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Data science is an emerging new area of science. With City’s MSc in Data Science you can develop the skills and knowledge to analyse data in many forms and communicate insights. Read more
Data science is an emerging new area of science. With City’s MSc in Data Science you can develop the skills and knowledge to analyse data in many forms and communicate insights.

Who is it for?

This programme is for students who have a numerate first degree or can demonstrate numerate skills. Students are often at the early stages of their careers in diverse professions including economics, statistics and computer science.

Students will have a curiosity about data, and will want to learn new techniques to boost their career and be part of exciting current industry developments. The MSc in Data Science includes some complex programming tasks because of the applied nature of the course, so many students have a mathematics or statistics background and enjoy working with algorithms.

Objectives

The demand for data scientists in the UK has grown more than ten-fold in the past five years *. The amount of data in the world is growing exponentially. From analysing tyre performance to detecting problem gamblers, wherever data exists, there are opportunities to apply it.

City’s MSc Data Science programme covers the intersection of computer science and statistics, machine learning and practical applications. We explore areas such as visualisation because we believe that data science is about generating insight into data as well as its communication in practice.

The programme focuses on machine learning as the most exciting technology for data and we have learned from our own graduates that this is of high value when it comes to employment within the field. At City, we have excellent expertise in machine learning and the facilities students need to learn the technical aspects of data analysis. We also have a world-leading centre for data visualisation, where students get exposed to the latest developments on presenting and communicating their results – a highly sought after skill.

Placements

There is the opportunity to do an internship as part of the programme. The final project, which is normally three months for a full-time student, can be extended to six months if you want to study within a specific organisation. When it comes to the big data and data science area, we have established relationships with organisations including the BBC, Microsoft and The British Library so you can be confident that with City, your access to professional experience is unparalleled. One recent student undertook an internship with Google and has since secured a job within the company.

Academic facilities

The School's computer science laboratories are equipped with the latest up-to-date hardware and software. From Oracle’s leading commercial object-relational database server to PCs with state-of-the-art NVidia GPUs for computer graphics, you will have access to an array of tools to support your learning.

The MSc Data Science programme offers two (three by mid 2016) dedicated computer servers for the Big Data module, which you can also use for your final project to analyse large data sets. We give you the opportunity to undertake training in MATLAB, the most popular numerical and technical programming environment, while you study.

Scholarships

A scholarship for the full fees of the MSc will be offered to an outstanding applicant. The scholarship is available to UK/EU and overseas students, studying full-time. To be considered for the scholarship, please include with your full application a one-page essay with your answer to the question:

'What are the challenges that Data Science faces and how would you address those challenges?'

The submission deadline for anyone wishing to be considered for the scholarship is: 1 MAY 2017

Teaching and learning

The teaching and learning methods we use mean that students’ specialist knowledge and autonomy increase as they progress through each module. Active researchers guide your progress in the areas of machine learning, data visualization, and high-performance computing, which culminates with an individual project. This is an original piece of research conducted with academic supervision, but largely independently and, where appropriate, in collaboration with industrial partners.

Taught modules are delivered through a series of 20 hours of lectures and 10 hours of tutorials/laboratory sessions. Lectures are normally used to:
-Present and exemplify the concepts underpinning a particular subject.
-Highlight the most significant aspects of the syllabus.
-Indicate additional topics and resources for private study.

Tutorials help you develop the skills to apply the concepts we have covered in the lectures. We normally achieve this through practical problem solving contexts.

Laboratory sessions give you the opportunity to apply concepts and techniques using state-of-the-art software, environments and development tools.

In addition to lectures, laboratory sessions and tutorial support, you also have access to a personal tutor. This is an academic member of staff from whom you can gain learning support throughout your degree. In addition, City’s online learning environment Moodle contains resources for each of the modules from lecture notes and lab materials, to coursework feedback, model answers, and an interactive discussion forum.

We expect you to study independently and complete coursework for each module. This should amount to approximately 120 hours per module if you are studying full time. Each module is assessed through a combination of written examination and coursework, where you will need to answer theoretical and practical questions to demonstrate that you can analyse and apply data science methods and techniques.

The individual project is a substantial task. It is your opportunity to develop a research-related topic under the supervision of an academic member of staff. This is the moment when you can apply what you have learnt to solve a real-world problem using large datasets from industry, academia or government and use your knowledge of collecting and processing real data, designing and implementing big data methods and applying and evaluating data analysis, visualisation and prediction techniques. At the end of the project you submit a substantial MSc project report, which becomes the mode of assessment for this part of the programme.

Course content

Data science is the area of study concerned with the extraction of insight from large collections of data.

The course covers the study, integration and application of advanced methods and techniques from:
-Data analysis and machine learning
-Data visualisation and visual analytics
-High-performance, parallel and distributed computing
-Knowledge representation and reasoning
-Neural computation
-Signal processing
-Data management and information retrieval.

It gives you the opportunity to specialise so, once you graduate, you can apply data science to any sector from health to retail. By engaging with researchers and industrial partners during the programme, you can develop your knowledge and skills within a real-world context in each of the above areas.

Core modules
-Principles of data science (15 credits)
-Machine learning (15 credits)
-Big Data (15 credits)
-Neural computing (15 credits)
-Visual analytics (15 credits)
-Research methods and professional issues (15 credits)

Elective modules
-Advanced programming: concurrency (15 credits)
-Readings in computer science (15 credits)
-Advanced databases (15 credits)
-Information retrieval (15 credits)
-Data visualisation (15 credits)
-Digital signal processing and audio programming (15 credits)
-Cloud computing (15 credits)
-Computer vision (15 credits)
-Software agents (15 credits)

Individual project - (60 credits)

Career prospects

From health to retail, and from the IT industry to government, the Data Science MSc will prepare you for a successful career as a data scientist. You will graduate with specialist skills in data acquisition, information extraction, aggregation and representation, data analysis, knowledge extraction and explanation, which are in high demand.

City's unique internships, our emphasis on machine learning and visual analytics, together with our links with the industry and Tech City, should help you gain employment as a specialist in data analysis and visualization. Graduates starting a new business can benefit from City's London City Incubator and City's links with Tech City, providing support for start-up businesses.

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Students in this graduate program have a core set of requirements in theory and method courses, which provide foundations in three research areas. Read more

Program Areas

Students in this graduate program have a core set of requirements in theory and method courses, which provide foundations in three research areas: Communication and Culture, Organizational and Interpersonal Communication, and Rhetoric and Political Discourse. In addition, students complete their plans of study, with elective courses from among any graduate courses in the department (see link below) or outside of the department, with the approval of their academic advisors.

Visit the website https://comstudies.ua.edu/graduate-program/

COMMUNICATION STUDIES (COM)

COM 500 Introduction to Graduate Studies. One hour.
The primary goal is to orient new graduate students to the expectations and procedures of graduate study in the department. Topics covered include developing the plan of study, thesis prospectus, comprehensive examination, and choosing advisors and committees.

COM 501 Introduction to Teaching Public Speaking. No hours.
The primary goal of this course is to facilitate the instruction of COM 123 Public Speaking. Students enrolled in this course will provide lesson plans for their classes and discuss options for improving classroom learning.

COM 513 Communication and Diversity. Three hours.
Study and analysis of issues of diversity as they relate to groups in society and in communication fields. Emphasis is on the media's treatment of various groups in society. Approved as a communication and cultural diversity elective.

COM 515 African American Rhetoric. Three hours.
A historical-critical investigation of African American public discourse from the Revolutionary era to the present, exploring rhetorical strategies for social change and building community.

COM 521 Political Communication. Three hours.
An exploration of rhetorical, media, and cross-disciplinary theories and literature related to political communication as expressed in campaigns and institutional governance.

COM 525 Gender and Political Communication. Three hours.
Study of the impact of gender on political communication activities. Topics include gender differences in political messages and voter orientation, masculine ideals of leadership, women’s roles and advancement in the political sphere, and media representations.

COM 536 Independent Study. Three hours.
Prerequisite: Written permission.
Students who want to count this course toward their Plans of Study must complete the official request form and submit it for the approval of their faculty advisor and the Graduate Program Director.

COM 541 Contemporary Rhetorical Theory. Three hours.
A survey of major contributions to rhetorical theory from the 20th century up to the present.

COM 545 Classical Rhetorical Theory. Three hours.
A systematic inquiry into the development of Greek and Roman rhetorical theory during the classical period (ca. 480 B.C.E.–400 C.E.).

COM 548 Seminar in Rhetorical Criticism. Three hours.
An examination of various methodological perspectives of rhetorical criticism. Specifically, the course aims to familiarize students with both traditional and alternative critical methods and to encourage students to perceive the rhetorical dimensions of all manner of public discourse, ranging from speeches, advertising, film, popular music to discursive forms in new media and the Internet.

COM 560 Group Leadership. Three hours.
An advanced study of small-group behavior, examining in detail theories of leadership as they relate to problem solving in group situations.

COM 550 Qualitative Research Methods. Three hours.
An introduction to qualitative research methods in communication, including data collection and analysis. The goals of the course are to provide exposure to a broad array of qualitative methods, help students learn to use some of these methods, and to help them to understand the role of research in our field. The course is designed to help student actually conduct research, resulting in two conference-worthy papers.

COM 555 Conflict and Negotiation. Three hours.
Negotiation is fundamentally a communicative activity. The main objective of this course is to understand processes of formal conflict management in mixed motive settings. Students will apply negotiation theory and skills to simulated negotiation cases that include buyer-seller transactions, negotiating through an agent or mediator, salary negotiations, deal making, resolution of workplace disputes, multiparty negotiations, international and intercultural negotiations, and ethical decision making and communication in negotiation. The skills and theory introduced in this course will help students manage integrative and distributive aspects of the negotiation process to achieve individual and collective goals.

COM 561 Human Communication Theory. Three hours.
A detailed review of selected theories of speech communication with a focus on the critical examination of the foundation of social scientific theories.

COM 562 Theories of Persuasion. Three hours.
A critical review of social-influence theories in the area of persuasion and human action.

COM 563 Relational Communication. Three hours.
Prerequisite: COM 220 or permission of the instructor.
Focused investigation of to communication in close personal relationships, with primary emphasis on contemporary concepts and theories of romantic relationships and friendships.

COM 565 Intercultural Communication. Three hours.
Survey and analysis of major concepts, theories, and research dealing with communication between people of different cultural backgrounds in multicultural and international settings.

COM 567 Seminar: Public Address. Three hours.
A topical consideration of individual case studies from public discourse, designed to probe problems of the nature of the audience, the ethics of persuasion, and the power of public advocacy in mass society. Topics may vary.

COM 569 Communication and Gender. Three hours.
Explores the role of communication in the construction of gender. Covers feminist theoretical approaches in communication and other disciplines, the intersections of gender with other marginalities, and the role of gender in various communication contexts. Approved as a communication and cultural diversity elective.

COM 571 Seminar in Organizational Communication. Three hours.
An introductory examination of historical and contemporary issues in organizational communication scholarship from a variety of theoretical and methodological perspectives.

COM 572 Organizational Assessment and Intervention. Three hours.
Examines the theoretical issues inherent in the study of organizational communication, the primary factors requiring assessment and intervention, the impact of on-going changes and new information techniques, current challenges facing the organizational consultant, and the practical application of communication processes for improving organizations.

COM 575 Technology, Culture, and Human Communication. Three hours.
Study of the complexity of technologically-mediated communication across cultures. This course combines literature and concepts from intercultural communication with human communication and technology and addresses the challenges of interacting with others via technology, working in global virtual teams and organizations, and participating as a citizen and consumer in the technology age.

COM 590 Internship in Communication Studies. One to three hours.
Prerequisite: Written permission from the graduate program director.
Proposal for supervised field experience in communication studies must be submitted and approved.

COM 595 Special Topics. Three hours. Topics vary by instructor.

COM 598 Professional Project. Three hours.

COM 599 Thesis Research. One to three hours.

Career Options

A Master of Arts degree in Communication Studies can offer many career options. Communication skills — oral, written, electronic — are now recognized as critical aspects in all major professions in the United States. Both in education and in the work force, there is a growing need for those who not only understand how human communication functions in its various forms, but also can analyze and advise others on ways to improve human communication. Graduates typically pursue one of three career paths: teaching public speaking, working in professional communication positions, or continuing with advanced academic study, such as in doctoral or law degree programs.

Find out how to apply here - https://comstudies.ua.edu/graduate-program/admissions/

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Learning how to turn real-world data sets into tools and useful insights, with the help of software and algorithms. Data plays a role in almost every scientific discipline, business industry or social organisation. Read more
Learning how to turn real-world data sets into tools and useful insights, with the help of software and algorithms.

Data plays a role in almost every scientific discipline, business industry or social organisation. Medical scientists sequence human genomes, astronomers generate terabytes of data per hour with huge telescopes and the police employ seismology-like data models that predict where crimes will occur. And of course, businesses like Google and Amazon are shifting user preference data to fulfil desires we don’t even know we have. There is therefore an urgent need for data scientists in whole array of fields. In the Master’s specialisation in Data Science you’ll learn how to turn data into knowledge with the help of computers and how to translate that knowledge into solutions.

Although this Master’s is an excellent stepping-stone for students with ambitions in research, most of our graduates work as data consultants and data analysts for commercial companies and governmental organisations.

Why study Data Science at Radboud University?

- This specialisation builds on the strong international reputation of the Institute for Computing and Information Sciences (iCIS) in areas such as machine learning, probabilistic modelling, and information retrieval.
- We’re leading in research on legal and privacy aspects of data science and on the impact of data science on society and policy.
- Our approach is pragmatic as well as theoretical. As an academic, we don’t just expect you to understand and make use of the appropriate tools, but also to program and develop your own.
- Because of its relevance to all kinds of different disciplines, we offer our students the chance to take related courses at other departments like at language studies (information retrieval and natural language processing), artificial intelligence (machine learning for cognitive neuroscience), chemistry (pattern recognition and chemometrics) and biophysics (machine learning and optimal control).
- The job opportunities are excellent: some of our students get offered jobs before they’ve even graduated and almost all of our graduates have positions within six months after graduating.
- Exceptional students who choose this specialisation have the opportunity to study for a double degree in Computing Science together with the specialisation in Web and Language Interaction (Artificial Intelligence). This will take three instead of two years.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/datascience

Admission requirements for international students

- A proficiency in English
In order to take part in the programme, you need to have fluency in English, both written and spoken. Non-native speakers of English without a Dutch Bachelor's degree or VWO diploma need one of the following:
- TOEFL score of >550 (paper based) or >213 (computer based) or >80 (internet based)
- IELTS score of >6.0
- Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE) or Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE), with a mark of C or higher

Career prospects

A professional data scientist has fine problem-solving, analytical, programming, and communication skills. He or she applies those skills to analyse a problem in the light of the available real-world data:
- To come up with a creative and useful solution.
- To find or program the right tool to turn the data into knowledge.
- To communicate the obtained findings to others.

By combining data, computing power and human intellect, data scientists can make a real difference to help and improve our society.

The job perspective for our graduates is excellent. Industry desperately needs data science specialists at an academic level, and thus our graduates have no difficulty in find an interesting and challenging job. A few of our graduates decide to go for a PhD and stay at the university, but most of our students go for a career in industry. They then typically either find a job at a larger company as consultant or data analysis, or start up their own company in data analytics.

Examples of companies where our graduates end up include SMEs like Orikami, Media11 and FlexOne, and multinationals like ING Bank, Philips, ASML, Capgemini, Booking.com and perhaps even Google.

Our approach to this field

Data nowadays plays a role in almost every scientific discipline as well as industry and is rapidly becoming a key driver of scientific discoveries, business innovation, and solutions for societal challenges such as better healthcare. Medical scientists are sequencing and analysing human genomes to uncover clues to infections, cancer, and other diseases. With huge telescopes, astronomers generate terabytes of data per hour to study the formation of galaxies and the evolution of quasars. Businesses like Google and Amazon are sifting social networking and user preference data to fulfill desires we don't even know we have. Police employing seismology-like data models can predict where crimes will occur and prevent them from happening.

It is then with good reason that data science has been called the sexiest job of the 21st century. Many companies complain about the difficulty to find skilled data scientists and predict this to be even harder in the future. A professional data scientist has fine problem-solving, analytical, programming, and communication skills. He or she applies those skills to analyse a problem in the light of the available real-world data, to come up with a creative and useful solution, to find or program the right tool to turn the data into knowledge, and to communicate the obtained findings to others. By combining data, computing power and human intellect, data scientists can make a real difference to help and improve our society.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/datascience

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Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Health Data Science at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Health Data Science at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

Healthcare, with an already established strong relationship with Information & Communication Technologies (ICT), is continuously expanding the knowledge forefront as new methods of acquiring data concerning the health of human beings are developed.

Processing this data to extract valuable information about a population (epidemiological applications) or the individual (personalised healthcare applications) is the work of health data scientists. Their work has the potential to improve quality of life on a large scale.

Swansea University is the first institution in the UK to offer this taught master's programme in Health Data Science designed to develop the essential skills and knowledge required of the Health Data Scientist.

Key Features of the Health Data Science Programme

- A one year full-time taught master's programme designed to develop the essential skills and knowledge required of the Health Data Scientist.
- The Health Data Science course is also available for three years part-time study.
- An integrated programme of studies tailored to the essential skill set required for Data Scientists operating within healthcare organisations covering key topics in computation, data modeling, visualisation, machine learning and key methodologies in the analysis of linked health data.
- Hands on experiential learning from the professionals behind the Secure Anonymised Information Linkage (SAIL) Databank, a UK-exemplar project for the large scale mining of healthcare data within a secure environment.
- Strong collaboration links with colleagues from the Centre for Health Services Research of the University of Western Australia, a group of leading experts in the analysis of linked health data.
- The Health Data Science course is based within the award winning Centres for Excellence for Administrative Data and eHealth Research of Swansea University, awarded by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) and Medical Research Council (MRC), enhancing the quality of the course.

Who should study MSc Health Data Science?

The Health Data Science course is suitable for those working in healthcare with roles involving the analysis of health data and also computer scientists with experience in working with data from the healthcare domain, as well as biomedical engineers and other similar professions.

Course Structure

Students must complete 6 modules of 20 credits each and produce a 60 credits dissertation on a Health Data Science project. Each module of the programme requires a short period of attendance that is augmented by preparatory and reflective material supplied via the course website before and after attendance.

Attendance Pattern

Health Data Science students are required to attend the University for 1 week (5 consecutive days) for each module in Part One. Attendance during Part Two is negotiated with the supervisor.

Modules

Modules on the Health Data Science programme typically include:

Scientific Computing and Health Care
Health Data Modelling
Introductory Analysis of Linked Health Data
Machine Learning in Healthcare
Health Data Visualisation
Advanced Analysis of Linked Health Data

Professional Development

The College of Medicine offers the modules on the Health Data Science course as standalone opportunities for prospective students to undertake continued professional development (CPD) in the area of Health Data Science.

You can enroll on the individual modules for the Health Data Science programme as either an Associate Student (who will be required to complete the module(s) assessments) or as a Non-Associate Student (who can attend all teaching sessions but will not be required to complete any assessments).

For information and advice on applying for any of the continuing education opportunities, please contact the College directly at .

Employability

Postgraduate study has many benefits, including enhanced employability, career progression, intellectual reward and the opportunity to change direction with a conversion course.

From the moment you arrive in Swansea, specialist staff in Careers and Employability will help you plan and prepare for your future. They will help you identify and develop skills that will enable you to make the most of your postgraduate degree and enhance your career options. The services they offer will ensure that you have the best possible chance of success in the job market.

The student experience at Swansea University offers a wide range of opportunities for personal and professional development through involvement in many aspects of student life.

Co-curricular opportunities to develop employability skills include national and international work experience and study abroad programmes and volunteering, together with students' union and athletic union societies, social and leisure activities.

For the MSc Health Data Science course, we are in the process of identifying opportunities for our students to complete volunteering placements with a number of our collaborative partners.

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The opportunity to exploit Big Data is recognised world-wide and some countries include it in their economic strategies. The UK Government identified Big Data as one of the 8 great technologies which will have a strong impact on growth and the Scottish Government highlights it as an emerging opportunity for Scotland. Read more
The opportunity to exploit Big Data is recognised world-wide and some countries include it in their economic strategies. The UK Government identified Big Data as one of the 8 great technologies which will have a strong impact on growth and the Scottish Government highlights it as an emerging opportunity for Scotland.

Our MSc in Data Science aims to produce specialist data scientists with training in industry relevant data acquisition, storage, warehousing, analytics and visualisation tools and techniques and a good understanding of the needs of industry. The course will prepare graduates in technical disciplines for a career in the design and implementation use of computer-analytics and visualisation solutions for industry.

Visit the website: http://www.rgu.ac.uk/computing/study-options/postgraduate/masters-in-data-science

Course detail

The course will focus on satisfying industry’s demand for data scientists who have the ability to:

• Apply appropriate data science tools and techniques to industry’s data in order to uncover important, previously unknown information only implicit in the data.
• Relate a company’s key performance indicators to a data science problem area in order to focus a data science task.
• Handle large amounts of real-time, non-persistent, data.
• Contribute to business decision-making by effectively communicating (potentially large volumes of) key data visually.
• Understand, clean up, summarise, interpret and manage data.
• Grasp key knowledge about new problem areas in order to communicate with end-users; understand key business needs and processes and identify added value through data analytics.
• Provide user-centred data analytics at an appropriate level.
• Protect and share data as appropriate.

The course will emphasise Big Data, covering not only traditional data management systems but also systems where data and/or its storage is unstructured.

Format

Throughout the course, content is complemented by practical work, allowing you to support your theoretical knowledge with practical experience in data storage, mining, warehousing, visualisation and analysis as well as transferrable skills. You will be taught through a mixture of lectures, tutorials, labs. You will be invited to attend talks presented by highly-experienced researchers, speakers from industry, and members of the BCS (British Computer Society) on a wide range of industry-related topics. You will also be supported through our online virtual learning environment where you can access a wide variety of resources and other support materials.

The individual project provides an opportunity for applying specialist knowledge together with analytic, problem-solving, managerial and communication skills to a particular area of interest within data science. Working with the full support and guidance of an allocated project supervisor, you will be given the opportunity to propose, plan, specify, develop, evaluate, and present a substantial project.

Placements and accreditation

Students who perform particularly well during their first semester of studies will be invited to apply for a 45-week internship.

Careers

The course prepares you for a career in Data Science. Job openings include: Data Scientist, Data Analyst, Data Visualisation Specialist, Data Manager, Database Designer/Manager, Data Mining Expert and Big Data Scientist.

Aberdeen is home to many multinational oil and gas companies and associated suppliers such as mainstream software houses, IT providers to major oil-related companies, specialist software consultancies, and venture capital start-ups.

The university is involved in a number of commercial collaborations on a local, national and international scale with organisations such as BP, British Geological Survey, Wood Group PSN, Accenture, WIPRO and many Aberdeen-based software development companies.

The course also prepares students for research careers by providing the skills necessary of an effective researcher. Suitable MSc graduates may continue to PhD programmes within the school.

How to apply

To find out how to apply, use the following link: http://www.rgu.ac.uk/applyonline

Funding

For information on funding, including loans, scholarships and Disabled Students Allowance (DSA) please click the following link: http://www.rgu.ac.uk/future-students/finance-and-scholarships/financial-support/uk-students/postgraduate-students/postgraduate-students/

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The developments of the internet have given database journalism a new definition, according to which it defines a process where the database becomes the center of the journalistic work (as opposed to the story in traditional journalism). Read more
The developments of the internet have given database journalism a new definition, according to which it defines a process where the database becomes the center of the journalistic work (as opposed to the story in traditional journalism). It slowly evolved into data journalism; a journalistic process based on analyzing and filtering large data sets for the purpose of creating a new story.

This new international Master's program explores the opportunities of data journalism from four angles: data retrieval, data storytelling, data visualization and data publishing. It combines the scientific methods of data treatment with the core values of journalism: select, arrange, digest and reflect. The Data Journalism Master's track puts a strong focus on online and social media based journalism.

The master track Data Journalism (DJ) has a natural connection with Human Aspects of Information Technology (HAIT) and Communication Design (CD). Embedded in the strong Communication and Information Sciences program, Tilburg University believes it has launched a unique Master's program in which students learn how to transfer information and how new means of communication can be used.

Career Prospects Data Journalism

After completing the MSc specialization Data Journalism, a broad range of career paths in business, research and education will be open to the student. A graduate will be able to work and consult on data journalism and work in a broad range of media (related) companies or institutes. With a master's degree, a student can also start a career as a scientific researcher in this field. These opportunities are worldwide because the master is internationally-oriented.

Core competences:
•Ability to select data from a broad range of data sources
•Ability to analyze and abstract data from a scientific perspective
•Ability to explore and detect abnormity in data
•Familiarity with various data standards & the ability to convert
•Ability to visualize data from a journalistic perspective in graphics and text
•Ability to transform data in a journalistic storyline
•Ability to plan and organize innovative data projects

International careers:
•Data journalist
•Research journalist
•Data consultant
•Data researcher
•Interaction designer
•Multimedia storyteller
•Innovation officer
•Project manager new media
•Data scientist
•Researcher

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By studying this MA in Media and Communication you will develop an advanced knowledge and understanding of different forms of communication in their social, political and cultural contexts, focusing either on the relationship between the media and politics in contemporary societies or, on digital culture and communication. Read more
By studying this MA in Media and Communication you will develop an advanced knowledge and understanding of different forms of communication in their social, political and cultural contexts, focusing either on the relationship between the media and politics in contemporary societies or, on digital culture and communication.

The Digital Culture and Communication pathway offers an excellent opportunity for you to engage with contemporary issues and debates on culture, media and society in the digital age. The pathway critically examines the relationship between media, technology and everyday life and it encourages students to analytically reflect on their own digital cultures, identities and everyday practices.

The pathway is built around core modules which focus on the theories and debates surrounding:

the role and impact of cultures of communication and media in the digital age
technologies that are in the contemporary public eye, such as the Internet, social media, “Big Data”, mobile devices etc.
research methods used in media and communication research.
You will develop skills that directly enhance employability, including applying critical reviewing skills, giving presentations, plus data management, problem-solving, team-working and research design and implementation.

You'll able to pursue your own specific research/study interest in political communication via a 12,000-15,000 word dissertation and by choosing two further modules from a range of other M-level modules provided by the department or wider school.

Key Facts

We can offer you:-
- Excellent library facilities
- Opportunities for interdisciplinary inputs
- High quality research methods training
- A regular programme of communication and media seminars open to everyone

Why Communication and Media?

Close knit-community

Communication and Media is a close-knit community of dedicated, innovative teachers and researchers that extend a warm welcome to postgraduate taught and research students. You can benefit from a personalised approach which treats you as an individual and encourages you to become involved in the life of the department. Our approach enables a productive dialogue to be created between and amongst our postgraduate community and our staff, so that we are all engaged in the pursuit of excellent scholarship and research and, more broadly, making a contribution to the development of our field.

Active Research

Key areas of research strength include: communication, politics and power; media theory; political and independent cinema; gender and identity in media; media, ethics and human rights; media and war; new media and digital communication; media discourse; global entertainment and media industries; media, space and place; media and heritage; sociolinguistics, communication and language; and media and cultural identity.

This broad range of research expertise underpins the two pathways we offer – ‘Media and Politics’ and ‘Digital Culture and Communication’. We also run two regular research seminar series – the Liverpool Film Seminar and the Media and Politics Seminar Series – which postgraduate students are encouraged to participate in.

The department's actively contributing to the development of our field through research, key subject associations, conference organisation and speaking engagements, and editorial board membership of significant journals. Our activities include internationally recognised research, linking political science and communication studies primarily through crossover interests in public and digital communication within the British, European and International political and cultural contexts.

Liverpool

Immerse yourself in a city known as a political and creative force. What better place to immerse yourself in the subject than Liverpool, a city with a reputation as a political and creative force, with a thriving production sector and a unique cultural heritage? The Department has close links to cultural industries and venues in the city, some of which collaborate with us in offering assessed work placements as part of our programme of study.

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Our communication programmes were among the first in the UK, combining the research and teaching strengths in the School of English and Languages with the expertise of Surrey Business School. Read more
Our communication programmes were among the first in the UK, combining the research and teaching strengths in the School of English and Languages with the expertise of Surrey Business School.

We’ve successfully trained over 300 graduates who have left to work successfully in a wide variety of multinational and international organisations, particularly in the fields of advertising, international management, media and public relations.

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW

The MA Communication and International Marketing programme equips students with a critical understanding of communication in contemporary international marketing contexts in order to address the market needs of the international business environment.

The programme comprises six compulsory modules and two optional modules covering a wide range of disciplines. These offer numerous opportunities to apply and develop your skills through practical tasks.

It is ideal for marketing and communications professionals who wish to enhance their profile with a postgraduate qualification; and for graduates of humanities, languages or business disciplines wanting to deepen their insight into marketing across linguistic and cultural boundaries.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year. It consists of eight taught modules and a dissertation.

The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.
-Introduction to Research Methods
-Marketing
-International Marketing Management
-Marketing Communications
-Strategy
-Interpersonal Communication
-Global Diversity in Language and Communication
-Professional Communication
-Identity: Marketing and Communication in Practice
-Globalisation: Theories, Discourses and Practices
-The Language of Advertising
-Organisations and Written Communication
-Dissertation

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF THE PROGRAMME

The overall purpose of the programme is to:
-Provide a comprehensive and differentiated understanding of communication and marketing communication
-Supply the tools enabling students to apply this understanding to the task of addressing the market needs of the international business environment
-Instil in students the capacity for carrying out advanced supervised research in an area of (Marketing) Communication

In particular, the programme aims to:
-Develop students’ awareness of the linguistic and cultural differences arising from the (inter)cultural encounter of Anglophone culture(s) with the diverse cultures subject to its influence
-Sensitize students to linguistic and cultural difference in the construction of everyday and institutional discourse resulting from the increased marketization of private and public services, as well as to the issues and concerns of the rapidly growing media industries
-Impart the knowledge and skills of communication and marketing necessary to enable students to compete for jobs/research opportunities in fields relevant to their degree (human resource management, advertising, international marketing), as well as PhD opportunities in this area
-Develop students’ abilities to evaluate and judiciously apply scholarship in Communication

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes in the following areas:

Knowledge and understanding
-Demonstrate a critical understanding of different types of communication, in particular intercultural, cross-cultural, non-mediated (face-to-face) and mediated (telephone, internet,etc.) communication
-Demonstrate a critical understanding of models of consensus-generation, agenda-setting, opinion-formation and communicative interaction
-Demonstrate an awareness of the issues and concerns involved in strategic communication, in marketing communication and intercultural communication
-Demonstrate a comprehensive knowledge of the strategies and content and methods of the marketing function, both within corporations and as a service industry
-Demonstrate a comprehensive knowledge of the strategies and processes of social interaction either spoken or written
-Demonstrate a critical understanding of the role of marketing with particular reference to international case studies
-Demonstrate an appreciation of the different frames for analysing social interaction to be applied to the research work required for the writing of the MA dissertation (this would involve the collection, analysis and manipulation of data of diverse kinds from a variety of theoretical and methodological perspectives, an awareness of the (dis)advantages of each frame and/or method and, consideration of the ethical issues involved in data collection and storage relative to the (sub) cultures examined)

Intellectual / cognitive skills
-Demonstrate an ability to create and carry out a project in the field of (non) professional communication of significant complexity
-Demonstrate an ability to reflect upon the knowledge gained and incorporate this into independent learning strategies
-Critically appreciate the different frames for analysing social interaction to be applied to the research work required for the writing of the MA dissertation

Professional practical skills
-Demonstrate an ability to create appropriate strategies for effective communication with members of the same and/or other (sub)cultures
-Demonstrate the capacity to evaluate communication processes already in place in different contexts and implement marketing communication policies

Key / transferable skills
-Demonstrate the capacity to work both independently and with others in order to achieve common goals
-Demonstrate an ability to manage learning self-critically

GLOBAL OPPORTUNITIES

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.

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Mankind has always communicated, but the means of communication changes. Over the past century, communication technologies have had a fundamental impact on how we carry out our daily lives. Read more
Mankind has always communicated, but the means of communication changes. Over the past century, communication technologies have had a fundamental impact on how we carry out our daily lives. Besides using the internet and mobile phones for interpersonal communication; businesses, banking, transportation systems, TV and radio broadcasts and smart power grids rely on advanced communication technology.

In a constant and rapidly evolving field, you as a communication engineer will be needed to design and build the systems of the future.

Programme aim

Society today is firmly rooted in electronic communication systems, and it is hard to imagine life without them.

Global systems such as TV, radio, the Internet and wired and mobile telephones have a fundamental impact on the way we live and work.

In the near future, we will see rapid development of e.g.

- sensor network communication,
- algorithms to decrease energy consumption of communication networks,
- tele-presence systems that reduce the need for transportation of people,
- communication as it becomes an increasingly prominent aspect of vehicles and transportation,
- many more areas.

Exactly what the future will bring is unknown, but some things are almost certain: there will still be advanced communication systems - some of them will be different from what the world knows today and communication engineers will be needed to develop and maintain them.

Programme description

Global communication systems have not only changed the world but are also advancing at an exceptional rate. Future communication systems will form the foundation for a sustainable and intelligent society where people and equipment can be connected anywhere, any time – with anything. A high degree of connectivity will be a key enabler for new innovative technologies and applications that can benefit from information sharing.

Evolving technologies are e.g. 5G mobile communications, machine communications, fibre optical links and networks, and sensor network communication, with emerging new applications such as remote and assisted medical diagnosis and treatment, traffic and vehicle safety, environmental monitoring, maximizing efficiency and reliability in smart grid infrastructure, and tele-presence systems that reduce the need for energy consuming transportation of people.

In order to gain insight into communication systems of the future, and to develop such systems, solid analytical skills and an understanding of the fundamental principles of digital information transmissions are essential.

Besides the fundamentals in communication engineering we focus on e.g. random signal analysis, stochastic methods for digital modulation and coding, applications of digital signal processing, optical fibres and lasers and information theory and coding.

The combination of theoretical and applied knowledge in systems that apply on a global scale gives you a toolbox and a degree in Communication Engineering for a lifelong learning process in communication technologies.

Who should apply

You should apply if you find the future outlook for communication engineers interesting, and have the following skills at a bachelor’s level: signals and systems theory (including linear systems and transforms), mathematical analysis (including probability and linear algebra) and basic programming. Basic knowledge in data communications is recommended but not required.

Why apply

In order to gain insight into communication systems of the future, and to develop such systems, solid analytical skills and an understanding of the fundamental principles of digital information transmissions are essential, where mathematics and signal processing are important tools. The combination of theoretical and applied knowledge prepares students with a degree in Communication Engineering for a lifelong learning process in communications.

Educational methods

The pedagogical structure of the programme is targeted towards learning system design processes as practiced in the communication industry. In general, the educational methods are based on what are expected from engineering graduates in an industrial environment, with specific emphasis on building and refining problem-solving skills, team work and presentation skills. Certain emphasis is placed on solving complex tasks by defining subtasks and interfaces, performing these subtasks independently, and assembling the results. All courses in the program are permeated by the principles of sustainable development. You get the opportunity to interact with the industry via guest lectures and study visits. Finally, the Master’s Thesis gives you training in individual research, project planning, documentation and presentation. It can be carried out at the University, industry or another university/research institute.

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The modern world is experiencing a growth of online data in a variety of forms, including social networks, web documents, digital libraries, blogs, medical records, biological data, remote sensing, imaging, forecasting etc. Read more
The modern world is experiencing a growth of online data in a variety of forms, including social networks, web documents, digital libraries, blogs, medical records, biological data, remote sensing, imaging, forecasting etc. This data may not be fully structured but still contains valuable information that needs discovering, such as emerging opinions in social networks, consumer purchase behaviour, trends from search engines, and other patterns that emerge from such huge data sources.

These developments mean traditional applications are no longer appropriate to the processing and analysis of the amount of data available. Companies, such as Google, are leading the movement from a large-scale relational database reflecting the desire to analyse data automatically and on a larger scale than previously seen.

Course content

The course is designed to respond to critical skill shortages in the rapidly expanding field of Big Data. It offers a balance of practical skills combined with academic rigour in the field of Big Data. This is a unique offering which builds on the strengths and experience of Staffordshire University in delivering practical scholarship relevant to real world situations.

It is intended to assist students and career professionals enter and succeed in the growing, high demand analytics workforce. The course recognises and acknowledges the changing patterns in study including the growing demand for extended and distance learning modes of study and builds on the many years of experience the faculty has of delivering these modes.

As a full time student, you would study in the first semester:
-Managing Emerging Technologies
-Data Harvesting and Data Mining
-Distributed Storage
-Distributed Processing

This first semester is concerned with those areas of big data fundamentals and is used to examine how big data is stored, processed and how an organisation can start to use tools to examine this data and start to improve businesses awareness of its customer base.

In the second semester you will study:
-Research Methods
-Virtualisation
-Big Data Applications
-Data Modelling and Analysis

This semester encompasses a module on how to manage big data within a network, a maths module on algorithms that are required to enhance big data and a module which will prepare you for the master project in the last semester. The last module will examine existing big data applications that can help get the most out of big data.

The final semester is a major research project. The actual content is open to discussion with the award leader and project supervisor must be a discipline related to Big Data.

On completion of the award you will have developed detailed knowledge and understanding of Big Data and the ability to apply this knowledge in an academic or commercial context.

The award also aims to instil sound academic & professional skills required for lifelong learning & development - for example, skills in research methods, critical thinking & analysis, academic and professional report writing, and communication skills.

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Today’s society operates on large amounts of data. Industry, governments and academia are asked to provide insight into these data. Read more
Today’s society operates on large amounts of data. Industry, governments and academia are asked to provide insight into these data.
•But how do we deal with such large amounts of data?
•What techniques do we use to mine the data?
•What are the legal and ethical aspects regarding these data sets?
•And what economic value can be found in big data?

The MSc specialization Data Science: Business and Governance trains students to become Data Scientists that can address these questions. The Harvard Business Review calls the job of Data Scientist "the sexiest job of the 21st century"!

Why Data Science: Business and Governance in Tilburg?
•Tilburg University offers a wide range of complementary expertise, including techniques for data mining, pattern recognition, business analytics, visualization and process analytics; as well as knowledge on law, regulation, ethics and entrepreneurship.
•The MSc specialization consists of courses in methods of analysis, together with economic and management as well as legal, ethical and methodological perspectives on data, all of them taught by experts in these fields.
•The Master’s specialization Data Science: Business and Governance offers (constitutes/ consists of) a well-balanced mixture of theoretical and practical (elective) courses.

These elements combine to make this specialization unique in Europe and possibly even in the world: Four schools (Tilburg School of Economics and Management, Tilburg School of Law, Tilburg School of Social and Behavioral Sciences, and the Tilburg School of Humanities) work together in offering the best possible training for the job of the future, that of Data Scientist.

Career Prospects

Data Science: Business and Governance graduates will not only have knowledge and expertise in the area of data analysis and data mining, but also in economic, management and legal perspectives on big data.

Growing need for Data Scientists

There is a growing need in government organizations, in companies and in academia for employees with the analytical skills needed to analyze large datasets, recognize patterns, and visualize data, and combining these skills with interdisciplinary knowledge of perspectives on Data Science.

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Our course enables you to meet the growing need for increased knowledge in cross-cultural communication. You will receive communication-focused training and develop expertise in cross-cultural communication. Read more
Our course enables you to meet the growing need for increased knowledge in cross-cultural communication. You will receive communication-focused training and develop expertise in cross-cultural communication. The course covers understanding how cultures and human behaviour reflexively interconnect.

Changing social conditions and circumstances require new ways of dealing with people, and fresh ways of interacting and communicating with people of other cultures.

There is an urgent need to improve our knowledge and understanding of the processes and issues involved in cross-cultural communication, and to discover how such knowledge can be effectively applied in everyday experiences.

What this means in practice is that we need to develop our knowledge of why and how communication 'works' and how and why it sometimes does not 'work'.

The course answers questions including how cultural background impacts upon successful communication and how language, thought, and behaviour are interrelated.

The Cross-Cultural Communication (CCC) MA is relevant if you wish to study communication, language and culture. It will also suit anyone intending to work, or are already working, in international and cross-cultural environments where communication is an essential aspect of that work, as for example:
-Communications consultants
-Interpreters
-Social workers
-International sales representatives
-Journalists
-Medical and healthcare professionals
-Humanitarian aid staff
-Teachers
-Local government officials

The course is theoretically, practically and research oriented, and allows selection of one of six specialist pathways.

Our CCC courses are the only ones in the world to offer such a broad range of specialisms. This unique combination of expertise in cross-cultural communication and an additional area provides our graduates with enhanced employability in the competitive global marketplace.

We have an international student cohort, with up to 35 countries represented. Former students identify this as one of the main strengths of the course, as they are regularly working with peers from a wide range of national, linguistic and professional backgrounds. This provides everyone with an opportunity to develop their interpersonal and intercultural skills while studying.

Through the research portfolio, you are equipped with the analytical and theoretical skills required to understand and analyse communication in a wide range of settings. You learn about research in communication and cross-cultural communication from a range of perspectives, including:
-Social psychology
-Communication studies
-Intercultural communication studies
-Ethnography
-Discourse studies

The course has received praise from external examiners and the University's Internal Subject Review committee for the emphasis on teaching and assessing empirical, data-driven research. You receive training on the practical, theoretical and methodological skills required to conduct research relevant to the field of cross-cultural communication. This includes the various ways of collecting and analysing empirical data:
-Ethnographic observation
-Research interviews
-Questionnaire-based statistical analysis
-Discourse analysis

Delivery

Modules are delivered through a range of means, including:
-Lectures
-Seminars
-Workshops
-Group projects

Each module tends to last one semester. Some optional modules are taught in short, intensive blocks and/or on occasional weekends.

Work experience

You are encouraged to apply your research interests to real world case studies, particularly of international organisations or workplaces with which you have a connection.

For example, your empirical project submitted in research file three can be in connection with voluntary work (for a charity or NGO) or an internship, arranged over the summer towards the end of the course.

As a part time student you can conduct a research project of relevance to your employer and/or industry.

Pathway

The Cross-Cultural Communication MA has six specialist pathways:
-Applied Linguistics
-Education
-International Management
-International Marketing
-Media
-International Relations

Facilities

As a student in the School of Education, Communication and Language Sciences you'll have access to facilities and a growing collection of online resources, including:
-A well-stocked Education Resource Centre
-Language Analysis Lab
-A phonetics lab
-An audio-video lab
-A recording studio

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MSc Media and Communication (Data and Society) offers an intensive, year-long exploration of the significance of data and information within contemporary societies and communications. Read more

About the MSc programme

MSc Media and Communication (Data and Society) offers an intensive, year-long exploration of the significance of data and information within contemporary societies and communications. At a time when intensive data-gathering about online activity is central to both business models and to governments’ strategies for understanding their citizens, the programme’s critical perspective on the “move towards data” is highly relevant, allowing you to understand, evaluate and respond to the social and political contexts of data production and analytics. You will also consider the cultural aspects of data’s role within everyday life.

The programme provides you with the resources to understand the wider implications of a social shift towards data (as highlighted in recent debates about the data-gathering of the NSA and social media platforms). The programme will also teach you skills in understanding how data processes can be constructed, managed and renewed to fulfil social and civic ends, identifying the ethical questions raised by data’s growing role in communication and social processes and what approaches might resolve them, and understanding the significance of data-collection processes.

Graduate destinations

This programme will provide students with an understanding of how data shapes social life specifically through communication processes. This is useful for future careers in media and communication fields that are increasingly bound up with information systems and data development, such as: advertising and marketing, data analytics, legal and political consulting, information management, and editorial.

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As a Data Visualisation Designer you can contribute innovative solutions with the potential to transform societal challenges, by designing the human interface to increasingly complex problems. Read more

Why take this course?

As a Data Visualisation Designer you can contribute innovative solutions with the potential to transform societal challenges, by designing the human interface to increasingly complex problems.

On this course, you will learn how to create rich and meaningful stories with data. We will study digital content in any mode, whether it is in alphanumeric form, binary, vector, pixel, video, or others. The designer provides an important interface, that allows us to explore data and generates meaningful communication. This communication is predominantly visual, but with developments in Wearables and the Internet of Things, is also becoming increasingly physical, affective, networked and interactive. Data Visualisation Design spans traditional graphic and information design, interaction design, information architecture, computational design, design thinking and user-centred and user experience design.

What will I experience?

On this course you can:

Learn the theory and practice of data visualisation, data, interface/interaction design and user experience, and apply this to your own design
Critically question the role of data related to the social, political, economic and cultural through contextual research
Explore live data sets from real world scenarios, such as industry or charities like the digital humanitarian network
Develop independent research and project ideas to create innovative, forward thinking design solutions and experiences for a digital and data driven world

What opportunities might it lead to?

The course will prepare you to work in the design disciplines of the creative industries, with a focus on data visualisation, information design, computational design, digital content, interactivity and user experience. Data Visualisation designers are in demand in sectors including business, research, health, education, government/public service, the arts.

The skills gained on this course can also be applied to employment in UI (user interface) design, or focus on interaction as a UX (User experience) designer. The critical and contextual outlook allows you to position yourself as a strategist and operate in a consultative manner. The research aspect of the course would also suit a career in compulsory, further and higher education.

Careers include:

Data Visualisation Design
Information Design
Digital Graphic Design
UI (user interface) / UX (user experience) design
Interaction design

Module Details

The course is offered over one year (full-time) or two years (part-time).

You will study five units, one of which is shared with other MA courses in the School of Art and Design. There will be preparatory units delivering a grounding in practical skills, theoretical context and academic research (competencies and skills). You will also study units that allow more thematic engagement with interactive and data driven design in terms of theory such as critical design, affordances, experience and complexity. It will also provide a unit oriented towards employability, and incorporate live briefs and group work. These units work to catalyse your own ideas and research direction for the Major Project unit.

Core units currently comprise:

A Question of Research
Fundamentals of Data and Interaction Design
Digital Futures – Themes and Issues in Practice
Design Solutions for Enterprise, Society and Culture
Major Project

Programme Details

The teaching combines interactive lectures and group seminar discussions with support through one-to-one tutorials. You also receive feedback on your work through friendly but critical peer review in group sessions with other students, members of faculty and other experts as appropriate. One of the units includes working as a team. Your project work emphasises self-initiated learning which gives you the freedom to explore the specialist area of your interest, while being helpfully guided by your supervisor. The curriculum is very closely related to the research areas in the department, so the staff have cutting edge knowledge of the field and its potential for innovation.

Your learning is mostly assessed through the submission of practical course work, such as digital prototypes, and the documentation of the learning journey in sketchbooks, diaries, blogs or journals.

This will be documenting contextual research as well as stages in practical experimentation and annotation of reflection. There are some written elements to be submitted as well, mostly accompanying proposals/reports to contextualise your practice. The assessment also includes individual and group presentations, this mode is also used to give you formative feedback on your work throughout.

Here's how we assess your work:

Digital artefacts / prototypes
Learning journals
Proposals
Reports
Oral presentation

Student Destinations

This course is an opportunity to focus your creative design practice on the interactive, data driven, user centred and culturally contextualised. It also enhances your design career by upgrading your skills and widening your knowledge and thinking in the digital arena, allowing you to stay one step ahead of the rest. The independent research aspect of the course prepares you for further education in terms of a research degree and employment in R&D and/or education.

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This innovative new course developed in collaboration with CDA (Common Data Access Ltd) provides flexible entry to an education in the field of petroleum data management. Read more
This innovative new course developed in collaboration with CDA (Common Data Access Ltd) provides flexible entry to an education in the field of petroleum data management. The course has been designed as an access route for those with relevant work experience in the energy sector who do not currently have the necessary qualifications in this area. The course facilitates access to any of our Masters Degree courses available from the Department of Information Management and enhances professional career development.

You will be able to draw upon your current and previous work experience within the modules. This approach will allow you to analyse both the organisation and its approach to petroleum data management, and to utilise the course content to improve strategic organisational effectiveness. In addition, it encourages you to consider any practical problems that may arise in the execution of any activities, and to reflect critically on the value of your own organisational input.

Visit the website: http://www.rgu.ac.uk/information-communication-and-media/study-options/distance-and-flexible-learning/petroleum-data-management

Course detail

The Petroleum Data Management Graduate Certificate aims to promote the understanding of subsurface exploration and production data and evaluate its importance to upstream oil and gas businesses. The course focuses on managing subsurface exploration and production data throughout its life cycle from capture to realisation until it becomes obsolete.

You will study four modules over the academic year, each assessed through coursework assignments:

• Managing Subsurface Exploration and Production Data
• The Data Management Life Cycle
• Providing Data Management Services
• Data Quality and Governance

Format

The course will be offered online. Our supported distance learning mode of delivery allows you to study online from any location and is designed to fit in around any existing work commitments.

Our virtual learning environment, CampusMoodle offers students flexibility of where and when they can study, offering full and open access to tutors and other class members. Students have the benefit of being part of a group of learners with the invaluable opportunity to participate in active, group-related learning within a supportive online community setting. The online campus provides students with lectures and course materials and it also includes:

• Virtual tutorials
• Live chat
• Discussion forums - student and tutor led
• Up-to-date web technology for delivery methods
• User friendly material
• Access to our online library

As online learners, students are part of a 'virtual cohort' and the communication and interaction amongst members of the cohort is a significant aspect of the learning process.

Careers

There is a growing recognition of the need for more effective data management in the energy sector. In addition to gaining a recognised industry-focussed qualification, this course will also provide access to our CILIP accredited courses allowing you to develop your knowledge and career further, and to undertake a diverse range of roles in the energy sector including:
• Data analyst
• Information scientist
• Records manager

Benefits

The award of Graduate Certificate Petroleum Data Management given on completion of this course has been promoted by CDA as a means of promoting the professionalisation of data managers within the energy sector.

How to apply

To find out how to apply, use the following link: http://www.rgu.ac.uk/applyonline

Funding

For information on funding, including loans, scholarships and Disabled Students Allowance (DSA) please click the following link: http://www.rgu.ac.uk/future-students/finance-and-scholarships/financial-support/uk-students/postgraduate-students/postgraduate-students/

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