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MA Deaf Education is taught over two years through a combination of face-to-face and online learning. Read more

MA Deaf Education is taught over two years through a combination of face-to-face and online learning. Approved by the Department for Education (DFE) to offer the Mandatory Qualification for Teachers of the Deaf, the programme integrates cutting-edge research knowledge with practitioner expertise to develop skilled, knowledgeable and critical practitioners. All students are enrolled on the MA Deaf Education (ToD) programme but they may choose to graduate with a Post Graduate Diploma (PG Dip) Deaf Education (Teacher of the Deaf). It is also possible to complete an MA Deaf Education without the teacher of the deaf qualification.

Central to the programme is an understanding that the establishment of language fluency and effective communication as a basis for cognitive development, social development and access to the curriculum must be the educational priority for all deaf learners. Individual auditory potential must be carefully evaluated and regularly reappraised in relation to the communicative and educational demands of the context, so that advances in personal and assistive hearing technologies combined with the latest thinking on optimal classroom management can be put into practice.

Unique to this programme is recognition of the plural and diverse linguistic contexts of deaf children’s lives. Through consideration of the roles of spoken and signed languages and increasingly sophisticated hearing technologies in deaf children’s lives and education, you will develop a broad language base and the skills to respond flexibly to deaf children’s dynamic and changing communication needs.

We welcome suitably qualified deaf and hearing applicants, and provide appropriate access and support arrangements for all students. Bursaries are offered to UK Deaf Education schools or services funding more than one student per school or service in a single year.

Course content

MA Deaf Education comprises four core modules delivered across two years. Your first module will be either Deafness and Development or Educational Audiology, depending on when you commence your studies.

If you are working towards the Teacher of the Deaf (ToD) award, you will also build a Professional Skills Portfolio throughout the two years. This applied aspect of the programme allows you to acquire and demonstrate the mandatory teaching, communication and audiological skills required of a ToD.

Course structure

Year 1

Compulsory modules

  • Educational Audiology 30 credits
  • Learning and Teaching in Deaf Education 30 credits
  • Professional Skills Portfolio (Teacher of the Deaf award only)

Year 2

Compulsory modules

  • Deafness and Development 30 credits
  • The Context of Deaf Education 30 credits
  • Dissertation in Deaf Education (not required for PGDip) 60 credits
  • Professional Skills Portfolio (Teacher of the Deaf) 30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Deaf Education (Teacher of the Deaf Qualification) MA in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

Each core module comprises a study day or a short residential in Leeds, followed by twelve online taught sessions, two online tutorials and a regional tutorial. Bespoke online meetings, phone, email and Skype support is also available from tutors.

We expect you to commit the equivalent of a study day per week to this programme -- to be negotiated with your employer at the application stage. Some practical requirements of the programme are difficult to fulfil without this allocated time. We also ask you to identify someone in your school or service who will act as a mentor for you throughout the training.

Assessment

We assess the four core modules and dissertation through written assignments. The Professional Skills Portfolio is practically assessed and includes a minimum of a four-week supervised teaching placement.

Professional Skills Portfolio

The Professional Skills Portfolio module is compulsory if you are working towards the ToD qualification. The modules allows you to acquire and demonstrate the range of practical and practice based skills that you need as a Teacher of the Deaf. We outline the four strands to be completed below.

Audiology.

This strand provides guidance for developing practical skills with audiological technology and its management within different educational settings.

Communication

This strand focuses on the development of communication skills through reflective practice with both pupils and parents. It includes recording and analysing a pupil’s language use, evaluation of personal language use when teaching a pupil or group of pupils, and a reflective and critical review of a home visit.

Placement

This strand entails either one or two four-week teaching placements, depending on current and previous professional experience. At least one placement will be undertaken in an unfamiliar setting and be supported by a regional tutor.

Professional Competencies

This portfolio contains details of the ToD competencies against which you will track your progress throughout the two year course. It will also provide the means through which to identify objectives for continued professional development.

Career opportunities

MA Deaf Education provides Teachers of the Deaf with the specialist knowledge and skills they need to work across a range of settings in deaf education and provides the mandatory qualification required for England and Wales.

Graduates from the course have taken up a range of positions in specialist support services and schools. Many have subsequently progressed to management and leadership roles.

The programme also provides a route to further research and study at post graduate level via an EdD or PhD route. 



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The MSc in Deaf Education gives you the opportunity to develop research skills within this area of expertise and also provides training for qualified teachers who want to work within deaf education. Read more
The MSc in Deaf Education gives you the opportunity to develop research skills within this area of expertise and also provides training for qualified teachers who want to work within deaf education. It delivers an evidence-based approach to meeting the diverse needs of deaf children.

The course places a strong emphasis on translation of theory to practice. The rapid developments in audiology, and our understanding of language, communication and educational practice, make this an exciting area of study. The course has DfES/TDA approval, which meets the requirements of the mandatory qualification.

If you already hold the PGDip in Deaf Education, an additional module is available to allow you to gain an MSc, including Research Methods and a Dissertation.

Aims

This course aims to provide you with the skills, knowledge and understanding to ensure deaf children are able to achieve their full potential.

Special features

The course is delivered by a multi-professional team within a highly specialised and internationally recognised department.

Coursework and assessment

A variety of assessment methods are used including written assignments, case reports, practical work and practical delivery of work.

As part of the course, there are opportunities for formative assessments that help to shape individual studies but do not contribute to the final marks.

The dissertation may be in the form of:
-A systematic review
-A detailed critical review of a school/service
-A theoretical review
-A quantitative study
-A metasynthesis
-A policy review

Career opportunities

The majority of students who graduate from the MSc or Diploma in Deaf Education progress to a career teaching deaf children. This is a diverse remit and a teacher of the deaf may work in a school for the deaf, a unit or resourced provision, at primary or secondary level, or a specialist nursery class. They may also act as peripatetic support to deaf learners in mainstream classes, or early years child and family support, often moving through a range of these roles throughout their career.

Career opportunities can also include a move into academic research and higher education if that is an interest. There are a small but growing number of teachers of the deaf who take time out to work abroad (eg through UN or V.S.O.) supporting services in developing countries.

Accrediting organisations

-Teacher Development Agency

Associated organisations

-British Association of Teachers of the Deaf
-The National Deaf Children's Society

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Our PGDip in Deaf Education provides training for qualified teachers who want to work within deaf education. It delivers an evidence-based approach to meeting the diverse needs of deaf children. Read more
Our PGDip in Deaf Education provides training for qualified teachers who want to work within deaf education. It delivers an evidence-based approach to meeting the diverse needs of deaf children.

The course places a strong emphasis on translation of theory to practice. The rapid developments in audiology, and our understanding of language, communication and educational practice, make this an exciting area of study. The course has DfES/TDA approval, which meets the requirements of the mandatory qualification.

Aims

This course aims to provide you with the skills, knowledge and understanding to ensure deaf children are able to achieve their full potential.

Special features

This course is delivered by a multi-professionals in a highly specialised and internationally recognised team.

Teaching and learning

In addition to the full-time option, the University offers an on-campus option (2 years part-time) or an e-blended learning and distance learning course (2 years part-time) to make the course as accessible and flexible as possible.

The e-blended course is a new option offering online and written materials with 2x3 days on campus per year. All students undertake two placement blocks with a total of eight weeks on placement over the course of study.

All on-campus students are also required to attend a weekend workshop (this is optional for students undertaking the e-blended course). The weekend provides an opportunity to meet a range of professionals, to extend knowledge and understanding, to exchange ideas and to establish a strong group identity. It is based in a well-appointed University conference centre in Manchester.

Career opportunities

The majority of students who graduate from the Diploma in Deaf Education progress to a career teaching deaf children. This is a diverse remit and a teacher of the deaf may work in a school for the deaf, a unit or resourced provision, at primary or secondary level, or a specialist nursery class. They may also act as peripatetic support to deaf learners in mainstream classes, or early years child and family support, often moving through a range of these roles throughout their career.

Accrediting organisations

-Teacher Development Agency.

Associated organisations

-British Association of Teachers of the Deaf (BATOD)
-National Deaf Children's Society

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The master of science degree in secondary education of students who are deaf or hard of hearing prepares students to meet the national need for teachers of secondary students who are deaf or hard of hearing. Read more
The master of science degree in secondary education of students who are deaf or hard of hearing prepares students to meet the national need for teachers of secondary students who are deaf or hard of hearing. The program prepares teachers not only as effective and ethical practitioners but also as scholars and leaders in the profession.

Faculty members are international leaders in research and are highly skilled in the education of deaf people. A carefully designed system of faculty advisement is a prominent feature of the program. On-campus facilities, state-of-the-art technology, and a well-established system of educational access services combine to make this a vital program for both deaf and hearing students who desire careers as professional educators of deaf students.

Plan of study

Course work requires a minimum of four semesters. A cumulative GPA of at least 3.0 must be maintained. Before graduation, students are expected to have at least intermediate-level signing skills as determined by a Sign Language Proficiency Interview.

Admission requirements

To be considered for admission to the MS program in secondary education of students who are deaf or hard of hearing, candidates must fulfill the following requirements:

- Hold a baccalaureate degree from an accredited college or university,

- Have a cumulative grade point average of 3.0 or higher,

- Submit official transcripts (in English) of all previously completed undergraduate and graduate course work,

- Have a basic knowledge of American Sign Language as measured by a departmental skill assessment, or willingness to take American Sign Language I (or its equivalent) at NTID or another college prior to beginning the program,

- Have a level of writing proficiency appropriate to graduate study as indicated by a review of undergraduate writing-intensive courses and an expository essay,

- Submit letters of reference and an expository essay that indicates evidence of professional commitment and potential for success in the program,

- Submit scores from Graduate Record Exam (GRE),

- Participate in an individual interview, and

- Complete a graduate application.

- International applicants whose native language is not English must submit scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). Minimum scores of 550 (paper-based) or 213 (Internet-based) are required.

Additionally, 30 semester credit hours in a content area are required by the New York State Education Department for initial certification to teach a secondary (grades 7–12) content area. Students who do not have the required number of hours must complete the additional credits before applying for New York State certification. Secondary academic subjects include American Sign Language, English, mathematics, social studies, or science. Please note: The social studies content area includes economics and government, and at least 21 semester hours in the history and geography of the United States and the world.

Additional information

- Financial Aid

NTID graduate tuition rates are less than one-half of RIT’s tuition. Approximately 70 percent of students enrolled in the MS program in secondary education receive some type of financial assistance each year. Students complete only the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) to apply for financial aid. Students enrolled in this program may be eligible for grant funding from the U.S. Department of Education. In addition, federal loan programs may be available.

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This specialisation in Sign Language and Deaf Studies is unique amongst existing Master’s degrees in including components in the psychology and linguistics and neuroscience of deafness and sign language, taught by staff at the Deafness Cognition and Language Research Centre. Read more
This specialisation in Sign Language and Deaf Studies is unique amongst existing Master’s degrees in including components in the psychology and linguistics and neuroscience of deafness and sign language, taught by staff at the Deafness Cognition and Language Research Centre. Students also have the opportunity to study introductory British Sign Language.

Degree information

Students take a set of core modules and then specialise in linguistics, psychology of language, and/or interpreting. In selecting the modules for specialisation, students are able to take full advantage of the breadth of expertise in language research in the UCL Division of Psychology & Language Sciences.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two mandatory modules (45 credits), three specialisation modules (45 credits), two optional modules (30 credits) and a research project (60 credits). A Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits) consisting of two mandatory modules (45 credits), four core modules (60 credits), and one optional module (15 credits) is also offered. A Postgraduate Certificate of four mandatory modules (60 credits) is also offered.

Core modules
-Introduction to the Brain and Imaging
-Research Methods: Principles, Skills and Applications

Specialisation modules - students take four specialisation modules, students who already hold BSL CACDP Level 1 or equivalent choose three specialisation modules and two optional modules:
-Introduction to British Sign Language
-Deafness: Cognition and Language
-Linguistics of Sign Languages
-Introduction to Deafhood

Optional modules - students then select one optional module from all those offered within the Division of Psychology and Language Sciences, subject to availability and agreement with the Programme Director (students who already hold BSL level one or equivalent select two). Recommendations include:
-Foundations of Linguistics
-Historical and Social Context of Interpreting
-Interaction and Language Management of Interpreting
-Introduction to Children’s Language Development
-Multimodal Communication and Cognition
-Sociolinguistics

Not all modules will run every year, some modules may require a minimum number of registered students.

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project in an area of Language Science which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, small-group teaching and a virtual learning environment. Some modules also involve workshops or practical classes. Student performance is assessed through coursework, examinations and the research dissertation.

Careers

The majority of students who graduate from Language Sciences MSc programmes go on to further study or research. Recent graduates have gone on to PhD study in UCL, and other UK and overseas institutions. Others have gone to work in related industries, for example in speech technology industries, cochlear implants manufacturers, and in education. The skills that the MSc develops - independent research, presentation skills, and statistics - are transferable and very highly sought outside of academia.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The division undertakes world-leading research and teaching in mind, behaviour, and language. Staff and students benefit from cutting-edge resources including extensive laboratories for research in speech and language, perception, and cognition.

Opportunities for students to work with world-renowned researchers exist in all areas of investigation. The division offers a supportive environment including numerous specialist seminars, workshops, and guest lectures.

The Language Sciences MSc provides the opportunity for in-depth study of one or more areas of the Language Sciences. The programme is an 'umbrella degree', with a number of specialisation strands that follow a common structure.

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This distance learning programme approved by the National College for Teaching and Leadership (NCTL) has been offered at the University of Birmingham since 1989. Read more
This distance learning programme approved by the National College for Teaching and Leadership (NCTL) has been offered at the University of Birmingham since 1989. It is open to teachers who are qualified to teach school-aged pupils who wish to gain the mandatory qualification of teacher of the deaf. The programme aims to equip teachers who are already qualified to teach school-aged children in England to meet the relevant NCTL standards to achieve qualified teacher of the deaf status.

It is also open to other professionals who do not wish, or are not eligible, to obtain qualified teacher of the deaf status – for example lecturers of deaf students, communication support workers and educational psychologists. Applicants who are not qualified teachers of school-aged pupils may take the University (non mandatory) Award but will not be eligible to obtain qualified teacher of the deaf status from the NCTL.

Study is supported through study packs, tutorial groups, telephone, email, web based learning and online materials, and through an allocated tutor in a small tutorial group which allows students to learn with each other. Internet access is required for the programme. There is a University based study week in January each year, at which attendance is compulsory.

Students who successfully complete all modules for the Postgraduate Diploma may choose to transfer to the MEd.

About the School of Education

The School of Education has a long-standing reputation as a centre of excellence for teaching and research in a wide range of areas of educational practice and policy. It is an international leader in education with a history of top rated research. In the 2016 QS World Rankings, it was ranked 28th in the World and joint 7th in Europe/UK.
The School employs over 100 academic staff who teach more than 2,500 students. It is home to a number of departments and research centres with a history of top rated research and is an international leader in education.
School of Education ranking:
- Ranked 6th in the Guardian University League Tables 2017
- Ranked 10th in the 2017 Complete University Guide
- In Top 3 for HEI provision in the Good Teacher Training Guide
- Ranked 28th in the World in the 2016 QS World Rankings
- Ranked 9th overall for Research in the 2014 REF (with more than 82% of research rated as ‘internationally excellent’ (3*) or ‘world leading’ (4*).
- Rated 'outstanding' in latest Ofsted inspection (2013) for its Teacher Training programmes
- Ranked third for Education in The Times Good University Guide 2017

Funding and Scholarships

There are many ways to finance your postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. To see what funding and scholarships are available, please visit: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/funding

Open Days

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open days.
Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/visit

Virtual Open Days

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

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The master of science in health care interpretation is designed to meet the demand for nationally-certified sign language interpreters who wish to work in health care environments. Read more

Program overview

The master of science in health care interpretation is designed to meet the demand for nationally-certified sign language interpreters who wish to work in health care environments.

Health care interpreters work in various health care settings where hearing people and deaf or hard-of-hearing people need to interact and communicate. Interpreters may assist deaf patients and their families in understanding medical testing, treatments, and diagnoses; facilitate communication for deaf health care professionals with colleagues and patients; and/or provide interpretation for deaf individuals who are enrolled in health care-related degree programs or training courses designed to educate and prepare them for careers in health care-related professions. This unique program also prepares interpreters to work in administrative roles ensuring language access to patients in hospital settings. Successful completion of this program could lead to employment as a sign language health care interpreter and/or a language access coordinator of sign and spoken language interpreting services in one of the most important new fields of health care.

The program may be completed on a full- or part-time basis.

Curriculum

Health care interpretation, MS degree, typical course sequence:
First Year
-Professional Seminar (summer)
-Human Body Systems/Diseases I (summer)
-Theories of Translation and Interpretation (summer) 3
-Health Care Practical Interpreting I
-Human Body Systems/Diseases II
-Research Methods
-Health Care Practical Interpreting II
-Health Care Governance and Economics
-Human Resources in Health Care
Second Year
-Health Care Interpreting Within a Diverse Deaf Community (summer)
-Capstone Professional Project or Research Paper (summer)

Other admission requirements

-Submit an ASL interpretation sample (audio/video file or text translation will be provided).
-Submit two letters of reference from individuals who have had the opportunity to observe the applicant's interpreting work.
-Submit official transcripts (in English) of all previously completed undergraduate and graduate course work.
-Submit a completed graduate application.
-Submit a personal statement describing the applicant's educational objectives.
-Provide proof of completion of a course in medical terminology. (This is required after admission to the program is offered. The course must be completed prior to the beginning of the summer session. This $99 self-paced online course is called Language of Medicine.)

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This new programme will interest graduates who want to make a difference to the lives of a wide range of children in education. You will compare inclusive educational practices in Scotland, the UK and across the world. Read more

This new programme will interest graduates who want to make a difference to the lives of a wide range of children in education. You will compare inclusive educational practices in Scotland, the UK and across the world. You will study particular approaches to removing barriers to learning and including all children.

The programme has specific pathways for Postgraduate Diploma (visually impaired learners), Postgraduate Diploma (deaf learners) and Postgraduate Diploma (bilingual learners).

Programme structure

Compulsory courses

  • Inclusive Pedagogy
  • Sources of knowledge
  • Conceptualising research

Option courses

You will choose three option courses from this range:

  • Comparative approaches to inclusive and special education
  • Collaborative working in children’s services
  • Education for all
  • Teachers as agents of change
  • Foundations of international child protection
  • Issues and strategies for teaching and learning (VI)
  • Inclusion of pupils with visual impairment
  • Cerebral VI and profound and multiple learning difficulties
  • Audiology and audiometry
  • Language and communication (deaf children)
  • The developing bilingual learner
  • Specific learning difficulties: dyslexia
  • Assessing pupils with visual impairment
  • Bilingualism and other additional support needs
  • Promoting achievement and curriculum access to deaf / bilingual learners
  • Specific learning difficulties: co-occurring difficulties
  • Deaf Studies
  • an option course worth up to 40 credits from within the School or from elsewhere in the University (at SCQF level 11), subject to approval by the programme director

Dissertation (MSc)

  • Planning research
  • Research dissertation

Learning outcomes

The programme aims to:

  • develop and appropriately apply knowledge, skills and attitudes relevant to inclusive education and the contexts in which it takes place
  • reflect critically on the relationships between theory and practice and explore issues in the implementation of educational and social principles and ideals
  • engage with and where appropriate influence policy issues and the practice of professionals in relation to the delivery of inclusive education
  • develop extended skills in research and enquiry, including the use of literature, reviewing evidence, gathering, organising and evaluating data, responding to evidence and providing critical comment

Career opportunities

Suiting newly qualified teachers and experienced practitioners alike, this programme provides a qualification that can open doors to a new career in inclusive and special education, or an advanced role in the field.

It can also provide the foundations for a career in policy formation and development, as well as a broad range of highly transferable skills, such as communication and project management, which can be applied to roles in any field.



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Why study at Roehampton. A professionally-oriented course offering students a wide range of contacts in industry in the UK and abroad. Read more

Why study at Roehampton

  • A professionally-oriented course offering students a wide range of contacts in industry in the UK and abroad.
  • A flexible course that allows students the option to either develop a range of translation skills or focus particularly on those they wish to pursue.
  • The course is part of the European Masters in Translation network, recognised by the European Commission as a course of excellence and can lead to further opportunities in doctoral research.
  • Roehampton is ranked best modern university in London (Complete University Guide 2018) and the most research-intensive modern university in the UK (Research Excellence Framework 2014).

Course summary

The MA in Audiovisual Translation is an internationally leading course in its field, recognised by the European Commission as a European Masters in Translation.

This international leading programme addresses the growing demand for translators with skills in translating audiovisual texts. It covers a range of areas, including subtitling, accessibility (subtitling for the deaf and hard of hearing, audio description and live subtitling), multimedia localisation, dubbing and voice-over for films. The programme is open to bilingual students wishing to work between different languages, but it also welcomes monolingual English-speaking students.

This programme places significant emphasis on accessibility in the media and offers a grounding in translation theory and research methods. Through your work with dedicated software and high-tech industry-standard equipment, you will equip yourself with the skills necessary to enter the professional market and the knowledge to pursue further research in this field.

You will be taught by staff who are experts in their field and influence the policies of organisations such as OFCOM. They will bring their professional experience into the classroom, meaning you will always be benefiting from the most up-to -date research and practice.

Roehampton’s location in London means you are ideally situated, as the city has established itself as one of the main centres for translation in the world. Work placements opportunities are also available on the course; in addition to putting the skills you have learnt on the course into practice, you'll also learn valuable new ones, build a strong CV and make vital industry contacts.

Content

This course covers the theoretical and the practical aspects of audiovisual translation. During the course you will address the main theoretical issues shaping translation today and understand how these theories relate to the practice of translation. You will also explore the broad range of approaches to translation, including, but not limited to: linguistic, socio-linguistic, cultural, cognitive, descriptive, gender and postcolonial. You will also gain the practical skills of translation you will require for a career fit for the 21st century. You will learn how to subtitle, to translate for dubbing and voiceover, and/or to provide captioning for the deaf and the hard-of-hearing.

IT skills are central to a translator's work, so we offer a module on ‘Translation Tools’ that will familiarise you with some of the tools you will be using in your professional life. These include terminology databases, translation memory tools, and other computer assisted translation systems.

Other optional modules currently include ‘The Localisation of Video Games’, where you will examine the principles and practices of localisation in the area of multimedia interactive entertainment software. You will gain the practical experience of working with the various types of materials that make up the localisation process, including in-game, user interface, interactive subtitles, online help, voice-over, manuals, packaging, graphics files and official websites.

You will complete your MA with a dissertation, which allows you to apply your understanding, knowledge, analytical, conceptual and personal skills to an in-depth investigation of a translation-related topic.

Modules

Compulsory modules (MA & PGD)

  • Translation Theory and Practice Module code: AST040L730A 
  • Subtitling: Concepts and Practice Module code: AST040L748A 

Optional modules (MA & PGD)

  • Translation Tools Module code: AST020L734S 
  • Dubbing and Voice-over Module code: AST020L741S
  • Media Access: Audiodescription, Subtitling for the Deaf and Respeaking Module code: AST020L742S
  • Translation Project Module code: AST020L743S
  • Accessible Filmmaking: Theory and Practice Module code: AST020L744
  • The Localisation of Video Games Module code: AST020L747S 
  • Transnational Cinemas from the Multiplex to the Web Module code: FSC020L004S

Compulsory module (MA students only)

  • Dissertation Module code: AST060L775Y

Career options

Students go on to careers in a broad range of media companies and broadcasters, subtitling companies, translation and localisation providers, and production houses with in-house translation teams.

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This course is aimed at practising audiologists. It combines audiology-specific course units and units shared with other health professionals from a variety of other disciplines. Read more
This course is aimed at practising audiologists. It combines audiology-specific course units and units shared with other health professionals from a variety of other disciplines.

You may choose to complete 60 credits for a PGCert (exit award) or 120 credits for a PGDip. On successful completion of 120 credits, progression to the full MSc qualification allows you to explore, in depth, a specific aspect of audiology practice, policy, research or education in the form of a 60-credit, 12,000 to 15,000-word dissertation.

Aims

The course aims to:
-Enable you to critically evaluate and apply aspects of contemporary audiology and healthcare practice, policy, research and education
-Foster positive values and attitudes that recognise and respect individual and cultural diversities and challenge discriminatory practice
-Equip you with in-depth knowledge, understanding and skills to critically evaluate research and the evidence base for audiology practice that promotes optimal health and involves service users and carers in the delivery of care
-Develop your abilities and skills in critical reflective practice, problem solving and creative ethical decision making
-Contribute to innovation, change and quality improvement in audiology and health care practice at both individual and organisational levels by equipping you with a systematic and critical understanding of relevant knowledge, theoretical frameworks and advanced skills
-Enhance your career development and lifelong learning in order to support safe practice and the maintenance and enhancement of appropriate standards of audiology practice

Additional aims for the MSc are to enable you, through the systematic, in-depth, exploration of a specific area of audiology practice, policy, research or education to extend your knowledge, understanding and ability to contribute to the advancement of audiology knowledge and practice at an individual and/or organisational level.

Special features

The course provides unique opportunities for interprofessional learning, combining specialist audiology course units with a range of course units in which students from a range of health care professions study core concepts and subjects together. You will also have the opportunity to study with professionals in closely related areas such audiology as teachers of the deaf.

The wide variety of units available allows you to your tailor learning and through assessments you will further apply core knowledge and skills.

Additional course information

The University is at the forefront of developments in health care professional education and research having received excellent research ratings in UK Research Assessment Exercises. We have also been commended on the excellent quality of teaching and learning provision.

An established reputation for excellence, outstanding learning facilities and high student support, combined with the opportunity to be taught by leading academic, clinical and research staff, make The University of Manchester the ideal place for practising audiologists to study for a postgraduate qualification.

Teaching and learning

You will participate in a range of teaching and learning methods including lectures, small group work, student led seminars, problem based learning and online learning. In addition, you will be required to undertake independent study in order to further develop and consolidate your learning. Where appropriate, and with individual arrangements, some audiology modules may include participation in practical skills laboratories.

Part-time students entering the PG Dip or MS will normally study one day per week to complete 60 credits per year as required for the award. An exit award of PG Cert is available to students exiting after completion of 60 credits. This must include at least 15 credits of Audiology specific units from those available.

Please note, a maximum of 30 credits of individual course units can also be studied on a stand-alone basis.

Coursework and assessment

A variety of assessments are used within individual course units and across the course as a whole. All assessments require you to integrate knowledge and understanding, and apply this to your own practice relevant to the outcomes of each unit.

Assessment methods include:
-Essays
-Case studies
-Assessed seminar presentations
-Literature reviews
-Change proposals

The full MSc qualifications requires an extended written piece of work (12,000-15,000 words) which focuses on a specific aspect of audiology practice, policy or research in the form of an extended literature based review.

Course unit details

Taught units can be studied in any order except where there are specific pre-requisites. Optional taught units for the PG Dip/MSc:
-Neurosensory Science
-Clinical Applications of Neurosensory Sciences
-Adult Auditory Assessment and Management
-Vestibular Assessment and Management
-Paediatric Audiology
-Effective Amplification for Infants and Children
-Developing Deaf Child
-Language Acquisition
-Understanding Practice in Deaf Education in the UK
-Advanced Skill in Aural Rehabilitation

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The M.Sc. in Disability Studies provides students with a deep understanding of disability from social, historical, cultural, economic and political perspectives. Read more
The M.Sc. in Disability Studies provides students with a deep understanding of disability from social, historical, cultural, economic and political perspectives. Graduates of the M.Sc. are equipped with the knowledge, analytical skills and perspectives to help translate rights into reality in the field of disability. The programme offers:

Immersion in the policy and practice implications of the critically important United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and related human rights instruments.
Familiarisation with the key global issues in the field of disability.
A thorough grounding in the principles and practice of programme planning and evaluation.
An internship in a cutting edge disability organisation in the public, private, or voluntary sectors.
Access to the unique expertise of the National Institute for Intellectual Disability and the Centre for Deaf Studies, both located in Trinity College Dublin and closely associated with the programme.
Academic interaction with the students of the Certificate in Contemporary Living, the first third level education programme for people with intellectual disabilities in Ireland.
Exposure to teaching from a range of disciplinary perspectives.

The programme aims to prepare graduates for employment or career development in areas such as disability advocacy, quality assurance in disability services, programme planning and evaluation in the field of disability, disability research, and disability policy analysis.

Admission Requirements

The M.Sc. in Disability Studies offers admission to full-time (TRT69) and part-time (TRT79) students. EU and Non-EU applicants are required to hold at least an upper second class honours degree in a relevant area (e.g., Social Sciences, Health Sciences, Humanities, Education, Deaf studies, Law, and Psychology). Applications are taken on a yearly basis from January to July.

The following are required as part of the application:

Application form
Official transcripts
2 reference letters (at least one academic)
Curriculum Vitae
Statement of purpose addressing the following (1,000 words):
Your interest in the MSc in Disability Studies at TCD
A research topic in the area of disability you would like to examine in your dissertation
How the programme best suits your career development
Your preference for elective modules and placement

Successful applicants will be invited for an interview.

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See the department website - https://www.rit.edu/academicaffairs/sois/getting-started/graduate/graduate-degrees-programs. The professional studies program is specifically designed to enable students to create an individualized plan of graduate study tailored to their personal and professional goals. Read more
See the department website - https://www.rit.edu/academicaffairs/sois/getting-started/graduate/graduate-degrees-programs

The professional studies program is specifically designed to enable students to create an individualized plan of graduate study tailored to their personal and professional goals. This degree offers students the opportunity to draw on more than 50 graduate programs in order to gain the advanced knowledge and skills necessary to respond successfully to new and emerging career opportunities. The professional studies degree can be completed on campus or online.

For example, students interested in integrating sustainability into their career as a facilities manager might combine courses from the sustainability and facility manangement programs. Educators may be interested in combining courses from the school psychology and secondary education of students who are deaf or hard of hearing programs to improve their knowledge of special learning populations and the social issues students face in today's educational environments. Communication professionals interested in employment in government offices might choose concentrations in communication and media technologies and public policy to enhance their knowledge of media relations, public relations, government operations, and policy formation. There are a wide range of concentrations that can be created based on each student's professional career aspirations.

The degree also includes a capstone project. This applied, hands-on project is directly related to the student’s individualized plan of study.

Concentration areas

Students create two or three concentrations with courses selected from a wide range of graduate programs at RIT. Some common concentration areas include:

Applied and Computational Mathematics
Applied Statistics/Quality
Bioinformatics
Business (Marketing, Management, etc.)
Chemistry
Color Science
Communication and Media Technology
Computer Engineering
Computer Science
Criminal Justice
Electrical Engineering
Environmental, Health and Safety Management
Facilities Management
Health Systems Administration
Human Resource Development
Imaging Science
Industrial and Systems Engineering Industrial Design
Information Sciences and Technologies
Microelectronics Manufacturing Engineering
Packaging Science
Product Development and Design
Project Management
Public Policy
School Psychology
Secondary Education of Students Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing
Service Management
Software Development
Software Engineering
Sustainability
Training, Design and Assessment
Visual Communication Design

Plan of study

The program requires the completion of 33 credit hours and can be completed through full or part-time study. Students begin their studies with Contexts and Trends (PROF-705), the program’s foundation course. Throughout this course students explore their personal career objectives and research RIT’s portfolio of graduate programs to identify courses that best match their professional and personal goals.

Students create two or three concentrations that make up their required course work for the degree program. Each concentration is a selection of courses drawn from existing RIT graduate programs and can range from 9 to 15 credit hours. Graduate credits earned in other programs may be used in completing a concentration, upon approval.

Credit hours not required to fulfill a concentration area may be used for electives. All elective and transferred graduate courses need to be integrated into the proposed plan of study. With certain concentrations, the degree may be completed entirely through online learning.

Required courses

Context and Trends (PROF-705)

This course introduces students to interdisciplinary thinking, personal self-assessment, problem solving, goal setting, and research techniques using electronic information resources. Students work toward selecting concentrations and finalizing a plan of study for their graduate program.

The Capstone Project (PROF-775)

This course is a supervised, hands-on experience in which students apply the skills and knowledge developed through their individualized plans of study, concluding with oral and written presentations. Before students can engage in theri capstoe porject, they must first complete the Capstone Proposal Seminar course (PROF-770).

International Students

International applicants whose native language is not English must submit scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language. Minimum scores of 550 (paper-based) or 79 (Internet-based) are required. Scores from the International English Language Testing System (IELTS) are accepted in place of the TOEFL exam. Minimum acceptable scores will vary; however, the absolute minimum score for an unconditional acceptance is 6.5. The TOEFL requirement is waived for native speakers of English or for those submitting educational transcripts and diplomas from American colleges and universities.

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This course is suitable for audiologists from a wide range of clinical settings who are interested in aural rehabilitation. The course will provide you with further knowledge and skills in adult and paediatric aural rehabilitation to support career development and progression for qualified audiologists. Read more

This course is suitable for audiologists from a wide range of clinical settings who are interested in aural rehabilitation. The course will provide you with further knowledge and skills in adult and paediatric aural rehabilitation to support career development and progression for qualified audiologists.

The course aims to create an intellectually stimulating opportunity for you to develop academic knowledge and research skills, thus enhancing your practice in rehabilitative audiology. Suitable for international, UK and local audiologists, the course will develop knowledge of the evidence base in practice and further develop critical thinking, clinical reasoning and research knowledge.

The course is organised in three broad strands: 

  • Research (Research Proposal and Dissertation) 
  • Rehabilitative Audiology 
  • Professional Practice

Knowledge, understanding and skills acquired across the course will be integrated and applied in the clinical setting throughout all modules. This course will ensure that the audiologist acquires the advanced knowledge required to work with complex Audiological cases as well as managing service input.

PgCert in Hearing and Communication

The PgDip/MSc (Post-Registration) in Rehabilitative Audiology is open only to qualified audiologists but includes modules that are of interest to a range of professionals. The PgCert in Hearing and Communication has been developed to allow students from a variety of non-audiology backgrounds the opportunity for further study in relation to hearing impairment and auditory/ vestibular rehabilitation.

Students may take up to four years to complete the 60 credits required to be awarded a PgCert. Applicants might include: speech and language therapists; teachers of the deaf; linguists; any health professional interested (Post-Registration) in developing their knowledge and skills in relations to hearing and balance management. It is acknowledged that each of these groups has unique needs and concerns which will be taken into consideration during the admissions process and throughout the programme.

The minimum entry requirement for the Pg Cert in Hearing and Communication will normally be a first or second class BSc (Hons) degree in a related discipline (eg education, psychology, linguistics, speech and language therapy or another health science).

Teaching, learning and assessment

This is a distance learning course and students engage with staff members and each other through regular contact within the online teaching and learning environment. An extensive range of learning technologies – including The Hub, eportfolio and multimedia resources – will be available  to support directed, independent learning.  Learning materials may include narrated PowerPoint lectures, video or audio clips, reading materials, case-based data, guided learning activities, discussion boards and self-assessment quizzes. Online seminars and discussion groups will be scheduled to allow maximum participation. Discussions and seminars will also be archived to allow students to review the content after the event. Assessment is carried out through case-based assignments, reflective journals, research reports, electronic portfolio, online discussions as well as a final dissertation.

Teaching hours and attendance

We suggest that a student should spend an average of 18 hours on independent learning/ course work each week per module. This could include online discussions.

Modules

Advanced counselling: Theory and Practice (15 credits)/ Research Methods (30 credits)/ Adult Aural Rehabilitation: Advanced Practice (30 credits) OR Paediatric Aural Habilitation (30 credits)

A further 45 credits from: Hearing Technology: Advanced Theory and Practice (15 credits)/ Advanced Vestibular Rehabilitation (15 credits)/ Tinnitus and Hyperacusis (15 credits) / Language and Culture of Deaf People (15 credits) / Adult Aural Rehabilitation: Advanced Practice (30 credits)/ Paediatric Aural Habilitation (30 credits)

If studying for the MSc, you will also complete a dissertation (60 credits).

Careers

Graduates may work within the National Health Service and private sector. There are also career opportunities for research in universities and research institutes.

Quick Facts

  • This course is delivered completely online. 
  • It offers flexible learning pathways and draws from clinical experience.  
  • This course provides interaction with students from various backgrounds and contexts which supports critical


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Why study at Roehampton. The programme is taught by academic staff and by experts from the industry who bring their professional experience into the classroom. Read more

Why study at Roehampton

  • The programme is taught by academic staff and by experts from the industry who bring their professional experience into the classroom.
  • The University has a state-of-the-art language lab with cutting-edge translation software including SDL Trados, Swift and WinCAPS.
  • You will have the option to study the localisation of computer games, equipping you to work in one of the UK’s fastest growing industries.
  • Roehampton’s location in London is ideal, as the city has established itself as one of the main centres for translation in the world.
  • Roehampton is ranked best modern university in London (Complete University Guide 2018) and the most research-intensive modern university in the UK (Research Excellence Framework 2014).

Course summary

This programme aims to address the growing demand for translators with skills in translating technical texts.

The programme will familiarise you with the sociocultural, linguistic and technical dimensions that characterise specialised multilingual material. Through working with dedicated software and high-tech industry standard equipment, you will learn the skills you need to enter the professional market and gain the knowledge to pursue further research in this field.

There is a particular emphasis on learning translation tools (in particular SDL Trados) and on localisation, especially for video games. This programme is not limited to specific language pairs. You can work into and out of English and another language of your choice.

You will be taught by staff who are leaders in the field of translation and whose work has influenced organisations such as OFCOM. They work closely with industry and bring in key professionals in the field to teach and give talks, thus helping you to make vital industry contacts.

Roehampton boasts state-of-the-art language labs with cutting-edge translation software, including SDL Trados, Swift and WinCAPS. The lab also features a training suite and an open access area where you can work independently.

In recent years our graduates have found work with a broad range of organisations including: media companies and broadcasters such as the BBC, France TV, and RTVE; subtitling companies such as IMS, Deluxe, ITFC; and translation and localisation providers including Pole To Win, London Translations and JF Traduções e Interpretações.

As a Specialised Translation student you will become a member of the Centre for Research in Translation and Transcultural Studies, which promotes excellence in research into translation-related areas including language learning, audiovisual translation, accessibility to the media and other areas of translation.

Content

This course covers the theoretical and the practical aspects of specialised translation. In the compulsory module ‘Technical and Scientific Translation’ you will practice your skills in translating highly specialised documents into your chosen language. During the course you will also address the main theoretical issues shaping translation today and understand how these theories relate to the practice of translation.

IT skills are central to a translator's work so the compulsory module ‘Translation Tools’ will familiarise you with some of the translation tools you will be using in your professional life. These include terminology databases, translation memory tools, and other computer-assisted translation systems. You will be taught how to carry out efficient documentation and make appropriate use of research tools in solving technical and scientific translation problems.

You could also study ‘The Localisation of Video Games’ where you will examine the principles and practices of localisation in the area of multimedia interactive entertainment software. Other optional modules currently include ‘Subtitling: Concepts and Practice’, where you will explore the techniques of subtitle synchronisation using specialised software. MA students will also undertake a dissertation, which will provide you with the ideal opportunity to undertake an in-depth investigation of a translation-related topic that is of interest to you.

Modules

Compulsory modules (MA & PGD)

  • Translation Theory and Practice Module code: AST040L730A 
  • Translation Tools Module code: AST020L734S
  • Technical and Scientific Translation Module code: AST020L737A 

Optional modules (MA & PGD)

  • Economic and Legal Translation Module code: AST020L738S
  • Translation Project Module code: AST020L743S
  • Accessible Filmmaking: Theory and Practice Module code: AST020L744
  • The Localisation of Video Games Module code: AST020L747S
  • Subtitling: Concepts and Practice Module code: AST020L749A
  • Think, Create, Translate: Transcreation in the Creative Industries Module code: AST020L724Y
  • Media Access: Audiodescription, Subtitling for the Deaf and Respeaking Module code: AST020L742S
  • Dubbing and Voice-over Module code: AST020L741S

Compulsory module (MA students only)

  • Dissertation Module code: AST060L775Y

Career options

Specialised translator, subtitler, technical writer, editor, terminologist, project manager or localiser.

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Taught classes as well as counselling skills training, supervision and reflective practice modules emphasises the application of current psychological knowledge informed by empirical research in the work of the counselling psychologist. Read more
Taught classes as well as counselling skills training, supervision and reflective practice modules emphasises the application of current psychological knowledge informed by empirical research in the work of the counselling psychologist. The students are facilitated to be aware of current research findings and to incorporate them into their clinical practice. In the first year the course offers academic and practical skills training in counselling psychology and related research. After the first few weeks of concentrated, full time coursework and personal development work, 2 full days per week are spent on placement and 2-3 days in classes. The D.Couns.Psych. offers a wide range of course approved placement options in community, health, mental health, education and private practice settings, as well as welcoming new student recommended sites, particularly for those students residing outside the greater Dublin area. At least 3 different placements are required during the 3 years of the course. The second year involves further training in counselling theories and practice, and students conduct a research dissertation related to counselling psychology, initiated during the summer before entering second year.

Personal development work, including individual therapy, is required throughout the 3 years. The third year includes small group supervision, reflective practice, and advanced counselling and psychotherapy theory and its application. However, the main focus will be on research. A research project resulting in the doctoral dissertation is carried throughout the three years. Courses are taught and supervision provided by both core staff and other practitioners from varied theoretical orientations. Humanistic theory underlies the course. Psychodynamic and systemic perspectives are also emphasised, and training in cognitive behavioural approaches is provided. Practical placements continue through the summer and always follow the placement site's calendar, not that of College. Guidelines for all aspects of the course are provided. All components of the course must be passed i.e., practical, academic; research, and personal development, as well as members of the Court of Examiners recommending the student as suitable to receiving the Doctorate in Counselling Psychology degree.

Graduates of this course are skilled to conduct mental health assessments and therapy with individuals, couples and groups across the lifespan. Typically, they start to specialise during their studies and further develop their skills after the course. They are employed by Health Service Executive, e.g. the National Counselling Service, Refugee and Asylum Seekers Service, Autism Services; Voluntary agencies, e.g. St. John of God's Services, Brothers of Charity Services, National Association for the Deaf; third level student counselling services; private practice; research settings; and multiple other locations.

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