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Masters Degrees (Death)

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Taught at our Parkgate Road Campus in Chester, our MA in Archaeology of Death and Memory explores the complex history of death and memory from the hunter-gatherer societies of the Palaeolithic to recent times. Read more
Taught at our Parkgate Road Campus in Chester, our MA in Archaeology of Death and Memory explores the complex history of death and memory from the hunter-gatherer societies of the Palaeolithic to recent times. Our course is an exciting, cross-period postgraduate course of global application. It will allow you to study and gain advanced expertise in the study of death, burial and commemoration in the human past, shedding light on debates and concerns of our present day.

The course focuses on archaeology but is unusually cross-disciplinary. You will explore debates that connect archaeology to research themes shared across the humanities and social sciences, including studies of ritual, the body, material culture, memory and mortality. Consequently, this degree will interest those with first degrees in archaeology or history, and also those with backgrounds in other disciplines.

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Study the field that brings past people to life. Past societies responded to and treated their dead in a huge diversity of ways, providing archaeologists with crucial insights into their workings. Read more
Study the field that brings past people to life

Why choose this course?

Past societies responded to and treated their dead in a huge diversity of ways, providing archaeologists with crucial insights into their workings. Funerary archaeology combines analysis of human remains with their archaeological context to take a truly interdisciplinary approach to studying both life and death in the past. The course at York offers the chance to develop skills in a range of different methods and techniques, but all centred on learning how to investigate death and burial in the past. The flexible nature of the course enables you to pursue your own particular period or methodological interests.
-Explore the varied archaeological and methodological approaches to funerary archaeology
-Work alongside internationally renowned specialists in a range of different periods and methodologies, by choosing either the MA or MSc route
-Gain ‘hands on’ experience of the analysis of human remains
-Learn through fieldtrips to local museums and relevant sites, e.g. the prehistoric monuments in the Yorkshire Wolds
-Choose modules to support your own research interests
-Use the latest techniques and equipment to build key practical skills
-Receive advice on developing your career and research interests from knowledgeable staff

What does the course cover?
The course focuses a range of topics from identity, landscape, social structure, commemoration and memory, ritual and belief, and the body. It covers attitudes and repsonses to death from the first evidence for the special treatment of human remains by homids up to the place of funeray rites in modern day societies, but with a particular focus on the interpretively challenging evidence from Prehistory. The analysis of human remains and their archaeological context are both taught in a flexible modular system, that allows you to tailor the course to your particular methodological or period interests.

The MA and MSc pathways offer a chance to specialise in different areas of Funerary Archaeology research. There is also an opportunity to learn valuable practical skills, which are essential for a wide range of archaeological and associated careers.

Who is it for?
This degree is for anyone interested in studying Funerary Archaeology from a range of perspectives, which are at the frontiers of both archaeological method and theoretical approach. It is primarily for students with previous experience in archaeology, anthropology, history, art history, biology or related fields, but students from a wide variety of academic backgrounds are encouraged.

What can it lead to?
The course provides a solid foundation for a wide range of careers and further studies. Postgraduate students at York have gone on to research degrees, academic or teaching careers, museum positions and archaeology posts at local councils, regional authorities, field units, and heritage bodies such as English Heritage.

Careers

By the end of the MA or MSc Funerary Archaeology course you will be able to:
-A thorough understanding of the history of research and the theoretical approaches to Funerary Archaeology
-A broad foundation in the key aspects of studying death and burial in the past
-Identify and record human bone assemblages
-Age, sex and assess pathologies from human bones
-Explore selected methods and periods in detail, through the option modules
-Critically evaluate published research and datasets
-Orally present knowledge and concepts
-Plan, design and undertake a piece of independent research

These skills and techniques are deployed widely in the field of archaeological research and exploration, but they are also valuable for a wide range of careers and further studies.

Many of York's Masters postgraduates go on to further research, academic or teaching careers, museum positions and archaeology posts at local councils, regional authorities, field units and heritage bodies. Some of the organisations our students now work for include:
-Archaeological field units
-Environmental archaeology
-Professional archaeologists – field and laboratory based
-Laboratory technicians
-Demonstrators
-University/research technicians
-Academia
-On-site osteoarchaeologists
-Medical humanities

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The Warwick History Department is recognised internationally as a centre for innovative and influential research and is consistently ranked among the best history departments in the UK. Read more

Introduction

The Warwick History Department is recognised internationally as a centre for innovative and influential research and is consistently ranked among the best history departments in the UK. The MA in the History of Medicine aims to introduce students to the advanced study of the history of medicine, and to equip them with the conceptual and practical skills to carry out independent historical research in this field. The students on the MA are encouraged to engage with a range of concepts, and to place developments within medical theory and practice in a broad social and cultural framework.

The Term One core module ‘Themes and Methods in Medical History’ is designed to introduce students to some of the main historiographical approaches and debates within the history of medicine from the early modern period to the twenty-first century. The module focuses on the evolution of ideas, institutions and practices within medicine, the reception of new approaches and lay responses, the structure of medical practice and the medical professions, and the scientific, social and cultural context of medical intervention. Students are encouraged to situate illness, disease and health care in a broad context, and to frame discussions in seminars in response to a detailed and critical survey of the literature in this area.

The Term Two core module, 'Matters of Life and Death', will address three sets of topics in the history of medicine (broadly construed) selected by its students from a menu of possible options. This unusual structure gives 'Matters of Life and Death' the flexibility required to ensure that it is always focused on subjects closely related to student interests and dissertation research. Possible topics range across the expertise of teaching and research staff in the Centre for the History of Medicine, and of our Associates in the wider University context.

Students actively engage with a wide range of sources available to the historian of medicine (e.g. medical texts, practice records, diaries, case records, public health reports and health propaganda, and visual sources).

Prospective students may be nominated for Wellcome Awards, as well as Departmental, University and ESRC funding.

Course Overview

AUTUMN TERM
◾Core Module Themes and Methods in Medical History (HI907) (30 CATS)
◾Core Module (Term 1): Theory, Skills and Method (HI989) (30 CATS)
A compulsory course designed to help students acquire the methodological skills required to undertake an extended piece of historical research and writing.

SPRING TERM
◾Core Module (Term 2): Matters of Life and Death: Topics in the Medical Humanities (HI991) (30 CATS)
◾Optional Module (Term 2): to be selected from the list below. (All 30 CATS)

SUMMER TERM
◾Dissertation : (20,000 words) (60 CATS)

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. This MA allows you to develop an in-depth understanding of the history of health, medicine and society. You’ll be trained in historical research methods and conceptual and methodological approaches to the history of health, medicine and society. Read more

This MA allows you to develop an in-depth understanding of the history of health, medicine and society.

You’ll be trained in historical research methods and conceptual and methodological approaches to the history of health, medicine and society. You can combine British, European and African history under the guidance of leading researchers in History, History and Philosophy and Science and Medieval Studies. You’ll have the chance to focus on topics and periods that suit your own interests, whether that’s the history of health, medicine and society in the Middle Ages or the First World War.

Looking at the health of individuals, families and communities, you could study the human life course from birth to death, the experiences of medical practitioners and caregivers, medicine during periods of war and conflict, or the impact of health policy in different societies. It’s an exciting opportunity to explore how health and medicine have always been shaped by the social and cultural context.

Specialist resources

We have an exceptional range of resources to help you explore the topics that interest you. The world-class Brotherton Library holds a wealth of resources in its Special Collections, including historical works on health, medicine, cookery and medicinal uses of food, as well as extensive archival material about the history of medicine, surgery and nursing during the First World War and across the region since the eighteenth century.

You’ll be encouraged to participate in events run by the School of History’s lively ‘Health, Medicine and Society’ research group, including seminars, reading group sessions and a postgraduate symposium. You’ll also be able to attend a huge range of other events at the University of Leeds, including seminars at the Centre for History and Philosophy of Science and the Leeds Centre for Medical Humanities.

You’ll also have access to the University’s Museum of Science, Technology and Medicine, which is especially rich in its medical collections, and we have close links with the Thackray Medical Museum in east Leeds and its 47,000 medical objects.

Course content

The first semester will lay the foundations of your studies, introducing you to historical research methods, and key sources, debates and methodologies in the history of health, medicine and society. You’ll take part in a source analysis workshop and gain practical knowledge of documentary, visual and material sources in the university and local area which can be used to study the history of health, medicine and society.

You’ll also develop specialist knowledge of the development of the history of medicine and the social history of medicine as historical sub-disciplines, and the place of health and medicine within the discipline of history.

In Semester Two, you’ll build on this knowledge with your choice from a wide range of optional modules, including specialist topics such as birth , death and illness in the Middle Ages; Medicine and warfare in the 19th and 20th centuries or disease and sexuality in Africa. You’ll also have the opportunity to work collaboratively with partner organisations, such as the West Yorkshire Archive Service, by studying the ‘Making History: Archive collaborations’ module.

Throughout the programme, you’ll develop your knowledge across a variety of areas as well as key skills in research and critical analysis. You’ll showcase these skills when you complete your dissertation, which will be independently researched on a topic of your choice and submitted by the end of the programme in September.

If you choose to study part-time, you’ll study over a longer period and take fewer modules in each year.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • Research Methodology in History 30 credits
  • Dissertation (History of Health, Medicine and Society) 60 credits
  • Approaches to the History of Health and Medicine 30 credits

Optional modules

  • Making History: Archive Collaborations 30 credits
  • Medicine and Warfare in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries 30 credits
  • Women, Gender and Sexuality: Archives and Approaches 30 credits
  • Sexuality and Disease in African History 30 credits
  • Lifecycles: Birth, Death and Illness in the Middle Ages 30 credits
  • Special Option (History of Science) 30 credits
  • Science in the Museum: Interpretations & Practices 30 credits
  • The Origin of Modern Medicine (Birth of the Clinic) 30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read History of Health, Medicine and Society MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read History of Health, Medicine and Society MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

We use a range of teaching and learning methods. The majority of your modules will be taught through weekly seminars, where you’ll discuss issues and themes in your chosen modules with a small group of students and your tutors. Independent study is also crucial to this degree, giving you the space to shape your own studies and develop your skills.

Assessment

We use different types of assessment to help you develop a wide range of skills, including presentations, research proposals, project reports and essays, depending on the subjects you choose.

Career opportunities

This programme will heighten your cultural and social awareness as well as allowing you to build your historical knowledge. You’ll also gain high-level research, analysis and communication skills that will prove valuable in a wide range of careers.

Graduates have found success in a diverse range of careers in education, research and the private sector. Many others have continued with their studies at PhD level. Your knowledge and skills will appeal to a wide range of employers, including in the charitable, education, healthcare, and heritage sectors .

We offer different forms of support to help you reach your career goals. You’ll have the chance to attend our career groups, meeting students with similar plans, or you could become a paid academic mentor to an undergraduate completing their final-year dissertation. You could also apply for one of the internships we offer each year.



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This course looks at religion from anthropological and sociological perspectives. Read more

This course looks at religion from anthropological and sociological perspectives. Durham has particular strengths in the study of Mormonism; death, dying and disposal; religion and emotion; religion/faith and globalisation; religion and politics; contemporary evangelicalism and post-evangelicalism; and religion and generational change. It also boasts the Centre for Death and Life Studies and the Project for Spirituality, Theology and Health.

Course Structure

  • Social Scientific Methods in the Study of Religion core module
  • Three option modules
  • Dissertation.

Core Modules

  • Social Scientific Methods in the Study of Religion 
  • Dissertation.

Optional Modules

Optional modules in previous years have included:

2-3 choices from:

  • Ritual, Symbolism and Belief in the Anthropology of Religion
  • Theology, Ethics and Medicine
  • Literature and Religion
  • Christian Northumbria 600-750
  • Ecclesiology and Ethnography

Plus up to 1 choice from:

  • Advanced Hebrew Texts
  • Advanced Aramaic
  • Middle Egyptian
  • The Bible and Hermeneutics
  • The Old Testament Pseudepigrapha and the New Testament
  • Paul and his Interpreters
  • Gospels and Canon
  • Patristic Exegesis
  • Patristic Ecclesiology
  • The Anglican Theological Vision
  • Liturgy and Sacramentality
  • Classic Texts in Christian Theology
  • Conceiving Change in Contemporary Catholicism
  • Christian Gender
  • Principles of Theological Ethics
  • Catholic Social Thought
  • Doctrine of Creation
  • Selected modules from the MA in Theology and Ministry programme
  • Level 3 undergraduate module, or any Level 1 – 2 language module offered by the Department of Theology and Religion, taken in conjunction with the Extended Study in Theology & Religion module
  • 30 credits from another Board of Studies (including appropriate credit-bearing language modules offered by the University’s Centre for Foreign Language Study)

Course Learning and Teaching

Most MA teaching is delivered through small group seminars and tutorials. These exemplify and encourage the various skills and practices required for independent scholarly engagement with texts and issues. Teaching in the Department of Theology & Religion is ‘research led’ at both BA and MA levels, but particularly at MA level. Research led teaching is informed by staff research, but more importantly it aims to develop students as independent researchers themselves, able to pursue and explore their own research interests and questions. This is why the independently researched MA dissertation is the culmination of the MA programme. Such engagement with texts and issues is not only an excellent preparation for doctoral research, it also develops those skills of critical analysis, synthesis and presentation sought and required by employers.

Many MA classes will contain a ‘lecture’ element, conveying information and exemplifying an approach to the subject-matter that will enable students to develop a clear understanding of the subject and improve their own ability to analyse and evaluate information and arguments. Seminars enhance knowledge and understanding through preparation and interaction with other students and staff, promoting awareness of and respect for different viewpoints and approaches, and developing skills of articulacy, advocacy and interrogation. Through small group discussions and tutorials, feedback is provided on student work, with the opportunity to discuss specific issues in detail, enhancing student knowledge and writing skills.

The Dissertation module includes training in generic research skills, from the use of the Library to issues in referencing and bibliography. The subject specific core module introduces students to questions of interpretation and argument in the disciplines encompassed by theology and religion, and helps them to develop their own interests and questions that will issue in the MA dissertation. The latter is a piece of independent research, but it is fostered and guided through individual tutorials with a supervisor, with whom students meet throughout the academic year.

Career Opportunities

A significant number of our graduates find employment in academic institutions (universities and seminaries) around the world.

Others go into teaching, church ministry, the caring professions, and many other professional fields.



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Our history programme offers research opportunities in areas as diverse as medicine, death, historical demography, gender, women's history and urban culture. Read more
Our history programme offers research opportunities in areas as diverse as medicine, death, historical demography, gender, women's history and urban culture. As an MPhil or PhD student you will enjoy a research environment in which ambitious and original ideas can flourish.

Many of the research opportunities in history are interdisciplinary and are available for most periods of history and in most geographical regions.

You can find out more about MPhil and PhD supervision areas from the School of History, Classics and Archaeology. There are opportunities for joint supervision with Latin American researchers in the School of Modern Languages.

Supervision is normally available in the following subject areas:

Classical, medieval and early modern medicine

Topics include:
-Reception(s) of Hippocratic medicine and Hippocratic Oath
-History of medical ethics
-History and iconography of melancholy and psychopathology
-Medical history/historiography as an academic discipline
-Genres of medical writing
-Interface between medicine and literature, Thomas Mann and medicine
-Medicine and philosophy; medicine and law

The supervisor in this area is Dr T Rütten.

Death and burial

The history of poverty and poor relief in pre-industrial England (Professor J Boulton).

Gender, women's history and the history of sexuality

Britain (Dr H Berry); the modern Atlantic world (Dr D Paton); Greece (Dr V Hionidou).

Historical demography

The history of nutrition, famine and mortality; the history of fertility, birth control and contraception (Dr V Hionidou).

History of ideas

Revolutionary ideology in 18th and 19th century Britain and France (Dr R Hammersley); European historiography (Dr L Racaut).

History of psychiatry

Mental health and the 'asylum'; forensic psychiatry, criminal lunacy and crime; the history of the body; early modern social and cultural history of health; history of hospitals; history of sexuality; domestic/household medicine; travel and medicine (Dr J Andrews).

Early medieval Britain and Europe (Dr S Ashley, Ms A Redgate).

National identity, inter-ethnic relations and border issues

Japan (Dr M Dusinberre); North America (Dr B Houston); Russia and Ukraine (Professor D Saunders); Mexico and Cuba (Dr K Brewster); the Caribbean (Dr D Paton); Spain (Dr A Quiroga); Ireland (Dr S Ashley, Dr F Campbell); the Irish in Britain (Dr J Allen).

Politics, international relations and the impact of war

Modern British politics (Dr J Allen, Dr M Farr, Dr F Campbell); European fascism and the Nazi new order (Professor T Kirk); 20th century France (Dr M Perry); 20th century Italy (Dr C Baldoli); transwar Japan (Dr M Dusinberre); American Civil War and the United States in the 19th century (Professor S M Grant); the United States in the 20th century (Dr B Houston).

Urban history and urban culture

History of the press in early modern France (Dr L Racaut); 19th century Newcastle and the North East (Dr J Allen); 18th century urban cultures in Britain (Dr H Berry); 17th century London (Professor J Boulton); urban culture in the Habsburg Empire (Professor T Kirk).

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The postgraduate certificate in palliative care looks at the development of effective palliative and end-of-life care, which is a major priority for health providers both nationally and internationally. Read more
The postgraduate certificate in palliative care looks at the development of effective palliative and end-of-life care, which is a major priority for health providers both nationally and internationally.

This palliative care nursing course addresses the complex challenges end-of-life care creates for societies and health professionals, including a range of ethical, social, professional and cultural issues that need careful analysis.

This online palliative care nursing course is designed to develop and enhance the knowledge and skills you require to promote, lead and drive high quality care for the palliative patient and their families in their care setting. Your studies will centre on current philosophies that underpin palliative care, bringing together a range of clinical and academic experts from this field.

See the website http://courses.southwales.ac.uk/courses/313-postgraduate-certificate-palliative-care-distance-learning

What you will study

Modules:
- Therapeutic Management of Life Limiting Illness in Palliative Care: Assessment and management of complex symptoms

The assessment and management of complex symptoms including pain, nausea and vomiting, anxiety, depression, fatigue and agitation will be explored and appropriate interventions critically discussed. Consideration through the module will be given to psychosocial issues, such as, anxiety and depression within patients who have a life limiting illness and the communication strategies used in relation to managing difficult symptoms.

- Nature and Scope of Palliative Care: Specific issues pertinent to the delivery of effective palliative care

This will explore issues pertaining to palliative care via case studies and a narrative approach. These can include euthanasia, the right to die, and the use of advanced directives while considering the issue of capacity and choice.

- End of Life Care: Role of the professional in the care of an individual at the end of life, including perspectives from the individual and family

You will critically explore the role of the professional in the care of an individual at the end of their life. It will include exploring the impact of death and dying from a holistic perspective on the individual and family. The themes of loss, grief and bereavement will be central within this module. Professional, legal and ethical issues related to death and dying will also be considered through the module.

Learning and teaching methods

You will be taught through online discussion forums via the University’ learning portal Blackboard.

Work Experience and Employment Prospects

This course will enable students to demonstrate clear evidence of ongoing professional development in line with national strategic plans.

Assessment methods

Assessment involves written assignments and achievement of clinical competencies. You will receive key learning materials and be supported throughout the course by the module team and your contact with other students.

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The Postgraduate Certificate in Acute and Critical Care addresses the complex care required by critically ill patients. Patients can become acutely or critically ill at any time and the more ill the patient becomes, the more likely they are to be vulnerable, physiologically unstable and require complex care. Read more
The Postgraduate Certificate in Acute and Critical Care addresses the complex care required by critically ill patients.

Patients can become acutely or critically ill at any time and the more ill the patient becomes, the more likely they are to be vulnerable, physiologically unstable and require complex care. Acutely or critically ill patients exist throughout many settings in hospitals and beyond, and there is a need to ensure the quality of care is delivered by knowledgeable health care practitioners.

This one year acute and critical care nursing course is suitable if you work in ICU, CCU, HDU, A&E, theatres, medical/surgical assessment units (MAU/SAU), pre-hospital care and general acute wards.

See the website http://courses.southwales.ac.uk/courses/709-postgraduate-certificate-acute-and-critical-care

What you will study

- Applied Physiology of Acute and Critical Illness
This module looks at critically analysing the impact of pathophysiology on acute and critically ill adult patients and to understand altered physiology. You will explore the consequences of acute and critical illness on homeostasis using a wide knowledge base of normal and altered physiology to understand key treatments. The module will also focus on cardio-respiratory physiology, neurological control and acute medical conditions.

- Care and Management of the Acute and Critically Ill
You will critically evaluate the complexity of care issues in relation to acutely and critically ill adult patients and analyse the context of that care. The effectiveness of care implementation across a range of patient presentations will be analysed with consideration given to the processes of assessment, monitoring and intervention.

- Legal and Professional Issues in Caring for the Acute and Critically Ill
In this module you will undertake a critical evaluation of service delivery systems from legal and professional perspectives. This includes the right to health care; upholding human rights; duty and standards of care; professional negligence and the application of these to professional practice in acute and critical care contexts. Topics such as life and death, euthanasia, legal definitions of death, organ and tissue donation are also considered in terms of the implications on practitioners caring for acute and critically ill patients.

Learning and teaching methods

You will study through a mixture of lectures,group work, patient scenarios, interactive tutorials and seminar presentations. You will need to attend University one day a week, currently our students are taught on Fridays at 9am-5pm.

Work Experience and Employment Prospects

You will develop personally and professionally within your specialist clinical area. The course will also enable you to develop a high level of skill in transferring complex theoretical knowledge into comprehensive, patient-centred and focused clinical practice.

Assessment methods

Modules are assessed through multiple-choice questions, viva voce (oral examination), assignments, Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCE) and written evidence of personal and professional development. The OSCEs will take place in May each year and be completed as part of the clinical skills modules and involve undertaking a comprehensive patient history, examining a particular bodily system, and identifying a management and treatment plan for the individual.

Facilities

Our state of the art Clinical Simulation Centre replicates an acute care NHS environment, providing realistic clinical facilities for our nursing and midwifery students and qualified healthcare professionals.

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Using the process of scientific reasoning as its framework, the programme will integrate the key issues central to the theoretical aspects in these specialist areas with communication skills, management approaches, timely and reasoned decision making, identification of treatment options, best practice etc. Read more
Using the process of scientific reasoning as its framework, the programme will integrate the key issues central to the theoretical aspects in these specialist areas with communication skills, management approaches, timely and reasoned decision making, identification of treatment options, best practice etc.

You will have the opportunity to tailor your learning experiences and backgrounds to meet your own personal and professional needs. You will also have the opportunity to develop your leadership skills within a multidisciplinary setting that cares for trauma-afflicted patients. Enquiry-, evidence-based learning will be a key feature of the programme through problem based learning and journal clubs. In addition, you will have the opportunity to take part in a substantive research project, allowing you to develop research skills, project management, oral/poster presentation and writing a research dissertation. Research projects may be undertaken in an academic laboratory or can be in a clinical setting.

The rise of trauma:

The incidence of trauma continues to rise. The World Health Organization estimates that by 2020 trauma will become the leading cause of death worldwide due to ageing in Western populations, increasing road use in developing countries and conflict. In England alone there are at least 20,000 cases of major trauma each year resulting in 5,400 deaths and many others resulting in permanent disabilities requiring long-term care. There are around a further 28,000 cases which, although not meeting the precise definition of major trauma, would be cared for in the same way.

Major trauma costs the NHS between £0.3 and £0.4 billion a year in immediate treatment, but when considering the costs of subsequent hospital treatments, rehabilitation, home care support, informal carer costs and the annual lost economic output as a result of major trauma is estimated to be between £3.3 and £3.7 billion (National Audit Office, Major Trauma Care in England, 2010).

Neurotrauma alone - including mild traumatic brain injury, which does not fit into the definition of major trauma - is the leading cause of death and disability in the first 4 decades of life and is estimated to cost the UK economy £8 billion a year (more than stroke). Many countries around the world now recognise the importance of trauma research to their health care systems and are developing specialist research programmes of to meet the growing needs of their population. This expansion in specialist clinical provision is generating demand for professionals with a recognised background of trauma sciences training.

About the College of Medical and Dental Sciences

The College of Medical and Dental Sciences is a major international centre for research and education, make huge strides in finding solutions to major health problems including ageing, cancer, cardiovascular, dental, endocrine, inflammatory diseases, infection (including antibiotic resistance), rare diseases and trauma.
We tackle global healthcare problems through excellence in basic and clinical science, and improve human health by delivering tangible real-life benefits in the fight against acute and chronic disease.
Situated in the largest healthcare region in the country, with access to one of the largest and most diverse populations in Europe, we are positioned to address major global issues and diseases affecting today’s society through our eight specialist research institutes.
With over 1,000 academic staff and around £60 million of new research funding per year, the College of Medical and Dental Sciences is dedicated to performing world-leading research.
We care about our research and teaching and are committed to developing outstanding scientists and healthcare professionals of the future. We offer our postgraduate community a unique learning experience taught by academics who lead the way in research in their field.

Funding and Scholarships

There are many ways to finance your postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. To see what funding and scholarships are available, please visit: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/funding

Open Days

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open days.
Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/visit

Virtual Open Days

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

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This programme will give you an insight into the complex history of technology, medicine, scientific knowledge and methodology, as well as how they have shaped the world we live in. Read more

This programme will give you an insight into the complex history of technology, medicine, scientific knowledge and methodology, as well as how they have shaped the world we live in.

You’ll explore the themes, concepts and debates in the study of the history of science through core modules. These will also allow you to develop your historical research skills, using our excellent library resources to work with primary and secondary sources. But you’ll also choose from a range of optional modules that allow you to specialise in topics areas that suit your interests, from birth, death and illness in the Middle Ages to modern science communication.

Guided by leading researchers and supported by our Centre of History and Philosophy of Science, you’ll learn in a stimulating environment with access to a wide range of activities. You could even gain research experience by getting involved in the development of our Museum of the History of Science, Technology and Medicine.

We have world-class research resources to support your studies. The Brotherton Library houses extensive manuscript, archive and printed material in its Special Collections, including Newton’s Principia, a first edition of his Opticks and thousands of books and journals on topics from the 16th century onwards on topics such as astronomy, botany, medicine, physiology, chemistry, inventions and alchemy. You’ll also have access to the collections of artefacts across campus that we have brought together through the Museum of the History of Science, Technology and Medicine.

The Centre also hosts a number of research seminars given by visiting speakers, staff members and doctoral students and which all postgraduate students are encouraged to attend. There are also regular reading groups on a wide range of topics and the seminar series of other centres within the School are also available.

Course content

In your first semester you’ll take a core module introducing you to different approaches and debates in history of science, technology and medicine, as well as how they have been used over time to help us understand scientific developments. You’ll build on this in the following semester with a second core module that will give you a foundation in historical skills and research methods, equipping you to work critically and sensitively with primary and secondary sources.

You’ll have the chance to demonstrate the skills and knowledge you’ve gained in your dissertation, which you’ll submit by the end of the year. This is an independently researched piece of work on a topic of your choice within the history of science, technology and medicine – and you can choose to take an extended dissertation if you want to go into even greater depth.

Throughout the year you’ll be able to choose from a range of optional modules, allowing you to develop your knowledge by specialising in a topic of your choice such as science and religion historically considered, or science in the museum. You’ll take one optional module if you take the extended dissertation, or two if you do the standard dissertation.

If you choose to study part-time, you’ll study over a longer period and take fewer modules in each year.

Course structure

These are typical modules/components studied and may change from time to time. Read more in our Terms and conditions.

Compulsory modules

You’ll take three compulsory modules, though you can choose whether to take a standard (60 credits) or extended (90 credits) dissertation. You’ll then choose one or two optional modules.

  • Historical Skills and Practices 30 credits
  • Current Approaches in the History of Science, Technology & Medicine 30 credits

Optional modules

  • The European Enlightenment 30 credits
  • Lifecycles: Birth, Death and Illness in the Middle Ages 30 credits
  • Science and Religion Historically Considered 30 credits
  • History & Theory of Modern Science Communication 30 credits
  • Special Option (History of Science) 30 credits
  • Science in the Museum: Interpretations & Practices 30 credits
  • The Origin of Modern Medicine (Birth of the Clinic) 30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read History of Science, Technology and Medicine MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read History of Science, Technology and Medicine MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

Most of our taught modules combine seminars and tutorials, where you will discuss issues and concepts stemming from your reading with a small group of students and your tutor. You’ll also benefit from one-to-one supervision while you complete your dissertation. Independent study is also an important element of the programme, allowing you to develop your skills and pursue your own interests more closely.

Assessment

We assess your progress using a combination of exams and coursework, giving you the freedom to research and write on topic areas that suit your interests within each module you study.

Career opportunities

You’ll gain a range of in-depth subject knowledge throughout this programme, as well as a set of high-level transferable skills in research, analysis, interpretation and oral and written communication that are very attractive to employers.

As a result, you’ll be equipped for a wide range of careers. Some of these will make direct use of your subject knowledge, such as museum work or public engagement with science, while your skills will enable you to succeed in fields such as business and finance, publishing, IT and teaching.

Graduates of our School also regularly go onto careers in journalism, the media, social work, human resources, PR, recruitment and the charity sector. Many also continue with their studies at PhD level and pursue careers in academia.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



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In this programme, you will learn to find the answer to these and other puzzles of Classical and Mediterranean Archaeology. The programme is part of the Archaeology Master programme and builds on the knowledge and skills obtained in a BA programme of Archaeology. Read more
In this programme, you will learn to find the answer to these and other puzzles of Classical and Mediterranean Archaeology. The programme is part of the Archaeology Master programme and builds on the knowledge and skills obtained in a BA programme of Archaeology.

Within the programme three different tracks are available. These tracks have their specific core modules, but also share courses with the other tracks within our MA programme.

The tracks are:

* Classical and Mediterranean Archaeology, with core modules The Rise of Cities and States, Mediterranean Landscape Archaeology and the Archaeology of Death.

* Bioarchaeology, with a core module of the same name.

* Maritime Archaeology with a core module of the same name.

The first semester comprises one compulsory module, Archaeology Today, and two optional modules (The Rise of Cities and States, and Mediterranean Landscape Archaeology). In the second semester you can follow two optional modules (Archaeology of Death, Advanced GIS course), or do an internship. The final stage of the MA programme is a thesis.

Why in Groningen?

- flexible structure
- all courses are taught in English
- attention to both theory and practice
- large international research projects in Italy, Greece, Egypt, Turkey, Iraq
- unique archaeobotanical and archaeozoological reference collections
- GIS and Material Culture laboratories
- close connections with Ancient History, Classics and Religious Studies
- close connections with Centre for Isotopes Research and Biology
- very low tuition fees
- a student friendly city

Job perspectives

The job opportunities for archaeologists in Europe are good. Because of the Valleta Treaty, all spatial planning projects have to take archaeological heritage into account. This has increased the work possibilities at consultancy and governmental agencies. It is also possible to find a position in the museum world or become an academic researcher.

The BA and MA programmes are strongly tied to the Groningen Institute of Archaeology (GIA), which comprises the archaeological research of the University of Groningen.

GIA research is focused on:
- Prehistoric, protohistoric and historical archaeology in the Netherlands, the Mediterranean and the Arctics.
- Bioarchaeology: archaeobotany and archaeozoology
- Material culture studies, including conservation
- Landscape archaeology, including GIS-based studies

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The objective of the international one-year MSc programme in Population Studies is to train young professionals in the theories, methods and skills required to comprehend population dynamics. Read more
The objective of the international one-year MSc programme in Population Studies is to train young professionals in the theories, methods and skills required to comprehend population dynamics.

Essential to understanding population dynamics is the study of demographic behaviour of people, in terms of their life events, e.g. birth, marriage, divorce, health, migration, and death. The master programme focuses on these demographic events, on how decision-making regarding these life events (e.g. its timing) is influenced by the historical, economic, societal, cultural, and medical context, and on how these demographic events have an impact on population-level trends.

You will learn about:
- Pressing population issues as population ageing, integration of migrants, health inequalities and poverty
- Individual decision-making processes behind demographic events, such as family formation, residential choices and migration, and health care use
- Collecting and interpreting demographic data
- Methods and techniques to analyze demographic data: life table, population projections, advanced survey analysis, qualitative research methods
- Population policies and intervention programmes

The field of Population Studies reflects on and deals with currently relevant demographic topics and related societal issues. The study is simultaneously concrete and broad.

Why in Groningen?

Our programme is unique in its combination of analytical and social demography, its combination of quantitative and qualitative research methods, its structured progress through the research process, and its international, multidisciplinary and strong scientific orientation - as officially being recognized. Interactive ways of teaching are being employed by very enthousiastic and dedicated teachers. Within the Netherlands, Groningen is the only university offering an MSC in Population Studies.

Job perspectives

The program has been developed for future professionals in business, government, non-governmental organisations (NGOs), and academia. Demographers are competent in reflecting on how the context in which we live affects population dynamics (migration, fertility, mortality, ageing, etc.) and vice-versa. This can be either through analyses of large data files for demographic data and trends, or through in-depth qualitative analysis of people's life.

The career perspectives are good. Many of our alumni continue into a PhD, whereas international mid-career alumni mostly acquire a higher position within the institute they were working.

Our alumni gain employment at:
- (interdisciplinary) research institutes
- universities (lecturer, PhD student)
- (inter)national statistical offices
- national planning and government offices
- United Nations agencies
- NGO's, like Doctors without Borders
- private companies (e.g. as data-manager or communication expert)

Research

The Master's thesis topic is integrated in the research theme of the Population Research Centre: “Population and Wellbeing in Context”. This comprises topics such as population decline, population ageing, global migration, life of migrants, healthy ageing in society, families, households, residence, causes of death, child health, nutrition, access to health care, place making of elderly.

The master programme clearly reflects the major characteristics of the research programme by focussing on both the macro (population) and micro level (the demographic behaviour of people); by adopting multi-disciplinary perspectives (demography, epidemiology, anthropology, geography, social ageing, nutrition); by teaching both quantitative and qualitative research methods; by focusing on the translation of research into policies or interventions.

The students are being taught the theories, methods and skills that the different teachers apply in their research. They participate in seminars and discussion groups in an active research environment including guest lectures and seminars by established professionals from other demographic institutions.

Part of the Master Programme is the participation in the Dutch Demography Day - a conference for demographers - and an excursion to the Netherlands Interdisciplinary Demographic Institute in The Hague.

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Study Policing and Criminal Investigation at LJMU and work with crime victims and witnesses to enhance your knowledge and key skills in this area. Read more
Study Policing and Criminal Investigation at LJMU and work with crime victims and witnesses to enhance your knowledge and key skills in this area.

-Commences January 2017
-Explore investigative issues to gain the knowledge and practical skills to operate as a crime investigator in serious and complex cases
-Consider the links between investigation, forensics and psychology
-Work with crime victims and witnesses
-Ideal for serving officers and those about to embark on their policing or academic career
-Excellent employment opportunities in policing/investigative work, private investigation and with bodies such as Trading Standards and the Inland Revenue
-A valuable foundation for progression to PhD

The MSc Policing and Criminal Investigation combines supervised independent research with specialist training in research methods and academic skills, while also helping students become aware of emerging approaches currently practiced in the discipline.
​Over the course of the programme you will be introduced to key developments in policing studies and given the skills necessary to produce a successful postgraduate research project. You will work individually with a supervisor throughout the year, as well as taking part in taught modules with fellow Policing Studies students and/or students from other disciplines/Faculties. In addition, you will be part of the wider research activities of the Liverpool Centre for Advanced Policing Studies.

You will receive specialist supervision and study within a diverse community of fellow researchers. Staff are active in a wide range of fields including: Crime Prevention, GIS, People Trafficking, Public Order, Mental Health, Multi Agency and Partnership Working in the Public Sector, Computer Crime, Investigation, Terrorism and Counter-terrorism, Port Security, Risk Management and Education.

What you will study on this degree

Please see guidance below on core modules:

Policing in Context

Gain insights into current policing, community safety and criminal justice priorities by exploring different perspectives that relate to policing, regulatory processes, professional values and ethics

Advanced Research Skills

In preparation for your dissertation, this module introduces key epistemological and methodological issues that impact upon research into crime, security, community safety and criminal justice

Advanced Investigation Skills

Examine the administrative difficulties posited during a criminal investigation and the importance of investigative ethics

Forensic and Medicolegal Death

Discover core foundational concepts of criminal investigations, enabling you to understand, explain, analyse and evaluate causes, sustainment and consequences of processing a death scene

Forensic Cognition

Critically explore why offenders commit acts of sexual and physical violence by examining influential theories that have been developed to aid in investigating sexual/violent offences

Investigative Interviewing

Examine current practices, techniques and applications of police interviewing by being exposed to comparative international techniques in interviewing, interpretation of verbal and physical behaviour, causes of denial, deception and defensiveness

Dissertation

Analyse and interpret an issue in your chosen field

​Further guidance on modules

The information listed in the section entitled 'What you will study' is an overview of the academic content of the programme that will take the form of either core or option modules. Modules are designated as core or option in accordance with professional body requirements and internal Academic Framework review, so may be subject to change. Students will be required to undertake modules that the University designates as core and will have a choice of designated option modules. Additionally, option modules may be offered subject to meeting minimum student numbers.

Academic Framework reviews are conducted by LJMU from time to time to ensure that academic standards continue to be maintained.

Please email if you require further guidance or clarification.

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Why study at Roehampton. One of the longest running postgraduate programmes in clinical neuroscience in the UK. It will give you an insight into recent advances in neurosciences of relevance to neurological and neuropsychiatric diseases. Read more

Why study at Roehampton

  • One of the longest running postgraduate programmes in clinical neuroscience in the UK.
  • It will give you an insight into recent advances in neurosciences of relevance to neurological and neuropsychiatric diseases.
  • The programme is recognised by the Federation of Neuroscience Societies (FENS) and included in the Network of European Neuroscience Schools (NENS), which is the highest accolade in European neuroscience teaching.
  • Roehampton is ranked best modern university in London (Sunday Times Good University Guide 2015)
  • We are the most research-intensive modern university in the UK (Research Excellence Framework 2014)

Course summary

This cutting-edge programme offers an exciting opportunity to study modern neuroscience with a focus on clinical implications. You will gain a strong foundation in understanding the mechanisms and treatments of neurological and neuropsychiatric diseases.

This course is designed for students from a range of backgrounds, who are interested in pursuing a career in neuroscience. You will develop a detailed understanding of modern theory and concepts relating to brain research and neuroscience and the application of these principles in the treatment of brain disorders. This course places emphasis on the clinical relevance of recent developments in neuroscience.

The development of your research methods skills is an integral part of the course. You will further your understanding of applied neuroscience with a research project which will develop your data handling and analysis skills, use of applied theory and statistics. 

You will join the Health Sciences Research Centre whose academics are currently investigating a range of topical issues such as the addictive nature of new psychoactive substances, effects of stress on the brain regulatory systems and the mechanisms of brain cell death and repair using neural stem cells. You will be welcome to attend research seminars and discussions on topical developments in neuroscience and health sciences, led by experts. 

MSc Clinical Neuroscience is recognised by the Federation of Neuroscience Societies (FENS) and included in the Network of European Neuroscience Schools (NENS), which is the highest accolade in European neuroscience teaching.

Content

In this postgraduate programme, you will develop an integrated overview of contemporary neuroscience as a rapidly developing discipline with multiple links with molecular biology, genetics, pharmacology and medical sciences. 

You will be introduced to a diverse range of topics and will have the chance to focus on areas that interest you. Examples of topics that you might cover include: clinical relevance of recent developments in neuroscience, brain imaging techniques and their applications in neurology and psychiatry, neurobiological mechanisms of human brain disorders, effects of nutrition and addiction on brain function, and research methods.

You will discuss ethical issues in clinical neuroscience and develop your ability to critically evaluate current developments in clinical brain research, which are relevant to healthcare. 

This course can accommodate students from a range of backgrounds including new graduates from life sciences or psychology as well as health professionals who hold non-traditional qualifications. The programme options of PG Diploma or PG Certificate can be useful to health professionals who wish to refresh update theory knowledge without the commitment of conducting a research project (MSc). It is also suitable for applicants from the NHS, for example neuro-nurses or therapists.

Modules

Here are examples of the modules:

  • The Brain from a Clinical Perspective
  • Biomedical Practical on Brain Function
  • Brain, Diet, and Addiction
  • The Immune Brain

Career options

Health professionals, research careers in academia, NHS or private sector including the pharmaceutical industry. Alternatively, graduates may opt for further academic study at PhD level.

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This varied degree will allow you to explore the cultural, social, political, theological and other aspects of medieval history while gaining valuable skills for further research. Read more

This varied degree will allow you to explore the cultural, social, political, theological and other aspects of medieval history while gaining valuable skills for further research.

Core modules will allow you to gain an understanding of medieval Latin and palaeography so you can work with primary sources. You’ll also study research methods and bibliography to sharpen your research skills – all of which will allow you to make the most of the fantastic archives, library resources and collections both within the University and in the region.

You’ll also choose from a range of optional modules offered by our School of History and Institute for Medieval Studies, allowing you to gain specialist knowledge in the areas that interest you while cutting across disciplines and using different critical approaches. You could study a broad range of topics, reflecting the diverse research interests across the University which is home to the International Medieval Congress.

The Institute for Medieval Studies (IMS) has access to excellent resources, both in the University and beyond. The world-class Brotherton Library contains extensive facsimiles and microfilms of primary materials as well as a wide range of online resources. Its Special Collections also contain a wide range of manuscript, archive and early printed material, including the Melsteth Icelandic Collection, archives of the Yorkshire Archaeological Society, the old library of Ripon Cathedral, and the manuscripts and incunabula of the Brotherton Collection.

Leeds is also home to the Royal Armouries and its extensive medieval collections, while the West Yorkshire Archives are dotted around the region and the British Library has a Document Supply Centre in nearby Boston Spa.

This programme is also available to study part-time over 24 months.

Course content

Core modules throughout the degree will allow you to develop important research skills, equipping you to work with primary sources. You’ll gain a working knowledge of medieval Latin, look at research methods in historical study and learn to read and transcribe medieval manuscripts by studying palaeography.

Then you’ll build on this foundation with your choice of optional modules. You’ll choose at least one module offered by the School of History, but you could also choose from the range of interdisciplinary modules offered by IMS. You’ll also specialise further when you complete your dissertation, allowing you to conduct independent research on a specific topic of your choice to showcase the skills you’ve acquired.

If you choose to study this programme part-time, you’ll study over a longer period and take fewer modules in each year.

Details of compulsory modules can be found in the table below; for details of optional modules please see the online module catalogue.

Course structure

These are typical modules/components studied and may change from time to time. Read more in our Terms and conditions.

Compulsory modules

  • Dissertation (Medieval History) 30 credits
  • Introduction to Medieval Latin 30 credits
  • Intermediate Medieval Latin 30 credits
  • Research Methods and Bibliography 15 credits
  • Palaeography: Reading Medieval Manuscripts 15 credits

Optional modules

  • Making History: Archive Collaborations 30 credits
  • Bede's Northumbria 30 credits
  • Christian Society and the Crusades, 1185-1230 30 credits
  • Gender, Sex, and Love: Byzantium and the West, 900-1200 30 credits
  • Lifecycles: Birth, Death and Illness in the Middle Ages 30 credits
  • Warfare in the Age of the Crusades (1095-1204) 30 credits
  • How to be a Saint in the Middle Ages: Saints' Cults and their impact on culture and society (500-1500) 30 credits
  • Religious Communities and the Individual Experience of Religion, 1200-1500 30 credits
  • The Medieval Tournament: Combat and Spectacle in Western Europe, 1100-1600 30 credits
  • The Holy Land under the Franks: The Kingdom of Jerusalem and its Enemies, 1099-1187 30 credits
  • Medieval Bodies 30 credits
  • Preaching History: Understanding Sermons as Literature and Historical Source 30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Medieval History MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Medieval History MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

IMS tutors are experts in their fields, and their cutting-edge research will inform your teaching. To help you make the most of their expertise, all IMS modules are taught in small groups.

You may study skills in seminar groups of 12 or more students, but languages and other interdisciplinary options are usually taught in tutorials of up to eight students. You’ll also have one-to-one meetings with your supervisor during your dissertation.

Assessment

Depending on the modules you choose, you’ll be assessed by a range of methods to develop skills that are useful across the field of medieval studies. These will include transcriptions, bibliographies, essays, reports, translations and occasionally exams.

Career opportunities

This degree is excellent preparation for further study in related fields. It will also equip you with advanced research, communication and analytical skills that are valuable to employers in a wide range of careers such as in museums and business.

We offer a range of paid opportunities for you to gain experience that can really help with your career plans. You’ll be able to provide a mock tutorial for first-year undergraduates during their induction week, or become an academic mentor for final-year students as they complete their dissertations to gain experience of teaching, one-to-one communication and people management.

We also run several paid one-year internships throughout the year on projects such as the International Medieval Bibliography, IMS website and the International Medieval Congress to gain practical experience.

Read more about Employment in IMS.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



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