

Strategic Marketing

Understand and critically evaluate how strategic marketing interfaces with general business strategy. In addition, appraise the difference between good strategic marketing practice and practice that falls short of professional quality.

Strategic Operations Management

Gain an appreciation of operational processes, techniques, planning and control systems with reference to both manufacturing and service industries from a qualitative and quantitative perspective.

Research Methods

Conduct a proper scientific investigation and present it in a written format. This will develop your understanding and research skills in a management and/or professional development context.

Management Project

Explore the concept, theories and practice of project management and consultancy skills whilst building on the research methodological skills and requirements of critical debate established throughout the program. Learn how these key skills are vital within a business context to ensure rigorous decision making. 

Teaching

Taught sessions are delivered through self-guided study, lectures, seminars, group work, case studies and exercises. You will have the opportunity to strategically analyse organisations, deliver presentations and prepare marketing and business plans.

Alongside your studies, you will also be part of a study visit to see first-hand how different companies operate. You are also encouraged to attend the many guest lectures organised by the Business School, to broaden your understanding of important subject areas.

Assessment

You will be assessed through written assignments, presentations and project work. The MBA involves the completion of a business research project which will develop your communication and consulting skills.

Careers

Employability is at the heart of everything we do, and we aim to ensure that our students are innovative, creative and entrepreneurial, which helps make our graduates employable across the globe.

This demanding and dynamic course is designed for those looking to take their career to the next level. It will help you develop the knowledge and skills to be a successful strategic business leader and equip you with an insight into the business practices you will need for a future in an ever changing global environment.

Developed in close consultation with a range of employers who have contributed significantly to making our graduates more effective in the workplace, the University of South Wales MBA is recognised globally as a qualification due to its relevance within the world of work. The completion of a management project gives you the chance to showcase your knowledge and analytical skills that are essential to top employers.



Read less
This programme will provide you with a comprehensive knowledge of the issues, theories and the working practices connected with the dynamic and increasingly important field of marketing in the global business arena. Read more
This programme will provide you with a comprehensive knowledge of the issues, theories and the working practices connected with the dynamic and increasingly important field of marketing in the global business arena. It will be attractive for both graduates and professionals who are interested in a career in marketing, or who wish to widen their knowledge and competencies in this field.

The programme will identify processes of globalisation and their impact on multinational enterprises and national firms. It will compare strategies involved in marketing, examine the role played by marketing communication, discuss the contemporary debate over marketing ethics, and contrast different approaches to the study of marketing and their implications.

* Marketing is a field which is defined by its ever changing set of working practices and strategies as technologies evolve, this Masters will give you the fundamental theories to be able to base your next set of tactics on
* You will gain an in-depth knowledge of the theories, issues and current working trends in Marketing
* You will gain an understanding of the nature of global brands and their role in creating relationships in a global market
* You will learn about the centrality of consumers as crucial stakeholders
* You will learn about qualitative and quantitative research methods, and how to design marketing programmes

Why study with us?

This programme is run by the School of Business and Management.

The School of Business and Management is rapidly building a strong reputation for our distinctive approach, in particular our focus on the inter-disciplinary nature of business and management. The School entered the RAE for the first time in 2008 with outstanding success, ranking joint 25th out of 90 Business Schools. This result is the highest ever recorded first-time entry.

"The programme explored different cultures, lifestyles and beliefs which aided my understanding of marketing in a variety of international scenarios - this was particularly helpful to me."
Thais McGowan

* This programme is the first Marketing MA in the University of London
* This programme has an international agenda and is taught by globally recognised international staff
* Learn amongst high quality students from all over the globe, and make networks which will last for life
* You will compare strategies involved in marketing and have the opportunity to examine the growing field of e-Marketing, discuss the contemporary debate over marketing ethics and contrast different approaches to the study of marketing and their implications

Facilities

You will have access to postgraduate only facilities which include the Lock-keeper's Cottage Graduate Centre dedicated solely to the use of graduate students in the faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, with the use of a common room and interdisciplinary training workshops.

You will also have access to Queen Mary's comprehensive libraries and The British Library can be accessed as a research resource.

Read less
This Masters gives artists, practitioners, teachers and educators, in informal and formal learning environments, the opportunity to extend, enrich and consolidate the overlapping practices and theories of contemporary art and learning and teaching through individual and collaborative research- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-artist-teachers-contemporary-practices/. Read more

This Masters gives artists, practitioners, teachers and educators, in informal and formal learning environments, the opportunity to extend, enrich and consolidate the overlapping practices and theories of contemporary art and learning and teaching through individual and collaborative research- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-artist-teachers-contemporary-practices/

Why study MA Artist Teachers & Contemporary Practices (MAAT) at Goldsmiths?

Engaging with practice and theory, you will create new work; develop innovative research approaches and outcomes; critically debate the changing nature of contemporary art, gallery/exhibition practices and art education; and sustain these practices and ideas as artist teacher beyond the MAAT.

You’ll be taught by staff who are nationally and internationally renowned and published artist researcher teachers.

You’ll draw on the international scope of contemporary art practices in London through partnerships with international galleries including Tate Modern, The Whitechapel Gallery and The Showroom Gallery.

You’ll be part of a student body with a rich diversity of backgrounds and experiences, and have the opportunity to develop and maintain collaborative peer networks and support.

You’ll have access to an extensive programme of guest lectures, presentations and projects that has included: Grayson Perry, Yinka Shonibare, Sonia Boyce, Susan Pui San Lok, Danny Devenny, Mark Ervine, Marty Lyons and John Matthews, hosted through our Centre for Arts and Learning (CAL).

The MAAT can be a pathway before or after the completion of a UK QTS (Qualified Teacher Status) programme, such as the PGCE (Secondary): Art & Design.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact John Johnston.

Overview

The programme places a strong emphasis on student-centred and directed learning, where teaching sessions and personal tutorials draw on the critical reflection and development of your artist teacher practices: including artistic, theoretical, political and learning and teaching concerns.

The modules of the programme are all underpinned with theories of contemporary art, learning and critical and dialectical pedagogical theories and philosophies.

You'll attend all lectures, seminars, workshops and tutorials where you'll engage in questioning the political, ideas, practices, theory and philosophy related to the specific topics of: contemporary art practice, teaching and learning, identity and place/space construction, dialectical pedagogical theories and practice, social-engagement, and research led practices where you'll be encouraged and expected to critically discuss and debate the issues raised.

But this is just a small proportion of what we expect you to do on the degree. Independent learning/research (practice with theory) is expected throughout the MAAT, this typically involves critical reflection and development of your practices as artist teacher including: additional readings, preparing topics for discussion/presentations, working with fellow students, producing essays, artist teacher statements, research, planning, organising and producing practice-based work and/or projects, curating exhibitions and presentations, both individually and collaboratively.

This emphasis on independent learning is very important at Goldsmiths. We don't just want you to accept what we tell you without question. We want you to be deeply engaged with theory and practice to develop and sustain your own ideas and practices as artist teachers.

Structure

To enable greater flexibility for you and a more equitable experience for full-time and part-time students, the MAAT programme has a modular structure, with the majority of teaching sessions usually conducted in the evenings.

This also enables part time and full-time students to attend the same evening teaching sessions and therefore form a collaborative and supportive learning environment.

For you to obtain the postgraduate degree of MAAT you will need to complete 180 CATS at Masters level.

The MAAT comprises five core modules (150 CATS) and one option module (30 CATS).

You may also take advantage of two exit points:

Postgraduate Certificate in Artist Teacher and Contemporary Practices (60 Credits)

Postgraduate Diploma in Artist Teacher and Contemporary Practices (120 Credits)

Assessment

The MA Artist Teacher and Contemporary Practices utilises a number of complementary assessment strategies. These have been devised to appropriately assess the range of learning outcomes and are underpinned by the ethos of the programme these include, exhibition/presentation/performance, essay, viva voce.

Download the programme specification for this degree to find out more about what you'll learn and how you'll be taught and assessed.

Please note that due to staff research commitments not all of these modules may be available every year.

Skills

Through the programme, you’ll develop independent thinking, understand theoretical underpinning, and the ability to question and have confidence in your ideas and practice - skills that will benefit you throughout your chosen career. You'll also develop:

critical and analytical skills

creative and practical skills

ability to express complex and sophisticated ideas with clarity and confidence

the ability to work independently and collaboratively

IT skills

As a MAAT alumna, you’ll continue to research and engage in the presentation of your practices through practice, exhibitions, socially-engaged projects, international conferences and international journals.

Careers

Our graduates have an outstanding employment record in the fields of education, galleries/museums, social work/charity, health, public administration and welfare with the majority of graduates gaining full-time employment in a variety of careers including:

Teacher, lecturer, tutor

Heads of Faculties/Departments

Community artists

Gallery educators/curators

Practicing artists/photographers

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.



Read less

Show 10 15 30 per page



Cookie Policy    X