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Masters Degrees (Death Studies)

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Giving you a critical and evaluative understanding of film within an interdisciplinary context, this programme encourages you to understand the role of film and cinema within a range of socio-cultural arenas. Read more
Giving you a critical and evaluative understanding of film within an interdisciplinary context, this programme encourages you to understand the role of film and cinema within a range of socio-cultural arenas.

Exploring the links between film theory and film practices, cultural politics and state or foreign policy, it will also allow you to assess the notion of film as a social process engaging with issues of representation, production and consumption.

The programme is modular and offers a structured approach that includes taught core and optional modules such as Cold War Film, Death and the Moving Image, and Film and Television Authorship.

Alongside this you will undertake training in research skills, culminating in an independently researched 20,000-word thesis.

You will gain a firm grounding in different approaches to the analysis of film, a broad knowledge of the history of cinema and developments in film studies, and the ability to evaluate these in relation to films and film cultures.

You’ll also automatically become a member of - and contribute to - B-Film: The Birmingham Centre for Film Studies. This multidisciplinary hub for research activities on film at the University coordinates various events like visiting speakers, film screenings and international conferences.

We have internationally-recognised research expertise in the fields of European, American and World Cinema, film theory, ethics and aesthetics, queer theory, television studies, children’s media, film and television authorship, performance and audience studies, documentary, digital media, social action filmmaking, film festivals, film production and screenwriting.

The Department brings together the expertise of our Film Studies and Creative Writing staff, opening up exciting new opportunities for postgraduates to benefit from synergies between the two fields.

We enjoy excellent collaborative relationships with professional partners in film, television, theatre, literature and new media.

About the School of English, Drama and American & Canadian Studies

"Welcome to the School of English, Drama and American & Canadian Studies, in the College of Arts and Law. This is one of the largest Schools in the College, and variety is our watchword. We offer one of the most extensive ranges of undergraduate and postgraduate programmes in the country. Our research expertise is equally diverse, and we welcome students and researchers from all over the world." - Professor Andrzej Gasiorek, Head of School.

We particularly encourage creative thinking, with a range of pioneering programmes including Masters opportunities in Creative Writing, Film and Television and Shakespeare and Creativity. Our creative offerings are also strengthened by the development of our Department of Film and Creative Writing – established in 2015 – which has opened up exciting new opportunities for postgraduates to benefit from synergies between the two fields.

Our well-established Departments also provide an excellent environment for postgraduate study. The Department of Drama and Theatre Arts has a highly respected national and international reputation for excellence in teaching and research. We are also one of the leading centres for the postgraduate study of English in the UK, spanning language and literature. The Department of English Language and Applied Linguistics is a world-leading centre of excellence for both teaching and research in this field.

We are also proud to be home to the world-renowned Shakespeare Institute, based in Stratford-upon-Avon. Situated within walking distance of Shakespeare’s birthplace, school and grave, and the theatres of the Royal Shakespeare Company (RSC), the Shakespeare Institute offers postgraduate students and scholars an academic experience unrivalled by any other university.

Funding and Scholarships

There are many ways to finance your postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. To see what funding and scholarships are available, please visit: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/funding

Open Days

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open days.
Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/visit

Virtual Open Days

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

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This interdisciplinary degree will equip you with a broad understanding of historical and cultural aspects of the medieval world, as well as the skills to conduct high-level research. Read more

This interdisciplinary degree will equip you with a broad understanding of historical and cultural aspects of the medieval world, as well as the skills to conduct high-level research.

Core modules will develop your ability to read Medieval Latin and decipher palaeography, giving you the skills to transcribe, translate and analyse primary sources. You could even learn another medieval language such as medieval French or Old Norse. You’ll also focus on areas that interest you when you choose from optional modules on interdisciplinary themes across literature, history, art history, cultural studies and theology and religious studies, and study specialist modules offered by Schools across the University.

The Institute for Medieval Studies sits at the heart of the University, with impressive research resources and a wide range of expertise among its teaching staff. You’ll gain the skills and knowledge to explore the medieval period in the home of the International Medieval Congress.

The Institute for Medieval Studies (IMS) has access to excellent resources, both in the University and beyond. The world-class Brotherton Library contains extensive facsimiles and microfilms of primary materials as well as a wide range of online resources.

Its Special Collections also contain a wide range of manuscript, archive and early printed material, including the Melsteth Icelandic Collection, archives of the Yorkshire Archaeological Society, the old library of Ripon Cathedral, and the manuscripts and incunabula of the Brotherton Collection.

Leeds is also home to the Royal Armouries and its extensive medieval collections, while the West Yorkshire Archives are dotted around the region and the British Library has a Document Supply Centre in nearby Boston Spa.

This programme is also available to study part-time over 24 months.

Course content

Core modules throughout the degree will allow you to develop important research skills, equipping you to work with primary sources. You'll gain a working knowledge of medieval Latin and could even choose to learn another medieval language. You'll also develop your understanding of research methods and bibliography and explore palaeography.

Then you'll build on this foundation with your choice of interdisciplinary optional modules, to explore areas that interest you, and even choose from some modules offered by other Schools on historical, literary or art historical topics. You'll also demonstrate the skills you've acquired in your dissertation, where you'll undertake independent research on a topic of your choice and submit your work by the end of the programme.

If you choose to study this programme part-time, you'll study over a longer period and take fewer modules in each year.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • Introduction to Medieval Latin 30 credits
  • Intermediate Medieval Latin 30 credits
  • Research Methods and Bibliography 15 credits
  • Palaeography: Reading Medieval Manuscripts 15 credits
  • Medieval Studies Dissertation 30 credits

Optional modules

  • The Margins of Medieval Art 30 credits
  • Encountering Things: Art and Entanglement in Anglo-Saxon England 30 credits
  • The Origins of Postcolonial England 30 credits
  • Culture and Identity in the Later Fourteenth Century 30 credits
  • Old and New Beliefs in Medieval Scandinavia: From Pagan to Christian 30 credits
  • Arthurian Legend: Medieval to Modern 30 credits
  • Making History: Archive Collaborations 30 credits
  • Bede's Northumbria 30 credits
  • Christian Society and the Crusades, 1185-1230 30 credits
  • Lifecycles: Birth, Death and Illness in the Middle Ages 30 credits
  • Medieval German Language 30 credits
  • Old and Middle French 30 credits
  • Advanced Medieval Latin 30 credits
  • Men writing women writing men 30 credits
  • Medieval English 30 credits
  • Old Norse 30 credits
  • Vikings, Saxons and Heroic Culture 30 credits
  • Warfare in the Age of the Crusades (1095-1204) 30 credits
  • The Bible in the Medieval World 30 credits
  • Religious Communities and the Individual Experience of Religion, 1200-1500 30 credits
  • Theologus-Poeta: Dante and Medieval Theology 30 credits
  • The Medieval Tournament: Combat and Spectacle in Western Europe, 1100-1600 30 credits
  • The Holy Land under the Franks: The Kingdom of Jerusalem and its Enemies, 1099-1187 30 credits
  • Medieval Bodies 30 credits
  • Preaching History: Understanding Sermons as Literature and Historical Source 30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Medieval Studies MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Medieval Studies MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

IMS tutors are experts in their fields, and their cutting-edge research will inform your teaching. To help you make the most of their expertise, all IMS modules are taught in small groups.

You may study skills modules in seminar groups of 12 or more students, but languages and other interdisciplinary options are usually taught in tutorials of up to eight students. You’ll also have one-to-one meetings with your supervisor during your dissertation.

Assessment

Depending on the modules you choose, you’ll be assessed by a range of methods to develop skills that are useful across the field of medieval studies. These will include transcriptions, bibliographies, essays, reports, translations and occasionally exams.

Career opportunities

This degree is excellent preparation for further study in related fields. It will also equip you with advanced research, communication and analytical skills that are valuable to employers in a wide range of careers such as in museums and business.

We offer a range of paid opportunities for you to gain experience that can really help with your career plans. You’ll be able to provide a mock tutorial for first-year undergraduates during their induction week, or become an academic mentor for final-year students as they complete their dissertations to gain experience of teaching, one-to-one communication and people management.

We also run several paid one-year internships throughout the year on projects such as the International Medieval Bibliography, IMS website and the International Medieval Congress to gain practical experience.

Read more about Employment in IMS



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This fascinating course examines many different aspects of the ancient Greek and Roman worlds – their literature, history, philosophy, archaeology, languages and material cultures – through a scholarly tradition that is both fast-moving and long-standing. Read more

MA in Classical Studies

This fascinating course examines many different aspects of the ancient Greek and Roman worlds – their literature, history, philosophy, archaeology, languages and material cultures – through a scholarly tradition that is both fast-moving and long-standing. You will investigate the different disciplinary fields of Classical Studies, bringing you into direct contact with a wide range of fragmentary evidence from classical antiquity such as surviving texts and artefacts, which you’ll examine from multiple theoretical and methodological perspectives. You will also acquire and develop research skills that will enhance your knowledge of the ancient Graeco-Roman world and prepare you for independent study, culminating in a dissertation.

Key features of the course

•Explores the question of ‘how we know what we know’ about the ancient civilisations of Greece and Rome
•Takes an interdisciplinary approach to the study of ‘the ancient body’, including birth, death, ancient medicine, dress and beauty
•Draws on cutting-edge research by members of the Classical Studies department
•Concludes with a substantial piece of independent research on a topic of your choice.

This qualification is eligible for a Postgraduate Loan available from Student Finance England.

Modules

To gain this qualification you require 180 credits as follows:

Compulsory modules

• MA Classical Studies part 1 (A863)
• MA Classical Studies part 2 (A864)

The modules quoted in this description are currently available for study. However, as we review the curriculum on a regular basis, the exact selection may change over time.

Credit transfer

If you’ve successfully completed some relevant postgraduate study elsewhere, you might be able to count it towards this qualification, reducing the number of modules you need to study. You should apply for credit transfer as soon as possible, before you register for your first module. For more details and an application form, visit our Credit Transfer website.

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The objective of the international one-year MSc programme in Population Studies is to train young professionals in the theories, methods and skills required to comprehend population dynamics. Read more
The objective of the international one-year MSc programme in Population Studies is to train young professionals in the theories, methods and skills required to comprehend population dynamics.

Essential to understanding population dynamics is the study of demographic behaviour of people, in terms of their life events, e.g. birth, marriage, divorce, health, migration, and death. The master programme focuses on these demographic events, on how decision-making regarding these life events (e.g. its timing) is influenced by the historical, economic, societal, cultural, and medical context, and on how these demographic events have an impact on population-level trends.

You will learn about:
- Pressing population issues as population ageing, integration of migrants, health inequalities and poverty
- Individual decision-making processes behind demographic events, such as family formation, residential choices and migration, and health care use
- Collecting and interpreting demographic data
- Methods and techniques to analyze demographic data: life table, population projections, advanced survey analysis, qualitative research methods
- Population policies and intervention programmes

The field of Population Studies reflects on and deals with currently relevant demographic topics and related societal issues. The study is simultaneously concrete and broad.

Why in Groningen?

Our programme is unique in its combination of analytical and social demography, its combination of quantitative and qualitative research methods, its structured progress through the research process, and its international, multidisciplinary and strong scientific orientation - as officially being recognized. Interactive ways of teaching are being employed by very enthousiastic and dedicated teachers. Within the Netherlands, Groningen is the only university offering an MSC in Population Studies.

Job perspectives

The program has been developed for future professionals in business, government, non-governmental organisations (NGOs), and academia. Demographers are competent in reflecting on how the context in which we live affects population dynamics (migration, fertility, mortality, ageing, etc.) and vice-versa. This can be either through analyses of large data files for demographic data and trends, or through in-depth qualitative analysis of people's life.

The career perspectives are good. Many of our alumni continue into a PhD, whereas international mid-career alumni mostly acquire a higher position within the institute they were working.

Our alumni gain employment at:
- (interdisciplinary) research institutes
- universities (lecturer, PhD student)
- (inter)national statistical offices
- national planning and government offices
- United Nations agencies
- NGO's, like Doctors without Borders
- private companies (e.g. as data-manager or communication expert)

Research

The Master's thesis topic is integrated in the research theme of the Population Research Centre: “Population and Wellbeing in Context”. This comprises topics such as population decline, population ageing, global migration, life of migrants, healthy ageing in society, families, households, residence, causes of death, child health, nutrition, access to health care, place making of elderly.

The master programme clearly reflects the major characteristics of the research programme by focussing on both the macro (population) and micro level (the demographic behaviour of people); by adopting multi-disciplinary perspectives (demography, epidemiology, anthropology, geography, social ageing, nutrition); by teaching both quantitative and qualitative research methods; by focusing on the translation of research into policies or interventions.

The students are being taught the theories, methods and skills that the different teachers apply in their research. They participate in seminars and discussion groups in an active research environment including guest lectures and seminars by established professionals from other demographic institutions.

Part of the Master Programme is the participation in the Dutch Demography Day - a conference for demographers - and an excursion to the Netherlands Interdisciplinary Demographic Institute in The Hague.

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This course is unique in its focus on the Highlands and Islands of Scotland. It offers the opportunity to consider wider archaeological concepts and theoretical issues utilising world-class sites in Orkney and the North Atlantic region. Read more
This course is unique in its focus on the Highlands and Islands of Scotland. It offers the opportunity to consider wider archaeological concepts and theoretical issues utilising world-class sites in Orkney and the North Atlantic region.

The MLitt Archaeological Studies will enable you to engage critically with current themes and debates in archaeological practice, theory and method.

There are a wide range of module options which draw on the research specialisms of the Archaeology Institute staff and these provide you with the flexibility to combine taught modules and dissertation research.

You can develop chronological specialisms grounded in the archaeology and heritage of the region; for example, in Prehistoric Archaeology or in Celtic through to Viking/Norse and Medieval Archaeology. Or you may choose to combine period-based modules with our professional skills modules to gain a broader knowledge and understanding of the diversity of methods and theory practiced within archaeology.

Special Features

• A limited number of funded places are available for full-time, Scottish or EU fee status students.
• Loans for tuition fees are available from the Students Award Agency for Scotland (SAAS) for eligible Scotland domiciled and EU students, and loans for living costs for eligible Scottish students.
• Study in the outstanding archaeological landscape of the Orkney Islands
• You will be taught by internationally recognised experts in the field and take advantage of cutting edge research taking place at world renowned sites including the Ness of Brodgar World Heritage site excavations
• You can study individual modules for personal or professional development
• The course offers preparation for specialised research at PhD level

Study Options

The course is available to study full time in September and part time in September and January by self directed study.
You will study this course through a combination video conference seminars and online learning.

Modules

PgCert

Core modules are: Archaeology of the Highlands and Islands; Research and Dissertation Skills
You will also choose one option module listed under the PgDip

PgDip

Option modules, from which you must choose three, may include:
Death and Burial Archaeology; Vikings and Norse in the North Atlantic; Neolithic Studies; From Vikings to VE Day: Scottish Medieval and Later Society; Iron Age Scotland in the Atlantic World; Archaeological & Geophysical Survey; Maritime Archaeological Heritage; Digital Analysis; Sustainability Past and Present; Excavation; Art and Archaeology: Contemporary Theory and Practice

MLitt

To achieve the MLitt award you must complete a research dissertation.

Locations

Inverness College UHI, 1 Inverness Campus, Inverness, IV2 5NA
Lews Castle College UHI, Stornoway, Isle of Lewis, HS2 0XR
Orkney College UHI, East Road, Kirkwall, KW15 1LX
Highland Theological College UHI, High Street, Dingwall, IV15 9HA
Perth College UHI, Crieff Road, Perth, PH1 2NX

Funding

The University of the Highlands and Islands is pleased to offer a limited number of places with full tuition fee support for Scottish-domiciled/EU students, studying full time, on this course starting in September 2017 to help talented students join this key growth sector for the Scottish economy. Fees will be funded by the European Social Fund and Scottish Funding Council as part of Developing Scotland’s Workforce in the Scotland 2014-2020 European Structural and Investment Fund Programmes.
See https://www.uhi.ac.uk/en/studying-at-uhi/first-steps/how-much-will-it-cost/funding-your-studies/funded-postgraduate-places/

From 2017, eligible Scotland domiciled students studying full time can access loans up to 10,000 from the Student Awards Agency for Scotland (SAAS).This comprises a tuition fee loan up to £5,500 and a non-income assessed living cost loan of £4,500. EU students studying full time can apply for a tuition fee loan up to £5500.

Part-time students undertaking any taught postgraduate course over two years up to Masters level who meet the residency eligibility can apply for a for a tuition fee loan up to £2,750 per year.

See Scholarships tab below for full details

Top reasons to study at UHI

1. Do something different: our reputation is built on our innovative approach to learning and our distinctive research and curriculum which often reflects the unique environment and culture of our region and closely links to vocational skills required by a range of sectors.
2. We have campuses across the Highlands and Islands of Scotland. Each campus is different from rich cultural life of the islands; the spectacular coasts and mountains; to the bright lights of our city locations.
3. Small class sizes mean that you have a more personal experience of university
4. The affordable option - if you already live in the Highlands and Islands of Scotland we're right here on your doorstep

How to apply

If you want to apply for this postgraduate programme click on the ‘visit website’ button below which will take you to the relevant course page on our website, from there select the Apply tab to complete our online application.
If you still have any questions please get in touch with our information line by email using the links beow or call on 0845 272 3600.

International Students

If you would like to study in a country of outstanding natural beauty, friendly communities, and cities buzzing with social life and activities, the Highlands and Islands of Scotland should be your first choice. We have campuses across the region each one with its own special characteristics from the rich cultural life of the islands to the bright city lights of Perth and Inverness. Some courses are available in one location only, for others you will have a choice; we also have courses that can be studied online from your own home country. .http://www.uhi.ac.uk/en/studying-at-uhi/international

English Language Requirements

Our programmes are taught and examined in English. To make the most of your studies, you must be able to communicate fluently and accurately in spoken and written English and provide certified proof of your competence before starting your course. Please note that English language tests need to have been taken no more than two years prior to the start date of the course. The standard English Language criteria to study at the University of the Highlands and Islands are detailed on our English language requirements page http://www.uhi.ac.uk/en/studying-at-uhi/international/how-to-apply-to-uhi/english-language-requirements

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Study at the world centre for Mesolithic research. The University of York is the only place in the world where you can study a Masters programme Mesolithic archaeology. Read more
Study at the world centre for Mesolithic research

Why choose this course?

The University of York is the only place in the world where you can study a Masters programme Mesolithic archaeology. Mesolithic studies have gathered huge momentum in recent years, with academics at York leading the way in uncovering significant new evidence on sites such as Howick and the internationally renowned Star Carr – not far from York.

The lack of detailed study into the Mesolithic period means there is a huge amount waiting to be discovered. Almost any project investigating the period is sure to uncover something new and previously unknown. That gives our students an incredible opportunity to become leading specialists in the period, and to get involved in truly pioneering projects.
-Study in the globally recognised centre for Mesolithic archaeology
-Make new discoveries in this under-researched field of study
-Get involved in globally significant Mesolithic field projects
-Gain ‘hands-on’ experience of experimental archaeology at our Mesolithic camp
-Work alongside world leaders conducting pioneering research
-Learn about cutting-edge techniques, such as ancient DNA and stable isotope analysis and climate-change reconstruction
-Receive career and research guidance from experienced and knowledgeable staff

What does the course cover?
The MA in Mesolithic Studies provides an important review of the European Mesolithic, exploring the ways in which the period has been interpreted from the 19th century, up to the present day. It also explores key topics such as technology, consumption practices, death and burial, plants and animals, and settlement, drawing on the research carried out in the department.

Students have the opportunity to get involved in one of several Mesolithic excavation projects, including nearby Star Carr, site of the oldest house and oldest carpentry in Europe, Howick in Northumberland, and coastal shell middens in Europe, all of which have featured on TV and in the media.

Who is it for?
This course is suitable for graduates of archaeology, anthropology, biology or related fields, as well as for people with relevant experience or enthusiasm for the subject.

What can it lead to?
This masters course gives you the chance to specialise in an exciting area of archaeology, but also gives you the essential skills and knowledge required for many different archaeological and related careers or further study. While some students take the course as the gateway to further specialist research at PhD level, others go on to a wide variety of careers.

Careers

By the end of the MA in Mesolithic Studies course you will have:
-A thorough understanding of the history of research and the theoretical approaches in Mesolithic Studies
-A broad foundation in the key aspects of Mesolithic lifeways
-Developed a critical understanding of the key debates in the period
-Developed an ability to gather and organise information and arguments in a critical and independent manner through writing essays under various conditions
-Undertaken a piece of independent research on a topic within the field of Mesolithic archaeology
-Developed presentation skills through the delivery of seminar papers on a range of diverse themes

Many course graduates go on to further specialist research at PhD level, many of which have been funded, and then pursue careers in academia. Others have gone into a range of careers, from teaching and digital archiving to commercial archaeology work and wilderness training.

Some of the organisations our past students now work for include the Chartered Institute for Archaeologists, Council for British Archaeology, Yorkshire Museums Trust, archaeological consultancies and even Wikipedia.

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Taught at our Parkgate Road Campus in Chester, our MA in Archaeology of Death and Memory explores the complex history of death and memory from the hunter-gatherer societies of the Palaeolithic to recent times. Read more
Taught at our Parkgate Road Campus in Chester, our MA in Archaeology of Death and Memory explores the complex history of death and memory from the hunter-gatherer societies of the Palaeolithic to recent times. Our course is an exciting, cross-period postgraduate course of global application. It will allow you to study and gain advanced expertise in the study of death, burial and commemoration in the human past, shedding light on debates and concerns of our present day.

The course focuses on archaeology but is unusually cross-disciplinary. You will explore debates that connect archaeology to research themes shared across the humanities and social sciences, including studies of ritual, the body, material culture, memory and mortality. Consequently, this degree will interest those with first degrees in archaeology or history, and also those with backgrounds in other disciplines.

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This course is a joint collaboration between the European Heart Academy of ESC, European Heart Rhythm Association and Maastricht University Medical Centre (MUMC). Read more

About the programme

This course is a joint collaboration between the European Heart Academy of ESC, European Heart Rhythm Association and Maastricht University Medical Centre (MUMC).

The Diploma of Advanced Studies in Cardiac Arrhythmia Management trains future leaders in arrhythmology to deliver state-of-the-art cardiovascular services in the next decade and beyond. DAS-CAM brings together renowned experts, who will cover not only clinical cardiac electrophysiology and device technology, but also the leadership, biostatistics and health economics perspectives. The programme will empower electrophysiologists to fulfil leadership roles as well as regulatory and managerial positions in their hospitals, universities, and other work environments.

Program Features

DAS-CAM is designed as an executive programme, consisting of eight modules spread over 2 years. Each module has the following format: online preparatory phase, intensive 4-day in-person training, followed by evaluation phase to integrate and reflect on the module. In addition to time spent in the classroom, you will also be expected to complete coursework from a distance. Modules will be taught in Brussels and Maastricht.

Year 1:
- Towards an optimal use of the ECG in cardiac arrhythmia management | Maastricht
- Fundamentals of Cardiac Arrhythmogenesis | Maastricht
- How to organise an arrhythmia unit? | Brussels
- Atrial fibrillation | Maastricht

Year 2:
- Ventricular tachycardia | Maastricht
- Cardiac pacing, defibrillation and electrical management of heart failure | Maastricht
- Sudden arrhythmic death | Maastricht
- Guideline implementation and future trends in arrhythmia management | Brussels

Tuition fees

For January 2017 entry, course fees were €2,500 per annum for a total of €5,000.
Travel, accommodation and other expenses accrued during the course will be covered by the participants.

Applications

Follow our webpage to know the next entry date.

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English Literature at Cardiff is taught by staff with an international reputation for innovative and influential research. Our passion for the subject and the strength and range of our scholarship enable us to offer a degree which is. Read more
English Literature at Cardiff is taught by staff with an international reputation for innovative and influential research. Our passion for the subject and the strength and range of our scholarship enable us to offer a degree which is:

• Inclusive. We teach across the whole chronological span of English Literature, from Middle English to literature of the twenty-first century. We offer modules in a range of critical approaches, from bibliography and textual studies to contemporary women’s writing, and from Barthesian semiotics and postcolonial ways of reading, to theories of gender and queer studies. We are intrigued by the connections between literature and popular culture and literature and theory, and our teaching reflects these interests.

• Challenging. Staff offer modules on their research areas of expertise. This means that students engage with new, up-to-date ideas that are helping to shape and define the future of the discipline.

• Diverse. There are no compulsory modules. You have the freedom to use any critical, theoretical perspective to analyse any type of (aesthetic, cultural, historical) material.

• Engaged. The MA in English Literature is a successful programme of study that has a strong reputation for offering a comprehensive range of modules from all periods and genres that bring the latest developments in literary and critical theory to bear upon the reading of literary and cultural texts.

Distinctive features

• A wide-ranging programme of research-led modules taught by specialists in the field
• A series of dedicated research pathways, including Medieval and Renaissance Studies; Romantic and Victorian Studies; Modern and Contemporary Literature; Gender and Sexuality Studies; Cultural and Critical Theory
• Access to skills training and various research activities
• The freedom to assemble a programme of study tailored to personal and professional interests
• High-level training in the latest research methods, critical theory and scholarly writing and presentation skills in a non-assessed core module
• Popular two-day residential conference and workshop at Gregynog Hall, where you will present short 15-minute papers in a supportive and lively atmosphere
• One-day symposium dedicated to increasing your employability skills
• Opportunities to take part in a series of dynamic research seminar series
• Access to specialist library collections

Structure

Our flexible structure allows you to assemble programmes of study tailored to your personal and professional interests. You can opt for the open pathway, or choose one of our specialist pathways: Medieval and Renaissance; Romantic and Victorian Studies; Modern and Contemporary Literature; Gender and Sexuality Studies; Cultural and Critical Theory, which groups together groups of taught modules with related research activities and skills training available in the School.

The degree is structured in two parts.

• Part one

You choose four modules from a range of specialist options. You take two modules per semester (one module per semester for part-time study)

All teaching is by seminars and workshops structured around student participation, featuring opportunities to present your work. Each module consists of a two-hour seminar per week and is assessed by a 4,000-word essay (or equivalent).

In addition to the taught modules, you attend weekly workshops on research methods and scholarly presentation.

• Part Two

You undertake a dissertation of 16,000-20,000 words on a subject of your choice, developed in consultation with a supervisor in the field. You begin to plan and research your dissertation in the second semester for submission in September.

Core module:

English Literature Ma Dissertation

Optional modules:

The Myth of King Arthur in The Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries
Violent Death in Renaissance Drama
Reading/Theory
Constructing Shakespeare
Neo-Victorian Metatextualities
Writing and Experimentation
Heroes and Villains from Chaucer to Shakespeare
Spectral Femininities
Writing Victorian Science
Children's Fantasy Fiction Since 1900
Before Homosexuality? Representing Same Sex Desire from Smollett to Sexology
Romantic Poetry and Place
Project Management and Advanced Research Skills
Narrative and Nation: Romantic Prose 1980-1830
White
Virginia Woolf's Modernism
Ecotheories
Digital Theory

Teaching

Teaching is delivered in seminar groups for all modules. The teaching for each module is text-based and revolves around the exploration of concepts and ideas from a range of literary, historical, and theoretical perspectives within the broad field of English Literature.

The learning activities vary from module to module as appropriate, but will include such as activities as interactive discussions of prepared texts/topics and, in some cases, student-led presentations.

Encouraged to explore our excellent library resources, you are expected to undertake preparation including wide-ranging reading to enable full participation.

Assessment

Each module on Part One is assessed by a 4,000-word essay or equivalent (which can include up to 10% of the module being assessed by oral presentation).

Part Two is examined by a 16,000-20,000-word dissertation.

Career prospects

Postgraduate study is a gateway to many careers within and beyond academia.

Many of our alumni enter (or return to) various professions including academia, primary and secondary education, journalism, publishing, archival and library work, the Civil Service, arts administration and the creative industries.

In addition to taught modules and academic workshops, we also offer dedicated sessions to increase your transferable skills and employability prospects. We also encourage all students on the programme to work closely with the University’s Careers and Employability office.

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You’ll study contemporary creative writing and develop your skills in different genres and styles. You’ll also develop and explore your own writing through practical workshops. Read more

About the course

You’ll study contemporary creative writing and develop your skills in different genres and styles. You’ll also develop and explore your own writing through practical workshops. You’ll complete two core modules, optional modules and a dissertation. Your final portfolio of work may take the form of short stories, a novel extract, script or poetry.

Your career

You’ll examine early modern texts, language and culture. Staff expertise includes palaeography, rhetoric, news writing, the sermon, drama, and issues of political, sectarian and national identity between 1400 and 1700. Modules (including modules from History) can be tailored to suit your interests. You’ll complete one core module, optional modules and a dissertation.

Cultural life

Study eighteenth-century literature to develop a broad range of advanced skills. The focus is on the interface between historical and literary approaches, and you’ll be introduced to current academic debates and research methods in the field. Spanning eighteenth century prose and poetry, Romantic poetry, prose, and drama, and Gothic literature, there’s an incredible range to choose between.

First-rate facilities

We’re based in a brand new building at the heart of the campus. There are computer workstations especially for postgraduates and a DVD library with viewing facilities. Our theatre workshop is a fully equipped teaching/performance area with excellent film-viewing facilities and audio suites.

Specialist resources

The University Library subscribes to the major periodicals and full-text electronic archives, including Early English Books Online and Eighteenth-Century Collections Online. Special collections include an outstanding collection of Restoration drama, the Hope Collection of eighteenth-century periodicals, the Jack Rosenthal scripts collection, and papers of contemporary writers such as Anita Brookner, Marina Warner, Fay Weldon and Peter Redgrove.

Funding

There are a number of studentships and fee bursaries available, funded by the University. Deadlines for funding applications are usually in winter/early spring. For details, see our website.

Research training for PhD

If you intend to progress to a PhD, your course can be tailored to include essential research training. The same applies to students on the online course.

Part-time study

Part-time students usually take one taught module in each semester. In the second year, you’ll also take a dissertation module. For most courses, you’ll need to come in for one half-day per week. The MA Creative Writing is taught in the evening. Some modules, such as Theatre and Performance, may require greater time commitment. We try to be as flexible as possible to accommodate the different needs of our students.

Core module

The Eighteenth Century: Research Approaches.

Examples of optional modules – literature

May include: British Poetry in the Long Eighteenth-Century; The Rise of the Gothic; Poetry and History; Fiction and Reality; Humans, Animals, Monsters and Machines: from Gulliver’s Travels to King Kong; Sex and Death in the Eighteenth Century.

Examples of optional modules – history

May include: The Historical Novel; Framing the Past: the eighteenth century on film; Arguments about Eighteenth-Century Crime; Eighteenth-Century British American Colonies; Material Life and Culture in the Early Modern World.

Teaching and assessment

Teaching takes place through seminars. You’ll be assessed on your essays and a 15,000-word dissertation.

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Lincoln’s long and fascinating history, along with its range of medieval resources, make it an ideal location in which to undertake an advanced study of the Middle Ages. Read more
Lincoln’s long and fascinating history, along with its range of medieval resources, make it an ideal location in which to undertake an advanced study of the Middle Ages.

This course is designed to develop the critical understanding and extensive analytical skills that may be particularly beneficial to careers in the heritage sector, museums and teaching. Core modules look to provide a grounding in the skills needed for advanced study. Students can also choose from an exciting palette of optional modules: these vary from year to year, but can include Intermediate Medieval Latin, Reason and Rebellion, and Public and Private Emotions in the Middle Ages.

You will have the opportunity to develop skills such as palaeography and to utilise historical archives to explore the economic, social and religious history of England. Some modules are supported by the wealth of literary manuscripts at Lincoln Cathedral, including one of only 50 full manuscripts of The Canterbury Tales, and The Thornton Romances, which contains the earliest known accounts of King Arthur’s death.

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Health humanities seeks novel ways of understanding health and illness in society, and how methods from the humanities and social studies may be brought to bear on biomedicine, clinical practice, and the politics of healthcare. Read more
Health humanities seeks novel ways of understanding health and illness in society, and how methods from the humanities and social studies may be brought to bear on biomedicine, clinical practice, and the politics of healthcare. Experiences and portrayals of health and illness in literature, film and contemporary culture are also studied.

Degree information

The programme enables students to approach issues relating to health and illness from both a historical and contemporary perspective and from a variety of a disciplines, including anthropology, history, philosophy, sociology, science and technology studies, global health, literature and film studies. Students will also learn to work in an interdisciplinary manner.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two core modules (60 credits), elective modules of 15 or 30 credits each (up to a total of 60 credits) and a research dissertation (60 credits). A Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits), two core modules (60 credits) and two electives (60 credits) is also offered. A Postgraduate Certificate (60 credits), two core modules is also offered.

Core modules
-Illness
-Madness

Optional modules - students may choose from the list of recommended modules below, or other relevant modules in UCL, with the approval of the convenors.
-Anthropology and Psychiatry
-Classical Chinese Medicine
-Clinically Applied Cultural Psychiatry
-Conflict, Humanitarianism and Health
-Cultural Memory
-Death, Dying and Consequences
-Disease in History
-German Literature and Psychology
-Global Health and Development: Emerging Policy Debates
-Global Justice and Health
-Health Inequalities Over the Lifecourse
-Health Policy and Reform
-Medical Anthropology
-Medieval Science and Medicine in Global Perspective
-Science, Technology, and Identity
-Social Value and Public Policy, Health and the Environment
-From Imperial Medicine to Global Health, 1860s to present
-Medicine on Screen

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000-12,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures and seminars. Assessment is through essays and a dissertation. There is no unseen examination.

Careers

This MA provides an exceptional foundation for those hoping to undertake PhD research and pursue an academic career, ranging from interdisciplinary work in the health humanities to a broad spectrum of more specialised disciplines, such as medicine, the philosophy of medicine, history of medicine, medical sociology or medical anthropology, among others. It is also a suitable preparation for a range of careers including science and medical journalism, bioethics, healthcare policy, NGOs and museum and heritage.

Employability
The programme gives students the opportunities to work in an interdisciplinary manner, and to engage in debate and develop their presentation skills. Students will gain experience of writing essays and training in conducting original research and applying the appropriate methodology. There are many additional activities available, both within the UCl Health Humanities Centre and the Institute of Advanced Studies, and the wider UCL community, to help students develop employability skills.

Why study this degree at UCL?

Health Humanities MA is based in UCL's new Health Humanities Centre which draws together world-leading researchers from different disciplines including medicine and health in history, philosophy, sociology, anthropology, and cultural and film studies.

Leading clinicians at UCL's acclaimed Medical School and Division of Psychiatry, who are engaged in humanities and social science research, are also actively involved with the centre. The centre was formed through the merger of the Centre for Philosophy, Justice and Health and the Centre for the History of Psychological Disciplines.

UCL Health Humanities Centre forms part of the new UCL Institute of Advanced Studies, which showcases and fosters multidisciplinary research within the humanities and the social sciences, with an active programme of events and visiting international scholars.

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. This MA allows you to develop an in-depth understanding of the history of health, medicine and society. You’ll be trained in historical research methods and conceptual and methodological approaches to the history of health, medicine and society. Read more

This MA allows you to develop an in-depth understanding of the history of health, medicine and society.

You’ll be trained in historical research methods and conceptual and methodological approaches to the history of health, medicine and society. You can combine British, European and African history under the guidance of leading researchers in History, History and Philosophy and Science and Medieval Studies. You’ll have the chance to focus on topics and periods that suit your own interests, whether that’s the history of health, medicine and society in the Middle Ages or the First World War.

Looking at the health of individuals, families and communities, you could study the human life course from birth to death, the experiences of medical practitioners and caregivers, medicine during periods of war and conflict, or the impact of health policy in different societies. It’s an exciting opportunity to explore how health and medicine have always been shaped by the social and cultural context.

Specialist resources

We have an exceptional range of resources to help you explore the topics that interest you. The world-class Brotherton Library holds a wealth of resources in its Special Collections, including historical works on health, medicine, cookery and medicinal uses of food, as well as extensive archival material about the history of medicine, surgery and nursing during the First World War and across the region since the eighteenth century.

You’ll be encouraged to participate in events run by the School of History’s lively ‘Health, Medicine and Society’ research group, including seminars, reading group sessions and a postgraduate symposium. You’ll also be able to attend a huge range of other events at the University of Leeds, including seminars at the Centre for History and Philosophy of Science and the Leeds Centre for Medical Humanities.

You’ll also have access to the University’s Museum of Science, Technology and Medicine, which is especially rich in its medical collections, and we have close links with the Thackray Medical Museum in east Leeds and its 47,000 medical objects.

Course content

The first semester will lay the foundations of your studies, introducing you to historical research methods, and key sources, debates and methodologies in the history of health, medicine and society. You’ll take part in a source analysis workshop and gain practical knowledge of documentary, visual and material sources in the university and local area which can be used to study the history of health, medicine and society.

You’ll also develop specialist knowledge of the development of the history of medicine and the social history of medicine as historical sub-disciplines, and the place of health and medicine within the discipline of history.

In Semester Two, you’ll build on this knowledge with your choice from a wide range of optional modules, including specialist topics such as birth , death and illness in the Middle Ages; Medicine and warfare in the 19th and 20th centuries or disease and sexuality in Africa. You’ll also have the opportunity to work collaboratively with partner organisations, such as the West Yorkshire Archive Service, by studying the ‘Making History: Archive collaborations’ module.

Throughout the programme, you’ll develop your knowledge across a variety of areas as well as key skills in research and critical analysis. You’ll showcase these skills when you complete your dissertation, which will be independently researched on a topic of your choice and submitted by the end of the programme in September.

If you choose to study part-time, you’ll study over a longer period and take fewer modules in each year.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • Research Methodology in History 30 credits
  • Dissertation (History of Health, Medicine and Society) 60 credits
  • Approaches to the History of Health and Medicine 30 credits

Optional modules

  • Making History: Archive Collaborations 30 credits
  • Medicine and Warfare in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries 30 credits
  • Women, Gender and Sexuality: Archives and Approaches 30 credits
  • Sexuality and Disease in African History 30 credits
  • Lifecycles: Birth, Death and Illness in the Middle Ages 30 credits
  • Science in the Museum: Interpretations & Practices 30 credits
  • The Origin of Modern Medicine (Birth of the Clinic) 30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read History of Health, Medicine and Society MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read History of Health, Medicine and Society MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

We use a range of teaching and learning methods. The majority of your modules will be taught through weekly seminars, where you’ll discuss issues and themes in your chosen modules with a small group of students and your tutors. Independent study is also crucial to this degree, giving you the space to shape your own studies and develop your skills.

Assessment

We use different types of assessment to help you develop a wide range of skills, including presentations, research proposals, project reports and essays, depending on the subjects you choose.

Career opportunities

This programme will heighten your cultural and social awareness as well as allowing you to build your historical knowledge. You’ll also gain high-level research, analysis and communication skills that will prove valuable in a wide range of careers.

Graduates have found success in a diverse range of careers in education, research and the private sector. Many others have continued with their studies at PhD level. Your knowledge and skills will appeal to a wide range of employers, including in the charitable, education, healthcare, and heritage sectors .

We offer different forms of support to help you reach your career goals. You’ll have the chance to attend our career groups, meeting students with similar plans, or you could become a paid academic mentor to an undergraduate completing their final-year dissertation. You could also apply for one of the internships we offer each year.



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This MA is one of the most wide-ranging programmes of its kind, offering a rich variety of modules on the region, ranging from the premodern period to the 21st century, from Russia and Poland to the Czech Republic and Croatia, and from film and philosophy to literature and cultural studies. Read more
This MA is one of the most wide-ranging programmes of its kind, offering a rich variety of modules on the region, ranging from the premodern period to the 21st century, from Russia and Poland to the Czech Republic and Croatia, and from film and philosophy to literature and cultural studies.

Degree information

Students develop an advanced knowledge and understanding of aspects of Russian and/or East European literature and culture, including art, film, philosophy, and linguistics. They gain key research skills, enabling them to solve problems of conflicting sources or interpretations, locate primary and secondary materials, and use research aids and resources effectively.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of one core module (30 credits), optional modules (90 credits) and a research dissertation (60 credits).

Core module
-Literary and Cultural Theory

Optional modules - up to 90 credits of optional modules. Subject to approval, optional courses up to the value of 30 credits may be taken from other SSEES MA Programmes or from other UCL MA Programmes.
-All Quiet on the Eastern Front: Culture, Politics and Everyday Life in Central and Eastern Europe
-Beyond Stereotypes: The Jews in Polish Culture
-Introduction to Hermeneutics: How to Read and Interpret Texts
-Contemporary Cultural Studies: Between Post-Communism & Post-Modernism
-Freedom Death and Love: Polish Fiction 1918–2005 (language prerequisite)
-How to Read/Interpret Texts: Introduction to Hermeneutics
-Literatures of Rupture: Modernism in Russia and Eastern Europe
-The 19th-Century Russian Novel
-The Reflecting Screen: Russian and Soviet Cinema in its Cultural Context, 1896 to the Present
-The Self and the World: Theoretical Approaches to Travel Writing
-Language Modules
-Russian Monarchy: Court Ritual and Political Ideas, 1498-1917
-Comparative Literary Studies
-Translation Studies
-Comparative Literature Modules

Dissertation/report
All MA students undertake an independent research project, which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000–12,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, tutorials, presentations, film viewings and private study. Students are assessed by a variety of methods, including unseen examinations, long essays, course work and the research dissertation.

Careers

With their specialist knowledge and language skills, SSEES Master's graduates can be found in business, finance, the media, international agencies, charities, diplomacy, international security organisations, the law, and academe. Some of our graduates advise the Russian, Polish, American, and other governments, and the European Commission.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-PhD Russian Literature, University College London (UCL)
-Publishing Assistant, Sheldrake Press
-Language Producer, Unspecified Language Production Company
-Freelance Translator, Self-Employed Translator
-Business Consultant, Grit 3 Group and studying MA Russian and East European Literature and Culture, University College London (UCL)

Employability
Students who have successfully completed the programme have progressed to further academic research on the region, or have obtained employment in such organisations as the European Parliament and the Ministry of Defence, as well as roles in business, think tanks, NGOs, or similar, both in Britain and abroad. Networking is facilitated by two major collaborations led by SSEES: CEELBAS and the International Master's (IMESS). Scholarships, internship opportunities and excellent links with other universities in the region provide further benefits.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL School of Slavonic & East European Studies (SSEES) is a world-leading specialist institutions, and the largest national centre in the UK, for the study of central, Eastern and south-east Europe and Russia.

Located on the edge of Bloomsbury, SSEES offers an ideal location for scholars. The British Library, British Museum, University of London Library and other similar research centres are all close by.

The SSEES Library is unequalled in Britain for the depth and breadth of its collections, the majority of which are on open access in the SSEES building.

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Study the field that brings past people to life. Past societies responded to and treated their dead in a huge diversity of ways, providing archaeologists with crucial insights into their workings. Read more
Study the field that brings past people to life

Why choose this course?

Past societies responded to and treated their dead in a huge diversity of ways, providing archaeologists with crucial insights into their workings. Funerary archaeology combines analysis of human remains with their archaeological context to take a truly interdisciplinary approach to studying both life and death in the past. The course at York offers the chance to develop skills in a range of different methods and techniques, but all centred on learning how to investigate death and burial in the past. The flexible nature of the course enables you to pursue your own particular period or methodological interests.
-Explore the varied archaeological and methodological approaches to funerary archaeology
-Work alongside internationally renowned specialists in a range of different periods and methodologies, by choosing either the MA or MSc route
-Gain ‘hands on’ experience of the analysis of human remains
-Learn through fieldtrips to local museums and relevant sites, e.g. the prehistoric monuments in the Yorkshire Wolds
-Choose modules to support your own research interests
-Use the latest techniques and equipment to build key practical skills
-Receive advice on developing your career and research interests from knowledgeable staff

What does the course cover?
The course focuses a range of topics from identity, landscape, social structure, commemoration and memory, ritual and belief, and the body. It covers attitudes and repsonses to death from the first evidence for the special treatment of human remains by homids up to the place of funeray rites in modern day societies, but with a particular focus on the interpretively challenging evidence from Prehistory. The analysis of human remains and their archaeological context are both taught in a flexible modular system, that allows you to tailor the course to your particular methodological or period interests.

The MA and MSc pathways offer a chance to specialise in different areas of Funerary Archaeology research. There is also an opportunity to learn valuable practical skills, which are essential for a wide range of archaeological and associated careers.

Who is it for?
This degree is for anyone interested in studying Funerary Archaeology from a range of perspectives, which are at the frontiers of both archaeological method and theoretical approach. It is primarily for students with previous experience in archaeology, anthropology, history, art history, biology or related fields, but students from a wide variety of academic backgrounds are encouraged.

What can it lead to?
The course provides a solid foundation for a wide range of careers and further studies. Postgraduate students at York have gone on to research degrees, academic or teaching careers, museum positions and archaeology posts at local councils, regional authorities, field units, and heritage bodies such as English Heritage.

Careers

By the end of the MA or MSc Funerary Archaeology course you will be able to:
-A thorough understanding of the history of research and the theoretical approaches to Funerary Archaeology
-A broad foundation in the key aspects of studying death and burial in the past
-Identify and record human bone assemblages
-Age, sex and assess pathologies from human bones
-Explore selected methods and periods in detail, through the option modules
-Critically evaluate published research and datasets
-Orally present knowledge and concepts
-Plan, design and undertake a piece of independent research

These skills and techniques are deployed widely in the field of archaeological research and exploration, but they are also valuable for a wide range of careers and further studies.

Many of York's Masters postgraduates go on to further research, academic or teaching careers, museum positions and archaeology posts at local councils, regional authorities, field units and heritage bodies. Some of the organisations our students now work for include:
-Archaeological field units
-Environmental archaeology
-Professional archaeologists – field and laboratory based
-Laboratory technicians
-Demonstrators
-University/research technicians
-Academia
-On-site osteoarchaeologists
-Medical humanities

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