• University of York Featured Masters Courses
  • Leeds Beckett University Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Edinburgh Featured Masters Courses
  • Swansea University Featured Masters Courses
  • Xi’an Jiaotong-Liverpool University Featured Masters Courses
  • Regent’s University London Featured Masters Courses
  • Imperial College London Featured Masters Courses
De Montfort University Featured Masters Courses
University of Kent Featured Masters Courses
Institute for Advanced Architecture of Catalonia Featured Masters Courses
University of Birmingham Featured Masters Courses
University of Birmingham Featured Masters Courses
"databases"×
0 miles

Masters Degrees (Databases)

  • "databases" ×
  • clear all
Showing 1 to 15 of 492
Order by 
This course is your opportunity to specialise in the development of web-based software systems that use databases. Read more
This course is your opportunity to specialise in the development of web-based software systems that use databases. During your time with us, you will gain a critical awareness of the methodologies, tools and techniques used for the development of web-based computer systems and an advanced understanding of the techniques used for the development, evaluation and testing of databases.

The course also develops an awareness of the latest developments in the field of advanced databases, data mining and data warehousing. You will also gain substantial knowledge and skills in the deployment of SAS business intelligence software leading towards SAS data miner accreditation, and learn what the Semantic Web and Linked Data are, together with what these technologies enable.

Key benefits:

• The course gives you hands-on experience in design and implementation of databases in both Oracle and Microsoft SQL Server DBMS and prepares you to obtain DBA certification
• You learn how to design and implement a web application using ASP.NET, Microsoft SQL Server, and PHP with My SQL
• You learn the data mining techniques to mine data in different application domains using most popular data mining tools.

Visit the website: http://www.salford.ac.uk/pgt-courses/databases-and-web-based-systems

Suitable for

This course is for students who want to become trained professionals:

• In designing and implementing database systems in Oracle Micro Soft SQL Server DBMS and who want to be prepared to obtain DBA certification
• In designing and implementing a web application using ASP.NET, Microsoft SQL Server, and PHP with My SQL
• With hands-on experience in data mining techniques to mine data in different application domains using the most popular data mining tools.

Programme details

This course covers a very comprehensive range of topics split in to four large modules worth 30 credits each plus the MSc Project. External speakers from blue-chip and local companies will give seminars to complement your learning, that will be real-world case studies related to the subjects you are studying in your modules. These are designed to improve the breadth of your learning and often lead to ideas that you can develop for your MSc Project.

Format

Teaching on this course takes the form of lectures, individual and group class work, topical class discussions and critical case study evaluation.

You will gain hands-on lab experience of using and setting up databases and web-based systems. What’s more, tutorials will give you practice in solving the theoretical and design problems associated with these systems.

Module titles

• Advanced Databases
• Web-Based Software Development
• Semantic Web and Information Extraction
• Business Intelligence
• MSc Project

Assessment

• Coursework 60%
• Examinations 40%

Career potential

With this qualification, you’ll be equipped as web/database designer and programmer, data analytics and miner among other roles. Your experience will be in high demand across all industrial and commercial sectors.

Previous students have gone on to work with companies including British Airways, Google, Hewlett-Packard, Oracle and other IT firms.

How to apply: http://www.salford.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/applying

Read less
Jointly run by the University of Salford and Manchester Metropolitan University, UNIGIS is a three year programme, with the first two years comprising taught units, and a final year to complete a dissertation. Read more
Jointly run by the University of Salford and Manchester Metropolitan University, UNIGIS is a three year programme, with the first two years comprising taught units, and a final year to complete a dissertation.

The Geographical Information Systems (GIS) pathway aims to provide students with a broadly based postgraduate qualification in the field of GIS. Importantly, it offers students choice in the selection of their application area (with a range of units available). The pathway helps students to develop an in-depth knowledge of the issues involved in applying GIS to solving spatial problems with an understanding of the constraints imposed by the application area(s) and the interactions between data, methods, people, and technology.

The first year of study (equivalent to PgC in GIS) involves three core units:

Foundations of GIS -
This unit provides an introduction to Geographical Information Systems (GIS) from conceptual, theoretical, and practical perspectives. Students will learn about the different methods used in geographic encoding and spatial data modelling before employing such datasets in a software environment. The unit concludes with a review of contemporary issues in GIS. Key elements of the curriculum include: Origins of GIS; Representation, Modelling and Geovisualisation; Software Skills; GIS: Today and Tomorrow.

Spatial Data Infrastructures -
Spatial data is key to any GIS project. This unit investigates how spatial data is sourced and also aims to provide students with the requisite knowledge and practical skills to identify and evaluate, against recognised national and international quality standards, spatial data for use in GI-based projects. Key elements of the curriculum include: Spatial Data; Data Standards and Infrastructures; Sourcing Spatial Data; Data Quality; Evaluating Fitness for Purpose.

Databases -
GIS are fundamentally information systems which provide specialist facilities for the creation, storage and manipulation of spatial and attribute data. Much of the functionality offered by GIS software is shared with conventional database software. Indeed, most GIS - at their core - have a conventional database management system (DBMS) around which spatial functionality has been wrapped. It is essential that GIS specialists have a thorough understanding of database theory, design and implementation. Key elements of the curriculum include: Why Databases?; Relational Databases; Critiquing Relational Databases; Implementation and Interrogation.

The second year of study (equivalent to the PgD in GIS) involves one core and two elective units:

Methods in GIS (core) -
The concepts, theories and methods behind the application of GIS are examined in detail. The unit explores research design, data analysis and interpretation and presentation. Special focus is given to methods of spatial analysis and their implementation using GIS software. Key elements of the curriculum include: Research Design; Qualitative and Quantitative Techniques; Fundamentals of Spatial Analysis; Recent Advances in Spatial Analysis.

Two elective units are chosen from:

Distributed GIS -
This unit discusses the most vibrant and rapidly developing area of geospatial technology. Desktop GIS packages are increasingly looking like the specialist packages for serious users that, in truth, they always were. Now, for the very large majority of people who really only want to look at the location of things, we can offer WebGIS systems that deliver what they need directly into their web-browsers. This unit explains the concepts and methods of Internet GIS, development and its applications. Key elements of the curriculum include: From Desktop to Distributed GI Services; Technologies in Distributed GIS; Building the GeoWeb; Tutorials.

Environmental Applications of GIS -
GIS and related technologies such as remote sensing have been widely employed in environmental applications for almost forty years. The advent of satellite remote sensing allowed reliable synoptic data to be available to scientists who have developed numerous models. This together with the decision-making tools and spatially-referenced framework of GIS offers significant support to researchers investigating different environmental phenomena. Data from remote sensing, GPS and other sources provide a valuable input into GIS models for environmental monitoring, modelling and prediction. This unit introduces case study examples of how GIS and related technologies can be used in environmental applications and seeks to critically evaluate their potential value. Key elements of the curriculum include: Applicability and benefits of GIS; Practical Problem Solving and Evaluation using techniques such as Terrain Analysis, Multicriteria Evaluation, Landscape Metrics etc.

Remote Sensing for GIS Applications -
This unit provides students with an introduction to the principles of remote sensing and explores its role in data gathering/information extraction for GIS applications. Key elements of the curriculum include: Principles of Remote Sensing; Satellite Systems; Quantitative Data; GIS Integration.

Social Applications of GIS -
Where an investigation into social, economic, political, and cultural characteristics and phenomena is required, GIS provides a powerful tool. For social applications such as crime mapping and healthcare resource management, GIS can be used effectively to help model, monitor and enable (spatial) decision making based on existing criteria. Social systems are often highly organised and complex - GIS allows this complexity to be effectively distilled into an abstraction representing the most causally related behaviour. This unit introduces case tudy examples of how GIS can be used in social applications and seeks to critically evaluate their potential value. Key elements of the curriculum include: Exemplars of GIS use in Social Applications, e.g. health, crime and urban transportation; Evaluation of the Benefits of GIS; Practical Problem Solving techniques.

Spatial Databases and Programming -
The importance of programming and GIS as part of a larger system, which involves spatial databases, software development and programme coding, has been increasingly realised in GIS practice. This unit aims to develop your geospatial skills in building enterprise oriented databases (e.g. geo-database and server) and creating application-oriented GIS models through programming. This unit also helps you to critically evaluate the issues and trends in enterprise GIS and GIS application development from the perspective of software engineering and geospatial technology. Key elements of the curriculum include: Spatial Databases; Design and Quality; Programming; Tutorials.

The final year of study (the MSc stage) requires the student to design and undertake a substantial and unique independent research project, to be presented as an academic dissertation (max. of 15,000 words).

Read less
Jointly run by the University of Salford and Manchester Metropolitan University, UNIGIS is a three year programme, with the first two years comprising taught units, and a final year to complete a dissertation. Read more
Jointly run by the University of Salford and Manchester Metropolitan University, UNIGIS is a three year programme, with the first two years comprising taught units, and a final year to complete a dissertation.

The Geographical Information Systems (GIS) pathway aims to provide students with a broadly based postgraduate qualification in the field of GIS. Importantly, it offers students choice in the selection of their application area (with a range of units available). The pathway helps students to develop an in-depth knowledge of the issues involved in applying GIS to solving spatial problems with an understanding of the constraints imposed by the application area(s) and the interactions between data, methods, people, and technology.

The first year of study (equivalent to PgC in GIS) involves three core units:

Foundations of GIS -
This unit provides an introduction to Geographical Information Systems (GIS) from conceptual, theoretical, and practical perspectives. Students will learn about the different methods used in geographic encoding and spatial data modelling before employing such datasets in a software environment. The unit concludes with a review of contemporary issues in GIS. Key elements of the curriculum include: Origins of GIS; Representation, Modelling and Geovisualisation; Software Skills; GIS: Today and Tomorrow.

Spatial Data Infrastructures -
Spatial data is key to any GIS project. This unit investigates how spatial data is sourced and also aims to provide students with the requisite knowledge and practical skills to identify and evaluate, against recognised national and international quality standards, spatial data for use in GI-based projects. Key elements of the curriculum include: Spatial Data; Data Standards and Infrastructures; Sourcing Spatial Data; Data Quality; Evaluating Fitness for Purpose.

Databases -
GIS are fundamentally information systems which provide specialist facilities for the creation, storage and manipulation of spatial and attribute data. Much of the functionality offered by GIS software is shared with conventional database software. Indeed, most GIS - at their core - have a conventional database management system (DBMS) around which spatial functionality has been wrapped. It is essential that GIS specialists have a thorough understanding of database theory, design and implementation. Key elements of the curriculum include: Why Databases?; Relational Databases; Critiquing Relational Databases; Implementation and Interrogation.

The second year of study (equivalent to the PgD in GIS) involves one core and two elective units:

Methods in GIS (core) -
The concepts, theories and methods behind the application of GIS are examined in detail. The unit explores research design, data analysis and interpretation and presentation. Special focus is given to methods of spatial analysis and their implementation using GIS software. Key elements of the curriculum include: Research Design; Qualitative and Quantitative Techniques; Fundamentals of Spatial Analysis; Recent Advances in Spatial Analysis.

Two elective units are chosen from:

Distributed GIS -
This unit discusses the most vibrant and rapidly developing area of geospatial technology. Desktop GIS packages are increasingly looking like the specialist packages for serious users that, in truth, they always were. Now, for the very large majority of people who really only want to look at the location of things, we can offer WebGIS systems that deliver what they need directly into their web-browsers. This unit explains the concepts and methods of Internet GIS, development and its applications. Key elements of the curriculum include: From Desktop to Distributed GI Services; Technologies in Distributed GIS; Building the GeoWeb; Tutorials.

Environmental Applications of GIS -
GIS and related technologies such as remote sensing have been widely employed in environmental applications for almost forty years. The advent of satellite remote sensing allowed reliable synoptic data to be available to scientists who have developed numerous models. This together with the decision-making tools and spatially-referenced framework of GIS offers significant support to researchers investigating different environmental phenomena. Data from remote sensing, GPS and other sources provide a valuable input into GIS models for environmental monitoring, modelling and prediction. This unit introduces case study examples of how GIS and related technologies can be used in environmental applications and seeks to critically evaluate their potential value. Key elements of the curriculum include: Applicability and benefits of GIS; Practical Problem Solving and Evaluation using techniques such as Terrain Analysis, Multicriteria Evaluation, Landscape Metrics etc.

Remote Sensing for GIS Applications -
This unit provides students with an introduction to the principles of remote sensing and explores its role in data gathering/information extraction for GIS applications. Key elements of the curriculum include: Principles of Remote Sensing; Satellite Systems; Quantitative Data; GIS Integration.

Social Applications of GIS -
Where an investigation into social, economic, political, and cultural characteristics and phenomena is required, GIS provides a powerful tool. For social applications such as crime mapping and healthcare resource management, GIS can be used effectively to help model, monitor and enable (spatial) decision making based on existing criteria. Social systems are often highly organised and complex - GIS allows this complexity to be effectively distilled into an abstraction representing the most causally related behaviour. This unit introduces case tudy examples of how GIS can be used in social applications and seeks to critically evaluate their potential value. Key elements of the curriculum include: Exemplars of GIS use in Social Applications, e.g. health, crime and urban transportation; Evaluation of the Benefits of GIS; Practical Problem Solving techniques.

Spatial Databases and Programming -
The importance of programming and GIS as part of a larger system, which involves spatial databases, software development and programme coding, has been increasingly realised in GIS practice. This unit aims to develop your geospatial skills in building enterprise oriented databases (e.g. geo-database and server) and creating application-oriented GIS models through programming. This unit also helps you to critically evaluate the issues and trends in enterprise GIS and GIS application development from the perspective of software engineering and geospatial technology. Key elements of the curriculum include: Spatial Databases; Design and Quality; Programming; Tutorials.

The final year of study (the MSc stage) requires the student to design and undertake a substantial and unique independent research project, to be presented as an academic dissertation (max. of 15,000 words).

Read less
Established 25 years ago, the Laboratory for Foundations of Computer Science (LFCS) continues to lead the way in the development of mathematical models, theories and tools that probe the possibilities of computation and communication. Read more

Research profile

Established 25 years ago, the Laboratory for Foundations of Computer Science (LFCS) continues to lead the way in the development of mathematical models, theories and tools that probe the possibilities of computation and communication.

Our students benefit from being part of one of the largest and strongest groups of theoretical computer scientists in the world.

Our research is aimed at establishing deep understanding of computation in its many forms. Using advanced mathematical principles, we create theories and software tools allowing fundamental capabilities of computation to be explored, as well as designing languages that can be used to construct safe and effective programs.

Areas of interest within LFCS include verification, semantics, concurrency, process algebra, algorithms, logic and complexity.

While the results of our research can be applied to any one of a large number of diverse fields, biological modelling is of particular interest. Advances in experimental techniques mean that cell biologists need innovative tools and software to understand the vast quantities of data that are being generated.

Other areas where our research is applied include:

computer security
database systems
software analysis
programming language design
performance analysis.

Training and support

As a research student at LFCS, you will have access to our highly respected academic staff community, which includes Fellows of the Royal Society and a winner of a Blaise Pascal medal. Our students regularly receive ‘best paper’ awards at conferences.

You will carry out your research within a research group under the guidance of a supervisor. You will be expected to attend seminars and meetings of relevant research groups and may also attend lectures that are relevant to your research topic. Periodic reviews of your progress will be conducted to assist with research planning.

A programme of transferable skills courses facilitates broader professional development in a wide range of topics, from writing and presentation skills to entrepreneurship and career strategies.

The School of Informatics holds a Silver Athena SWAN award, in recognition of our commitment to advance the representation of women in science, mathematics, engineering and technology. The School is deploying a range of strategies to help female staff and students of all stages in their careers and we seek regular feedback from our research community on our performance.

Facilities

The award-winning Informatics Forum is an international research facility for computing and related areas. It houses more than 400 research staff and students, providing office, meeting and social spaces.

It also contains two robotics labs, an instrumented multimedia room, eye-tracking and motion capture systems, and a full recording studio amongst other research facilities. Its spectacular atrium plays host to many events, from industry showcases and student hackathons to major research conferences.

Nearby teaching facilities include computer and teaching labs with more than 250 machines, 24-hour access to IT facilities for students, and comprehensive support provided by dedicated computing staff.

Among our entrepreneurial initiatives is Informatics Ventures, set up to support globally ambitious software companies in Scotland and nurture a technology cluster to rival Boston, Pittsburgh, Kyoto and Silicon Valley.

Career opportunities

Our graduates are in high demand for postdoctoral academic roles. In addition, the skills you will graduate with can be applied to roles in industry, particularly finance, software development and consultancy.

Read less
UNIGIS is a Distance Learning Postgraduate Network in Geographical Information Systems (GIS) jointly run by Manchester Metropolitan University and the University of Salford. Read more

Description

UNIGIS is a Distance Learning Postgraduate Network in Geographical Information Systems (GIS) jointly run by Manchester Metropolitan University and the University of Salford. The UNIGIS network has over 25 years' experience of success in delivering GIS postgraduate courses. Our highly regarded programme is designed to meet the needs of professionals working in the GI industry - or those wishing to enter the sector. UNIGIS aims to provide a deeper and balanced education in GIS.

Although GIS is a relatively new and emerging branch of geography, the UNIGIS network has over 25 years experience of successfully delivering GIS courses at postgraduate level. You study via web-based distance learning.

The application of GIS is growing rapidly in areas such as urban and regional planning, transportation and land use interaction, and retail marketing, which opens up a range of opportunties for graduates of these courses.

Three separate pathways are offered up to MSc level:

Geographical Information Systems (GIS)

Providing a broadly based postgraduate qualification in the field of GIS permitting some choice in application selection. Develop in-depth knowledge of the issues involved in applying GIS to solving spatial problems with an understanding of the constraints imposed by application area and the interactions between data, methods, people and technology.

Applied Geographical Information Systems (Applied GIS)

Helps develop an in-depth knowledge of GIS based methods for monitoring social/human and natural environments. Establish an effective understanding of the spatial interaction of social/human and environmental factors and develop the capability to extract information from a variety of sources and to analyse and assess within a GIS framework.

Geographical Information Technologies (GI Technologies)

Aids critical understanding of the software engineering practices and standards that underpin database and web application development and the methodologies for implementing those practices in a GIS context. A critical understanding of the issues involved in designing the storage and use of geographical data in databases and web-based applications is forged. Also key is proficiency in the design, implementation and evaluation of small scale database and web-application projects.

Common units Year 1

- Foundations of GIS
- Spatial Data Infrastructures
- Databases

Year 2

- Methods in GIS (Core)

GIS

Choose two from:
- Distributed GIS
- Environmental Applications of GIS
- Remote Sensing
- Social Applications of GIS
- Spatial Databases and Programming

Applied GIS

Choose two from:
- Environmental Applications of GIS
- Remote Sensing
- Social Applications of GIS

GI Technologies

Compulsory
- Distributed GIS
- Spatial Databases and Programming

All study routes employ web-based delivery and aim to provide the conceptual and technical framework required for an in-depth understanding of GIS. Each route has either core or elective units available and all incorporate a project and dissertation which involves the design and execution of an original study.

Career prospects

As a UNIGIS student you will be joining an extensive Geographical Information Systems (GIS) community, with representatives in over 30 countries. The application of GIS is growing rapidly in areas such as urban and regional planning, transportation and land use interaction, and retail marketing.

Read less
The GIS (Geographical Information Science) MSc provides an education in the theoretical, scientific and practical aspects of GIS. Read more
The GIS (Geographical Information Science) MSc provides an education in the theoretical, scientific and practical aspects of GIS. It prepares students for technical and analytical GIS roles and is in high demand; we have very close links with industry and the majority of our students find employment prior to contemplating their degree.

Degree information

Students gain a solid grounding in the scientific principles underpinning the computational and analytical foundations of GISc. Our staff are world-leading experts in the areas of programming location-enabled Apps, spatial and 3D databases, big spatio-temporal analytics, citizen science and and human computer interaction, and the MSc therefore is able to offer a wide range of options and specialisations.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits. The programme consists of four core modules (60 credits), four optional modules (60 credits) and a research project (60 credits). A Postgraduate Diploma, four core modules (60 credits), four optional modules (60 credits), full-time nine months is offered.

Core modules - core modules introduce the theory underpinning GIS, along with programming skills (python) and the basics of spatial analysis and statistcs. You'll learn to critically engage with GIS rather than just pushing buttons - how does the way data is captured and modelled influence the results of your analysis? Do you get the same results from two different GIS packages? Knowing what is inside the 'black box' means you understand analytical results and their limitations.
-GIS Principles and Technology
-Principles of Spatial Analysis
-Mapping Science
-Representations, Structures and Algorithms

Optional modules - term two is where you start to specialise, chosing modules that fit your interests, intended career choice and/or prepare you for your dissertation. At this point you can chose a heavilty technical route (e.g. databases, programming, human computer interaction) a more analytical route (spatio-temporal data mining, network and locational analysis, databases) or a mixture of the two routes. You will need to chose four modules in total. At least 30 credits of optional modules selected from :
-Geographical Information System Design
-Spatio-Temporal Analysis and Data Mining
-Web and Mobile GIS – Apps and Programming
-Spatial Databases and Data Management

Plus no more than 30 credits of optional modules (all term two) selected from :
-Airborne Data Acquisition
-Applied Building Information Modelling
-Network and Locational Analysis
-Image Understanding
-Ocean and Coastal Zone Management
-Positioning
-Research Methods
-Terrestrial Data Acquisition

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000–15,000 words. Where appropriate, this may be undertaken in conjunction with one of our many industrial partners, including Arup, Joint Research Centre, British Red Cross, Transport for London.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through lectures, practical classes, demonstrations and tutorials, and is supported by a series of external speakers from industry and visits to industrial who give weekly seminars describing how GIS is used in their field as well as what they are looking for when recruiting graduate GIS students. Assessment is through unseen examinations, group and individual coursework, formal and oral presentations, and the dissertation.

Careers

There are excellent employment prospects for our graduates, with starting salaries of around £25,000. Recent GIS graduates have found openings with large engineering design firms (such as Arup or WSP), specialist consultancy firms such as Deloitte or Informed Solutions, in leading professional software companies (such as ESRI or Google), with local authorities, for organisations such as Shell, Tesco, the Environment Agency, Transport for London, NHS and the Ordnance Survey.

Employability
Students will develop specific skills including a fundamental understanding of GIS and its application to real-world problems, through theoretical lectures covering the foundations of the science – how data is captured, map creation, generalisation, spatial data management, spatial analysis, data quality and error, and spatial algorithms. Students will develop strong technical (python, R, Java, HTML, Javascript, SQL) and analytical skills (data mining, human computer interaction and usability), and in order to fully understand the principles behind GIS will make use of multiple GIS packages, both proprietary and free/open source (ArcGIS, QGIS).

Why study this degree at UCL?

This highly regarded MSc has been running for nearly 30 years and is taught by internationally recognised academics. Our specialist GIS laboratory offers the latest open source and proprietary software and our unique dual focus on the computer science and analytical aspects of GIS means that you will be able to develop your skills in multiple directions.

Our close links with industry (a strong alumni group and weekly industrial seminars) mean that you will be able to directly link your classroom learning with your future career as a GIS professional; you can also undertake your dissertation with an industrial partner.

As well as weekly industrial seminars, you will have the option to do an industry-linked project, and you will be able to attend our annual GIS careers event, which is co-organized with the UK Assocation of Geographic Infrormation.

Read less
Jointly run by the University of Salford and Manchester Metropolitan University, UNIGIS is a three year programme, with the first two years comprising taught units, and a final year to complete a dissertation. Read more
Jointly run by the University of Salford and Manchester Metropolitan University, UNIGIS is a three year programme, with the first two years comprising taught units, and a final year to complete a dissertation.

The Applied Geographical Information Systems (Applied GIS) pathway aims to develop students in-depth knowledge of GIS-based methods for monitoring the social/human and natural environments. It will also help develop the student's understanding of the spatial interaction of social/human and environmental factors. Importantly, it seeks to increase the student's capability to extract social/human and/or environmental information from a variety of sources, such as remotely sensed data, and to undertake analysis and assessment using appropriate methods within a GIS framework.

The first year of study (equivalent to PgC in GIS) involves three core units:

Foundations of GIS -
This unit provides an introduction to Geographical Information Systems (GIS) from conceptual, theoretical, and practical perspectives. Students will learn about the different methods used in geographic encoding and spatial data modelling before employing such datasets in a software environment. The unit concludes with a review of contemporary issues in GIS. Key elements of the curriculum include: Origins of GIS; Representation, Modelling and Geovisualisation; Software Skills; GIS: Today and Tomorrow.

Spatial Data Infrastructures -
Spatial data is key to any GIS project. This unit investigates how spatial data is sourced and also aims to provide students with the requisite knowledge and practical skills to identify and evaluate, against recognised national and international quality standards, spatial data for use in GI-based projects. Key elements of the curriculum include: Spatial Data; Data Standards and Infrastructures; Sourcing Spatial Data; Data Quality; Evaluating Fitness for Purpose.

Databases -
GIS are fundamentally information systems which provide specialist facilities for the creation, storage and manipulation of spatial and attribute data. Much of the functionality offered by GIS software is shared with conventional database software. Indeed, most GIS - at their core - have a conventional database management system (DBMS) around which spatial functionality has been wrapped. It is essential that GIS specialists have a thorough understanding of database theory, design and implementation. Key elements of the curriculum include: Why Databases?; Relational Databases; Critiquing Relational Databases; Implementation and Interrogation.

The second year of study (equivalent to the PgD in GIS) involves one core and two elective units:

Methods in GIS (core) -
The concepts, theories and methods behind the application of GIS are examined in detail. The unit explores research design, data analysis and interpretation and presentation. Special focus is given to methods of spatial analysis and their implementation using GIS software. Key elements of the curriculum include: Research Design; Qualitative and Quantitative Techniques; Fundamentals of Spatial Analysis; Recent Advances in Spatial Analysis.

Two elective units are chosen from:

Environmental Applications of GIS -
GIS and related technologies such as remote sensing have been widely employed in environmental applications for almost forty years. The advent of satellite remote sensing allowed reliable synoptic data to be available to scientists who have developed numerous models. This together with the decision-making tools and spatially-referenced framework of GIS offers significant support to researchers investigating different environmental phenomena. Data from remote sensing, GPS and other sources provide a valuable input into GIS models for environmental monitoring, modelling and prediction. This unit introduces case study examples of how GIS and related technologies can be used in environmental applications and seeks to critically evaluate their potential value. Key elements of the curriculum include: Applicability and benefits of GIS; Practical Problem Solving and Evaluation using techniques such as Terrain Analysis, Multicriteria Evaluation, Landscape Metrics etc.

Remote Sensing for GIS Applications -
This unit provides students with an introduction to the principles of remote sensing and explores its role in data gathering/information extraction for GIS applications. Key elements of the curriculum include: Principles of Remote Sensing; Satellite Systems; Quantitative Data; GIS Integration.

Social Applications of GIS -
Where an investigation into social, economic, political, and cultural characteristics and phenomena is required, GIS provides a powerful tool. For social applications such as crime mapping and healthcare resource management, GIS can be used effectively to help model, monitor and enable (spatial) decision making based on existing criteria. Social systems are often highly organised and complex - GIS allows this complexity to be effectively distilled into an abstraction representing the most causally related behaviour. This unit introduces case tudy examples of how GIS can be used in social applications and seeks to critically evaluate their potential value. Key elements of the curriculum include: Exemplars of GIS use in Social Applications, e.g. health, crime and urban transportation; Evaluation of the Benefits of GIS; Practical Problem Solving techniques.

The final year of study (the MSc stage) requires the student to design and undertake a substantial and unique independent research project, to be presented as an academic dissertation (max. of 15,000 words).

Read less
This is a conversion course aimed at graduates with a first degree in a non-computing discipline who want to gain employment in the lucrative IT industry. Read more
This is a conversion course aimed at graduates with a first degree in a non-computing discipline who want to gain employment in the lucrative IT industry.

You begin by studying key computing topics including:
-Introduction to databases and big data.
-Computer programming and web development.
-Introduction to technology and computer hardware.
-IT project management and modern development methods.

These modules provide the background knowledge you need to develop more advanced skills later in the course. They allow you to become familiar with the major technologies and concepts that underpin the modern computing industry.

Your learning at this stage has a practical focus and you are encouraged to take part in technical development work.

You go on to study a specialist topic in more depth with the choice of: databases; big data; web and cloud technologies. These areas are very current within the computing industry and in high demand of qualified IT personnel.

You then take an industrial expertise module where you have the opportunity to engage in live projects for real clients. This gives you experience working in a team to identify client needs, plan projects and produce working solutions.

During the final part of the course you complete an individual project which is the equivalent of a dissertation. To prepare you for this project, you first take a module on research skills and principles. You gain an understanding of research methods and learn how to manage a project of this kind.

As well as submitting project materials, you also deliver an assessed presentation describing your work to an audience.

For more information, see the website: https://www.shu.ac.uk/study-here/find-a-course/msc-computing

Course structure

1 year full time. Starts September

Core modules
-Databases and big data
-Web and multimedia programming
-Technology and networking
-Project management methods
-Industrial expertise
-Research skills and principles
-Product development project

Optional modules
You choose one from:
-Databases
-Web and cloud technologies
-Big data

Assessment: individual assignments; group work; practical projects; reports; presentations.

Other admission requirements

Overseas applicants from countries whose first language is not English must normally produce evidence of competence in English. An IELTS score of 6.0 with 5.5 in all skills (or equivalent) is the standard for non-native speakers of English. If your English language skill is currently below an IELTS score of 6.0 with a minimum of 5.5 in all skills we recommend you consider a Sheffield Hallam University Pre-sessional English course which will enable you to achieve an equivalent English level.

Read less
This course is designed to provide a broad-based education in the principles and practice of GIS. Read more
This course is designed to provide a broad-based education in the principles and practice of GIS. Core modules cover issues such as the representation, acquisition, management and manipulation of spatial data; spatial analysis and modelling; remote sensing; GIS in the commercial environment; spatial databases and web-based programming. Concepts and techniques are illustrated using a variety of applications.

Key benefits

- Study to PgCert, PgDip or MSc level
- Modules may be taken in 'standalone' mode.
- Available both on-campus and by fully online distance learning
- Can be taken part-time or full-time
- Flexibility to transfer between full-time and part-time, on-campus and distance learning
- Strong focus on employable and professional skills
- Extensive hands-on practice with key software
- Entirely assessed by coursework - no formal examinations
- Established course (15 years +) with excellent reputation and feedback

Visit the website: https://www.ulster.ac.uk/courses/course-finder/201617/geographic-information-systems-9141

Course detail

- Description -

Graduates of the course are expected to have a broad overview of the field of GIS, to have extensive practical experience of GIS and related software and hardware, and be able to operate at a professional level in GIS employment.

PgDip modules cover issues such as the representation, acquisition, management and manipulation of spatial data, spatial analysis and modelling, remote sensing, GIS in the commercial environment, databases and web programming. Concepts and techniques are illustrated using a variety of applications. Students can take one optional module from a choice of GIS work experience / work-based project, GIS for environmental management, and customising GIS. Students may also opt for an environmental strand of the course.

In addition to acquiring substantial theoretical knowledge of the subject, students gain extensive practical experience using a variety of software, focusing primarily on ArcGIS but also including ERDAS Imagine, PostgreSQL, PostGIS, MySQL, OpenLayers, Geoserver, QGIS, Excel, SPSS and a number of GIS extensions and plug-ins. One of the core modules gives students experience of web-based programming languages such as HTML, CSS and JavaScript, while an optional module in customising GIS applications introduces them to Esri ModelBuilder and the Python programming language.

- Teaching and learning assessment -

Assessment is 100% by course work (no sessional examinations); a mixture of methods including practical reports, problem analysis, projects, literature reviews and essays, class tests, group work and a research project.

Students are able to use the University's extensive online resources of electronic journals, books and databases.

Career options

Successful students develop a range of skills in the management, processing, analysis, interpretation and presentation of geo-spatial data, as well as skills in project management, report writing and problem solving.

Graduates of the course have secured employment in a variety of roles in Ireland, the UK, Europe and further afield (including Australia, New Zealand, Canada and the Middle East), in GIS positions including technicians and analysts, development and sales, lecturing and research, within organisations such as mapping agencies and GIS companies, environmental consultancies, resource management and environmental agencies, planning, health services, housing authorities, local government, rural development, utilities and infrastructure, education, mining and retail analysis. Knowledge and understanding of geo-spatial data is also increasingly required in a variety of jobs outside of the GI profession, making a GIS qualification a valuable asset enhancing employability in a range of fields.

How to apply: https://www.ulster.ac.uk/apply/how-to-apply#pg

Why study at Ulster?

1. Over 92% of our graduates are in work or further study six months after graduation.
2. We are a top UK university for providing courses with a period of work placement.
3. Our teaching and the learning experience we deliver are rated at the highest level by the Quality Assurance Agency.
4. We are an international university with more than 2,000 international students from over 80 countries and Alumni from 121 countries.
5. More than 4,000 students from over 50 countries have successfully completed eLearning courses at Ulster University.

Flexible payment

To help spread the cost of your studies, tuition fees can be paid back in monthly instalments while you learn. If you study for a one-year, full-time master’s, you can pay your fees up-front, in one lump sum, or in either five or ten equal monthly payments. If you study for a master’s on a part-time basis (e.g. over three years), you can pay each year’s fees up-front or in five or ten equal monthly payments each year. This flexibility allows you to spread the payment of your fees over each academic year. Find out more by visiting http://www.ulster.ac.uk/learnyourway

Scholarships

A comprehensive range of financial scholarships, awards and prizes are available to undergraduate, postgraduate and research students. Scholarships recognise the many ways in which our students are outstanding in their subject. Individuals may be able to apply directly or may automatically be nominated for awards. Visit the website: https://www.ulster.ac.uk/apply/fees-and-finance/scholarships

English Language Tuition

CELT offers courses and consultations in English language and study skills to Ulster University students of all subjects, levels and nationalities. Students and researchers for whom English is an additional language can access free CELT support throughout the academic year: https://www.ulster.ac.uk/international/english-language-support

Read less
This is an exciting and dynamic time for documentary practice; in recent years there has been a renaissance in documentary, seeing huge developments in both technology and form. Read more
This is an exciting and dynamic time for documentary practice; in recent years there has been a renaissance in documentary, seeing huge developments in both technology and form. Documentary stories are now being told via telecommunications, in cinemas, on TV, and online.

In this contemporary course you will be provided tuition in the technological, ethical and intellectual developments in this recent boom in theatrical, broadcast and cross platform documentary. You will be taught by award winning documentary filmmakers and high profile TV, film and cross platform commissioners. Tutors Marc Isaacs , Helen Littleboy and Victoria Mapplebeck, are all active filmmakers with excellent industry contacts and through collaborating with them on work in progress you will gain a unique learning opportunity that will provide genuine vocational experience. We also welcome regular guest lecturers, giving students a direct link to industry professionals and the opportunity to learn from their substantial experience and expertise.

On graduating, our students are skilled in creative and professional documentary practice. We have one of the highest employability rates amongst UK Universities and our graduates have gone on to become award-winning filmmakers and journalists.

This is a split campus course, taught in both Egham and Bedford Square in central London.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/mediaarts/coursefinder/madocumentarybypractice.aspx

Why choose this course?

- We have had regular lectures from award winning filmmaker Marc Isaacs, Channel 4 commissioner Kate Vogel and Emily Renshaw Smith, commissioner of Current TV. Forthcoming guest lectures include BBC Director Adam Curtis, feature director Chris Waitts and Matt Locke, Commissioning Editor for New Media and Education at Channel 4.

- Guest commissioners provide students with knowledge of and links to current commissioning strategies. Several of our invited commissioners have subsequently worked with our students on developing their projects.

- You will have exclusive 24-7 access to six purpose-built editing rooms equipped with Final Cut Studio 2 on Mac Pro editing systems. Our Location Store provides an equipment loan and advisory support service with a lending stock that includes twenty Sony HVR-V1E cameras, twenty Sennheiser radio microphone kits and a selection of professional quality sound recording and lighting equipment.

- With access to the latest digital recording and editing equipment, and covering areas from authorship to authenticity, this course offers you an in-depth study of creative production, taking you from conception through commissioning to research, composition and exhibition.

- You will be provided with excellent tuition in self-shooting documentary filmmaking techniques. You will be able to meet the growing demand for self-shooting directors and producers in both the independent and commercial documentary industries.

Department research and industry highlights

- TRENT is an exciting and innovative collaborative project between the British Universities Film and Video Council (BUFVC) and Royal Holloway, University of London (RHUL) and funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC). Led by John Ellis the project brings together the nine existing online databases hosted and curated by the BUFVC which provide important film, radio and television material along with accompanying metadata and contextual information for academics, students, teachers and researchers. This project brings together all the material contained in these databases, yet Trent is not simply a master database. Instead it foregrounds creative searching through a common interactive interface using real-time ‘intelligent’ filtering to bringing disparate databases into a single search and discovery environment whilst maintaining the integrity and individual provenance of each.

- The EUscreen project is major funded EU project which aims to digitise and provide access to European’s audio-visual heritage. This innovative and ambitious three year project began in October 2009 and the project consortium is made up of 28 partners from 19 European countries and is a best practice network within the eContentplus programme of the European Commission. The Department of Media Arts at Royal Holloway’s is responsible for the content selection policy for EUscreen and those involved include John Ellis, Rob Turnock and Sian Barber.

- Video Active is a major EU-funded project aiming to create access to digitised television programme content from archives around Europe. It involves collaboration between the Department of Media Arts at Royal Holloway and Utrecht University, and eleven European archives including the BBC, to provide access to content and supporting contextual materials via a specially designed web portal. The team from the Department of Media Arts, who are John Ellis, Cathy Johnson and Rob Turnock, are responsible for developing content selection strategy and policy for the project.

- Migrant and Diasporic Cinema in Contemporary Europe is an AHRC-funded international Research Network, led by Daniela Berghahn, which brings together researchers from ten UK and European universities, filmmakers, policy makers and representatives from the cultural sector. The Research Network explores how the films of migrant and diasporic filmmakers have redefined our understanding of European identity as constructed and narrated in European cinema. The project seeks to identify the numerous ways in which multi-cultural and multi-ethnic presences and themes have revitalised contemporary European cinema by introducing an eclectic mix of non-Western traditions and new genres.

- Lina Khatib was awarded an AHRC Research Leave Grant to complete a book on the representation of Lebanese politics and society in Lebanese cinema over the last thirty years. The study focuses on cinema’s relationship with national identity in the context of the Civil War and the post-war period in Lebanon.

- Gideon Koppel was awarded an AHRC Research Leave Grant to complete his feature-length documentary portrait of a rural community in Wales, The Library Van, which has been partly funded by the Arts Council of Wales.

Course content and structure

You will study three core units during the year.

Core course units:
- From Idea to Screen
From Idea to Screen introduces the practice of documentary film making - exploring eclectic notions of the genre, from the conventional to those more associated with fine art. The course tutors also use their own work which is deconstructed across all its constituent parts idea, conception, pre-production planning, and research, shooting and post-production. Ideas to Screen will explore ways of translating observations and ideas into imagery – both visual and aural. There will be an emphasis on experimental forms of narrative – at time crossing the boundaries between fine art and documentary. For the final and assessed project in this unit, each student will be asked make a video ‘portrait’ of a character.

- Foundations of Production
Contemporary documentary production requires managerial and business skills as well as creative ones. This unit will instruct you in the industrial skills required for the production of video, television and multimedia documentary. These include researching the market, writing proposals, acquiring funding for development and production, drafting contracts, drawing up budgets, copyright clearance, and marketing.

- Major Documentary Production – Dissertation
Developing out of study, research and practice from previous units, you will direct and produce a substantial documentary production. This is the largest assignment in the course and is appropriately weighted. The unit is tutorial based.

On completion of the course graduates will have:

- gained invaluable experience of both authored and commercial documentary production

- the ability to develop their own ideas, preparing them for the documentary industry but also finding ways to reinvent it

- an understanding of documentary film genre and its changing boundaries as well as the changing technologies and their impact on the genre

- an advanced understanding of the processes of making a documentary film from initial concept to final form and the various stages of production.

- an awareness of the institutions and mechanisms of the UK film and television industry

- a critical knowledge of the current and changing platforms for documentary film, from cinema to television and the internet.

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including project work, photo essays and written production papers.

Employability & career opportunities

On graduating, our students will be skilled in creative and professional documentary practice. We have one of the highest employability rates amongst UK Universities and our graduates have become award-winning filmmakers and BBC journalists; recently one of our alumni Charlotte Cook was appointed Strand Co -Coordinator of BBC’s prestigious Documentary Strand Storyville.

Our graduate students have won and been nominated for many awards including, The One World Broadcasting Trust Award and The Jerwood First Cuts Documentary. In 2009 two of our students, Aashish Gadhvi and Michael Watts won the One World Student Documentary Fund which funds challenging international documentary projects.

Syed Atef Amjad Ali has recently had his film The Red Mosque previewed at The Amsterdam International Documentary Festival. The Red Mosque was made with production funds Syed received from The Jan Virijman Fund and also from the One World-Broadcasting Award.

Chung Yee Yu has won the Cinematography Award at Next Frame (A Touring Festival of International Student Film and Video) Chung Yee Yu has also won the Silver Award of Open Category of IFVA (The Hong Kong Independent Short Film & Video Awards)

Recent graduate Suzanne Cohen has just has her work selected for the BBC’s Film Network website; an interactive showcase for ‘new British filmmakers, screening three new short films in broadband quality every week, adding to a growing catalogue of great shorts’.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

Read less
From start to finish, producers are the driving force behind the film and television industry; they generate new projects and ideas, secure finance, manage production and strategically market the project. Read more
From start to finish, producers are the driving force behind the film and television industry; they generate new projects and ideas, secure finance, manage production and strategically market the project. The producer’s role has been transformed by the advent of globalization, digital technology and the multi-channel environment.

This course offers aspiring producers an opportunity to acquire the creative entrepreneurial skills required to enter a rapidly changing film and television universe. The course concentrates on developing creative, managerial, financial and legal capabilities for a successful career in production.

This Master’s degree reflects the global nature of the contemporary media marketplace but its main focus is UK film and television fiction, rather than factual production. It is targeted at those who want to follow a career path as producers, rather than as directors.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/mediaarts/coursefinder/maproducingfilmandtelevision.aspx

Why choose this course?

- The course benefits enormously from close links with the film and television industry. Tony Garnett (producer of Cathy Come Home and This Life), whose company World Productions has built up a reputation for challenging and innovative drama, was a guiding force in designing the course and has played a great part in the course's success.

- Professor Jonathan Powell (former Controller of BBC 1, Head of Drama for the BBC and Controller of Drama at Carlton TV), one of this country's most respected and experienced drama producers, now delivers the 'Role of the Producer' and ‘Script Development’ lectures as well as providing you with support and advice.

- You will normally undertake a full-time internship in a production company. In most cases this internship lasts about four weeks. You will be offered guidance and assistance in an effort to obtain industry internships.

- Students who have graduated from the course are working successfully in independent television and film production, for broadcasters such as the BBC and ITV, and for distributors, exhibitors, talent agencies and entertainment lawyers.

- Regular networking events are arranged where former alumni can make contact with each other and with the current group of students.

Department research and industry highlights

- TRENT is an exciting and innovative collaborative project between the British Universities Film and Video Council (BUFVC) and Royal Holloway, University of London (RHUL) and funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC). Led by John Ellis the project brings together the nine existing online databases hosted and curated by the BUFVC which provide important film, radio and television material along with accompanying metadata and contextual information for academics, students, teachers and researchers. This project brings together all the material contained in these databases, yet Trent is not simply a master database. Instead it foregrounds creative searching through a common interactive interface using real-time ‘intelligent’ filtering to bringing disparate databases into a single search and discovery environment whilst maintaining the integrity and individual provenance of each.

- The EUscreen project is major funded EU project which aims to digitise and provide access to European’s audio-visual heritage. This innovative and ambitious three year project began in October 2009 and the project consortium is made up of 28 partners from 19 European countries and is a best practice network within the eContentplus programme of the European Commission. The Department of Media Arts at Royal Holloway’s is responsible for the content selection policy for EUscreen and those involved include John Ellis, Rob Turnock and Sian Barber.

- Video Active is a major EU-funded project aiming to create access to digitised television programme content from archives around Europe. It involves collaboration between the Department of Media Arts at Royal Holloway and Utrecht University, and eleven European archives including the BBC, to provide access to content and supporting contextual materials via a specially designed web portal. The team from the Department of Media Arts, who are John Ellis, Cathy Johnson and Rob Turnock, are responsible for developing content selection strategy and policy for the project.

- Migrant and Diasporic Cinema in Contemporary Europe is an AHRC-funded international Research Network, led by Daniela Berghahn, which brings together researchers from ten UK and European universities, filmmakers, policy makers and representatives from the cultural sector. The Research Network explores how the films of migrant and diasporic filmmakers have redefined our understanding of European identity as constructed and narrated in European cinema. The project seeks to identify the numerous ways in which multi-cultural and multi-ethnic presences and themes have revitalised contemporary European cinema by introducing an eclectic mix of non-Western traditions and new genres.

- Lina Khatib was awarded an AHRC Research Leave Grant to complete a book on the representation of Lebanese politics and society in Lebanese cinema over the last thirty years. The study focuses on cinema’s relationship with national identity in the context of the Civil War and the post-war period in Lebanon.

- Gideon Koppel was awarded an AHRC Research Leave Grant to complete his feature-length documentary portrait of a rural community in Wales, The Library Van, which has been partly funded by the Arts Council of Wales.

On completion of the course graduates will have:

- a broad and detailed understanding of the nature of film and television production; how the role of the producer impacts on the production as the creative and managerial driving force, and how the producer communicates meaning to the writer, director, film crew and to the audience

- advanced understanding of the process of producing a film and/or TV programme, from initial concept through distribution and sales

- advanced understanding of script development

- advanced understanding of the various stages of the production process and how to write a pitch, a treatment, business plan, make a deal, write a financial plan, re-coupment schedule and budget as well as all relevant production contracts and documents

- critical knowledge of the current genres and trends in film and television and how they have evolved in recent years

- an understanding of the UK film and television industries, including their structure, institutions and working practices

- a broad understanding of the group nature of film and television production and how the roles played by the key players shape and influence the creative as well as business outcomes of a project

- a clear understanding of management structure within the production company and film crew, hands-on experience of production in

- a professionally equipped television studio working with industry professionals as well as fellow students

- a broad understanding of health and safety, industry codes of ethics, best practice and legal undertakings

- an introduction to high quality industry software for budgeting and scheduling, and post production editing

- an understanding of film and television history

- an understanding of what creative and business skills are needed to be successful in the media industries.

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including essays, script reports, treatments, pitching exercises, studio exercises, production papers, business reports and presentations.

Employability & career opportunities

Students who have graduated from the course are working successfully in independent television and film production, for broadcasters such as the BBC and ITV, and for distributors, exhibitors, talent agencies and entertainment lawyers.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

Read less
The MSc Law and Finance programme is offered jointly by the Centre for Commercial Law Studies (within the School of Law,) and the School of Economics and Finance at Queen Mary, to fill a significant gap in the current academic and professional training market in the UK and Europe. Read more

Overview

The MSc Law and Finance programme is offered jointly by the Centre for Commercial Law Studies (within the School of Law,) and the School of Economics and Finance at Queen Mary, to fill a significant gap in the current academic and professional training market in the UK and Europe. It will equip you with the knowledge, skills and practical tools needed to gain a thorough understanding of global economics and finance, and how this area is regulated by law. Such interdisciplinary skills are needed in order to manage the financial crisis and regulate the market effectively.

You can learn from and interact with some of the best academics and industry experts in their fields, many of whom advise and work with numerous leading institutions including the World Bank, national and international governments, the European Central bank, the IMF, the Bank of England, the European Union, the WTO, the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, Bloomberg, leading UK and International Banks, the FSA and leading International law and accountancy firms.

This programme will:

* Enhance your career options by allowing you to specialise in the highly sought after interdisciplinary areas of law, economics and finance.
* Allow you to tailor the programme to suit your interests by choosing one of four pathways: General; Banking and financial services; Law and financial regulation; or, Law and corporate finance.
* Provide you with the theory, knowledge, practical skills and latest developments required to work in both emerging and established economies in legal, banking, financial, governmental or research institutions.
* Provide professional module exemptions for the CISI (Chartered Institute for Securities & Investment) Masters in Wealth Management and the CBI Chartered Banker Diploma.

Why study your MSc in Law and Finance at Queen Mary?

The School of Law is firmly established as a centre of national and international excellence in legal studies and research, with leading academics in the field of banking, finance, regulation, insolvency, international commercial law and insurance law, including Professors Rosa Lastra, Philip Rawlings, George Walker, Rodrigo Olivares-Caminal and Dr Leon Vinokur.

High profile guest lecturers teaching on the courses have recently included Sean Hagan, General Counsel and Director of the Legal Department at the International Monetary Fund (IMF), Graham Nicholson, Chief Legal Advisor, Bank of England, Mr Lee Buchheit, Partner, Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton LLP, USA.

The School of Economics and Finance is one of the top economics schools in the country, with particular expertise in economic theory, econometrics and finance, and applied economics

You will have invaluable contributions from respected City practitioners and industry experts including banks, fund management businesses, who also teach students, bringing practical insights in to the classroom by applying the theory to real world scenarios.

You will have access to an unparalleled set of optional short courses designed to equip you with further practical training and key technical skills that are highly valued in the Financial Sector.

State-of-the-art facilities such as a virtual trading floor, which provides exclusive access to the latest technology and financial software used in the banking and finance industry, and access to specialised financial and economic databases and software used by economists in finance or in government for data analysis and simulation.

Facilities

You will have access to facilities and equipment at both Schools, including the Postgraduate School of Law Centre in Lincoln's Inn Fields, Holborn, based in the legal district of London, which comprises of workstations, wireless internet access, projectors and a common room.

As well as housing the Law Library and a European Documentation Centre, the Queen Mary Library at Mile End provides access to all the main British, European and international textbooks, law reports and periodicals and also offers one of the best commercial law collections in the country. Through the University of London College network, students have access to an unrivalled range of electronic law journals and databases.

In addition, Queen Mary provides free access to extensive online databases and collections including: Lexis, Nexis, Westlaw, Justis, Eur-lex, Hein-Online, Business Source Complete, Index to Legal Periodicals, International Court of Justice Reports, Kluwer Arbitration, Oxford Scholarship Online (Law), Reports of Patent, Design and Trademark Cases, UK Statute law database and United Nations Treaty Collection.

You will be able to access the well-stocked law library at the University of London’s Institute of Advanced Legal Studies (IALS). The Institute, located at Russell Square, a few minutes’ walk from Lincoln’s Inn Fields, is one of the major law libraries worldwide. You will also have access to the University of London Library at Senate House.

The School of Economics and Finance is able to offer excellent facilities and resources to its students.

IT Software
* Real Time Data/Trading Software: Queen Mary is one of the few UK universities offering training and access to both Reuters and Bloomberg trading terminals (in our designated trading room) as well as Interactive Brokers Trader Workstation (TWS) and FXCM FX Trading Station.
* Time Series Data Software: A full range of economic and financial data is available through DataStream, Macrobond and the WRDS platform (including Bankscope and CRSP).
* Statistical Analysis Software: A wide range of Econometric software including Eviews, Stata, Matlab, Gauss etc.

Computers Rooms
* 2 computers labs with 70 PC s and designated printers.

Trading Room
* Designated Trading Room offering training and access to Reuters, Bloomberg, Interactive Brokers Trader Workstation (TWS) and FXCM FX Trading Station.

Read less
This course takes an immersive approach to learning both the principles and practices of computer systems with much of the material based around examples and practical exercises. Read more
This course takes an immersive approach to learning both the principles and practices of computer systems with much of the material based around examples and practical exercises. Students completing this course will have a firm grasp of the current practices and directions in computer systems and will be able to design and build for example, distributed systems for the Web using Internet, Intranet and other technologies.

Programme Objectives
To provide the foundations for understanding of core ideas, methods and technologies in computer science.
To provide the technical skills and background material so that the postgraduate will be able to conduct a near state-of-the-art research or development project;
To provide the graduate with a range of specialist and transferable skills;
To provide the educational base for further professional development and lifelong learning.
Course Topics
Data networks and communications, project foundations and management tools, broadband communication systems, technologies for Internet systems, agent technologies and Artificial Intelligence, introduction to distributed systems and mobile systems, project and dissertation.

Taught Modules:

Java programming: This module provides students with an in-depth understanding of current and emerging Java programming concepts and programming variations. The module teaches the basic and advanced structures of Java and makes use of the object-oriented approach to software implementation. It also gives an in-depth understanding of advanced Java concepts in the area of user interfaces and will enable students to apply the theoretical knowledge of the Java language onto a test-case software development scenario.

Introduction to distributed systems: This module will introduce key ideas in distributed Systems and its role and application in operating systems and middleware. On completion of this module students will have an understanding of the key issues for distributed systems at OS level or as middleware, they will understand core concepts of concurrency, be able to program multithreaded and distributed applications and understand the issues and use of algorithms for transactional systems.

Data networks and communications: This module will provide an in-depth understanding of how real communication networks are structured and the protocols that make them work. It will give the students an ability to understand in detail the process required to provide an end-to-end connection.

Technologies for Internet Systems: In this module, students will be introduced to state of the art technologies and tools for Internet Systems and in particular e-commerce systems.

Agent Technologies: This module provides an in-depth understanding of technologies from Artificial Intelligence research such as machine learning, data mining, information retrieval, natural language processing, and evolutionary programming. It will look at the application of agent-oriented technologies for Artificial Life, for building Web search engines, for use in computer games and in film (such as the MASSIVE software developed for the Lord of the Rings movies), and for robotics. It will also provide an introduction to agent-oriented programming using the NetLogo programming language.

Foundations of computer graphics: This module will teach techniques, algorithms and representations for modelling computer graphics and enable students to code 2D and 3D objects and animations.

Database systems: Students completing this module will gain an in depth understanding of DBMS/Distributed DBMS architecture, functionality, recovery and data storage techniques. Students will also have a full understanding of how queries are processed and the importance of database maintenance. This module is designed to enable students to perform research into one or two areas of databases; for example, object oriented databases and deductive databases.

Project foundations and management tools: This module prepares students for their MSc research project, including reference search and survey preparation and familiarisation with project management tools.

MSc Research project: After the successful completion of the taught component of the MSc programme, students will spend the remainder of the time undertaking a research project and producing an MSc Dissertation. During this process, students will conduct project work at state-of-the-art research level and to present this work as a written dissertation. Completing a project and dissertation at this level will train students in: problem solving; researching new topics; organizing knowledge; exercising elementary time and project management skills; reporting and writing skills.

Read less
The UNIGIS courses all provide a good grounding in Geographical Information Systems, Science and Technology, but each has a different focus. Read more
The UNIGIS courses all provide a good grounding in Geographical Information Systems, Science and Technology, but each has a different focus. Geographical Information Systems provides a broad introduction to the major aspects of contemporary GIS. Applied GIS is focused more on the application of GIS and Geographical information, in the human and natural environments. Geographical Information Technologies looks at the various technologies that underpin GI solutions.

Key benefits:

• UNIGIS UK combines the teaching and research expertise of staff from two UK universities (Salford and Manchester Metropolitan).
• Widely known by employers for being relevant and up to date.
• Flexible course delivery, web-based distance learning part-time, to fit round work commitments

Visit the website: http://www.salford.ac.uk/pgt-courses/geographical-information-systems

Suitable for

The three UNIGIS courses are largely for UK and international graduates already working with GIS who wish to broaden their understanding and further develop their skills. However, those wanting to study GIS in order to change career paths are also catered for, irrespective of prior knowledge of GIS

Programme details

The application of GIS is growing rapidly, which opens up a range of opportunities for graduates of this course. As a UNIGIS student you will be joining an extensive community with representatives in over 30 countries. By selecting from the range of taught modules available in the second year, you will effectively determine which of the three MSc degrees you will be awarded; Geographical Information Systems; Applied Geographical Information Systems or Geographical Information Technologies.

Format

The courses are taught in part-time distance learning mode ONLY over a period of three years. The first two years are spent on taking taught modules and the third year is for your MSc dissertation and project. The courses start in September each year.

Module titles

• Foundations of GIS
• Spatial Data Infrastructures
• Databases
• Methods in GIS
• Environmental Applications of GIS
• Remote Sensing for GIS Applications
• Social Applications of GIS
• For Geographical Information Systerms
• MSc Project and Dissertation

Select two modules from:

• Distributed GIS
• Environmental Applications of GIS
• Remote Sensing for GIS Applications
• Social Applications of GIS
• Spatial Databases and Programming

For Geographical Information Technologies, there are two compulsory modules:

• Distributed GIS
• Spatial Databases and Programming

Assessment

All the UNIGIS programmes are assessed by 100% coursework.

Career potential

The UNIGIS programmes are particularly suited to those who wish to develop their GIS skills further to gain promotion, but many students use them as a way to get into GIS. Employment prospects are wide and include: analysts/programmers, cartographers/surveyors, consultants, GIS specialists, information technology/ information systems, lecturing, marketing, oil exploration, planning and project management.

How to apply: http://www.salford.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/applying

Read less
Would you like to expand your knowledge on an environmental topic at masters level -. These are all 15 credit point masters level modules. Read more
Would you like to expand your knowledge on an environmental topic at masters level -

These are all 15 credit point masters level modules.

Short courses running 2016/2017

Principles of GIS - start date 26th September 2016

This module introduces the theory and practice of Geographic Information Systems, and is intended to provide an understanding of the breadth of potential GIS applications and to equip students with key concepts and skills relating to the input, management, manipulation, analysis and output of spatial data. Lecture-based teaching of key concepts is reinforced by linked practical exercises which allow students to develop competence in ESRI’s ArcGIS package. The module assumes no prior knowledge or experience of GIS.

Remote Sensing - start date 26th September 2016

This postgraduate module offers students the opportunity to study the principles and applications of remote sensing and image analysis and to explore links between remote sensing and GIS. Students are expected to become familiar with theoretical foundations and are allowed to demonstrate technical principles through a series of software-based practical exercises using ERDAS Imagine 2013.

GIS Databases - start date 7th November 2016

This module examines the role of databases within the GI industry. It aims to enable students to appreciate the need for database skills that are used in GIS applications. The module is interactive and discussions about a range of spatial issues are incorporated within the lectures. A range of database skills are introduced which equip the student with knowledge of the potential and scope of databases within various applications. Students will be introduced to a range of open source DBMS and GIS software including MySQL, PostgreSQL, PostGIS and Quantum GIS.

GIS in Business & Society- start date 30th January 2017

This module introduces GIS-relevant management and decision making concepts in business and society. The module investigates the various decision-making capabilities of GIS, within management and spatial data analysis. Planning, design, error handling, decision support techniques and advanced spatial analysis are examined within the overall implementation of GIS projects, using lecture material, tutorial discussion and group work to enable students to gain an understanding of the potential value of GIS across a broad range of application areas. The module assumes no prior knowledge or experience of GIS.

Web-based GIS - start date 13th March 2017

This module examines the role of programming within the GI industry. It aims to enable students to appreciate the need for programming skills that can be used to customise and develop applications. The module is interactive and discussions about a range of programming issues are incorporated within the lectures. A range of programming skills is introduced which equip the student with knowledge of the potential and scope of programming within various applications.

Read less

Show 10 15 30 per page


Share this page:

Cookie Policy    X