• University of Derby Online Learning Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Bristol Featured Masters Courses
  • Jacobs University Bremen gGmbH Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Southampton Featured Masters Courses
  • Swansea University Featured Masters Courses
  • Goldsmiths, University of London Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Edinburgh Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Oxford Featured Masters Courses
Middlesex University Featured Masters Courses
Barcelona Technology school Featured Masters Courses
Imperial College London Featured Masters Courses
Vlerick Business School Featured Masters Courses
University of Surrey Featured Masters Courses
"cyber" AND "warfare"×
0 miles

Masters Degrees (Cyber Warfare)

We have 4 Masters Degrees (Cyber Warfare)

  • "cyber" AND "warfare" ×
  • clear all
Showing 1 to 4 of 4
Order by 
IN BRIEF. You will develop  practical and real-world skills in all major areas of cyber security, cyber forensics, cyber warfare and cyber threat intelligence to fight against Advanced Persistent Threats (APTs). Read more

IN BRIEF:

  • You will develop  practical and real-world skills in all major areas of cyber security, cyber forensics, cyber warfare and cyber threat intelligence to fight against Advanced Persistent Threats (APTs)
  • You will prepare yourself to obtain professional security certifications such as CISSP and CCFP
  • You will be among the most employable people on the planet!
  • Part-time study option
  • International students can apply

COURSE SUMMARY

This course builds on your previous knowledge of computer science and Information Technology (IT), and aims to provide you with an in-depth specialism in the fields of cyber security, cyber threat intelligence and digital forensics. You will gain advanced and in-depth knowledge of penetration testing, cyber forensics, malware reverse engineering and software vulnerability and will exploit research using a very hands-on approach. You will gain practical and real-world skills in all major areas of cyber security including penetration testing, digital forensics, cyber warfare and threat intelligence. Moreover, you will learn how to apply your skills in analysis, testing and maintenance of software systems or enterprise networks from a cyber security perspective.  

You will use your penetration testing and vulnerability assessment skills in finding weaknesses in existing devices and applications and to advise developers or network administrators to secure their application or environment. Your cyber forensics skills can be used to identify, collect, preserve and analyse a wide range of digital evidences and present them in the court of law. You will use your knowledge of programming to analyse different malwares to determine how they work and how countermeasures can be developed. Only a small percentage of cyber security professionals are capable of analysing advanced persistent threats and are capable of understanding and managing malware campaigns. Finally, your cyber threat intelligence knowledge and skills will help you to strategically fight against organised cyber crimes, understand and analyse cyber warfare activities and propose appropriate defensive and offensive mechanisms to reduce or eliminate those risks.

You will have close and active contact with industry experts with the opportunity to attend regular industry guest lecture programs in cyber security while you operate within a well-formed professional and ethical framework.

TEACHING

  • Projects and assignments enable you to apply what you have learned to a realistic problem; to develop independent learning skills; to demonstrate an ability make decisions in uncertain situations; and to develop your ability to compare and contrast alternative technologies.
  • Group activities in class are used to develop your team working and professional skills (though all assessment is individual).
  • Supervised work in computer laboratories is used to put into practice principles you have covered in supporting lectures.
  • Research skills are integral to the program, and you will be required to critique examples of work and then carry out your own research-based investigations in our assignments.
  • The issue of professionalism and ethics is woven in throughout the programme, and issues must be identified and addressed as part of all assignments and projects.

ASSESSMENT

  • Examination (25%) assesses your immediate response to  small or medium unseen problems
  • Coursework (40%) assesses your considered and in-depth response to a larger problem
  • Project (35%) assesses your ability to work independently, to plan a significant activity and, in carrying out the plan, to demonstrate originality in the application of your knowledge.

CAREER PROSPECTS

Graduates from this course can work in a wide variety of technical security roles within business, banking, software, networking, government, consultancy, etc. This would include roles such as malware analyzer, penetration tester, information security manager, security consultant, forensics investigator or security programmer. There is a significant worldwide skills shortage in this area, particularly for graduates with the in-depth technical knowledge and skills that are developed by this course.

LINKS WITH INDUSTRY

This course has contacts with local industry such as software companies (such as Web Applications UK), infrastructure providers (such as UKFast) and security consultants (such as KPMG). These companies will provide you with a real-world perspective to help you appreciate the barriers that exist and the compromises that must be made to manage conflicting demands (known as the C-I-A triad).

FURTHER STUDY

Your MSc project will need you to demonstrate “originality in the application of knowledge”. Given a suitable topic, this may be able to be developed into an area where you can undertake a higher research degree to demonstrate “an original contribution to knowledge” which is the target for a PhD. You will get a chance to learn about the research interests of the University’s research active staff in order to help you develop a suitable topic. This may be directly in a security field, or applications of other fields of computing such as artificial intelligence or big data in cyber security and cyber forensics.



Read less
The traditional military threats which defined global security matters for the best part of the 20th century have been quickly replaced by new and re-emerging security challenges. Read more
The traditional military threats which defined global security matters for the best part of the 20th century have been quickly replaced by new and re-emerging security challenges. This programme offers you the opportunity to examine many of these contemporary threats..

Why this programme

◾You will develop your knowledge of the security challenges impacting our rapidly changing social and political environment at a local, national and global level. These range from terrorism and cyber warfare to disease, migration and climate change.
◾You can combine a broad spectrum of subject areas into your degree, including politics, sociology, Central & East European studies, war studies, archaeology, computing science, geography, law, business and education.
◾You will have the opportunity to take part in policy development exercises: working with government officials and policy-makers to simulate the process of responding to major international security crises.
◾The programme will also include a series of master classes from high profile professionals and academics working in the field of security.

Programme structure

You will take four core and selection of optional courses. You will also complete a dissertation as a piece of independent research. In addition to the general degree programme, you have the opportunity to study one of three specialised pathways.

Core courses
◾Comparative approaches to warfare and violent conflict
◾International security and global politics
◾Research design OR Qualitative methods
◾Thematic issues in global security.

Optional courses

Pathways

Cyber security and intelligence

Provides you with the opportunity to examine how cyber issues and information communications technologies challenge the way states and citizens alike attempt to use and constrain information in a range of societies for security purposes. Specialised courses within this pathway include
◾Human-centred security
◾Information systems and databases
◾Systems and networks.

Social and cultural perspectives (not running in 2017-18)

Provides you with the opportunity to examine global security from a critical perspective, reflecting on social and cultural aspects and constructions of 'security'. Important to this pathway will be an interrogation of the relationship between security, vulnerability and the ethics of care. Specialised courses within this pathway include:
◾Critical perspectives on securities and vulnerabilities
◾A range of related optional courses.

Strategy and defence

Provides you with the opportunity to examine shifts in Western strategic thought in both a historical and contemporary setting. Particular attention will be given to how strategy and defence is currently developing within a new interdependent global context. Specialised courses within this pathway include
◾Comparative approaches to warfare and violent conflict
◾The American way of war: from Revolution to the War on Terror
◾A range of related optional courses.

Career prospects

You can move into careers such as working with governmental and non-governmental organisations, business and international/transnational organisations. Recent graduates have gone on to work for the BBC, the United Nations, the UK armed forces, a US based research agency and UK based private security and risk analysis companies. Others have gone to undertake a PhD.

Read less
We are living through an era of tumultuous change in how politics is conducted and communicated. The great digital disruption of the early 21st century continues to work its way through media systems around the world, forcing change, adaptation, and renewal across a whole range of areas. Read more
We are living through an era of tumultuous change in how politics is conducted and communicated. The great digital disruption of the early 21st century continues to work its way through media systems around the world, forcing change, adaptation, and renewal across a whole range of areas: political parties and campaigns, interest groups, social movements, activist organisations, news and journalism, the communication industries, governments, and international relations.

In the New Political Communication Unit at Royal Holloway, University of London, we believe the key to making sense of these chaotic developments is the idea of power—how it is generated, how it is used, and how it shapes the diverse information and communication flows that affect all our lives.

This unique new Masters degree, which replaces the MSc in New Political Communication, is for critically-minded, free-thinking individuals who want to engage with the exciting intellectual ferment that is being generated by these unprecedented times. The curriculum integrates rigorous study of the very best academic research with an emphasis on making sense of political communication as it is practiced in the real world, in both "old" and "new" media settings.

While not a practice-based course, the MSc Media, Power, and Public Affairs is perfect for those who wish to build a career in the growing range of professions that require deep and critical insight into the relationship between media and politics and public communication more generally. These include advocacy, campaign management, political communication consultancy, journalism, government communication, policy analysis, public opinion and semantic polling, and public diplomacy, to name but a few. Plus, due to its strong emphasis on scholarly rigour, the MSc in Media, Power, and Public Affairs is also the perfect foundation for a PhD in political communication.

You will study a mixture of core and elective units, including a generous choice of free options, and write a supervised dissertation over the summer. Teaching is conducted primarily in small group seminars that meet weekly for two hours, supplemented by individual tuition for the dissertation.

This course is also offered at Postgraduate Diploma level for those who do not have the academic background necessary to begin an advanced Masters degree. The structure of the Diploma is identical except that you will not write a dissertation. If you are successful on the Diploma you may transfer to the MSc, subject to academic approval.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/politicsandir/coursefinder/mscpgdipmediapowerandpublicaffairs.aspx

Why choose this course?

- be taught by internationally-leading scholars in the field of political communication

- the curriculum integrates rigorous study of the very best academic research with an emphasis on making sense of political communication as it is practiced in the real world, in both "old" and "new" media settings

- perfect for those who wish to build a career in the growing range of professions that require deep and critical insight into the relationship between media and politics and public communication more generally

- a unique focus on the question of power and influence in today’s radically networked societies.

On completion of the programme, you will have:
- advanced knowledge and critical understanding of key concepts, theoretical debates, and developments in the field of political communication

- advanced knowledge of the texts, theories, and methods used to enhance understanding of the issues, processes, and phenomena in the field of political communication

- advanced knowledge and critical understanding of research methods in the social sciences

- a solid foundation for a career in the growing range of professions that require deep and critical insight into the relationship between media and politics and public communication more generally, or for a PhD in any area of media and politics.

Department research and industry highlights

- The New Political Communication Unit’s research agenda focuses on the impact of new media and communication technologies on politics, policy and governance. Core staff include Professor Andrew Chadwick, Professor Ben O’Loughlin, Dr Alister Miskimmon, and Dr Cristian Vaccari. Recent books include Andrew Chadwick’s The Hybrid Media System: Politics and Power (Oxford University Press, 2013), Cristian Vaccari’s Digital Politics in Western Democracies: A Comparative Study (Johns Hopkins University Press), and Alister Miskimmon, Ben O’Loughlin, and Laura Roselle’s, Strategic Narratives: Communication Power and the New World Order (Routledge, 2013). Andrew Chadwick edits the Oxford University Press book series Oxford Studies in Digital Politics and Ben O’Loughlin is co-editor of the journal Media, War and Conflict. The Unit hosts a large number of PhD students working in the field of new political communication.

Course content and structure

You will study four core course units (chosen from a total of six options), two elective units, and write a dissertation over the summer. Course units include one of three disciplinary training pathway courses, a course in research design, analysing international politics, and specialist options in international relations.

Students studying for the Postgraduate Diploma do not undertake the dissertation.

Core course units:
Media, Power, and Public Affairs: You will examine the relationship between media, politics and power in contemporary political life. This unit focuses on a number of important foundational themes, including theories of media effects, the construction of political news, election campaigning, government communications and spin, media regulation, the emergence of digital media, the globalisation of media, agenda setting, and propaganda and the role of media in international affairs. The overarching rationale is that we live in an era in which the massive diversity of media, new technologies, and new methodologies demands new forms of analysis. The approach will be comparative and international.

Internet and New Media Politics:
 Drawing predominantly, though not exclusively, upon specialist academic journal literatures, this course focuses on a number of important contemporary debates about the role and influence of new technologies on the values, processes and outcomes of: global governance institutions; public bureaucracies; journalism and news production; representative institutions including political parties and legislatures; pressure groups and social movements. It also examines persistent and controversial policy problems generated by digital media, such as privacy and surveillance, the nature of contemporary media systems, and the balance of power between older and newer media logics in social and political life. By the end of the course students will have an understanding of the key issues thrown up by the internet and new media, as well as a critical perspective on what these terms actually mean. The approach will be comparative, drawing on examples from around the world, including the developing world, but the principal focus will be on the politics of the United States and Britain.

Social Media and Politics: This course addresses the various ways in which social media are changing the relationships between politicians, citizens, and the media. The course will start by laying out broad arguments and debates about the democratic implications of social media that are ongoing not just in academic circles but also in public commentary, political circles, and policy networks—do social media expand or narrow civic engagement? Do they lead to cross-cutting relationships or self-reinforcing echo chambers? Do they hinder or promote political participation? Are they useful in campaigns or just the latest fashion? Do they foster effective direct communication between politicians and citizens? Are they best understood as technologies of freedom or as surveillance tools? These debates will be addressed throughout the course by drawing on recent empirical research published in the most highly rated academic journals in the field. The course will thus enable students to understand how social media are used by citizens, politicians, and media professionals to access, distribute, and co-produce contents that are relevant to politics and public affairs and establish opportunities for political and civic engagement.

Media, War and Conflict:
The post-9/11 global security situation and the 2003 Iraq war have prompted a marked increase in interest in questions concerning media, war and conflict. This unit examines the relationships between media, governments, military, and audiences/publics, in light of old, new, and potential future security events.

Introduction to Qualitative Research Methods in Politics and International Relations:
 You will be provided with an introduction to core theories and qualitative approaches in politics and international relations. You will examine a number of explanatory/theoretical frameworks, their basic assumptions, strengths and weaknesses, and concrete research applications. You will consider the various qualitative techniques available for conducting research, the range of decisions qualitative researchers face, and the trade-offs researchers must consider when designing qualitative research.

Dissertation (MSc only): The dissertation gives you the opportunity to study an aspect of Media, Power, and Public Affairs in depth. You will be assigned a dissertation supervisor and the length of the piece will be 12,000 words.

Elective course units:
Note: not all course units are available every year, but may include:
- Politics of Democracy
- Elections and Parties
- United States Foreign Policy
- Human Rights: From Theory to Practice
- Theories and Concepts in International Public Policy
- Contemporary Anglo-American Political Theory
- Transnational Security Studies
- Conflict and Conflict Resolution in the Middle East
- The Law of Cyber Warfare
- Comparative Political Executives
- European Union Politics and Policy
- International Public Policy in Practice
- Sovereignty, Rights and Justice
- Theories of Globalisation
- Introduction to Quantitative Research Methods in Politics and International Relations

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by coursework and an individually-supervised dissertation.

Employability & career opportunities

Advocacy, campaign management, political communication consultancy, journalism, government communication, policy analysis, public opinion and semantic polling, public diplomacy, PhD research.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

Read less
Security and the maintenance and promotion of security are key issues in international law and international relations. Read more

Why study International Law & Security at Dundee?

Security and the maintenance and promotion of security are key issues in international law and international relations. There are many career opportunities in these areas ranging from employment with an intergovernmental organisation such as the United Nations, to employment in an international court or tribunal, to advising government and securing a role in the military. If you intend to pursue such a career, then you will need a good understanding of why and how the international community and individual states are to respond to threats to international security. For this, you will need to understand the context in which decisions are made. international law and international relations provide that context.

Our MLitt in International Law & Security provides an overview of concepts and themes relating to the study of international security in the contemporary world, from a legal as well as an international relations point of view. It introduces both traditional and 'new' approaches to defining and conceptualising security and considers the impact of International Relations theories upon the subject. It also examines key issues such as war, the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, terrorism, the privatisation of warfare, energy security and environmental degradation.

Our course will equip you with the necessary analytical tools to understand and evaluate all aspects of security in the contemporary world. The issues outlined above lie at the heart of our course, which provides an opportunity to gain a deep understanding of the interactions of law and international relations and the way they combine to shape the responses of states to threats to security. The course also provides an opportunity to understand how those responses in turn shape international law and international relations.

What's so good about International Law & Security at Dundee?

The University of Dundee runs two parallel masters degree in International Law & Security: MLitt International Law & Security for graduates in International Relations or similar subjects, and LLM International Law & Security for Law graduates.

Each degree has one core module, and you will also be able to choose specialist option modules from the same list. You will also research and write a dissertation in your chosen area of interest, or work on a research project with integrated internship.

Internship opportunity:
The opportunity to undertake an approved internship as a part the programme of studies is an exciting innovation in this area of study which will enable students to gain a unique insight into the application of the materials addressed in taught modules and to gain valuable experience to add to their CV.

How you will be taught

The course starts in September or January, each year and lasts for 12 months on a full time basis or 24 months on a part time basis. A variety of teaching methods will be used, including: small group teaching, supervised study, independent research, seminars and presentations.

What you will study

The course is made up of two International Relations modules and two Law modules which are delivered during our two teaching semesters (Sep-Dec and Jan-Apr), and detailed below.

During the summer vacation students normally write a dissertation.

All students take the Law week-long induction in January, plus the first half of the module Legal Research Skills(including the first assessment), usually in your first semester, but can be deferred to your second semester if you don't select any first semester Law modules. You also take the non-credit bearing generic skills training seminars offered by the Humanities.

First Semester (Jan-Apr)

International Security (core module), plus one other taught 30-credit modules (from the list below).

Summer period (May-Aug)

Politics Dissertation (60 credits)

Second Semester (Sep-Dec)

Two taught 30-credit modules (from the list below).

Part time study

For part-time students the taught modules will be spread out over two years instead of one in a similar format as above, and the Dissertation or Research Project (with integrated internship) will be undertaken during the summer period of the second year of study.

Typical optional modules available

Individual Criminal Liability in International Criminal Law
Transnational Crime and Counter Terrorism
International Dispute Resolution
UN Human Rights Law
Regional Human Rights Systems
Global Human Rights: Traditions & Inspirations
Critical Studies on Terrorism
The Middle East and Terrorism
State Terror
Strategic Intelligence Studies
International Security of Drugs & Organised Crime
Human Rights in International Relations
Russian Politics & Security
Politics and Security in South Asia
Terrorism and Counter-Terrorism in Europe
Geopolitics of Natural Resources
Governing and Securing Cyber Space
European Union Security
Explaining and Understanding International Politics

How you will be assessed

By assessed coursework, examination and dissertation (or research project report).

Careers

Graduates from this degree are likely to pursue careers with international organisations such as the United Nations, the European Union, or institutions such as the International Court of Justice. You will also be well placed to pursue a career as a government adviser. Graduates from our Politics & International Relations degrees have successfully pursued careers in politics and diplomacy.

Read less

  • 1
Show 10 15 30 per page



Cookie Policy    X