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Masters Degrees (Culture Technology)

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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Gender and Culture at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Gender and Culture at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

The MA in Gender and Culture offers an innovative interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary approach to the study of Gender and Culture.

Key Features of MA in Gender and Culture

This is an interdisciplinary MA scheme in Gender and Culture taught by Gender specialists across the Arts and Humanities – in the subject areas of Development Studies, Political and Cultural Studies, English Literature, Egyptology, European Languages, History, Media Studies, and Political and Cultural Studies.

If you are interested in gender and gender relations in politics, literature, culture, and history, like engaging in discussion and intellectual argument, and are excited about the idea of working within and across different subject areas, this MA in Gender and Culture is ideal for you.

The MA Gender and Culture examines the production, reproduction and transformation of gender in culture and society.

The Gender and Culture degree is supported by the research activity of GENCAS, the Centre for Research into Gender in Culture and Society in the College of Arts and Humanities. The College of Arts and Humanities has a Graduate Centre. The Graduate Centre fosters and supports individual and collaborative research activity of international excellence and offers a vibrant and supportive environment for students pursuing postgraduate research and taught masters study. The Centre provides postgraduate training to enhance academic and professional development and facilitates participation in seminar programmes, workshops and international conferences.

The full-time Gender and Culture course comprises three modules taken in each academic semester (a total of six modules) and then a dissertation over the summer. In part one, students study three compulsory modules and three optional modules. In part two, students are required to write the dissertation component which draws on issues and themes developed throughout the year.

Part-time study is available for the Gender and Culture programme.

Gender and Culture Programme Aims

To develop independent thinking and writing. You devise your own essay projects in consultation with a gender specialist - this combines the benefits of expert guidance with the rewards of shaping an intellectual project for yourself. To sharpen and develop your skills and take them to a new level by providing the chance for original thinking and intellectual freedom in writing the ‘dissertation’ element, where you complete your own research project.

Modules

Modules on the Gender and Culture programme include:

• Women and Politics

• Civil Society and International Development

• Critical Security Studies

• Rights-Based Approaches to Development

• War, Technology and Culture

• Approaches to IR

• Violence, Conflict & Development

• Governance, Globalization and Neoliberal Political Economy

• Human Rights and Humanitarian Intervention

• The Policy Making Process

• State of Africa

• Politics in Contemporary Britain

• War in Space

• Politics and Public Policy in the New Wales

• Postcolonialism, Orientalism and Eurocentrism

• War, Identity and Society

• Approaches to Political Theory

• International Security in the Asia Pacific

• Gender Trouble: the Medieval Anchorite, and Issues of Wombs and Tombs

• Women Writers of the 1940’s

• Women Writing India

• ‘The Great Pretender’: Masculinity in Contemporary Women’s Fiction

• ‘The Unsex’d Females’: Women Writers and the French Revolution

• British Women’s Fiction 1918-1939

• Contemporary Women’s Writing

• Angela Carter

• Gender in Contemporary European Culture

• Literature in Social Context

• Women and Gender in Ancient Egypt

• Nature’s Stepchildren: European Medicine and Sexual Dissidents, 1869-1939

• The making of Modern Sexualities, 1650-1800

Who should Apply?

Students interested in Gender and Culture from a Classics and Ancient History, English, European Languages, History, Media Studies, and Political and Cultural Studies or related background. Professionals interested in the challenge of digital studying Gender and Culture. Students interested in preparation for postgraduate research, MPhil or PhD, or who wish to develop skills and knowledge related to gender and culture.

Career Prospects

Career expectations are excellent for Gender and Culture graduates. Our graduates are employed in diverse and dynamic vocations such as education, business, law and finance, marketing, sales and advertising; commercial, industrial and public sectors; media and PR; creative and professional writing; social and welfare professions; heritage and tourism; government and politics; foreign affairs and diplomatic corps; humanitarian organisations and some go on to study a PhD.



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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Gender and Culture (Extended) at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Gender and Culture (Extended) at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

Key Features of MA in Gender and Culture

This is an interdisciplinary MA scheme in Gender and Culture taught by Gender specialists across the Arts and Humanities – in the subject areas of Development Studies, Political and Cultural Studies, English Literature, Egyptology, European Languages, History, Media Studies, and Political and Cultural Studies.

If you are interested in gender and gender relations in politics, literature, culture, and history, like engaging in discussion and intellectual argument, and are excited about the idea of working within and across different subject areas, this MA in Gender and Culture is ideal for you.

The MA Gender and Culture examines the production, reproduction and transformation of gender in culture and society.

The Gender and Culture degree is supported by the research activity of GENCAS, the Centre for Research into Gender in Culture and Society in the College of Arts and Humanities. The College of Arts and Humanities has a Graduate Centre. The Graduate Centre fosters and supports individual and collaborative research activity of international excellence and offers a vibrant and supportive environment for students pursuing postgraduate research and taught masters study. The Centre provides postgraduate training to enhance academic and professional development and facilitates participation in seminar programmes, workshops and international conferences.

The full-time Gender and Culture course comprises three modules taken in each academic semester (a total of six modules) and then a dissertation over the summer. In part one, students study three compulsory modules and three optional modules. In part two, students are required to write the dissertation component which draws on issues and themes developed throughout the year.

Part-time study is available for the Gender and Culture programme.

The Extended MA (EMA) in Gender and Culture is a 240-credit postgraduate qualification that is equivalent to 120 ECTS (European Credit Transfer System) and is thus a recognised Masters qualification throughout the European Union. The EMA is a standard UK MA plus an additional 60 credits (30 ECTS) and this additional coursework is undertaken in one semester at a partner institution overseas. The EMA is therefore not only an EU recognised postgraduate qualification it also adds a study abroad experience thus enhancing the qualification’s employability credentials.

The partner institution for EMA Gender and Culture is the University of Regensburg. Founded in 1962, Regensburg is a renowned international centre of teaching and research. Although it has over 21,000 thousand students, the university offers a broad range of disciplines of study, as well as having excellent infrastructure and a favourable staff-student ratio. Regensburg is also active in research, with six special research areas supported by the German Research Society and a strong presence in German- and EU-funded research initiatives. The university has a significant international presence, offering exchange links with more than 200 European institutions and 45 overseas universities. Students will have access to the complete range of services and facilities offered at the university, along with inclusion in the many academic and social activities that take place. Located right in the heart of the old town of Regensburg, a UNESCO World Heritage Site, the university is situated in the centre of a culturally and socially rich area with over 2000 years of history.

Gender and Culture Programme Aims

To develop independent thinking and writing. You devise your own essay projects in consultation with a gender specialist - this combines the benefits of expert guidance with the rewards of shaping an intellectual project for yourself. To sharpen and develop your skills and take them to a new level by providing the chance for original thinking and intellectual freedom in writing the ‘dissertation’ element, where you complete your own research project.

Modules

Modules on the Gender and Culture programme include:

• Women and Politics

• Civil Society and International Development

• Critical Security Studies

• Rights-Based Approaches to Development

• War, Technology and Culture

• Approaches to IR

• Violence, Conflict & Development

• Governance, Globalization and Neoliberal Political Economy

• Human Rights and Humanitarian Intervention

• The Policy Making Process

• State of Africa

• Politics in Contemporary Britain

• War in Space

• Politics and Public Policy in the New Wales

• Postcolonialism, Orientalism and Eurocentrism

• War, Identity and Society

• Approaches to Political Theory

• International Security in the Asia Pacific

• Gender Trouble: the Medieval Anchorite, and Issues of Wombs and Tombs

• Women Writers of the 1940’s

• Women Writing India

• ‘The Great Pretender’: Masculinity in Contemporary Women’s Fiction

• ‘The Unsex’d Females’: Women Writers and the French Revolution

• British Women’s Fiction 1918-1939

• Contemporary Women’s Writing

• Angela Carter

• Gender in Contemporary European Culture

• Literature in Social Context

• Women and Gender in Ancient Egypt

• Nature’s Stepchildren: European Medicine and Sexual Dissidents, 1869-1939

• The making of Modern Sexualities, 1650-1800

Who should Apply?

Students interested in Gender and Culture from a Classics and Ancient History, English, European Languages, History, Media Studies, and Political and Cultural Studies or related background. Professionals interested in the challenge of digital studying Gender and Culture. Students interested in preparation for postgraduate research, MPhil or PhD, or who wish to develop skills and knowledge related to gender and culture.

Career Prospects

Career expectations are excellent for Gender and Culture graduates. Our graduates are employed in diverse and dynamic vocations such as education, business, law and finance, marketing, sales and advertising; commercial, industrial and public sectors; media and PR; creative and professional writing; social and welfare professions; heritage and tourism; government and politics; foreign affairs and diplomatic corps; humanitarian organisations and some go on to study a PhD.



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This course give you a unique opportunity to explore the many forms of digital culture and their profound effects on society from a number of different angles. Read more

This course give you a unique opportunity to explore the many forms of digital culture and their profound effects on society from a number of different angles. It aims to develop participants' skills in forming their own assessments of digital technologies and their impact on society and culture. 

Graduates of this coursewill have gained the analytical tools required to understand how digitisation and internet technologies have shaped and are shaping modern culture.

 Key Benefits

  • Develop an understanding of the role and impact of digital technologies in contemporary culture, broadly interpreted to include such areas of activity as performing arts, telecommunications, information technology, philosophy, law and education.
  • Study digital technologies within an interdisciplinary and cross-cultural framework, combining modules from participating departments.
  • Obtain on-the-job training in a month long internship within a relevant organisation.
  • Take field trips to major London cultural institutions, such as Tate Modern, National Gallery, Institute of Archaeology and the BBC Archives.

Description

On this Digital Culture & Society MA programme you will focus on how technology and culture are connected in today’s society. We broadly interpret this to include such areas of activity as performing arts, telecommunications, information technology, philosophy, law and education. We aim to develop and enhance your awareness and understanding of a range of subjects relevant to digital culture and technology, including:

  • The key information and communication technologies that shape contemporary society.
  • The key developments in contemporary cultural expression, specifically how these are driven, mediated or influenced by digital technologies.
  • The role of digital technologies in the study of culture and cultural artefacts from the past.
  • How digital technologies are shaping today’s society, including social intercourse, social structures, government, international politics, education and law.
  • The current critical and theoretical debates around digital culture and the role of technology in cultural life.
  • The ethical, moral and philosophical issues that arise from the role and impact of technology in cultural and social life.

Course purpose

The aim of the MA Digital Culture & Society programme is to develop participants’ understanding of the role and consequences of digital technologies in contemporary culture, broadly interpreted to include such areas of activity as performing arts, telecommunications, information technology, philosophy, law and education. The programme is conceived as fundamentally interdisciplinary, drawing for its teaching on four academic Schools: Arts and Humanities; Law; Physical Sciences and Engineering; and Social Science & Public Policy. It is aimed at a diverse range of participants, offering technological insights to those with non-technical backgrounds, and cultural perspectives to those who have not thought about digital culture in a systematic way.

Course format and assessment

Teaching Style

If you are a full-time student, we will provide 120 to 180 hours of teaching through lectures and seminars, and we will expect you to undertake 1674 hours of independent study.

If you are a part-time student, we will provide 90 hours of teaching through lectures and seminars in your first year, and 50 hours in your second. We will expect you to undertake 720 hours of independent study in your first year and 954 hours in your second.

Assessment

We will assess our modules entirely through coursework, which will mostly take the form of essays, with some project work.

Regulating body

King’s College is regulated by the Higher Education Funding Council for England.



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This interdisciplinary programme will allow you to benefit from the expertise of both the School of Sociology and Social Policy and the School of Media and Communication, enabling you to gain an in-depth understanding of key issues, debates and theoretical perspectives, and to critically analyse the relationship between culture, media and society. Read more

This interdisciplinary programme will allow you to benefit from the expertise of both the School of Sociology and Social Policy and the School of Media and Communication, enabling you to gain an in-depth understanding of key issues, debates and theoretical perspectives, and to critically analyse the relationship between culture, media and society.

Taught by leading researchers in the field, this programme covers key issues and concepts such as: media and social media; consumerism; audiences; representation; globalisation; migration and place; tourism; creative work and material culture. Through its grounding in sociological approaches to the study of culture and media, a concern with questions of power, inequality and identity will be threaded through the course, enabling you to think critically about the relationship between gender, class, race and ethnicity, and the cultural realm.

In addition to developing a specialist knowledge in the field, you will also acquire key transferable skills in research, communication, analytical skills, self-management and group working, which will open up a range of career pathways within the media and creative industries and beyond.

Highlights

  • Benefit from the expertise of both the School of Sociology and Social Policy and the School of Media and Communication.
  • Gain specialist knowledge in the areas of consumerism, media and social media, globalisation, representation and more.
  • Tailor the programme according to your interests with optional modules which cover PR, journalism, identity, cultural history and reality TV.
  • Develop transferable skills including in research, analysis, group work and communication.
  • Prepare for careers in PR, communications and media policy, social and digital media, media market, audience research and others.

Course content

Compulsory modules on Researching Society and Culture, Understanding Society and Culture, and Sociology of Media and Culture, will provide a solid grounding in key sociological theories for the study of society, culture and media, and methodological debates and approaches.

In addition to the core compulsory modules, you will have the opportunity to choose from a range of optional modules delivered by the School of Media and Communication, enabling you to tailor the programme to pursue your specialist interests.

The final dissertation project will allow you to design, develop and implement your own critical research enquiry into an aspect of culture and media.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • Researching Culture and Society 30 credits
  • Understanding Society and Culture 30 credits
  • Sociology of Media and Culture 30 credits
  • Dissertation (Media & Culture) 60 credits

Optional modules

  • Public Relations, Culture and Society 30 credits
  • Communication and Public Opinion 30 credits
  • Journalism Practice and Policy 30 credits
  • The Cultural History of Promotional Communication 30 credits
  • Identity, Culture and Technology 30 credits
  • Urban Narratives 30 credits
  • Researching Inequality in the Media 30 credits
  • Reality TV: Truth or Fiction? 30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Society, Culture and Media MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Society, Culture and Media MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

Throughout the course you will be exposed to a variety of teaching methods including guest lectures, seminars, presentations, group work, blended learning and independent critical enquiry.

Assessment

Assessment will include a series of short quizzes, a group project, an essay and dissertation.

Career opportunities

The combined nature of the programme will equip you with key transferable skills and the specialist knowledge required to pursue a career in sociology or media and culture. The national and international growth of the media and creative industries has sparked greater demand for graduates who possess advanced skills and knowledge in the field, opening opportunities in communications and media policy, PR, social and digital media, media markets and audience research or other cultural and creative industries.

Additionally, the sociology element of the programme will allow you to apply your knowledge and skills in fields such as education, statutory and voluntary agencies, NGOs (non-governmental organisations), INGOs (international non-governmental agencies) and charities. The programme also provides a basis for progression onto a PhD in sociology and media studies, and a strong grounding for an interdisciplinary PhD.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



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Imaginative, original and full of exciting ideas - if this sounds like you, then our MSc in Creative Technology could be your perfect course. Read more
Imaginative, original and full of exciting ideas - if this sounds like you, then our MSc in Creative Technology could be your perfect course. It's open to students from any background who are interested in combining technical and creative skills to create the technologies and experiences of the future. We'll give you the opportunity to learn about and experiment with different types of technology and use them to design and develop your own inventions.


Why study MA/MSc Creative Technology at Middlesex?

Technology is becoming increasingly important to art, design and culture and the skills associated with the once-separate creative and technical worlds overlap more and more. We welcome students from any background onto this course– it's an unusual opportunity for students with diverse skills to work together, and it's this variety that gives it so much character.

This is a highly practical course, assessed entirely through project work, with an emphasis on collaboration and experimentation. We want you to benefit from our creative, academic and technical expertise, and we like nothing more than to see you step out of your comfort zone and tackle something new. You'll work with your peers on group projects – recent students have made an interactive cushion, explored Kinect hacking, created apps and designed an interactive breakfast table that showed the news.

Never mind thinking outside the box – you'll be inventing 1,001 new things to do with it.

Course highlights

- All our staff are active in research, industry or both and are passionate about new technology and new ways to use it. Particular areas of expertise include music and sound technology, social media, interactive and haptic technology, visual and digital imagery and gaming.
- Our tutors, who come from both the School of Media and Performing Arts and the School of Science and Technology, include haptic technology specialist Dr Rui Loureiro, who has pioneered work in robot-aided stroke rehabilitation; Debbie Jedwab, a former set designer for the BBC; composer and sound artist Nye Parry, who has worked with the British Museum and the Science Museum; and multimedia artist Nic Sandiland, whose work has been shown worldwide.
- You'll also benefit from the cutting-edge facilities and equipment in our £80 million Art, Design and Media building, the equal of which is rarely seen in other UK universities. They include fully-equipped TV, radio and sound studios, workshops for digital image processing and a comprehensive digital publishing suite.
- You'll learn computer programming as part of the course, and will have access to cutting edge haptic technology and a graphics and games programming laboratory. The university is home to the Human Interactive Systems Laboratory, a centre of research into haptic technology, and the Lansdown Centre for Electronic Arts.
- As well as attending masterclasses and guest lectures by industry professionals, students often work on real industry briefs – they've recently worked with Sony and designer and engineer Moritz Waldemeyer. We've developed the course in consultation with advisors from the creative industries to ensure it's relevant and current.

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This MA introduces you to recent debates on gender in the disciplines of sociology and media and communications studies, and to the interdisciplinary domains of feminist social and cultural theory. Read more

This MA introduces you to recent debates on gender in the disciplines of sociology and media and communications studies, and to the interdisciplinary domains of feminist social and cultural theory.

Drawing on the internationally recognised and pioneering expertise of staff in the Department of Sociology and Department of Media and Communications, as well as the Centre for Feminist Research (CFR), the programme offers you the opportunity to develop cutting-edge critical skills in relation to cultural approaches to gender formation and gender theory.

As well as these theoretical and analytical points of orientation, the MA in Gender, Media and Culture aims to help you grasp the importance of epistemology and methodology for the evaluation of empirical investigations of gender formations.

The programme therefore introduces you to, and offers training in, the key socio-cultural methods for the study of gender in the contemporary world, including methods for the study of visual culture; the body and affect; and memory.

These two elements of the programme are brought together in a dissertation study, which involves tailored supervision in the application of research methods to a specific topic.

This programme relates to the following disciplines:

  • Sociology
  • Media and Communications
  • Humanities
  • Science and Technology Studies
  • Philosophy

Overall the programme has the following interrelated aims

  • to provide in-depth interdisciplinary knowledge of contemporary gender formations
  • to provide theoretical, analytical and methodological points of orientation for understanding gender and culture transnationally and across different societies and geo-political regions
  • to offer skilled supervision in the development and completion of a small research project which tests thoroughly a range of research skills
  • to expose students to a lively research environment and the relevant expertise of the research-led Departments of Sociology and Media and Communications

Modules & structure

Core components of the programme will familiarise you with the wide range of debates integral to the fields of gender studies, feminist theory, and cultural studies. These include:

  • questions about sexual difference and the performativity of gender
  • gender, science, debates on affect and emotion
  • gender and migration and the new international division of labour
  • feminism

You complete one core module and one option module each term, as well as a dissertation module in the spring term. The first core module introduces key debates and developments in feminist theory, cultural theory and, in particular, feminist cultural theory. It introduces both early debates which defined these fields and contemporary developments and departures. More specifically, you will be introduced to social constructivist and post-structuralist perspectives, to ‘new materialism’, to debates on feminism and the critique of universalism; to key questions in relation to feminism and biology; to debates on psycho-analysis and the emergence of queer theory and its intersection with feminist theory.

The second core module examines the place of gender, affect and the body in feminist theory and feminist practice. The course offers you different angles on what has become known as “the affective turn,” placing a strong emphasis on the history of feminist contributions to the study of affect and emotion as well as the body. We ask how bodies are constructed, experienced and lived from a variety of feminist perspectives, attending to questions of corporeal difference, as well as the intimacy of bodies, spaces, objects and technologies. We also reflect on the significance of affect and the body for feminist and queer cultural practices, as well feminist and queer activisms. This module therefore offers instruction in some of the most cutting edge issues in contemporary feminist theory. A team of leading feminist scholars based in the departments of Sociology and Media Communications at Goldsmiths teach this module on the basis of their research specialisms. 

There will be a series of dissertation workshops to help you plan and develop your dissertation, especially in regard to issues of methodology and method. Each student will be assigned a supervisor who will work with you to develop your proposal and undertake independent research.

Core modules

Option modules

You have 60 credits at your disposal, you can choose any 30 credit modules related to gender from postgraduate modules across the University. You can choose either a regular option (30 credits) or two ‘mini-options’ (2 x 15 credits).

For your other options, you can choose modules from either the Department of Sociology or the Department of Media and Communications as they co-convene the programme. You can also choose from the following departments across Goldsmiths:

Please note that not all modules are suitable for students from all academic backgrounds; you will discuss your choices with the Programme Convenor at the start of your degree.

Assessment

Assessment consists of coursework, extended essays, reports, presentations, practice based projects or essays/logs, group projects, reflective essays, and seen and unseen written examinations.

Skills

Graduates from this programme gain conceptual and methodological knowledge of the key concepts and debates in the study of gender and culture; the skills of critical analysis; the ability to distinguish and appraise a range of socio-cultural research methodologies; the skills to design and develop a research project; and the ability to recognise and account for sensitive ethical issues relating to research and representation.

The two core courses provide you with the necessary skills to understand the relationships between early debates in the fields of gender studies, feminist theory and feminist cultural theory, and the ability to critically engage with new developments in these fields. Furthermore, you will gain a critical appreciation of the role and place of the body and affect in the development of feminist cultural theory and gender theory, and the challenges that contemporary socio-cultural changes bring to the theorisation of the body.

Careers

Previous graduates have embarked on professional careers in social research, think tanks, the arts and cultural sectors, government and public administration, development, human rights, NGOs, and in media and communications globally. They have also progressed to PhD study.

Find out more about employability at Goldsmiths



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This programme has been designed to provide postgraduate education for current or future practitioners engaged in education, training or business practice relevant to Technology Enhanced Learning. Read more
This programme has been designed to provide postgraduate education for current or future practitioners engaged in education, training or business practice relevant to Technology Enhanced Learning.

Course Overview

The programme will be delivered online and will be available to anyone who meets the entry requirements and is professionally engaged in learning support, teaching or training practice. It is highly relevant for professional practitioners who work in learning in a university or college, in business training, public sector services or for people considering moving into one of these areas.

The programme provides theory and practice through experience of a range of learning technologies. It enables learners to explore the processes of designing and implementing technology-enhanced learning and issues concerning the practicalities of professional practice in their own context.

Learners will also develop their academic research skills as postgraduate learners. Learners will participate with other EU and non-EU professionals and with their tutors through a range of innovative online communication technologies. The programme aims to capitalise on a collaborative community of practitioners sharing the diversity of their experiences.

The first year of this three year programme is funded for successful applicants in working in vocational education and training in UK, Cyprus, Greece, Bulgaria and Sweden through the EU Lifelong Learning Programme.

Modules

PART 1
-Designing for Technology Enhanced Learning (30 credits)
-Implementing Technology Enhanced Learning (30 credits)
-Identity, Communities and Networks (30 credits)
-The Practitioner as Researcher (30 credits)

Within part 1 of the programme students undertaking the Postgraduate Diploma or MA must take all part 1 modules. Students who are undertaking a Postgraduate Certificate must take Designing for Technology Enhanced Learning and Implementing Technology Enhanced Learning.

PART 2
-Students undertaking the MA Technology Enhanced Learning take the 60 credit Dissertation module.

Key Features

63% of survey respondents from both the public and private sectors say that technological innovation will have a major influence on teaching methodologies over the next five years and that it will become a core differentiator in attracting students and corporate partners (Economist, 2008).

Technology led learning is continuing to grow at a phenomenal rate and the market for eLearning has exceed $52.6 billion in 2010 (Cegos, 2009). Cegos (2009) indicate the development of professional qualifications to meet the personnel demands of this “star” industry are lagging demand.

As an increasingly preferred approach for delivering training and education (Cedefop, 2010) the HE sector is now responding to the need for qualifications and learning demands of this fast changing sector. This MA Technology Enhanced Learning course is an online programme that is intended to attract a global student body.

Knowledge and understanding is achieved through learning activities that emphasise students’ engagement with research-led resources and dialogue and with each other and their tutor. Resources are made available electronically from a range of different sources including: e-books, electronic journal articles, videos, images, numerical data, voice recordings, transcripts, web applications and web documents, available through the University’s Virtual Learning Environment.

Assessment

The assessment scheme is designed to enable students to demonstrate individually that they have met the aims of the programmes and achieved the learning outcomes at the standard required for the MA. Assessment will also be used to provide feedback to students so as to assist in subsequent learning.

The assessment will enable theory to inform practice, with students demonstrating intellectual rigor and reflecting critically on their own experiences of using technology for learning. The overall assessment package is developed out of an inter-dependent learning culture. The assessment strategy aims to make use of the benefits to be gained from sharing practice in multiple contexts.

Career Opportunities

The MA Technology Enhanced Learning programme combines a theoretical approach with practical skills relevant for the teaching and training sectors and promotes an understanding of key concepts from an applied perspective. Graduates from the programme will have developed transferable employability skills such as research, problem solving, data interpretation and critical thinking as well as gaining the knowledge and practical skills applicable to the sector.

Graduates of the programme are likely to find employment within universities, vocational colleges, HRM departments, training companies and be employed as course managers, lecturers, teachers, instructional designers, authors, TEL Directors, information specialists or media design.

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The Education and Technology MA teaches students the practical and research skills to design, use and evaluate 'edtech' interventions. Read more

The Education and Technology MA teaches students the practical and research skills to design, use and evaluate 'edtech' interventions. They will develop methodological skills to ensure that processes and products respond to the needs of educators and add value to learning and teaching. Students learn how to embed technology within educational practice, explore key issues and debates in this field, and critically appraise educational theory.

About this degree

This programme develops students' theoretical insights and practical skills in technology in education. Students learn how to apply the latest educational theory to their everyday professional practice. The research skills developed allow progression on to doctoral research and/or a strong background for a career in design and evaluation work in the edtech sector.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two core modules (60 credits), and either two elective modules (60 credits) and a dissertation (60 dissertation), or a report (30 credits) and three elective modules (90 credits).

Core modules

  • Education and Technology: Key Issues and Debates (online/mixed)
  • Researching Digital Learning (online/mixed)

Elective modules

Students choose two optional modules from across the UCL Institute of Education's Master's-level offering.

The following are examples from the recommended UCL Knowledge Lab MA optional modules:

  • Design and Use of Technologies for Education
  • Technology and Education Beyond the Classroom
  • Digital Design Thinking and Making

Previous students have chosen optional modules from Psychology, Mathematics or Science Education, Higher and Professional Education and other programmes.

MA Mathematics Education Programme

Dissertation/report

All students undertake an independent project culminating either in a dissertation of 20,000 words or a report of 10,000 words, supervised either on campus or online.

Teaching and learning

Teaching is delivered through individual and group working; lectures and podcasts, student presentations and group discussion of reading and writing undertaken in preparation for sessions, both online and face-to-face; collaborative activities in face-to-face and online contexts. All modules are assessed by written assignments.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Education and Technology MA

Careers

Graduates of this programme are currently working as educators, university learning technologists, government education researchers, designers or developers of educational technology, consultants, PR and marketing managers. Some graduates continue their studies as PhD students.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • International School Teacher (Head of ICT), Rainbow International School Uganda
  • Research Officer, Institute of Education
  • Education Consultant, CfBT
  • ICT Trainer, Alvan Ikoku Federal College of Education and studying MOODLE DESIGN, Unspecified Institution
  • Lecturer / Instructional Designer, National University of Kaohsiung and studying MA Education and Technology, Institute of Education, University of London (IOE)

Employability

The Education and Technology MA is highly regarded within education and industry. Graduates from our programme have gone on to develop their careers in the education sector as senior teachers, learning technologists, education researchers, and to undertake PhD research.

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

This programme is run by UCL's Knowledge Lab (UCLKL) where researchers explore the future of learning with digital technologies in a wide range of educational settings. This brings together scientists from a range of fields including education, sociology, and semiotics who explore design, development and evaluation across a broad range of digital media. The research is interdisciplinary in nature, with collaborations involving, for example, computer scientists, designers, and subject specialist educators. 

This programme offers a number of opportunities for networking across different sectors in educational contexts:

  • The UCL Knowledge Lab runs regular seminars and talks from external academic visitors, which students are encouraged to attend, and are broadcast on Moodle for distance learners, providing networking opportunities with academics.
  • Several projects within the UCL Knowlege Lab are in collaboration with tech companies, providing potential opportunities to link with industry.
  • The programme attracts students from across the world providing international networking links across different educational sectors.

The MA attracts students from a wide variety of backgrounds and nationalities, providing scope for broad intellectual discussion and debate, and opportunities for multidisciplinary working, and global networking.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: Culture, Communication & Media

78% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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Strongly interdisciplinary in nature, the Institute for Language, Cognition and Communication (ILCC) is dedicated to both basic and applied research in the computational study of language, communication, and cognition, in both humans and machines. Read more

Strongly interdisciplinary in nature, the Institute for Language, Cognition and Communication (ILCC) is dedicated to both basic and applied research in the computational study of language, communication, and cognition, in both humans and machines.

As technology focuses increasingly on language-based communication tools, research into the automation of language processing has become vital. ILCC offers you the broadest research scope in the UK, and a strong computational focus.

Our primary areas of research are:

  • natural language processing and computational linguistics
  • spoken language processing
  • dialogue and multimodal interaction
  • information extraction, retrieval, and presentation
  • computational theories of human cognition
  • educational and assistive technology
  • visualisation

Much of our research is applied to software development, in areas as diverse as social media, assisted living, gaming and education.

You may find yourself working closely with other departments of the University, particularly the School of Philosophy, Psychology & Language Sciences.

Many of our researchers are involved in cross-disciplinary research centres; for instance:

Centre for Speech Technology Research (CSTR)

The Centre for Speech Technology Research (CSTR) is an interdisciplinary research centre linking Informatics and Linguistics. Founded in 1984, it is now one of the world's largest concentrations of researchers working in the field of language and speech processing.

CSTR is concerned with research in all areas of speech technology including speech recognition, synthesis, signal processing, acoustic phonetics, information access, multi-modal interaction and dialogue systems.

The Centre is home to state-of-the-art research facilities including specialised speech and language-orientated computer labs, a digital recording studio, perception labs and a meeting room instrumented with multiple synchronised video cameras and microphones. There is also access to high-performance computer clusters, the University storage area network, a specialist library, and many speech and language databases

Centre for Design Informatics

Data driven innovation is transforming society and the economy. In the Centre for Design Informatics, we design systems for better human data interaction, in diverse settings such as health, culture, mobility and finance. We explore design from, with, and by data: the central concern is the design of flows of data which sustain and enhance human values. Relevant technologies range from the internet of things, through blockchains, to robotics, speech recognition, data visualisation, interaction design, and social computing.

Data Science EPSRC Centre for Doctoral Training

The EPSRC Centre for Doctoral Training (CDT) in Data Science, based at the University of Edinburgh, is training a new generation of data scientists, comprising 50 PhDs over five intake years, with the technical skills and interdisciplinary awareness necessary to become R&D leaders in this emerging area.

Training and support

You carry out your research within a research group under the guidance of a supervisor. You will be expected to attend seminars and meetings of relevant research groups and may also attend lectures that are relevant to your research topic. Periodic reviews of your progress will be conducted to assist with research planning.

A programme of transferable skills courses facilitates broader professional development in a wide range of topics, from writing and presentation skills to entrepreneurship and career strategies.

The School of Informatics holds a Silver Athena SWAN award, in recognition of our commitment to advance the representation of women in science, mathematics, engineering and technology. The School is deploying a range of strategies to help female staff and students of all stages in their careers and we seek regular feedback from our research community on our performance.

Facilities

The award-winning Informatics Forum is an international research facility for computing and related areas. It houses more than 400 research staff and students, providing office, meeting and social spaces.

It also contains two robotics labs, an instrumented multimedia room, eye-tracking and motion capture systems, and a full recording studio amongst other research facilities. Its spectacular atrium plays host to many events, from industry showcases and student hackathons to major research conferences.

Nearby teaching facilities include computer and teaching labs with more than 250 machines, 24-hour access to IT facilities for students, and comprehensive support provided by dedicated computing staff.

Among our entrepreneurial initiatives is Informatics Ventures, set up to support globally ambitious software companies in Scotland and nurture a technology cluster to rival Boston, Pittsburgh, Kyoto and Silicon Valley.

Career opportunities

While many of our graduates pursue an academic career, others find their skills are highly sought after in the technology industry. A number of our students serve internships with large UK and international software developers, while others take up positions with major social media companies.



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The MA in Digital Media is unique in its combination of practical and theoretical approaches to contemporary media and technology. Read more

The MA in Digital Media is unique in its combination of practical and theoretical approaches to contemporary media and technology.

The established and exciting degree is designed to help you understand digital transformations in media, culture and society and apply this understanding in practice, in the media and creative industries and in further research. You will be equipped with skills that can be applied to current and future developments in digital media, social media, computing and other aspects of technology.

The MA in Digital Media educates aspiring media practitioners and academics as well as early and mid-career professionals who seek to reflect on their roles in a structured and stimulating learning environment designed to give all students up-to-the-minute knowledge of digital media and the skills to apply that knowledge to future developments.

The MA offers two pathways:

Pathway 1 is a theory programme where you learn about developments in digital media and technology from a wide range of perspectives

Pathway 2 is a theory and practice programme where you can explore transformations in media, culture and society through the practice of contemporary digital communication. You will work with one or more of the following to create installations, apps and single- and multi-screen work that's responsive to the continually changing digital landscape:

  • Animation
  • Photography
  • Video and other forms of moving image
  • Software and web design
  • Hybrid forms of image making

Acclaimed academics and practitioners

Benefit from the experience and expertise of one of the world’s leading media and communications departments. The programme is co-convened by Professor Joanna Zylinska and Daniel Rourke, and you will be taught by theorists and practitioners of international standing.

Work placements and internships

The MA in Digital Media regularly attracts offers of work placements and internships. In the past these have come from GoogleThe Science Museum and N1creative.com. There is also £6,000 bursary available for UK students studying this course. Find out more about the Stationers' Postgraduate Bursary Scheme on our departmental awards page.

Facilities

Our students have access to state-of-the-art facilities including well-equipped lecture and seminar rooms, exhibition spaces, computer facilities and digital media suites.

The department is also currently host to the renowned philosopher of media and technology, Bernard Stiegler and students will have access to his modulein Media Philosophy as well as priority access to the innovative and popular option After New Media. Designed to complement the MA in Digital Media, this course provides a framework for thinking about the current media environment as well as future forms of human and computer interaction.

An established record

The MA in Digital Media has been redefining media theory and practice since 2004. Our students become proficient in:

  • the history, sociology and philosophy of digital media
  • the application of critical conceptual skills to specialist areas and future forms of media
  • multimedia skills in image making (photography, video, animation, graphic art) script writing, journalism and documentary 

MA Digital Media students have access to the pioneering option ‘After New Media’, currently a non-assessed online module which explores the themes of self mediation, ethical mediation and intelligent mediation, and develops a framework for thinking about 'life' after new media. As well as accessing a series of podcasts, students are offered reading groups and a masterclass with Professor Sarah Kember co-author of the book Life After New Media on which the course is based.

Modules & structure

Overview

The programme consists of:

  • Two compulsory core modules
  • Pathway 1 - between two and four option modules (worth 60 credits) OR
  • Pathway 2 - a two-term practice block (worth 30 credits) and either one or two option modules (worth 30 credits)
  • The dissertation or the practice/theory project

Core modules

Assessment

Seen take-home paper; essays; dissertation or practice/theory project and other production work for image-making.

Skills

We provide graduates with skills that are cutting edge: in the critical analysis and/or creative production of digital media; in the disciplinary knowledge and conceptual frameworks necessary for current and future forms of media and technology; in the awareness of how digital media and technologies are re-shaping society from the ways we communicate (through social media and web 2.0) to the increasingly ‘smart’ environments in which we live.

Careers

Our programme provides a theory and practice pathway and prepares students for work in the following areas:

  • media and creative industries; advertising, marketing and PR (graduates of the MA Digital Media have found work with Virgin Media, Google, the BBC and other leading organisations worldwide)
  • research and academia (graduates from this programme have gone on to study for PhD degrees in higher education institutions around the world and also here with us)
  • media production and new media art (graduates have exhibited, published and produced work in photography, journalism, TV, documentary, film and multimedia)


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This course in Digital Humanities brings digital theory and practice to the study of human culture. from history, English and music to museums, digital publishing and beyond. Read more

This course in Digital Humanities brings digital theory and practice to the study of human culture: from history, English and music to museums, digital publishing and beyond.

Digital technology provides many new opportunities and challenges to those working with textual, visual or multimedia content and this course studies the history and current state of the digital humanities, exploring their role in modelling, curating, analysing and interpreting digital representations of human culture in all its forms.

Key benefits

  • This world-leading course is highly multidisciplinary and draws on a wide range of expertise in web technologies, digital publishing, open software and content creation, digital cultural heritage, coding in humanities/cultural contexts and maps, apps and the Geoweb.
  • The course provides opportunities to scope, build and critique practical experiments in digital research with an arts, humanities and cultural sector focus.
  • Through the optional internship module students can have direct access to some of the world’s most important culture and media institutions.
  • The MA can lead to further research or to careers in cultural heritage institutions (such as museums, libraries, and archives), in multimedia and new media companies, in internet companies, in publishing houses, and in web based businesses in London and overseas.

Description

In an age where so much of what we do is mobile, networked and mediated by digital culture and technology, digital humanities play an important role in exploring how we create and share knowledge. On this course, we will develop and enhance your awareness and understanding of a range of subjects that are relevant to the digitally mediated study of human culture, including:

  • How we model human culture using computers and how we can create memory and knowledge environments which facilitate new insights or new ways of working with the human record.
  • How the ethos of openness that the internet encourages – open access, open data – influences the knowledge economy.
  • The role of digital culture in changing concepts of authorship, editing and publication.
  • The potential application and limitations of big data techniques to further the study of human culture in an era of information overload.
  • The place of coding in our digital interactions with culture and cultural heritage.

We will give you a broad understanding of the most important applications of digital methods and technologies to humanities research questions and what they do and don’t allow us to do. You will be able to scope, build and critique practical experiments in digital research with an arts, humanities and cultural sector focus, and you will learn to provide critical commentary on the relationship between creativity, digital technology and the study of human culture.

Course purpose

The MA in Digital Humanities is designed to develop your understanding of digital theory and practice in studying human culture, from the perspectives of academic scholarship, cultural heritage and the commercial world.

Digital technology provides many new opportunities and challenges to those working with textual, visual or multimedia content and this course studies the history and current state of the digital humanities, exploring their role in modelling, curating, analysing and interpreting digital representations of human culture in all its forms.

The MA course is aimed at a diverse range of participants and aims to equip students with a variety of strategic, technical and analytical skills to provide direction and leadership in these areas.

Course format and assessment

Teaching

If you are a full-time student, we will provide 120 to 180 hours of teaching through lectures and seminars, and we will expect you to undertake 1674 hours of independent study.

If you are a part-time student, we will provide 90 hours of teaching through lectures and seminars in your first year, and 50 hours in your second. We will expect you to undertake 720 hours of independent study in your first year and 954 hours in your second.

Assessment

We will assess our modules entirely through coursework, which will mostly take the form of essays, with some project work.



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This programme, available in both part-time and full-time study modes, offers you a broad-based understanding of how film, television and other screen media have developed and interacted across their varying histories. Read more

This programme, available in both part-time and full-time study modes, offers you a broad-based understanding of how film, television and other screen media have developed and interacted across their varying histories. It also gives you the opportunity to specialise in chosen areas of those media histories, in order to personalise your MA studies towards specific intellectual interests and future career hopes. The programme is unique in the way that it combines rigorous academic study with creative and practical opportunities, the latter offered both within certain option modules and via the two-month work placement.

This intermixing of the academic and the practical also enables you to take your interests further, into further postgraduate study, towards a career in teaching or into possible work opportunities in many areas of the media industries.

The programme has two other pathways: MA Film and Screen Media (European Pathway) and MA Film and Screen Media with Film Programming and Curating.

Why study this course at Birkbeck?

COURSE STRUCTURE

The programme consists of the compulsory module Screen Media: History, Technology and Culture, a choice of option modules, a research project or placement and a dissertation.

The compulsory module is designed to introduce you to the basic methodologies and issues involved in the area concerned, as well as research skills and methods. The option modules allow you to pursue specific interests and areas of research.

A unique feature of the programme is the placement, which offers you the experience of working in a prominent media company or institution. Alternatively you can complete a research project which gives you the chance to undertake independent research and reflect on research methodologies.

You will complete the programme with a 15,000-word dissertation.

COMPULSORY MODULES

INDICATIVE OPTION MODULES

DISSERTATION MA FILM AND SCREEN MEDIA

You will also have the option to take an intercollegiate module offered at another college of the University of London through the Screen Studies Group.



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This programme, available in both full-time and part-time study modes, offers you a broad-based understanding of how film, television and other screen media have developed and interacted across their varying histories. Read more

This programme, available in both full-time and part-time study modes, offers you a broad-based understanding of how film, television and other screen media have developed and interacted across their varying histories.

It also gives you the opportunity to specialise in film exhibition and archival practice, in order to personalise your MA studies towards specific intellectual interests and future career hopes. The programme is unique in the way that it combines rigorous academic study with creative and practical opportunities, the latter offered both within certain option modules and via the two-month work placement.

This intermixing of the academic and the practical also enables you to take your interests further, into further postgraduate study, towards a career in teaching or into possible work opportunities in many areas of the media industries.

The programme has two other pathways: MA Film and Screen Media and MA Film and Screen Media (European Pathway).

HIGHLIGHTS

COURSE STRUCTURE

The programme consists of the compulsory module Screen Media: History, Technology and Culture, a choice of option modules, a research project or placement and a dissertation.

The compulsory module is designed to introduce you to the basic methodologies and issues involved in the area concerned, as well as research skills and methods. The option modules allow you to pursue specific interests and areas of research.

A unique feature of the programme is the placement, which offers you the experience of working in a prominent media company or institution. Alternatively you can complete a research project which gives you the chance to undertake independent research and reflect on research methodologies.

You will complete the programme with a 15,000-word dissertation.

COMPULSORY MODULES

INDICATIVE OPTION MODULES

DISSERTATION MA FILM AND SCREEN MEDIA

You will also have the option to take an intercollegiate module offered at another college of the University of London through the Screen Studies Group.



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This programme gives you the opportunity to study the main contexts of contemporary science and technology; gain a broad base in science policy, communication, sociology and engagement; enjoy flexibility in specialisation; and work in an interdisciplinary environment with research experts. Read more

This programme gives you the opportunity to study the main contexts of contemporary science and technology; gain a broad base in science policy, communication, sociology and engagement; enjoy flexibility in specialisation; and work in an interdisciplinary environment with research experts.

About this degree

The programme provides broad-based training in three disciplines: science policy and governance; science communication, engagement, and evaluation; and sociology of modern science and technology. This programme encourages specialised investigation. It also encourages interdisciplinary integration. Our degree works in dialogue with our sister MSc programme in History and Philosophy of Science, which adds historical and analytical depth to our offer.

MSc students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of one core module (15 credits), four optional modules (60 credits), three ancillary modules (45 credits) and a dissertation (60 credits)

Postgraduate Diploma students undertake modules to the value of 120 credits: one core (15 credits), four optional (60 credits), and three ancillary (45 credits), studied over one year.

Postgraduate Certificate students undertake modules to the value of 60 credits. The programme consists of one core module (15 credits), and three optional modules (45 credits), studied over one year.

Core module

  • Introduction to Science and Technology Studies

Optional modules

Students must take three modules from a prescribed list of options including:

  • Practical Science Communication and Engagement
  • Curating the History of Science
  • Responsible Science and Emerging Technologies
  • Science in the 20th Century and Beyond
  • Science Policy Beyond Borders
  • Science, Media, and Culture
  • Science, Security, and Social Research
  • Sociology and the Sociology of Science
  • Special Topics Seminar in STS
  • Ancillary Modules
  • Students must take two ancillary modules which may be options from our own degrees:
  • for example, Material Culture and Science in the 18th Century or Knowledge, Evidence,
  • and Explanation in Science, or they might be selected from any other programme at UCL.
  • Module descriptions can be found on the STS website.

Dissertation/report

All MSc students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000–12,000 words.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of seminars, lectures, tutorials and research supervision. Student performance is assessed through coursework such as long and short essays, advocacy work, and project work.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Science, Technology and Society MSc

Funding

For a comprehensive list of the funding opportunities available at UCL, including funding relevant to your nationality, please visit the Scholarships and Funding website.

Careers

Our programme provides essential training and study for students wishing to pursue PhD level study in several fields, and also provides appropriate training and qualifications sought by individuals pursuing careers in areas such as education, museum and archival curatorship, or administration and policy-making in science, engineering and health care.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Complaints Handler, IPSO (Independent Press Standards Organisation)
  • Copy Editor, Spandidos Publications
  • Export Analyst, U.S. Army Military District of Washington
  • Medical Communications Intern, inVentiv Health
  • Senior Software Engineer, Kano

Employability

The programme offers a range of transferable skills and networking opportunities. No matter whether your career plan looks towards the public or private sector, we can help you build a portfolio of skills and contacts that will give your CV the edge. Highlights of the programme include:

  • the chance to develop practical media skills, including audio production
  • learning to write for different audiences
  • developing your skills in both practical and theoretical science communication, including working in a major London museum
  • to meet and network with policy makers.

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

There is no UK academic department quite like UCL Science & Technology Studies. The department combines award-winning teaching with award-winning public engagement.

We are research active over an enormous range of topics. Our teaching builds on research not only in our subject specialties but also in the fundamentals of teaching and learning.

Our programme makes unique use of London’s attractions and resources. We have close links with the Science Museum, the National Maritime Museum, the Natural History Museum, the Wellcome Library, and UCL Museums & Collections. We also use the city as a classroom, with custom-made walking tours, site visits, and special excursions.



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Be part of a lively popular music research community that embraces everything from metal music to film scores with the opportunity to work alongside performers… Read more
Be part of a lively popular music research community that embraces everything from metal music to film scores with the opportunity to work alongside performers, composers and studio experts.This course is about the here and now - you will study everything from folk to jazz, right through to rock, hip-hop and dance, developing your knowledge of contemporary popular music.You'll join peers from backgrounds in cultural studies, sociology, music and the creative arts to explore today's local live music scene and its connection to the wider national and international industry. From getting out into the Leeds area and conducting ethnographic research into local gigs and events, to composing scores for film and television, you'll discover how a wide variety of communities fuse together to create what is recognised as a vibrant and expanding scene.Whether it's developing your music editing techniques in our studios, or organising events and liaising with artists at Leeds Festival, you'll gain the hands-on experience employers are looking for, gathering evidence for your major research project.This course is the perfect springboard to make contacts, help you discover the interconnectivity of popular music and culture, and really engage with a vibrant and varied scene which covers everything from metal right through to country.

Visit the website http://courses.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/popularmusicandculture_ma

Mature Applicants

Our University welcomes applications from mature applicants who demonstrate academic potential. We usually require some evidence of recent academic study, for example completion of an access course, however recent relevant work experience may also be considered. Please note that for some of our professional courses all applicants will need to meet the specified entry criteria and in these cases work experience cannot be considered in lieu.

If you wish to apply through this route you should refer to our University Recognition of Prior Learning policy that is available on our website (http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/studenthub/recognition-of-prior-learning.htm).

Please note that all applicants to our University are required to meet our standard English language requirement of GCSE grade C or equivalent, variations to this will be listed on the individual course entry requirements.

Careers

With more festivals and independent producers and artists than ever before, the need for live music and industry professionals has soared.

Employment opportunities could be open to you in sound engineering, performance, teaching, song writing, production, music for film and television, music journalism, marketing and PR, and events organisation.

Alternatively you may wish to further your research by studying for a PhD.

- Performer
- Songwriter
- Sound Technician
- Events Organiser

Careers advice: The dedicated Jobs and Careers team offers expert advice and a host of resources to help you choose and gain employment. Whether you're in your first or final year, you can speak to members of staff from our Careers Office who can offer you advice from writing a CV to searching for jobs.

Visit the careers site - https://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/employability/jobs-careers-support.htm

Course Benefits

As well as having access to modern, professional music studios, you'll benefit from being taught by a highly skilled and experienced teaching team, including Professor Karl Spracklen who is Secretary of the International Society for Metal Music Studies and the Editor of Metal Music Studies. You'll also have the chance to network with industry professionals during our guest lecture series. Previous speakers have included Leeds Festival boss Melvin Benn and chart-toppers Rudimental. We also have fantastic links with local and national music, arts and festival organisations, which help ensure you get the most from your course.

Core Modules

Popular Music as Leisure & Culture
Examine the importance of popular music as a form of leisure and culture. You will explore music subcultures through sociology, cultural geography, cultural studies and leisure theory.

Researching Popular Music & Culture
Develop an understanding of the strategies used in the study of popular music and culture, drawing on advanced approaches from sociology, musicology, cultural studies, ethnography, leisure and other relevant areas.

Popular Music Analysis
Examine performance, record production, video and reception and the meaning of music for your small scale, individual research project which focuses on the analysis of popular music artefacts.

Popular Music in Contemporary Culture
Engage in debate and discussion of how, where and why certain strands of musical productivity and creativity remain constantly part of the vocabulary of popular music.

Final Individual Project
Combine your learning into a significant piece of work, the nature of which will be determined by yourself and the course team.

Option Modules

Studio Production Skills
Produce a series of sound design projects and create your own systems for the purpose of manipulating/processing sound which will demonstrate your understanding of the concepts behind the tools used for sound design.

Creative Music Production
Develop a broad understanding of the creative possibilities of the studio environment by investigating a range of theoretical, technical, and creative approaches to the production process.

Music Industries in Context
Develop a range of theoretical perspectives drawing on contemporary research into the ecology of the music industries and how different stakeholders across the music sector work together.

Music Industries in Practice
Investigate a host of contemporary issues affecting the practice of operating in the music industries, focusing on one key area determined by your own interests.

Facilities

- Library
Our libraries are two of the only university libraries in the UK open 24/7 every day of the year. However you like to study, the libraries have got you covered with group study, silent study, extensive e-learning resources and PC suites.

- Broadcasting Place
Broadcasting Place provides students with creative and contemporary learning environments, is packed with the latest technology and is a focal point for new and innovative thinking in the city.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/postgraduate/how-to-apply/

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