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Masters Degrees (Curatorship)

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The MA in Art History, Curatorship and Renaissance Culture is offered by the Warburg Institute in collaboration with the National Gallery, London. Read more
The MA in Art History, Curatorship and Renaissance Culture is offered by the Warburg Institute in collaboration with the National Gallery, London. The purpose of the programme is to provide high level linguistic, archive and research skills for a new generation of academic art historians and museum curators. The art historical and scholarly traditions of the Warburg Institute are linked to the practical experience and skills of the National Gallery to provide an academic programme which will equip students either as academic art historians with serious insight into the behind the scenes working of a great museum or as curators with the research skills necessary for high-level museum work.

This twelve-month, full-time programme provides an introduction to:

Museum knowledge, which covers all aspects of curatorship including the technical examination of paintings, connoisseurship, materials and conservation, attribution, provenance and issues relating to display.
Art history and Renaissance culture to increase students’ understanding of methods of analysing the subjects of works of art and their knowledge of Renaissance art works and the conditions in which they were commissioned, produced and enjoyed.
Current scholarship and professional practice in these areas as well as new and emerging areas of research and scholarship.
The programme will be taught through classes and supervision by members of the academic staff of the Warburg Institute and by National Gallery curatorial and archival experts. The teaching staff of the Warburg Institute are leading professors and academics in their field who have published widely and are involved with research related to the topics they teach.

Structure

All students will take three core modules and two optional modules. The core modules include language and paleography classes, which will be selected following an individual language audit for each student, and are spread over two terms. The optional subjects will vary from year to year and students must select at least one in an art historical field.

Core courses:

Art History – Iconology – Dr Paul Taylor
Language, Paleographical and Archive Skills – Various tutors for language and palaeography classes; Dr Claudia Wedepohl (The Warburg Institute) and Mr Alan Crookham (National Gallery) for archive skills
Curatorship in the National Gallery – Curatorial, conservation and scientific staff of the National Gallery, including Dr Ashok Roy, Dr Susanne Avery-Quash, Mr Larry Keith and Ms Rachel Billinge
Optional courses (two to be chosen):

Artistic Intentions 1400 - 1700 – Dr Paul Taylor
Islamic Authorities and Arabic Elements in the Renaissance – Professor Charles Burnett
Music in the Later Middle Ages and the Renaissance - Professor Charles Burnett
New Worlds, Ancient Texts: Renaissance Intellectual History and the Discovery of the Americas - Dr Philipp Nothaft
Renaissance Art Literature – Dr François Quiviger
Renaissance Philosophy – Dr Guido Giglioni
Renaissance Material Culture – Dr Rembrandt Duits and Dr François Quiviger
Sin and Sanctity in the Reformation – Professor Alastair Hamilton

Students will also be encouraged to attend the Director’s weekly seminar on Work in Progress and any of the other regular seminars held in the Institute that may be of interest to them. These at present include History of Art and Maps and Society. The third term and summer will be spent in researching and writing a dissertation, under the guidance of a supervisor from the academic staff of the Warburg Institute or a member of staff from the National Gallery.

Assessment

The usual format for classes is a weekly seminar. All students are required to submit three essays of 4,000 words, one at the beginning of the second term and the remaining two at the beginning of the third term. A dissertation of 15,000 words, on a topic agreed by the student and supervisor, has to be submitted by 30 September. The course is examined on these four pieces of written work, a catalogue entry (submitted at the end of the first term), and examinations in language, paleographical and archive skills. Students are allocated a course tutor and, in addition, are encouraged to discuss their work with other members of the staff at the Warburg Institute and the National Gallery. Because of the small numbers involved (places are limited to 12 per year), students have unusually frequent contact, formal and informal, with their teachers.

Mode of study

12 months full-time only.

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Early Modern English Literature taught with the British Library; a unique opportunity to study early modern literary works, including Shakespeare, in light of recent critical approaches and as print and manuscript material artefacts. Read more
Early Modern English Literature taught with the British Library; a unique opportunity to study early modern literary works, including Shakespeare, in light of recent critical approaches and as print and manuscript material artefacts. Ideal foundation for doctoral work and careers in the arts, education, curatorship and broadcasting.

Key Benefits

- A strong tradition of Shakespeare and early modern literary studies at King's

- Unique access to unparalleled collections at the British Library and to the expertise of world-class curators, who will teach the core module and supervise some dissertations

- Close links with the London Shakespeare Seminar, the London Renaissance Seminar, and with the Institute of English Studies

Visit the website: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/early-modern-english-literature-text-and-transmission-ma.aspx

Course detail

- Description -

This MA programme focuses on the transmission of key early modern literary texts makes it unlike any other programme of its kind. Transmission is understood both as the circulation of literary texts in manuscript and print and their reception. Students will therefore learn to read early modern handwriting, to transcribe neglected literary manuscripts and rare printed texts and to edit them for the modern reader.

By focusing on transmission, this MA programme will also make students aware of the impact of the materiality of the text and of the material conditions of its (re)production on its interpretation. The specific process whereby a literary text reaches its readers or its audience is always central to its interpretation.

The core module taught at the British Library is specifically designed to teach students how to search collections of early modern manuscripts and rare books held in major research libraries worldwide and how to identify the agents involved in their production, transmission and preservation in libraries and private collections.

- Course purpose -

Early Modern English Literature taught with the British Library; a unique opportunity to study early modern literary works, including Shakespeare, in light of recent critical approaches and as print and manuscript material artefacts. Ideal foundation for doctoral work and careers in the arts, education, curatorship and broadcasting.

- Course format and assessment -

Core and optional modules assessed by coursework, plus a dissertation.

Career propsects:

We expect some students will pursue PhD level study in the area, leading to a teaching or academic career. Other students will be ideally placed for jobs in the arts, creative and cultural industries, curatorship and broadcasting.

How to apply: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/taught-courses.aspx

About Postgraduate Study at King’s College London:

To study for a postgraduate degree at King’s College London is to study at the city’s most central university and at one of the top 21 universities worldwide (2016/17 QS World University Rankings). Graduates will benefit from close connections with the UK’s professional, political, legal, commercial, scientific and cultural life, while the excellent reputation of our MA and MRes programmes ensures our postgraduate alumni are highly sought after by some of the world’s most prestigious employers. We provide graduates with skills that are highly valued in business, government, academia and the professions.

Scholarships & Funding:

All current PGT offer-holders and new PGT applicants are welcome to apply for the scholarships. For more information and to learn how to apply visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/pg/funding/sources

Free language tuition with the Modern Language Centre:

If you are studying for any postgraduate taught degree at King’s you can take a module from a choice of over 25 languages without any additional cost. Visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/mlc

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Research profile. The dual focus of this distinctive programme will enable you to pursue research-focused study while developing a rigorous understanding of current debates and practices in the field of curatorship. Read more

Research profile

The dual focus of this distinctive programme will enable you to pursue research-focused study while developing a rigorous understanding of current debates and practices in the field of curatorship.

Delivered in partnership with flagship cultural institutions this degree directly responds to a growing need for our graduates to be able to work at the interface of academic research and the curatorial profession. It offers a rigorous framework for intellectual development and innovation, combining supervised independent research with seminar teaching and unique opportunities for live project delivery.

You will gain critical, analytical, interpretative and other research skills that are transferable to further academic research, to curatorial settings and to other careers.

Collections and Curating Practices is devised and delivered in cooperation with National Museums Scotland, the National Library of Scotland, the National Galleries of Scotland, Talbot Rice Gallery, The Fruitmarket Gallery, and the University of Edinburgh's own Special Collections.

Training and support

You will be assigned a research supervisor at the outset of your degree with secondary supervisory support for the dissertation component drawn from ECA, the University or from a member of staff in one of the external partner organisations.

The core course will examine the theories and methods of collecting and curatorship. Two intensive one-day workshops will offer introductory training in the practical aspects of curatorship and collections management from object handling and transportation issues to accreditation processes.

Career development opportunities are built into the syllabus including advice days and a bespoke mentoring programme.

Facilities

Situated in the heart of Edinburgh's Old Town, Edinburgh College of Art has a wide range of studios and workshop spaces, libraries and collections, places to socialise, perform and show work; all within walking distance of world-class museums, music venues and galleries.

Our facilities range from the historic, to contemporary, specialist spaces for making work at all scales, in and across all media. In this directory, you’ll find details of our own facilities, and selected places in the city to be inspired, research, collaborate or gain work experience.



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This interdisciplinary programme will equip you with valuable skills and a critical understanding of issues in curatorship, museology and museum management. Read more

Overview

This interdisciplinary programme will equip you with valuable skills and a critical understanding of issues in curatorship, museology and museum management.

You’ll develop your understanding of the ways in which historians and cultural theorists have interpreted and represented architecture, material culture and museums over the past 2,000 years. You’ll look at different methods of display and interpretation and the methodologies behind museum practice and country house collections. Then you’ll choose from optional modules on topics such as cultural theory, sculpture, Hollywood icons or cinema.

At the same time, you’ll develop practical skills. You’ll work on an interpretation project in our Stanley and Audrey Burton Gallery and you’ll even undertake a negotiated work placement in your second semester. Supported by the Centre for Critical Studies in Museums, Galleries and Heritage, you’ll gain the knowledge and skills for a successful career in the museum and art gallery sector.

All students on the degree become members of the Centre for Critical Studies in Museums, Galleries and Heritage and enjoy opportunities from networking events and links to alumni to conferences, seminars and reading groups.

You’ll study in the heart of a cultural hub for this diverse and vibrant region. Leeds is home to a national museum, nine council-run museums, galleries and heritage sites and many private and charitable museums and galleries.

We’re also a short bus or train journey away from everything the rest of Yorkshire has to offer, from The Hepworth Wakefield to the National Media Museum, Yorkshire Sculpture Park and the Bronte Parsonage Museum. We have close links with many of these cultural institutions to support your practical learning.

The degree is also available to study part-time over 24 months. Students who study part-time will attend on one day per week each year. The part-time MA may be of special interest to those who are working in related fields as part of their career development.

Course Content

A set of core modules form the bedrock of the programme, introducing you to the concept of the ‘museum’ and the ways in which Western museums have represented and interpreted history and historical material.

You’ll also use contemporary theory to consider 20th-century museum practice and key questions around curatorship, museology and museum management. The role of the curator, funding and sponsorship and the display and interpretation of objects are among the topics you’ll cover.

Your core modules will give you the chance to apply your theoretical knowledge and gain practical skills. You’ll take part in an interpretation project in the University’s Stanley and Audrey Burton Gallery, as well as completing a work placement in an external arts or heritage organisation.

All MA students in the School take two core modules which develop the research skills to complete research projects such as your essays and dissertation. This will build to our unique MA Symposium in Semester 2, where you present some of your own research across interdisciplinary panels, and a dissertation which enables you to undertake research in a topic of interest to you.

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MA Design for Cultural Industries is an innovative programme for students who want to develop their career in cultural and creative sectors. Read more

What is this programme about?

MA Design for Cultural Industries is an innovative programme for students who want to develop their career in cultural and creative sectors. Through the application of design theory and practice, incorporating new technologies into the discourse, students will be able to create or initiate solutions and experiences in the context of the cultural industries.

This MA programme provides its graduates with the advanced skills necessary to confront their professional challenges and move forward in this highly competitive industry. Integrating materiality and object interpretation through applied imagination, developing innovative creative-thinking, enterprise skills and research-led projects, the programme's multidisciplinary and critical approach gives students a distinctive insight into the collaborative nature of these industries.

The programme is relevant for those wishing to pursue an advanced career in cultural and creative organisations such as private and social enterprises, design agencies, museums, galleries and research centres. The programme will also be applicable to artists, curators, designers and policy-makers wishing to advance their design thinking by bringing their own projects to life, or create outputs for their own clients and industry partners.

Graduates of the MA Design for Cultural Industries will be equipped with advanced skills to go to wide range of leadership or senior creative roles in the cultural and creative industries, both in the private and public sector. With an international outlook, our graduates will be sought after across an array of arts, design, events, culture, entertainment, media and creative technology departments globally.

The career paths that our graduates can look forward to include arts and cultural management, design management, policy making, curatorship (museum, gallery, festival), creative direction, education advisory, cultural publishing and art/design criticism. Alternatively, the programme can inspire graduates to open their own cultural start-ups or work for international consultancy firms. Graduates of the programme can also develop academic profiles and research interests to go into teaching or advanced study at MPhil and PhD level.

Visit the website http://www2.gre.ac.uk/study/courses/pg/art/des-cul-ind OR http://blogs.gre.ac.uk/design-for-cultural-industries/

Who is this programme for?

This MA programme is relevant for those wishing to pursue an advanced career in cultural and creative organisations such as private and social enterprises, design agencies, museums, galleries and research centres. The programme will also be applicable to artists, curators, designers and policy-makers wishing to advance their design thinking by bringing their own projects to life, or create outputs for their own clients and industry partners.

How is the programme organised and what will I learn?

The programme is run in two modes: full-time over one year and part-time over two years, with the taught content made up of core and option courses totalling 180 credits.

Core courses
* Experience Design (XD) - 30 Credits
* Materiality & Interpretation - 30 Credits
* Design Management and Cultural Enterprise - 30 Credits
* MA Final Project - 60 Credits

Option courses (two to choose from):
* Curatorial practice - 15 Credits
* Coding in Creative Contexts- 15 Credits
* Sound Design- 15 Credits
* Social Media and SEO - 15 Credits

What do students do after this programme?

Graduates of the MA Design for Cultural Industries will be equipped with advanced skills to go to wide range of leadership or senior creative roles in the cultural and creative industries, both in the private and public sector. The career paths that our graduates can look forward to include arts and cultural management, design management, curatorship (museum, gallery, festival), creative direction, education advisory, cultural publishing, policy making, and art/design criticism. Alternatively, the programme can inspire graduates to open their own cultural start-ups or work for international consultancy firms.

Graduates of the programme can also develop academic profiles and research interests to go into teaching or advanced study at MPhil and PhD level.

How are we taught?

Typically, in full-time mode, you can expect 10 hours attendance per week over two days in a class of around 15-20 students. Teaching is a mixture of studio work, seminars, lectures and workshops. The full-time mode should only be considered by students who are able to dedicate at least 25 hours per week to the programme. The part-time mode is recommended for students in full-time employment.

How do I apply for this programme?

Apply directly on our website (link below). Selected applicants will be invited to attend a personal or skype interview. We recommend early applications, as the places are limited. Overseas applications for this course should be received no later than the end of July for entry in September to allow the sufficient time for visa applications.

Where can I find more information?

For more information, please see the course page at our online prospectus and take a look at the CPDA website.

MA Design for Cultural Industries Blog: http://blogs.gre.ac.uk/design-for-cultural-industries

MA Design for Cultural Industries Prospectus Page http://www2.gre.ac.uk/study/courses/pg/art/des-cul-ind

Department Website and Student Work http://cpda.gre.ac.uk

How to Apply: http://www2.gre.ac.uk/study/apply/pg

For more information, you can also contact Programme Leader Dr. Isil Onol by email:

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This innovative programme gives you an in-depth knowledge of Renaissance and Early Modern culture from an interdisciplinary perspective. Read more

Programme description

This innovative programme gives you an in-depth knowledge of Renaissance and Early Modern culture from an interdisciplinary perspective.

It also offers the opportunity to work closely with Renaissance and Early Modern collections in Edinburgh, from paintings by Botticelli or Titian, to early printed editions of Shakespeare, pioneering scientific texts, historic buildings and archival documents.

Programme structure

The first two semesters are based around small-group teaching and a combination of lectures, seminars and tutorials. As well as the choice of a full range of option courses taught by experts in different humanities subjects, you will have the opportunity to choose an internship at a local museum, gallery or library, subject to availability. There may also be the option of an intensive course taught in Italy, subject to availability.

If the internship option is taken, this will require you to work one day a week at the host institution. From April to September, you will be engaged full-time researching and writing your dissertation.

Learning outcomes

Students will develop:

an interdisciplinary understanding of the key changes in European cultural life between the Renaissance and the Enlightenment;
familiarity with the variety of materials that can be used to explore this cultural life and the changes it underwent;
a critical understanding of some of the principal ways in which these changes have been conceptualised and their significance articulated by scholars, past and present;
skills that will allow them to undertake the kind of independent research required in fields such as collections management and curatorship, work in historic buildings or landmarks, as well as going on to further academic research at PhD level.

Career opportunities

You may choose to take your research skills and advanced knowledge into the area of doctoral research and work towards an academic career. Alternatively, you will be equipped to enter the cultural heritage field, especially with the practical experience you gain through the internship element of this programme.

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The MA Curating the Art Museum accepts 12 students annually and offers students a unique balance of lectures, hands-on experience and internship placements. Read more
The MA Curating the Art Museum accepts 12 students annually and offers students a unique balance of lectures, hands-on experience and internship placements. Its purpose is to extend and develop graduates’ art historical interests, expertise and scholarship into the area of curatorship and active engagement with collections and exhibitions in the museum and gallery realm.

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Programme description. The last 20 years have been a period of transition for Japan. Read more

Programme description

The last 20 years have been a period of transition for Japan.

The abrupt end in the early 1990s of Japan’s seemingly unstoppable economic growth plunged the nation into two decades of recession, which has in turn brought to the fore a range of social and political issues accumulated since the Second World War.

The end of Japanese economic superiority also coincided with the end of the Cold War, an event that brought about new regional and global dynamics, and with them new security challenges.

Meanwhile, Japanese culture has experienced a renaissance, with Japan recognised worldwide as a centre of global ‘cool’, and Japanese cultural products continuing to find new markets and influence new demographics worldwide.

The overall picture is of a rapidly changing nation in the vanguard of post-industrial societies — fascinating not only for its rich traditional heritage and diversity, but also for what its recent experience can tell us about world trends.

Understanding such complexity requires an interdisciplinary approach, and we offer you the opportunity to explore Japanese history, international relations, politics, religion, and arts, and help you see the connections between them.

Using Japanese source materials in tandem with the extensive English language literature on Japan, we will help you build upon and develop your own interests, focus on the aspects of Japan that fascinate you, and support you as you carry out your own original research project.

By the end of the programme you will have acquired specialist skills and knowledge that mark you out as an expert on Japan, and the confidence to apply those skills in industry, academia or beyond.

Programme structure

The programme is taught through a combination of seminars and tutorials. You will take one compulsory and four option courses, as well as a compulsory research skills and methods course. After two semesters of taught courses you will conduct your own research for your dissertation.

Compulsory courses:

State, Society and National Identity in Japan after 1989

Option courses may include:

The Buddhist Brush: Discursive and Graphic Expressions of Japanese Buddhism

Language Communities and Variation in Japanese

Japanese Performing Arts

Japanese Religions in the Modern Era

Japanese Cyberpunk

East Asian International Relations

Portfolio of Written Translation Exercises in Japanese

Learning outcomes

Students who follow the programme will:

develop critical awareness of at least two specific areas of Japanese Studies, both in terms of the indigenous literary and/or critical traditions and in comparison with Western critical thinking

acquire specialist knowledge of Japanese culture and awareness of the interaction of Japanese and other cultures in the contemporary context

use the bibliographic, internet and other relevant resources to advanced level

develop the ability to read and evaluate critically core texts in the specific areas studied

Those with previous experience in Japanese language learning will have the opportunity to develop the necessary linguistic skills to conduct research in defined areas within Japanese Studies by retrieving, selecting, translating and assimilating information from Japanese sources.

Career opportunities

The flexibility of focus this programme offers makes it an ideal foundation for advanced study, potentially leading to an academic career. Teaching or curatorship roles in cultural institutions are alternative career pathways

The transferable skills you gain in communication, project management and presentation will prove a valuable asset to employers in any field.



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This programme gives you the opportunity to study the main contexts of contemporary science and technology; gain a broad base in science policy, communication, sociology and engagement; enjoy flexibility in specialisation; and work in an interdisciplinary environment with research experts. Read more
This programme gives you the opportunity to study the main contexts of contemporary science and technology; gain a broad base in science policy, communication, sociology and engagement; enjoy flexibility in specialisation; and work in an interdisciplinary environment with research experts.

Degree information

The programme provides broad-based training in three disciplines: science policy and governance; science communication, engagement, and evaluation; and sociology of modern science and technology. This programme encourages specialised investigation. It also encourages interdisciplinary integration. Our degree works in dialogue with our sister MSc programme in History and Philosophy of Science, which adds historical and analytical depth to our offer.

MSc students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of one core module (15 credits), four optional modules (60 credits), three ancillary modules (45 credits) and a dissertation (60 credits) Postgraduate Diploma students undertake modules to the value of 120 credits: one core (15 credits), four optional (60 credits), and three ancillary (45 credits), studied over one year. Postgraduate Certificate students undertake modules to the value of 60 credits. The programme consists of one core module (15 credits), and three optional modules (45 credits), studied over one year.

Core module
-Introduction to Science and Technology Studies

Optional modules - students must take three modules from a prescribed list of options including:
-Practical Science Communication and Engagement
-Curating the History of Science
-Responsible Science and Emerging Technologies
-Science in the 20th Century and Beyond
-Science Policy Beyond Borders
-Science, Media, and Culture
-Science, Security, and Social Research
-Sociology and the Sociology of Science
-Special Topics Seminar in STS
-Ancillary Modules

Students must take two ancillary modules which may be options from our own degrees, for example, Material Culture and Science in the 18th Century OR, Knowledge, Evidence, and Explanation in Science, OR, they might be selected from any other programme at UCL.

Dissertation/report
All MSc students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000–12,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of seminars, lectures, tutorials and research supervision. Student performance is assessed through coursework such as long and short essays, advocacy work, and project work.

Careers

Our programme provides essential training and study for students wishing to pursue PhD level study in several fields, and also provides appropriate training and qualifications sought by individuals pursuing careers in areas such as education, museum and archival curatorship, or administration and policy-making in science, engineering and health care.

Employability
The programme offers a range of transferable skills and networking opportunities. No matter whether your career plan looks towards the public or private sector, we can help you build a portfolio of skills and contacts that will give your CV the edge. Highlights of the programme include:

the chance to develop practical media skills, including audio production
learning to write for different audiences
developing your skills in both practical and theoretical science communication, including working in a major London museum
to meet and network with policy makers.

Why study this degree at UCL?

There is no UK academic department quite like UCL Science & Technology Studies. The department combines award-winning teaching with award-winning public engagement.

We are research active over an enormous range of topics. Our teaching builds on research not only in our subject specialties but also in the fundamentals of teaching and learning.

Our programme makes unique use of London’s attractions and resources. We have close links with the Science Museum, the National Maritime Museum, the Natural History Museum, the Wellcome Library, and UCL Museums & Collections. We also use the city as a classroom, with custom-made walking tours, site visits, and special excursions.

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This programme offers breadth across a wide range of historical and philosophical themes. It also encourages intensive investigation and specialisation. Read more
This programme offers breadth across a wide range of historical and philosophical themes. It also encourages intensive investigation and specialisation: a survey of nearly 3,000 years of scientific ideas and communities, and an exploration of the inner workings of science's methods and theories.

Degree information

The programme provides broad-based training in the history of science, the philosophy of science, and an “integrated history and philosophy of science”. The historical coverage is broad, from antiquity to the present, while the philosophical coverage spans causality and the philosophy of medicine as well as the metaphysics of chemistry and computer science.

MSc students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of one core module (15 credits), four optional modules (60 credits), three ancillary modules (45 credits), and a dissertation (60 credits). The Postgraduate Diploma programme consists of one core module (15 credits), four optional modules (60 credits) and three ancillary modules (45 credits), available in full time mode. The Postgraduate Certificate programme consists of one core module (15 credits) and three optional modules (45 credits), available in full time mode.

Core modules
-Introduction to Science and Technology Studies

Optional modules - students choose four options from the following:
-Science in the 19th Century
-Material Culture and Science in the 18th Century
-Early Modern Science
-Medieval Science and Medicine in Global Perspective
-Science in Antiquity
-Causality, Mechanism, and Classification in Science
-Knowledge, Evidence, and Explanation in Science
-Science, Art, and Philosophy
-Special Topics Seminar in History and Philosophy of Science

One optional module from our sister MSc programme, Science, Technology, and Society, may be substituted here provided it contributes to a coherent programme of study.

Ancillary Modules - students choose three ancillary modules which may be options from our degrees, e.g. Science in the 20th Century and Beyond, and Curating the History of Science, or they might be selected from any other programme at UCL.

Dissertation/research project
All MSc students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000–12,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of seminars, lectures, tutorials and research supervision. Student performance is assessed through coursework such as long and short essays, advocacy work and project work.

Careers

Our programme provides essential training for students wishing to pursue PhD level study in related fields. It also provides appropriate training for those pursuing careers in education, museum and archival curatorship, or governance and policy-making.

Employability
During the course of this programme, students will develop a wide range of transferable skills, including writing, research, critical thinking, and working in collaboration with others. Most graduates of this programme go on to follow careers that engage with the substance of the degree, including in the museums sector, or in academia. For these students, this programme provides an excellent opportunity to develop the specialist skills and personal connections necessary to succeed. These include basic curatorial skills, developing personal contacts in London museums, and developing personal and intellectual connections with key thinkers in the field.

Why study this degree at UCL?

There is no UK academic department quite like UCL Science & Technology Studies. The department combines award-winning teaching with award-winning public engagement.

We are research-active over an enormous range of topics. Our teaching builds on research not only in our subject specialties but also in the fundamentals of teaching and learning.

Our programme makes unique use of London’s attractions and resources. We have close links with the Science Museum, the National Maritime Museum, the Natural History Museum, the Wellcome Library, and UCL Museums & Collections. We also use the city as a classroom, with custom-made walking tours, site visits, and special excursions.

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This MA provides a broad academic and professional training in all aspects of museum work, and encourages students to reflect on the concept of the museum and its associated practices. Read more
This MA provides a broad academic and professional training in all aspects of museum work, and encourages students to reflect on the concept of the museum and its associated practices. The programme looks at all types of museum, from art galleries to science museums, without concentrating on any particular kind.

Degree information

Students are equipped with a range of skills that they can apply in any museum and develop critically aware perspectives on professional practice and research processes. The programme's main aim is to provide an in-depth understanding of approaches to the research, documentation, communication, interpretation, presentation and preservation of curated materials in museums, while responding to their audiences and communities.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of four core modules (75 credits), two optional modules (30 credits), work placement (15 credits) and a research dissertation (60 credits).

Core modules - all students are required to take the following:
-The Museum: Critical Perspectives
-Managing Museums
-Collections Management and Care
-Museum Communication

Optional modules - students also choose further options to the value of 30 credits from the following:
-Antiquities and the Law
-Collections Curatorship
-Cultural Heritage, Globalisation and Development
-Cultural Memory
-Exhibition Project
-Intangible Dimensions of Museum Objects from Egypt
-Oral History from Creation to Curation

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project on a museological topic which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through lectures, seminars, practical workshops, museum visits and guest speakers. Students are required to undertake a work placement for a total of 20 days. Assessment is through coursework assignments, projects, essays, field reports, portfolio and the dissertation.

Placement
Students are required to undertake a 20 days' work in a museum (or similar institution). This usually takes place one day per week during term-time, although other arrangements may be possible. Students write an assessed 2,500 word report at the end of the placement reflecting on their experience.

Recent placements have included: Brent Museum, the British Museum, Croydon Museum, Event Communications, the Freud Museum, Hackney Museum, London Transport Museum, the Museum of London, RAF Museums, the Royal Academy, Royal Botanical Gardens, Royal Historical Palaces, St Paul's Cathedral, Tate Britain, UCL Museums & Collections.

Careers

Some recent graduates of the programme have gone to do complete a PhD while others have pursued a career in professional organisations associated with the museum and/or heritage sector. 90% of UK graduates from this degree take up employment in the museum sector within six months.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Research Officer, Imperial War Museum
-Archivist, Madame Tussauds
-Assistant Curator, Victoria and Albert Museum
-Cataloguer, Historic Royal Palaces
-Museum Assistant, British Museum

Employability
The MA in Museum Studies facilitates the development of both practical skills relevant to a professional career in the museum and galleries sector and a solid understanding of, and critical engagement with, theoretical issues involved in contemporary museum practice. Core practical skills include collections care procedures, packing and storing objects, documentation, collections-based research, exhibition production, and display evaluation. A museum-based placement and optional modules can be chosen to enable students to focus on specific additional areas of theory and practice. Thansferable skills include independent research, writing and communication skills, interpersonal skills, use of IT, time management and group working.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Institute of Archaeology is the largest and most diverse department of archaeology in the UK, and provides a stimulating environment for postgraduate study in related fields such as museum studies, heritage studies and conservation.

Its outstanding archaeological library is complemented by UCL's main library, University of London Senate House and other specialist libraries.

London's many museums and galleries are a wonderful source of discussion and material for this degree, but in particular UCL's own important museums and collections are drawn upon for teaching, including those of the Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology, the Art Museum, and the Grant Museum of Zoology. Students have access to MA degree programmes taught in other UCL departments. Please note that students need to contact the relevant programme coordinators to register their interest since there are only limited spaces available.

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The MSt in the History of Design is a taught Master's Degree offered part-time over two years. A tea cup, be it hand-painted porcelain, studio pottery or mass produced ceramic, offers a glimpse of the rituals of everyday life and historical experience. Read more
The MSt in the History of Design is a taught Master's Degree offered part-time over two years.

A tea cup, be it hand-painted porcelain, studio pottery or mass produced ceramic, offers a glimpse of the rituals of everyday life and historical experience. A designed object or space reflects the individual, the society for which it was created, as well as its creator. It expresses aesthetic preoccupations and articulates historical and political conditions. Decoration challenges the hierarchies and contested inter-relationships between the disciplines and careers of artists, designers, crafts workers, gardeners, and architects. Such concerns reside at the heart of the study of the history of design.

This history of design course is taught on nine monthly Saturdays and one residential weekend per annum. The syllabus focuses particularly on the period from 1851 to 1951 in Europe (including Britain) and America. Combining close visual and material analysis with historical methodologies, the course explores decorative and applied art, the design of interiors and public spaces, and for performance and industry.

There will be two Open Mornings, on one Saturday in November 2016 11am - 12.30pm and on one Saturday in February 2017 11am - 12.30pm, where you can meet the Course Director, Dr Claire O'Mahony, and learn more about the course. Please contact usl if you would like to attend including which day you prefer: .

Visit the website https://www.conted.ox.ac.uk/about/mst-in-the-history-of-design

Description

Core themes of the History of Design course will include the rivalries between historicism and modernity; internationalist and nationalist tendencies; handicraft and industrial processes, as well as the analysis of critical debates about the makers and audiences of decoration in advice literature and aesthetic writing.

The programme aims to provide students with a framework of interpretative skills useful to understanding design. It provides grounding in the analysis of the techniques and materials deployed in creating objects or sites. It enables students to develop a grasp of historical context, encompassing the impact of the hierarchies within, and audiences for, the critical reception of 'decoration'. It encourages the analysis of the historiography of political and aesthetic debates articulated by designers, critics and historians about design, its forms and purposes.

Teaching and learning takes a variety of forms in this programme. In keeping with the Oxford ethos, individual tutorials and supervisions will be an important of the course, particularly whilst researching the dissertation, whilst earlier stages of the programme principally take the form of seminar group discussion, lectures and independent study. First-hand visual analysis is an essential component of the discipline of the history of design. As such each course element of the programme includes site visits, both to Oxford University's unique museum and library collections, and to those nearby in London and the regions. Formal assessment is by means of analytical essay and dissertation writing, complemented by informal assessment methods including a portfolio of research skills tasks and an oral presentation about each candidate's dissertation topic.

The monthly format of the programme should enable applicants who are employed or have caring duties to undertake postgraduate study, given they have a determined commitment to study and to undertake independent research.

The University of Oxford offers a uniquely rich programme of lectures and research seminars relevant to the study of Design History. Research specialisms particularly well represented in the Department for Continuing Education are:

- Art Nouveau and Modern French Decoration
- Modernist Design and Architecture
- The Arts and Crafts Movement
- Garden History
- The Art of the Book
- Ecclesiastical Architecture and Design

As a discipline Design History is well represented in conferences organised and academic journals and books published by The Design History Society; the Association of Art Historians; AHRC Centre for the Historic Interior at the Victoria and Albert Museum; the Modern Interior Centre at Kingston University; The Twentieth Century Society; The Garden History Society; The Textile History Society; The Wallpaper Society, The Societe des Dix-Neuviemistes.

Graduate destinations

Future research and career paths might be a DPhil programme; creative industries; museum curatorship; the art market; teaching; arts publishing.

Programme details

- Course structure
The MSt is a part-time course over two years with one residential weekend per annum. Each year comprises nine Saturdays (monthly; three in each of the three terms in the academic year) students will also have fortnightly individual tutorials and undertake research in reference libraries in Oxford between these monthly meetings. The course is designed for the needs of students wishing to study part-time, including those who are in full-time employment but will require 15 to 20 hours of study per week.

- Course content and timetable
The course is based at Rewley House, 1 Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JA. Some classes may take place at other venues in Oxford. Class details, reading lists and information about any field trips will be supplied when you have taken up your place.

Core Courses

- Materials and Techniques of Design
- Historical Methods
- Research Project in the History of Modern Design
- Dissertation

Options Courses

- Decoration in Modern France
- The Arts and Crafts Tradition in Modern Britain
- Design in the Machine Age
- Design, Body, Environment
- Visual Cultures of the World Wars
- Academic Writing and Contemporary Practice

Course aims

The MSt was devised with the aim of providing effective postgraduate-level education in history of design on a part-time basis in which case it should be possible to participate fully in the programme while remaining in full-time employment.

The programme aims to provide students with skills:

- To develop further their critical understanding of the principles and practice of the history of design

- To enhance their subject knowledge, analytical and communication skills needed for professional involvement in the history of design

- To demonstrate a grasp of primary evidence to build on their critical understanding of the types of evidence used in the historical study of designed objects and sites and how they are selected and interpreted

- To build on the appropriate skills and concepts for analysing material objects and textural sources

- To enable the student to undertake their own research to be presented in essays, oral presentations and as a dissertation

- To demonstrate an understanding of primary evidence and secondary sources through the application of appropriate analytical skills and concepts within a research context resulting in a dissertation.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/graduate/applying-to-oxford

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Learn to speak and write confidently about museums and curatorship, together with hands-on experience in a museum setting, with a focus on photography. Read more
Learn to speak and write confidently about museums and curatorship, together with hands-on experience in a museum setting, with a focus on photography. Think about the future of museums and how you can contribute to it.

This MA introduces you to:
-Curatorial scholarship and its methodologies (including conservation-led research and technical art history)
-The histories of museums and their collections
-The ethical and legal frameworks within which curators and museums work
-The nature and politics of museum displays

You visit museums in Sussex and in London, allowing you to learn first-hand about institutional histories, collections, permanent galleries and temporary exhibitions.

You’re taught by Sussex tutors and external specialists. In the past, these have included senior staff from the Brighton Museum & Art Gallery, the V&A, and the Metropolitan Museum in New York.

How will I study?

In the autumn and spring terms, you take museum skills modules with seminars at Sussex and visit local and national collections alongside taking core modules and an option based on photography.

The summer term is taken up with a work placement at a local or national museum or gallery, working with photographic collections.

Throughout the course, you are encouraged to participate actively in the taught sessions and museum visits. With your tutors and classmates, you debate a range of ethical concerns facing museum curators.

You also develop your own research interests through the dissertation. Assessed work includes:
-Term papers
-Practical assignments
-A learning journal (written during the placement as a reflection on that experience)
-A 12,000-word dissertation

Scholarships

Our aim is to ensure that every student who wants to study with us is able to despite financial barriers, so that we continue to attract talented and unique individuals.

Chancellor's International Scholarship (2017)
-25 scholarships of a 50% tuition fee waiver
-Application deadline: 1 May 2017

HESPAL Scholarship (Higher Education Scholarships Scheme for the Palestinian Territories) (2017)
-Two full fee waivers in conjuction with maintenance support from the British Council
-Application deadline: 1 January 2017

USA Friends Scholarships (2017)
-A scholarship of an amount equivalent to $10,000 for nationals or residents of the USA on a one year taught Masters degree course.
-Application deadline: 3 April 2017

Careers

You gain knowledge about objects and collections, specifically in the context of photography, and develop a critical awareness of museum practices.

You develop communication and project management skills. These skills provide the practical and theoretical foundation for careers in:
-Museums
-Galleries
-Heritage at curatorial level
-The cultural sector more broadly

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The Sydney Master of Art Curatorship provides candidates with a sophisticated awareness of the full range of cultural, theoretical, social, political and economic issues underlying the art gallery and museum system. Read more
The Sydney Master of Art Curatorship provides candidates with a sophisticated awareness of the full range of cultural, theoretical, social, political and economic issues underlying the art gallery and museum system.

A highly valued aspect of the course is the project-based internships supervised by industry professionals in local, national and international visual arts organisations which provide invaluable workplace experience, training and networking opportunities.

The Master of Art Curating is designed and taught collaboratively by the Department of Art History and Film Studies and Sydney College of the Arts. The course emphasises the skills required for curating in a variety of contemporary contexts.

The program will provide students with a rich combination of academic core skills, art-historical and art-critical knowledge and community-engaged experience, creating pathways to careers and professional development in art institutions of all types. Graduates will possess a strong foundation in the history of art museums and their cultural impact, and an awareness of the changing nature and role of curators in society and the current challenges they face.

The program provides critical insight into and practical knowledge of both traditional institutions, such as museums and galleries, and the expanding field of contemporary curating and its wide range of non‑traditional exhibition spaces. These include artist-run and community art spaces, public art projects, festivals and commercial spaces.

Graduates will develop specialist knowledge and understanding of major developments and issues in the field of the history of art, and to be able to apply these to the care, display, and interpretation of objects, performances and art practices in curatorial contexts.

The course brings students into major Sydney art institutions for seminars. It includes an internship placement and students may choose to complete a second internship as part of their studies.

To ask a question about this course, visit http://sydney.edu.au/internationaloffice/

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All applicants will be required to present a portfolio of their work and will be interviewed by teaching staff. The course welcomes international applicants and requires an English level of IELTS 6.5 or equivalent. Read more
All applicants will be required to present a portfolio of their work and will be interviewed by teaching staff. The course welcomes international applicants and requires an English level of IELTS 6.5 or equivalent.

One of two strands of enquiry in arts practice at masters level (the other beting Arts Practice, Fine Art) the MA Arts Practice (Arts, Health and Wellbeing) course offers students the opportunity to explore their own art practice or to take an outward facing approach, in partnership with others. Students of the course develop the skills to evaluate, critique and implement methodologies, gaining the ability to articulate sound arguments relevant to their practice.

Graduates exploring the role of the Arts in realising health and wellbeing focus on the value of the arts in community engagement and also its impact on the environment. They make a significant contribution to the advancement of Arts in Health within Wales and further afield.

The broad and interdisciplinary nature ensures that our course reflects the diversity of activity and interest in this dynamic field.

The role of the arts in health and well-being is widely recognised and valued. The MA Arts Practice (Arts, Health and Wellbeing) course will be of interest to artists, arts or health managers, community workers and teachers, plus those with an interest in the relationship between arts and health. It aims to support and develop innovative practice and research in this vibrant and expanding sector, so you will be encouraged to engage in creative dialogue,collaboration and interdisciplinary working

See the website http://courses.southwales.ac.uk/courses/940-ma-arts-practice-art-health-and-wellbeing

What you will study

The MA Art Practice course runs over two calendar years if you choose part-time study, or one calendar year for full-time study:

Part One
- Critical Studies in the Arts (20 credits)
Learn about systems of enquiry, how to understand and engage with objects and issues that affect your particular domain

- Arts Practice 1 (40 credits)
Develop your skills in your chosen discipline, challenging genre and context to develop an original body of work in either a studio context or placement.

Please note: For students studying part-time the above modules will be undertaken between October – June during your first year.

Part Two
- Arts Praxis (40 credits)
Refine and build upon your line of enquiry, develop new skills, producing a body of work within a studio context or placement which demonstrates complexity of understanding.

- Professional Practice in the Arts (20 credits)
Explore entrepreneurial, marketing and management aspects of contemporary practice within a framework of social, political, economic and cultural responsibility

- Major Arts Project (60 credits)
Complete a detailed project demonstrating praxis; an area of research and practice relevant to your concerns, utilising research methods appropriate for an arts scholar and an appropriate means of presentation.

Please note: For students studying part-time the above modules will be undertaken between October – September during your second year.

Learning and teaching methods

The MA Art Practice course is delivered using specialist facilities in our post-graduate studios which are available seven days a week. The MA Art Practice course makes use of lectures, guest speakers, workshops, demonstrations and tutorials, field trips and visits (additional costs will apply for field trips and visits). Contact time will include weekly workshops or seminars, and regular group and individual tutorials. You will also be expected to develop your area of practice independently.

Work Experience and Employment Prospects

The course acknowledges the value of experience and partnerships to enable employability. A key element of the course involves establishing partnerships, internships, residencies and placements with arts organisations and galleries, NHS Trusts, social services, charitable trusts, schools, colleges, care homes and commercial companies to develop these. The course also develops your professional skills and positions your practice within critical and contextual frameworks.

You will have the opportunity to develop your practice and gain experience in the field through practical placements, mentoring and live projects matched to your needs whilst benefiting from specialist facilities and expertise to extend your skill sets.

Graduates can progress to careers in academia, arts administration, artists in residence, arts education, arts and disability, community arts, commissioned works, gallery administration and curatorship, health sector management, public art, studio practice, social services, and youth work.

Assessment methods

You will usually have to complete coursework as you progress, and normally sit exams at the end of each academic year.

Facilities

Practical facilities available to students include an MA base room, computer lab with software for digital imaging and film editing, printmaking studio, ceramics, casting, wood and metal workshops, photographic darkroom and studio.

Learning resources include the campus library, access to online journals and research.

Teaching

Our MA Art Practice staff are actively engaged in research, they embody a high level of knowledge, expertise and professional experience across a range of arts practices. Students on this course will benefit from interdisciplinary teaching delivered by a teaching team with extensive experience in exhibiting; project management; project realisation and practice within the public realm, NHS and community contexts.

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