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Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Gender and Culture at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Gender and Culture at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

The MA in Gender and Culture offers an innovative interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary approach to the study of Gender and Culture.

Key Features of MA in Gender and Culture

This is an interdisciplinary MA scheme in Gender and Culture taught by Gender specialists across the Arts and Humanities – in the subject areas of Development Studies, Political and Cultural Studies, English Literature, Egyptology, European Languages, History, Media Studies, and Political and Cultural Studies.

If you are interested in gender and gender relations in politics, literature, culture, and history, like engaging in discussion and intellectual argument, and are excited about the idea of working within and across different subject areas, this MA in Gender and Culture is ideal for you.

The MA Gender and Culture examines the production, reproduction and transformation of gender in culture and society.

The Gender and Culture degree is supported by the research activity of GENCAS, the Centre for Research into Gender in Culture and Society in the College of Arts and Humanities. The College of Arts and Humanities has a Graduate Centre. The Graduate Centre fosters and supports individual and collaborative research activity of international excellence and offers a vibrant and supportive environment for students pursuing postgraduate research and taught masters study. The Centre provides postgraduate training to enhance academic and professional development and facilitates participation in seminar programmes, workshops and international conferences.

The full-time Gender and Culture course comprises three modules taken in each academic semester (a total of six modules) and then a dissertation over the summer. In part one, students study three compulsory modules and three optional modules. In part two, students are required to write the dissertation component which draws on issues and themes developed throughout the year.

Part-time study is available for the Gender and Culture programme.

Gender and Culture Programme Aims

To develop independent thinking and writing. You devise your own essay projects in consultation with a gender specialist - this combines the benefits of expert guidance with the rewards of shaping an intellectual project for yourself. To sharpen and develop your skills and take them to a new level by providing the chance for original thinking and intellectual freedom in writing the ‘dissertation’ element, where you complete your own research project.

Modules

Modules on the Gender and Culture programme include:

• Women and Politics
• Civil Society and International Development
• Critical Security Studies
• Rights-Based Approaches to Development
• War, Technology and Culture
• Approaches to IR
• Violence, Conflict & Development
• Governance, Globalization and Neoliberal Political Economy
• Human Rights and Humanitarian Intervention
• The Policy Making Process
• State of Africa
• Politics in Contemporary Britain
• War in Space
• Politics and Public Policy in the New Wales
• Postcolonialism, Orientalism and Eurocentrism
• War, Identity and Society
• Approaches to Political Theory
• International Security in the Asia Pacific
• Gender Trouble: the Medieval Anchorite, and Issues of Wombs and Tombs
• Women Writers of the 1940’s
• Women Writing India
• ‘The Great Pretender’: Masculinity in Contemporary Women’s Fiction
• ‘The Unsex’d Females’: Women Writers and the French Revolution
• British Women’s Fiction 1918-1939
• Contemporary Women’s Writing
• Angela Carter
• Gender in Contemporary European Culture
• Literature in Social Context
• Women and Gender in Ancient Egypt
• Nature’s Stepchildren: European Medicine and Sexual Dissidents, 1869-1939
• The making of Modern Sexualities, 1650-1800

Who should Apply?

Students interested in Gender and Culture from a Classics and Ancient History, English, European Languages, History, Media Studies, and Political and Cultural Studies or related background. Professionals interested in the challenge of digital studying Gender and Culture. Students interested in preparation for postgraduate research, MPhil or PhD, or who wish to develop skills and knowledge related to gender and culture.

Career Prospects

Career expectations are excellent for Gender and Culture graduates. Our graduates are employed in diverse and dynamic vocations such as education, business, law and finance, marketing, sales and advertising; commercial, industrial and public sectors; media and PR; creative and professional writing; social and welfare professions; heritage and tourism; government and politics; foreign affairs and diplomatic corps; humanitarian organisations and some go on to study a PhD.

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Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Gender and Culture at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Gender and Culture at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

Key Features of MA in Gender and Culture

This is an interdisciplinary MA scheme in Gender and Culture taught by Gender specialists across the Arts and Humanities – in the subject areas of Development Studies, Political and Cultural Studies, English Literature, Egyptology, European Languages, History, Media Studies, and Political and Cultural Studies.

If you are interested in gender and gender relations in politics, literature, culture, and history, like engaging in discussion and intellectual argument, and are excited about the idea of working within and across different subject areas, this MA in Gender and Culture is ideal for you.

The MA Gender and Culture examines the production, reproduction and transformation of gender in culture and society.

The Gender and Culture degree is supported by the research activity of GENCAS, the Centre for Research into Gender in Culture and Society in the College of Arts and Humanities. The College of Arts and Humanities has a Graduate Centre. The Graduate Centre fosters and supports individual and collaborative research activity of international excellence and offers a vibrant and supportive environment for students pursuing postgraduate research and taught masters study. The Centre provides postgraduate training to enhance academic and professional development and facilitates participation in seminar programmes, workshops and international conferences.

The full-time Gender and Culture course comprises three modules taken in each academic semester (a total of six modules) and then a dissertation over the summer. In part one, students study three compulsory modules and three optional modules. In part two, students are required to write the dissertation component which draws on issues and themes developed throughout the year.

Part-time study is available for the Gender and Culture programme.

The Extended MA (EMA) in Gender and Culture is a 240-credit postgraduate qualification that is equivalent to 120 ECTS (European Credit Transfer System) and is thus a recognised Masters qualification throughout the European Union. The EMA is a standard UK MA plus an additional 60 credits (30 ECTS) and this additional coursework is undertaken in one semester at a partner institution overseas. The EMA is therefore not only an EU recognised postgraduate qualification it also adds a study abroad experience thus enhancing the qualification’s employability credentials.

The partner institution for EMA Gender and Culture is the University of Regensburg. Founded in 1962, Regensburg is a renowned international centre of teaching and research. Although it has over 21,000 thousand students, the university offers a broad range of disciplines of study, as well as having excellent infrastructure and a favourable staff-student ratio. Regensburg is also active in research, with six special research areas supported by the German Research Society and a strong presence in German- and EU-funded research initiatives. The university has a significant international presence, offering exchange links with more than 200 European institutions and 45 overseas universities. Students will have access to the complete range of services and facilities offered at the university, along with inclusion in the many academic and social activities that take place. Located right in the heart of the old town of Regensburg, a UNESCO World Heritage Site, the university is situated in the centre of a culturally and socially rich area with over 2000 years of history.

Gender and Culture Programme Aims

To develop independent thinking and writing. You devise your own essay projects in consultation with a gender specialist - this combines the benefits of expert guidance with the rewards of shaping an intellectual project for yourself. To sharpen and develop your skills and take them to a new level by providing the chance for original thinking and intellectual freedom in writing the ‘dissertation’ element, where you complete your own research project.

Modules

Modules on the Gender and Culture programme include:

• Women and Politics
• Civil Society and International Development
• Critical Security Studies
• Rights-Based Approaches to Development
• War, Technology and Culture
• Approaches to IR
• Violence, Conflict & Development
• Governance, Globalization and Neoliberal Political Economy
• Human Rights and Humanitarian Intervention
• The Policy Making Process
• State of Africa
• Politics in Contemporary Britain
• War in Space
• Politics and Public Policy in the New Wales
• Postcolonialism, Orientalism and Eurocentrism
• War, Identity and Society
• Approaches to Political Theory
• International Security in the Asia Pacific
• Gender Trouble: the Medieval Anchorite, and Issues of Wombs and Tombs
• Women Writers of the 1940’s
• Women Writing India
• ‘The Great Pretender’: Masculinity in Contemporary Women’s Fiction
• ‘The Unsex’d Females’: Women Writers and the French Revolution
• British Women’s Fiction 1918-1939
• Contemporary Women’s Writing
• Angela Carter
• Gender in Contemporary European Culture
• Literature in Social Context
• Women and Gender in Ancient Egypt
• Nature’s Stepchildren: European Medicine and Sexual Dissidents, 1869-1939
• The making of Modern Sexualities, 1650-1800

Who should Apply?

Students interested in Gender and Culture from a Classics and Ancient History, English, European Languages, History, Media Studies, and Political and Cultural Studies or related background. Professionals interested in the challenge of digital studying Gender and Culture. Students interested in preparation for postgraduate research, MPhil or PhD, or who wish to develop skills and knowledge related to gender and culture.

Career Prospects

Career expectations are excellent for Gender and Culture graduates. Our graduates are employed in diverse and dynamic vocations such as education, business, law and finance, marketing, sales and advertising; commercial, industrial and public sectors; media and PR; creative and professional writing; social and welfare professions; heritage and tourism; government and politics; foreign affairs and diplomatic corps; humanitarian organisations and some go on to study a PhD.

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This course give you a unique opportunity to explore the many forms of digital culture and their profound effects on society from a number of different angles. Read more
This course give you a unique opportunity to explore the many forms of digital culture and their profound effects on society from a number of different angles. It aims to develop participants' skills in forming their own assessments of digital technologies and their impact on society and culture.

Graduates of this programme will have gained the analytical tools required to understand how digitisation and internet technologies have shaped and are shaping modern culture.

Key Benefits

- Develop an understanding of the role and consequences of digital technologies in contemporary culture, broadly interpreted to include such areas of activity as performing arts, telecommunications, information technology, philosophy, law and education.

- Study digital technologies within an interdisciplinary and cross-cultural framework, combining modules from participating departments.

- Obtain on-the-job training in a month long internship within a relevant organisation.

- Take field trips to major London cultural institutions, such as Tate Modern, National Gallery, Institute of Archaeology and the BBC Archives.

Visit the website: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/digital-culture-and-society-ma.aspx

Course detail

- Description -

The central focus of the programme is the interrelatedness of technology and culture in contemporary society. The principle educational aims are to develop and enhance participants’ awareness and understanding of a range of subjects relevant to digital culture and technology, including:

- The key information and communication technologies that shape contemporary society.
- The key developments in contemporary cultural expression, specifically as these are driven, mediated or influenced by digital technologies.
- The role of digital technologies in the study of culture and cultural artefacts from the past.
- How digital technologies are shaping society more generally, e.g. social intercourse, social structures, government, international politics, education and law.
- The current critical and theoretical debates around digital culture and the role of technology in cultural life.
- The ethical, moral and philosophical issues that arise from the role and impact of technology in cultural and social life.

- Course purpose -

The aim of the MA Digital Culture & Society programme is to develop participants’ understanding of the role and consequences of digital technologies in contemporary culture, broadly interpreted to include such areas of activity as performing arts, telecommunications, information technology, philosophy, law and education. The programme is conceived as fundamentally interdisciplinary, drawing for its teaching on four academic Schools: Arts and Humanities; Law; Physical Sciences and Engineering; and Social Science & Public Policy. It is aimed at a diverse range of participants, offering technological insights to those with non-technical backgrounds, and cultural perspectives to those who have not thought about digital culture in a systematic way.

- Course format and assessment -

The programme consists of a compulsory core module (40 credits), optional modules (which consider aspects of the core module in greater detail) to the value of 80 credits, and a supervised research project (dissertation worth 60 credits). The taught core and optional modules are assessed by coursework and/or examination. One of the optional modules offered is an internship (20 credits) in an organisation relevant to digital culture.

Career Prospects:

Advanced research degree; cultural heritage institutions - libraries, archives, museums, galleries - either as early stage training or as professional development; commercial organisations interested in the social and organisational impact of technology.

How to apply: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/taught-courses.aspx

About Postgraduate Study at King’s College London:

To study for a postgraduate degree at King’s College London is to study at the city’s most central university and at one of the top 21 universities worldwide (2016/17 QS World University Rankings). Graduates will benefit from close connections with the UK’s professional, political, legal, commercial, scientific and cultural life, while the excellent reputation of our MA and MRes programmes ensures our postgraduate alumni are highly sought after by some of the world’s most prestigious employers. We provide graduates with skills that are highly valued in business, government, academia and the professions.

Scholarships & Funding:

All current PGT offer-holders and new PGT applicants are welcome to apply for the scholarships. For more information and to learn how to apply visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/pg/funding/sources

Free language tuition with the Modern Language Centre:

If you are studying for any postgraduate taught degree at King’s you can take a module from a choice of over 25 languages without any additional cost. Visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/mlc

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The MA in Digital Media is unique in its combination of practical and theoretical approaches to contemporary media and technology- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-digital-media-technology-cultural-form/. Read more
The MA in Digital Media is unique in its combination of practical and theoretical approaches to contemporary media and technology- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-digital-media-technology-cultural-form/

The established and exciting degree is designed to help you understand digital transformations in media, culture and society and apply this understanding in practice, in the media and creative industries and in further research. You will be equipped with skills that can be applied to current and future developments in digital media, social media, computing and other aspects of technology.

The MA in Digital Media educates aspiring media practitioners and academics as well as early and mid-career professionals who seek to reflect on their roles in a structured and stimulating learning environment designed to give all students up-to-the-minute knowledge of digital media and the skills to apply that knowledge to future developments.

The MA offers two pathways:

-Pathway 1 is a theory programme where you learn about developments in digital media and technology from a wide range of perspectives

-Pathway 2 is a theory and practice programme where you improve your skills, understanding and experience in one of the following areas:

Documentary
Image making
Journalism
Writing

Acclaimed academics and practitioners

Benefit from the experience and expertise of one of the world’s leading media and communications departments. You'll be taught by theorists and practitioners of international standing: Sarah Kember, Joanna Zylinska, Graham Young, Tony Dowmunt, Angela Phillips, Julian Henriques and David Morley.

Work placements and internships

The MA in Digital Media regularly attracts offers of work placements and internships. Recently these have come from Google, The Science Museum and N1creative.com.

Facilities

Our students have access to state-of-the-art facilities including well-equipped lecture and seminar rooms, exhibition spaces, computer facilities and digital media suites.

The department is also currently host to the renowned philosopher of media and technology, Bernard Stiegler and students will have access to his modulein Media Philosophy as well as priority access to the innovative and popular option After New Media. Designed to complement the MA in Digital Media, this course provides a framework for thinking about the current media environment as well as future forms of human and computer interaction.

An established record

The MA in Digital Media has been redefining media theory and practice since 2004. Our students become proficient in:

the history, sociology and philosophy of digital media
the application of critical conceptual skills to specialist areas and future forms of media
multimedia skills in image making (photography, video, animation, graphic art) script writing, journalism and documentary
MA Digital Media students have access the pioneering option ‘After New Media’, a non-assessed online module which explores the themes of self mediation, ethical mediation and intelligent mediation, and develops a framework for thinking about 'life' after new media. As befits a course of this kind we will be combining media, and exploring their pedagogic potential – uniting digital-online technologies with more traditional teaching formats, such as reading groups, seminars and an end of year symposium.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Dr Sarah Kember.

Modules & Structure

The programme consists of:

Two compulsory core modules
Pathway 1 - between two and four option modules (worth 60 credits) OR
Pathway 2 - a two-term practice block (worth 30 credits) and either one or two option modules (worth 30 credits)
The dissertation or the practice/theory project

Assessment

Seen take-home paper; essays; dissertation or practice/theory project and other production work in the area of documentary, image-making, journalism or fiction.

Programme overview

This is an exciting programme which offers a critical, contextual and practical approach to digital media and technology. It problematises approaches to the 'new' media in academic and professional debate, especially those which overemphasise the potential for radical social change led by a homogenised technology itself.

The programme is defined by its resistance to technological determinism and its insistence on the importance of addressing the social and historical contexts within which a range of media technologies are employed. In order to provide a contextual framework and facilitate the conceptualisation of digital media and technologies as fully cultural forms and processes, the programme will draw on a range of disciplines including: media and cultural studies, sociology, anthropology and philosophy. However, the programme will remain focused on key contemporary concerns about the potential role of digital media in society and on refiguring the contours of the 'new' media debate.

The programme offers two pathways. Pathway 1 addresses central theoretical and conceptual concerns relating to digital media. Pathway 2 combines theoretical analysis and practical work, offering students the opportunity to explore new media theories and concepts in practice. Pathway 2 is primarily aimed at students who already have some experience in one of the areas on offer: documentary; digital photography and image making; journalism; writing. It is meant to appeal to media industry professionals who are keen to reflect critically on their practice within a structured learning environment, graduates of practice-based courses but also those who have gained their practical experience in documentary; digital photography and image making; journalism or writing in informal settings.

Programme structure

The first compulsory core course is Digital Media - critical perspectives and this is taught in a small workshop format in the Autumn term. This course functions as a foundation for the second core course and offers students a map of the key debates in digital media. The course is taught in ten two hour workshop sessions and is supported by the provision of one-to-one tutorials.

The second compulsory core course is Technology and Cultural Form - debates, models, dialogues and this develops questions of technology, power, politics and subjectivity which were introduced in the first core course. The first part of this course highlights the key conceptual concerns of a contextualised approach to digital media plus the relevant debates and models formulated by key figures in the field. The second part of this course aims to generate a dialogue between theoreticians and practitioners around some of the most intellectually stimulating, contentious and contemporary ideas in the field without necessarily seeking a resolution. This course is taught in ten two hour workshop sessions during the Spring term and is supported by the weekly provision of one-to-one tutorials.

Students are required to take options from the lists provided by the Media and Communications, Anthropology, Comparative Literature and Sociology Departments as well as the Centre for Cultural Studies. Examples might include: After New Media, Nature and Culture, Cultural Theory, Globalisation, Risk and Control, Embodiment and Experience, Political Communications. Options are taught primarily through lectures and seminars and take place in the Autumn or Spring terms.

Each student's option profile is discussed with the programme convenor in order to ensure that the balance of subject-specific topics is appropriate for the individual concerned. Option courses are taught primarily through lectures, seminars and tutorials and take place in the Autumn or Spring terms.

All students are required to produce either a 12,000 word dissertation on a topic agreed by the student and supervisor or a practice/theory project in the area of documentary, photography and image making, journalism or fiction. The length of the practical element is dependent on the media and the form used and will be agreed in advance with the supervisor. It will, however, be comparable with practical projects undertaken in practice MA programmes in the relevant field. Students undertaking the practice/theory project will also be expected to submit a 3-4000 word analysis of their practice which locates it within the theoretical debates explored in the MA as a whole. This essay may be presented as a separate document or as an integral part of the project depending on the nature of the project and by a agreement with both theory and practice supervisors.

Programme outcomes

The programme's subject specific learning outcomes require students to analyse and contextualise developments in digital media and technology with reference to key debates in the history, sociology, anthropology and philosophy of the media. Students who opt for the practice/theory pathway will also be required to produce material of publishable or broadcast standard and to evaluate the ways in which theoretical and practical insights intersect. All students will develop a wide range of transferable qualities and skills necessary for employment in related or unrelated areas. These are described by the Quality Assurance Agency as: 'the exercise of initiative and personal responsibility, decision-making in complex and unpredictable situations, and the independent learning ability required for continuing professional development'.

By the end of the programme students will be able to:

-Map and critically evaluate key debates in the field of new media
-Analyse and contextualise current and future developments in digital media and technology
-Evaluate and articulate key historical, sociological, anthropological and philosophical approaches to the study of digital media and technology
-Demonstrate in-depth knowledge of at least four differing areas of inquiry
-Demonstrate an advanced level of conceptual knowledge and (where relevant) practical skill appropriate for a sustained piece of work in the field
-Prepare and deliver clearly argued and informed work
-Locate, retrieve and present relevant information for a specific project
-Manage a complex array of competing demands and work effectively to a deadline
-Work resourcefully and independently
-Think critically and/or work practically within a given context

Skills

We provide graduates with skills that are cutting edge: in the critical analysis and/or creative production of digital media; in the disciplinary knowledge and conceptual frameworks necessary for current and future forms of media and technology; in the awareness of how digital media and technologies are re-shaping society from the ways we communicate (through social media and web 2.0) to the increasingly ‘smart’ environments in which we live.

Careers

Our programme provides a theory and practice pathway and prepares students for work in the following areas:

-media and creative industries; advertising, marketing and PR (graduates of the MA Digital Media have found work with Virgin Media, Google, the BBC and other leading organisations worldwide)
-research and academia (graduates from this programme have gone on to study for PhD degrees in higher education institutions around the world and also here with us)
-media production and new media art (graduates have exhibited, published and produced work in photography, journalism, TV, documentary, film and multimedia)

Graduate Ekaterina discusses her career:

"I work for a company, called Visual DNA, which already sounds like life happening After New Media. The company is the largest data provider in Europe and is totally multinational. We actually try to analyse human visual DNA, you memories, feelings, thoughts about the future, anticipations, etc by creating personality quizzes where instead of verbal answers we tend to use images.

My role is as Creative Developer. It involves working with images from concept to finding/shooting and post-production. My qualifications perfectly matched what they’ve been looking for, Digital Media rocks!

My tip for the new-to-be-graduates is this: physically go to places and companies and talk to people. It really opens up loads of possibilities, and when I tell someone where I’ve graduated from they look impressed, and there is some sort of respect coming from them."

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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This programme is unique in teaching the collective history of science, medicine, environment and technology. It is also unique as it offers modules that combine imperial, ethical, and military history with general areas of history of science and medicine. Read more
This programme is unique in teaching the collective history of science, medicine, environment and technology. It is also unique as it offers modules that combine imperial, ethical, and military history with general areas of history of science and medicine.

You learn from experts working in these diverse fields, being taught how different societies, cultures, and races have conceptualised disease, reacted to changes in environment and created different technological artefacts and scientific knowledge. You are introduced to the major and recent historiographical and methodological approaches, become familiar with the main archives in the UK and encouraged to approach the history of medicine, science, environment and technology from past as well as contemporary concerns.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/83/history-of-science-medicine-environment-and-technology

About the School of History

The School of History at the University of Kent offers a great environment in which to research and study. Situated in a beautiful cathedral city with its own dynamic history, the University is within easy reach of the main London archives and is convenient for travelling to mainland Europe.

The School of History is a lively, research-led department where postgraduate students are given the opportunity to work alongside academics recognised as experts in their respective fields. The School was placed eighth nationally for research intensity in the most recent Research Excellence Framework, and consistently scores highly in the National Student Survey.

There is a good community spirit within the School, which includes regular postgraduate social meetings, weekly seminars and a comprehensive training programme with the full involvement of the School’s academic staff. Thanks to the wide range of teaching and research interests in the School, we can offer equally wide scope for research supervision covering British, European, African and American history.

At present, there are particularly strong groupings of research students in medieval and early modern cultural and social history, early modern religious history, the history and cultural studies of science and medicine, the medicine, the history of propaganda, military history, war and the media, and the history of Kent.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

HI878 - Methods and Interpretations of Historical Research (30 credits)
HI866 - Science and Medicine in Context (30 credits)
HI817 - Deformed, Deranged and Deviant (30 credits)
HI827 - Home Front Britain, 1914-18 (30 credits)
HI857 - Geiger Counter at Ground Zero: Explorations of Nuclear America (30 credits)
HI881 - Museums, Material Culture and the History of Science (30 credits)
HI883 - Work Placement (30 credits)

Assessment

All courses are assessed by coursework, and the dissertation counts for half the final grade (comprising one third assessed preparation, two thirds actual dissertation).

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- place the study of texts, images and documentaries in their historical contexts, at the centre of student learning and analysis

- ensure that students of the history of science, medicine, environment and technology acquire a comprehensive knowledge and understanding of the historical modes of theory and analysis

- enable you to understand and use concepts, approaches and methods of the history of science, medicine, environment and technology in different academic contexts and develop an understanding of the differing and contested aspects between, and within, the relevant disciplines

- develop your capacities to think critically about past events and experiences

- encourage you to relate the academic study of the history of science, medicine, environment and technology to questions of public debate and concern

- promote a curriculum supported by scholarship, staff development and a research culture that promotes breadth and depth of intellectual enquiry and debate

- assist you to develop cognitive and transferable skills relevant to your vocational and personal development.

Study support

Postgraduate resources
The resources for historical research at Kent are led by the University’s Templeman Library: a designated European Documentation Centre which holds specialised collections on slavery and antislavery, and on medical science. The Library has a substantial collection of secondary materials to back-up an excellent collection of primary sources including the British Cartoon Archive, newspapers, a large audio-visual library, and a complete set of British Second World War Ministry of Information propaganda pamphlets.

The School has a dedicated Centre for the Study of Propaganda and War, which has a distinctive archive of written, audio and visual propaganda materials, particularly in film, video and DVD. Locally, you have access to: the Canterbury Cathedral Library and Archive (a major collection for the study of medieval and early modern religious and social history); the Centre for Kentish Studies at Maidstone; and the National Maritime Collection at Greenwich. Kent is also within easy reach of the country’s premier research collections in London and the national libraries in Paris and Brussels.

Dynamic publishing culture
Staff publish regularly and widely in journals, conference proceedings and books. Among others, they have recently contributed to: Journal of Contemporary History; English Historical Review; British Journal for the History of Science; Technology and Culture; and War and Society.

Global Skills Award
All students registered for a taught Master's programme are eligible to apply for a place on our Global Skills Award Programme (http://www.kent.ac.uk/graduateschool/skills/programmes/gsa.html). The programme is designed to broaden your understanding of global issues and current affairs as well as to develop personal skills which will enhance your employability

Research areas

Medieval and early modern history
Covering c400–c1500, incorporating such themes as Anglo-Saxon England, early-modern France, palaeography, British and European politics and society, religion and papacy.

Modern history
Covering c1500–present, incorporating such themes as modern British, European and American history, British military history, and 20th-century conflict and propaganda.

History of science, technology and medicine
Incorporating such themes as colonial science and medicine, Nazi medicine, eugenics, science and technology in 19th-century Britain.

Careers

As the job market becomes increasingly competitive, postgraduate qualifications are becoming more attractive to employers seeking individuals who have finely tuned skills and abilities, which our programmes encourage you to hone. As a result of the valuable transferable skills developed during your course of study, career prospects for history graduates are wide ranging. Our graduates go on to a variety of careers, from research within the government to teaching, politics to records management and journalism, to working within museums and galleries – to name but a few.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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Imaginative, original and full of exciting ideas - if this sounds like you, then our MSc in Creative Technology could be your perfect course. Read more
Imaginative, original and full of exciting ideas - if this sounds like you, then our MSc in Creative Technology could be your perfect course. It's open to students from any background who are interested in combining technical and creative skills to create the technologies and experiences of the future. We'll give you the opportunity to learn about and experiment with different types of technology and use them to design and develop your own inventions.


Why study MA/MSc Creative Technology at Middlesex?

Technology is becoming increasingly important to art, design and culture and the skills associated with the once-separate creative and technical worlds overlap more and more. We welcome students from any background onto this course– it's an unusual opportunity for students with diverse skills to work together, and it's this variety that gives it so much character.

This is a highly practical course, assessed entirely through project work, with an emphasis on collaboration and experimentation. We want you to benefit from our creative, academic and technical expertise, and we like nothing more than to see you step out of your comfort zone and tackle something new. You'll work with your peers on group projects – recent students have made an interactive cushion, explored Kinect hacking, created apps and designed an interactive breakfast table that showed the news.

Never mind thinking outside the box – you'll be inventing 1,001 new things to do with it.

Course highlights

- All our staff are active in research, industry or both and are passionate about new technology and new ways to use it. Particular areas of expertise include music and sound technology, social media, interactive and haptic technology, visual and digital imagery and gaming.
- Our tutors, who come from both the School of Media and Performing Arts and the School of Science and Technology, include haptic technology specialist Dr Rui Loureiro, who has pioneered work in robot-aided stroke rehabilitation; Debbie Jedwab, a former set designer for the BBC; composer and sound artist Nye Parry, who has worked with the British Museum and the Science Museum; and multimedia artist Nic Sandiland, whose work has been shown worldwide.
- You'll also benefit from the cutting-edge facilities and equipment in our £80 million Art, Design and Media building, the equal of which is rarely seen in other UK universities. They include fully-equipped TV, radio and sound studios, workshops for digital image processing and a comprehensive digital publishing suite.
- You'll learn computer programming as part of the course, and will have access to cutting edge haptic technology and a graphics and games programming laboratory. The university is home to the Human Interactive Systems Laboratory, a centre of research into haptic technology, and the Lansdown Centre for Electronic Arts.
- As well as attending masterclasses and guest lectures by industry professionals, students often work on real industry briefs – they've recently worked with Sony and designer and engineer Moritz Waldemeyer. We've developed the course in consultation with advisors from the creative industries to ensure it's relevant and current.

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This programme has been designed to provide postgraduate education for current or future practitioners engaged in education, training or business practice relevant to Technology Enhanced Learning. Read more
This programme has been designed to provide postgraduate education for current or future practitioners engaged in education, training or business practice relevant to Technology Enhanced Learning.

Course Overview

The programme will be delivered online and will be available to anyone who meets the entry requirements and is professionally engaged in learning support, teaching or training practice. It is highly relevant for professional practitioners who work in learning in a university or college, in business training, public sector services or for people considering moving into one of these areas.

The programme provides theory and practice through experience of a range of learning technologies. It enables learners to explore the processes of designing and implementing technology-enhanced learning and issues concerning the practicalities of professional practice in their own context.

Learners will also develop their academic research skills as postgraduate learners. Learners will participate with other EU and non-EU professionals and with their tutors through a range of innovative online communication technologies. The programme aims to capitalise on a collaborative community of practitioners sharing the diversity of their experiences.

The first year of this three year programme is funded for successful applicants in working in vocational education and training in UK, Cyprus, Greece, Bulgaria and Sweden through the EU Lifelong Learning Programme.

Modules

PART 1
-Designing for Technology Enhanced Learning (30 credits)
-Implementing Technology Enhanced Learning (30 credits)
-Identity, Communities and Networks (30 credits)
-The Practitioner as Researcher (30 credits)

Within part 1 of the programme students undertaking the Postgraduate Diploma or MA must take all part 1 modules. Students who are undertaking a Postgraduate Certificate must take Designing for Technology Enhanced Learning and Implementing Technology Enhanced Learning.

PART 2
-Students undertaking the MA Technology Enhanced Learning take the 60 credit Dissertation module.

Key Features

63% of survey respondents from both the public and private sectors say that technological innovation will have a major influence on teaching methodologies over the next five years and that it will become a core differentiator in attracting students and corporate partners (Economist, 2008).

Technology led learning is continuing to grow at a phenomenal rate and the market for eLearning has exceed $52.6 billion in 2010 (Cegos, 2009). Cegos (2009) indicate the development of professional qualifications to meet the personnel demands of this “star” industry are lagging demand.

As an increasingly preferred approach for delivering training and education (Cedefop, 2010) the HE sector is now responding to the need for qualifications and learning demands of this fast changing sector. This MA Technology Enhanced Learning course is an online programme that is intended to attract a global student body.

Knowledge and understanding is achieved through learning activities that emphasise students’ engagement with research-led resources and dialogue and with each other and their tutor. Resources are made available electronically from a range of different sources including: e-books, electronic journal articles, videos, images, numerical data, voice recordings, transcripts, web applications and web documents, available through the University’s Virtual Learning Environment.

Assessment

The assessment scheme is designed to enable students to demonstrate individually that they have met the aims of the programmes and achieved the learning outcomes at the standard required for the MA. Assessment will also be used to provide feedback to students so as to assist in subsequent learning.

The assessment will enable theory to inform practice, with students demonstrating intellectual rigor and reflecting critically on their own experiences of using technology for learning. The overall assessment package is developed out of an inter-dependent learning culture. The assessment strategy aims to make use of the benefits to be gained from sharing practice in multiple contexts.

Career Opportunities

The MA Technology Enhanced Learning programme combines a theoretical approach with practical skills relevant for the teaching and training sectors and promotes an understanding of key concepts from an applied perspective. Graduates from the programme will have developed transferable employability skills such as research, problem solving, data interpretation and critical thinking as well as gaining the knowledge and practical skills applicable to the sector.

Graduates of the programme are likely to find employment within universities, vocational colleges, HRM departments, training companies and be employed as course managers, lecturers, teachers, instructional designers, authors, TEL Directors, information specialists or media design.

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This course covers the history of science, technology and medicine, integrating the study of these areas and addressing big historical and policy questions. Read more
This course covers the history of science, technology and medicine, integrating the study of these areas and addressing big historical and policy questions. Students are introduced to general themes and approaches to this field in a team-taught, programme-specific module which explores the development of science, technology and medicine and its implications for history in general.

Key benefits

- Programme incorporates a distinctive approach to history, integrating the study of science, technology and medicine and being particularly concerned with addressing big historical and policy questions.

- Led by staff from the Department of History, ranked 5th in the UK for Research Quality (REF 2014), including those former members of Imperial College Centre for the History of Science, Technology and Medicine (CHoSTM), and at the fore of innovation and excellence in the history of science, technology and medicine.

- The central London location offers students unrivalled access to world-class museums, collections, archives and libraries as well as easy access to resources in Europe.

- Vibrant research culture, including seminars and conferences at which students are encouraged to participate and give papers.

Visit the website: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/science-technology-and-medicine-in-history-ma.aspx

Course detail

- Description -

The programme provides teaching and research training at the postgraduate level in the history of science, technology and medicine (HSTM). It includes training in the research skills necessary for those who wish to go on to study for a PhD in the field, but is also designed for students who wish simply to study at the postgraduate level. Students are introduced to general themes and approaches to HSTM in a team-taught, programme-specific compulsory module. This explores the development of STM, its implications for history in general, and the historiographical and methodological issues that arise in studying it. Optional modules offer in-depth training in particular aspects of HSTM in different periods and places, with the opportunity to use primary sources where appropriate.

- Course purpose -

Provides a distinctive programme suitable both for those intending to proceed to a PhD and also for those who wish to study the history of science, technology and medicine at an advanced level. Encourages a distinctive approach to history, integrating the study of science, technology and medicine and being particularly concerned with addressing big historical and policy questions.

- Course format and assessment -

Full-time study: 4-8 hours of taught classes per week.

Part-time study: 2-6 hours of taught classes per week.

The taught compulsory and optional modules are assessed by coursework and/or take-home examination. The compulsory 15,000 word dissertation enables students to research a topic of their choice, working one-to-one with an academic supervisor.

Career Prospects:

Leads to further research or careers in teaching, archives, the media, finance, politics and heritage industries.

How to apply: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/taught-courses.aspx

About Postgraduate Study at King’s College London:

To study for a postgraduate degree at King’s College London is to study at the city’s most central university and at one of the top 21 universities worldwide (2016/17 QS World University Rankings). Graduates will benefit from close connections with the UK’s professional, political, legal, commercial, scientific and cultural life, while the excellent reputation of our MA and MRes programmes ensures our postgraduate alumni are highly sought after by some of the world’s most prestigious employers. We provide graduates with skills that are highly valued in business, government, academia and the professions.

Scholarships & Funding:

All current PGT offer-holders and new PGT applicants are welcome to apply for the scholarships. For more information and to learn how to apply visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/pg/funding/sources

Free language tuition with the Modern Language Centre:

If you are studying for any postgraduate taught degree at King’s you can take a module from a choice of over 25 languages without any additional cost. Visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/mlc

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Artists doing strange things with technology. This sums up our MADtech Programme. To imagine, interpret and change human interaction with a transforming world you will use and artistically explore different technologies. Read more
Artists doing strange things with technology. This sums up our MADtech Programme. To imagine, interpret and change human interaction with a transforming world you will use and artistically explore different technologies. You will do so with a tinker mentality: play and experimentation are important aspects in your development and will carry a special emphasis on the research you do. This mentality, combined with a critical reflective attitude and conceptual skills, will lead to unexpected perspectives, resulting in multimedia artistic work.

The Frank Mohr Institute at the Minerva Art Academy offers two international Masters of Arts:
-MA Painting
-MA MADtech (Media, Art, Design & Technology)*, each consisting of a two-year curriculum.


Past, present and future

At MA MADtech we are constantly searching for the dialogue between different viewpoints from the past, present and future: between art and science, laboratory and applied research, stable and unstable media, old and new technology, local and global forms of society. We do so collectively, sharing our views and ideas, working in groups and learning from each other. At the same time, you will follow your own path, improving your knowledge and skills, learning to reflect critically on your own position, role and work as well as on the world around you.

Hybrid practice

Participants of our programme come from different practices, media, art and design, and share a fascination for technology. The combination of these areas gives you the opportunity to develop your artistic vision, working in a hybrid practice as a critical and engaged artist. As your art engages with the world, you will grow as an individual as well as in your artistic profession, reinforcing the power of your imagination and exploring your own connection to a transforming, technologically charged society.

Art & Research

MADtech is all about combining art and technology, creating hybrid forms of art, using traditional as well as brand new, unexpected means, content and media. Experimentation, tinkering and playing are vital methods for developing your work, backed up by thorough reflection. Artistic technology research is therefore a major part of the master programme. You will take part in collaborative artistic research projects, exploring the possibilities and limitations of transdisciplinary and transmedial situations in contemporary culture. This will help you to understand the links between aesthetics, technology, materiality, thinking and politics.

Enriching your work and ideas

You enter this programme with your own research topic. You will develop and refine these ideas during your first year, enriching your ideas through the knowledge and skills that you will gain, the experiments that you will carry out and the collaboration that you'll encounter. The second year is almost entirely devoted to your graduation work and artistic research, leading to your master thesis. During your time with us you will be part of a community where education, research and the artistic practice meet and reinforce each other.

Hybrid Arts Lab

For most of your work, research and lectures you will go to our building on the Praediniussingel. There you will find our Hybrid Arts Lab, also called HAL 24/7.
It includes an artistic technology research lab, seminar, project, lecture and exhibition rooms, media and photography studios, common workplaces, common kitchen and individual studios. You also have access to your studio 24 hours a day, seven days a week. At HAL we provide plenty of facilities, which you can use, technologically and otherwise as well as sufficient technical support. If you require more complex, technological facilities, you are welcome to make use of the Hanze facilities at the Institute of Engineering in Assen.

Expert meetings, artist's talks and exhibitions

You can attend interesting expert meetings, artist's talks and exhibitions, for instance by lectors of the Centre of Applied Research and Innovation Art & Society. During the 'Energize Festival' an international workshop called 'Recycling Electronics' took place here. Another interesting example is the expert meeting concerning photography research in cross-disciplinary and cross-cultural artistic practices, which involved current students and alumni. Every year, the course Research & Development/New Media Art Practices organises different collaborative projects and workshops, for example, with CREW Immersive Media and Blast Theory.

Centre of Applied Research and Innovation Art & Society

The Art & Society research centre of the Hanze University of Applied Sciences Groningen covers the practice based research of Minerva Art Academy. The Art & Society research centre consists of three research groups: Lifelong Learning in Music, Image in Context and Popular Culture, and Sustainability & Innovation.

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This unique Masters Degree Course is delivered by the Griffith Innopharma Faculty of Science and blends the subjects of pharmaceutical technology and business. Read more
This unique Masters Degree Course is delivered by the Griffith Innopharma Faculty of Science and blends the subjects of pharmaceutical technology and business.

Why Study Pharmaceutical Business and Technology at Griffith College?

The MSc in Pharmaceutical Business and Technology is conducted over three thought semesters plus one additional semester to complete the dissertation.

The blended learning programme is delivered through evening class room learning supported by live online broadcasts and weekend group work and tutorials. The course will focus on core competencies such as pharmaceutical processes and production, pharmaceutical business introduction & technology transfer, emerging trends, operational excellence (Lean & Six Sigma), regulatory affairs, data analytics, strategic thinking and leadership development.

• Gain priceless practical experience within an ever-expanding industry
• Develop your professional skills to enhance career opportunities through the development of CVs, interview skills, and networking, presentation and communication skills.
• All classes are broadcast live online offering the learners the opportunity to either physically attend or join the class online.
• Extensive coaching and mentoring workshops will be provided with a specific focus on individual assessment and improvement.
• Part-time learning allows students already working in the area extra time to hone skills.

Course Structure

This two-stage programme is delivered two evenings per week and two Saturdays per month.

Stage 1: A three-semester taught programme in Pharmaceutical Business & Technology (60 ETCS Credits) leading cumulatively to a Postgraduate Diploma in Science in Pharmaceutical Business & Technology.

Stage 2: A one-semester dissertation stage leading to an MSc of Science in Pharmaceutical Business & Technology (30 ETCS Credits).

Modules:

• Process, Production & Pharmaceutical Quality
• 21st Century Dynamics & Emerging Trends
• Regulatory Landscape of Pharmaceutical Business
• Clinical Research Management
• Pharmaceutical Technology Transfer
• Strategy, Leadership & the Culture of Innovation
• Operational Excellence & the Science of Innovation
• Research Methods
• Dissertation

Timetables

Part Time Offering:
This two-stage programme is delivered 2 evenings per week (in class or online ) and 2 Saturdays per month.

Full Time / International Offering:
Four days per week on campus

Springboard Offering:
A PGDip in Pharmaceutical Business and Technology is currently available to those who meet Springboard eligibility requirements.

Career Progression

Potential Roles for graduates of this course include:

• R & D Product Management
• Production/ Supervisory Management
• Quality/ Regulatory Affairs Roles
• Supply Chain Roles
• Project Management
• Process Improvement roles

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Our aim is to develop teachers whose vision, imagination and professionalism takes them beyond the realities of current educational policy, and encourage them to continually seek to evolve new and better models of practice- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pgce/secondary-design-technology/. Read more
Our aim is to develop teachers whose vision, imagination and professionalism takes them beyond the realities of current educational policy, and encourage them to continually seek to evolve new and better models of practice- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pgce/secondary-design-technology/

Goldsmiths' Department of Design runs the PGCE (Secondary) in Design & Technology. The curriculum includes working with resistant materials (product design), systems and control (electronics, CAD/CAM), textiles, and food technology. What unifies these is the subject of Design, and the development of designing competence.

This programme is aimed at preparing you to teach in two broad areas.

You’ll be given the opportunity to specialise in one area to Key Stage 3 (age 11-14), and another to Key Stage 4 and beyond (age 14+). Key Stage 3 specialist fields are Materials; Textiles; Electronics and Communications Technology; and Food. The two Key Stage 4 specialist fields are Materials and Textiles.

Through an integrated course that involves both a practical and theoretical approach, you’ll be encouraged to reach your potential as a fully qualified teacher.

School Direct

It is also possible to study this course via our School Direct programme. Please visit our School Direct page to see which schools offer this subject.

Additional costs

As well as the PGCE fees, you will have to cover your travel costs to your school placements.

We produce reading packs electronically and in hard copy format. There’s a small charge for the hard copy reading packs. You may also be asked to contribute towards trips and some materials for your modules.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Alan Bright.

Structure

College-based work
There are seminars examining the nature of Design and Technology education, and workshops designed to develop your subject expertise. By the end of the programme you must offer a second area of competence to teach to the end of Key Stage 3, as well as your specialist area at Key Stages 4 and 5.

You engage in two design activities: one in the first term, and the second throughout the year.

The first activity is mirrored by the same project being undertaken by Year 9 pupils in a local school, and culminates in a shared presentation.

The second activity culminates in a presentation of a personal design-and-make project to your peers, to consider and reflect on the nature of the process of designing.

School-based work

During the Autumn Term you are placed in your first school, usually with a partner Design and Technology student teacher. The aim is induction, both into schooling and the teaching of design and technology, and into learning and teaching practices.

You do this by:

-observing teachers working and pupils participating in learning activities
-learning about whole school policies and practices
-studying the Design and Technology curriculum at Key Stages 3 and 4 (examinations)
-progressively taking on teaching activities, initially in tandem with the class teacher
-Spring and Summer terms are devoted to teaching practice in a second school, developing your competence to meet the Professional Standards.

You design a scheme of work for the Key Stage 3 curriculum, and develop your understanding of pupil learning styles, National Curriculum requirements, assessment and examinations.

Department

Design

Study in a department that's been ranked 1st in the UK for this subject.

Through design, we'll encourage you to bring about change, propose new visions of the future, and engage with sustainability. And we'll prepare you to become a teacher whose vision and imagination can inspire the next generation of young designers.

Design at Goldsmiths is ranked:

1st in the UK (The Guardian University Guide 2016)
12th in the world (QS World University Rankings by subject 2015)
We’ve also been ranked by LinkedIn as one of the top graduate universities for designers, because so many of our graduates go on to find jobs in the industry.

Educational Studies

We have been training teachers since 1904, and have established a reputation for excellence in this field

We see education as a window through which to view the world, and as something with the power to define who we are and how we live

As a department we’re interested in seeing what education can tell us about the social, political and economic forces of our times. And what these forces mean for the everyday lives of individuals and groups.

We place a strong emphasis on active and collaborative learning, and we'll train you to become a reflective and socially conscious teacher.

Teaching placements

We have partnerships with many London schools, offering you the chance to gain teaching practice in socially mixed, multi-ethnic urban classrooms.

Support

We offer a high level of support through a system of school and personal tutoring.

Research

Staff in the department carry out world-leading research – we're ranked 8th in the UK for the quality of this research.**

**Research Excellence Framework 2014, Times Higher Education research intensity subject rankings

It delves into areas including culture and identity, gender, multilingualism, and youth cultures, and why we maintain a commitment to social justice and inclusion.

Learning & Teaching

A range of teaching methods are employed across the PGCE programmes, including:

• Taught subject sessions
• Taught General Professional Study sessions
• Practical workshops
• Core lectures
• Group tutorials/seminars
• Individual tutorials
• Individual and group presentations
• Supported self-study

As with the other PGCE courses, you’ll be given the opportunity to work with children in a wide range of contexts. These might include focused interventions with individuals or groups, or larger scale events for the community.

How to apply

You apply for this PGCE through the UCAS Teacher Training website. Our institution code is G56 GOLD.

Please take a look at the information on applying, including the specific qualifications or experience you need for this course.

There's no closing date for primary or secondary applications, but we advise you to apply early to avoid disappointment.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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This MA provides a broad based training in social science approaches to the analysis of material and visual media. Read more
This MA provides a broad based training in social science approaches to the analysis of material and visual media: ranging from art, photography, film and media within visual anthropology, to consumption, museum anthropology and cultural heritage, landscape and genres (such as clothing and the built environment), within material culture.

Degree information

The programme covers a range of contexts such as production, exchange and consumption, and uses anthropological perspectives based on the comparative study of societies, historically and culturally. Skills training is given in social anthropological field research and analysis, and in specific methods for the study of material and visual forms.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of one core module (45 credits), three optional modules (45 credits) and a research dissertation (90 credits).

Core modules
-Critical Issues

Optional modules - the following is a selection of possible option modules:
-Anthropology and Photography
-Advanced Topics in Digital Culture: Ethnographies of the Digital
-Documentary Film and the Anthropological Eye
-Anthropology of Art and Design
-Social Construction of Landscape
-Transforming and Creating the World
-Anthropology of the Built Environment
-Mass Consumption and Design
-Risk, Power and Uncertainty
-Anthropologies of Religion
-Issues in Power and Culture

Dissertation/report
All MA students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a 15,000-word dissertation.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, group presentations and discussion, tutorials, independent directed reading, interactive teamwork, laboratory and practical work, video, film and web based courses. There will also be visits to museums, galleries and other relevant sites. Assessment is through coursework, unseen examination and the dissertation.

Careers

The programme can lead to careers in a wide range of areas such as architecture, media, commerce and aspects of development work where an emphasis on the material and visual environment is central.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Senior Curator, Frifthdi School of Art, Design and Technology
-Research Executive, Basis Research
-Web Designer, Elena Boykova Sirakova
-MSc Anthropology, Københavns Universitet (University of Copenhagen)
-Associate Director, DA and Company

Employability
The programme is designed as an advanced research degree providing exposure to a vanguard and creative field within anthropology and related disciplines. Students learn how to apply ethnographic theory and methodology in material and visual culture to a wide range of case studies highlighting material culture in the wider world - ranging from art, through photography, clothing, consumption, cultural memory, monuments and the built environment.

The degree can lead to further doctoral research or careers in a wide range of areas such as architecture, media, museums, business and aspects of development work where an emphasis on the material and visual environment is central.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL Anthropology is the world's leading centre for the study of material and visual culture. We publish the Journal of Material Culture and several relevant book series, and have nine specialist staff in this field.

The department is one of the largest anthropology departments in the UK. Our excellent results in the 2008 Research Assessment Exercises and 2014 Research Excellence Framework show that we are the leading broad-based anthropology department in the UK.

Students are encouraged to take full advantage of the wider anthropological community in London and the department's strong links with European universities and international institutions.

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Taught at our Parkgate Road Campus in Chester, the MA in Nineteenth-Century Literature and Culture explores the dynamic relationship between literary texts of the long 19th century (1789-1914) and the fascinating culture from which they emerged. Read more
Taught at our Parkgate Road Campus in Chester, the MA in Nineteenth-Century Literature and Culture explores the dynamic relationship between literary texts of the long 19th century (1789-1914) and the fascinating culture from which they emerged.

Why Study Nineteenth-Century Literature and Culture with us?

The Department of English, housed in a Grade II-listed Vicarage designed by John Douglas, in a University founded in 1839 and officially opened by Gladstone in 1842, has longstanding teaching and research strengths in 19th-century literature.

Our course is taught by a dedicated and experienced team of tutors with expertise in a wide range of areas, including Romantic poetry; the Sensation novel; detective fiction; the Gothic; and 19th-century Irish, American and South African literature. Our research publications include work on Shelley, Coleridge, the Brontës, Dickens, Collins, Eliot, travel literature, women and material culture, the Victorian periodical press, literature of the Great Famine, colonialism, Neo-Victorian literature, and representations of the body.

What will I learn?

The course offers a wide-ranging exploration of the representation of ideas such as revolution, crime, the body, gender, performance, domestic life, religious belief, nationality, empire, science, technology, and medicine, in 19th-century literature and culture.

Authors studied may include Austen, Shelley, Dickens, Gaskell, Alcott, Conan Doyle, Zola, Wells, and Conrad. You will also have the opportunity to develop your own research interests and expertise through the Research Methods module and your Dissertation.

ow will I be taught?

Nineteenth-Century Literature, Nineteenth-Century Culture, Research Methods, and Special Author(s)/Topic(s) will be taught by seminars (typically nine seminars per 20-credit module, and 18 per 40-credit module). For the Dissertation, you will work one-to-one with a supervisor.

Total workload (including reading, preparation, seminars, tutorials, research, and writing) is approximately 37.5 hours per week.

How will I be assessed?

Modules are assessed by coursework, including essays, research portfolios, presentations, and a 16,000-word Dissertation. There are no formal exams.

Postgraduate Visit Opportunities

If you are interested in this courses we have a number of opportunities to visit us and our campuses. To find out more about these options and to book a visit, please go to: https://www1.chester.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/postgraduate-visit-opportunities

Request a Prospectus

If you would like to know more about the University please request a prospectus at: http://prospectus.chester.ac.uk/form.php

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Be part of a lively popular music research community that embraces everything from metal music to film scores with the opportunity to work alongside performers… Read more
Be part of a lively popular music research community that embraces everything from metal music to film scores with the opportunity to work alongside performers, composers and studio experts.This course is about the here and now - you will study everything from folk to jazz, right through to rock, hip-hop and dance, developing your knowledge of contemporary popular music.You'll join peers from backgrounds in cultural studies, sociology, music and the creative arts to explore today's local live music scene and its connection to the wider national and international industry. From getting out into the Leeds area and conducting ethnographic research into local gigs and events, to composing scores for film and television, you'll discover how a wide variety of communities fuse together to create what is recognised as a vibrant and expanding scene.Whether it's developing your music editing techniques in our studios, or organising events and liaising with artists at Leeds Festival, you'll gain the hands-on experience employers are looking for, gathering evidence for your major research project.This course is the perfect springboard to make contacts, help you discover the interconnectivity of popular music and culture, and really engage with a vibrant and varied scene which covers everything from metal right through to country.

Visit the website http://courses.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/popularmusicandculture_ma

Mature Applicants

Our University welcomes applications from mature applicants who demonstrate academic potential. We usually require some evidence of recent academic study, for example completion of an access course, however recent relevant work experience may also be considered. Please note that for some of our professional courses all applicants will need to meet the specified entry criteria and in these cases work experience cannot be considered in lieu.

If you wish to apply through this route you should refer to our University Recognition of Prior Learning policy that is available on our website (http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/studenthub/recognition-of-prior-learning.htm).

Please note that all applicants to our University are required to meet our standard English language requirement of GCSE grade C or equivalent, variations to this will be listed on the individual course entry requirements.

Careers

With more festivals and independent producers and artists than ever before, the need for live music and industry professionals has soared.

Employment opportunities could be open to you in sound engineering, performance, teaching, song writing, production, music for film and television, music journalism, marketing and PR, and events organisation.

Alternatively you may wish to further your research by studying for a PhD.

- Performer
- Songwriter
- Sound Technician
- Events Organiser

Careers advice: The dedicated Jobs and Careers team offers expert advice and a host of resources to help you choose and gain employment. Whether you're in your first or final year, you can speak to members of staff from our Careers Office who can offer you advice from writing a CV to searching for jobs.

Visit the careers site - https://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/employability/jobs-careers-support.htm

Course Benefits

As well as having access to modern, professional music studios, you'll benefit from being taught by a highly skilled and experienced teaching team, including Professor Karl Spracklen who is Secretary of the International Society for Metal Music Studies and the Editor of Metal Music Studies. You'll also have the chance to network with industry professionals during our guest lecture series. Previous speakers have included Leeds Festival boss Melvin Benn and chart-toppers Rudimental. We also have fantastic links with local and national music, arts and festival organisations, which help ensure you get the most from your course.

Core Modules

Popular Music as Leisure & Culture
Examine the importance of popular music as a form of leisure and culture. You will explore music subcultures through sociology, cultural geography, cultural studies and leisure theory.

Researching Popular Music & Culture
Develop an understanding of the strategies used in the study of popular music and culture, drawing on advanced approaches from sociology, musicology, cultural studies, ethnography, leisure and other relevant areas.

Popular Music Analysis
Examine performance, record production, video and reception and the meaning of music for your small scale, individual research project which focuses on the analysis of popular music artefacts.

Popular Music in Contemporary Culture
Engage in debate and discussion of how, where and why certain strands of musical productivity and creativity remain constantly part of the vocabulary of popular music.

Final Individual Project
Combine your learning into a significant piece of work, the nature of which will be determined by yourself and the course team.

Option Modules

Studio Production Skills
Produce a series of sound design projects and create your own systems for the purpose of manipulating/processing sound which will demonstrate your understanding of the concepts behind the tools used for sound design.

Creative Music Production
Develop a broad understanding of the creative possibilities of the studio environment by investigating a range of theoretical, technical, and creative approaches to the production process.

Music Industries in Context
Develop a range of theoretical perspectives drawing on contemporary research into the ecology of the music industries and how different stakeholders across the music sector work together.

Music Industries in Practice
Investigate a host of contemporary issues affecting the practice of operating in the music industries, focusing on one key area determined by your own interests.

Facilities

- Library
Our libraries are two of the only university libraries in the UK open 24/7 every day of the year. However you like to study, the libraries have got you covered with group study, silent study, extensive e-learning resources and PC suites.

- Broadcasting Place
Broadcasting Place provides students with creative and contemporary learning environments, is packed with the latest technology and is a focal point for new and innovative thinking in the city.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/postgraduate/how-to-apply/

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The MBA (Digital Technology Management) is a flagship qualification designed to meet the needs and aspirations of early career individuals through the combination of a general management education with the specialist area of Technology Management. Read more
The MBA (Digital Technology Management) is a flagship qualification designed to meet the needs and aspirations of early career individuals through the combination of a general management education with the specialist area of Technology Management.

It is designed for individuals who want to develop their leadership and management skills along with their interest in Technology Management and for those seeking fast track career progression opportunities.

This postgraduate degree aims to enhance your professional prospects by developing your capability to apply the latest thinking relating to organisational development and change in the competitive global context.

Successful completion of the MBA (Digital Technology Management) highlights your potential to have a real impact on the transformation of the organisation you join.

Our courses are designed to be engaging, attractive and flexible in the current global marketplace. There are six entry points through the year. This allows you to start when it is most suitable. The entry points are:

• September
• November
• January
• March
• June
• July

Your course takes place over three semesters. Depending upon when you join the course, this will determine the order of units which you will study. You will benefit by beginning your studies with others who started at one of the earlier points of entry.

Visit the website: https://www.beds.ac.uk/howtoapply/courses/postgraduate/next-year/business-administration-digital-technology-management

Course detail

The course adopts a practical and applied business curriculum and aims to develop an advanced knowledge of organisations and their effective management in the dynamic competitive global context.

We will enable you to creatively apply this knowledge and understanding to complex issues to systematically and innovatively enhance strategic business and management practice.

This offers a challenging learning opportunity to encourage the integration of theory and practice supported by experienced academics with substantial management experience.

Through practice events you will work with academics and professors of practice on live consultancy projects with leading employers in organisations across private, public and not-for-profit sectors to support your personal and professional development as a creative and innovative leader with the knowledge and skills needed in the global, knowledge-based economy.

You will develop the attributes and skills expected of post-graduates confirmed by partner industry bodies including the Chartered Management Institute and the Confederation of British Industry, including team-working, negotiation skills, leadership, confidence and the ability to apply critical and creative thinking to complex and unclear problems to develop innovative solutions.

Modules

• Leading and Managing Organisational Resources
• Strategy and the Global
• Competitive Environment
• Digital Technology Management
• Project Management
• Management Practice
• Theory into Practice Project

Assessment

Assessments are rooted in real life and practical workplace scenarios to enable learning to be transferred to the workplace. Later assessments allow for greater integration and synthesis. Exams are kept to a minimum as the focus is on practical skills such as report writing, presentation and projects.

A range of assessment methods are used throughout the course for you to demonstrate your knowledge and skills, including:

• Individual written reports that allow you to apply theory to case studies for in-depth analysis
• Business Reports that allow you to demonstrate contextual insight and report professionally on practice
• Project Plans that requires you to use your knowledge and skills of project management
• Seminar Papers that allow progressive development of critical analysis skills
• Project Reports that integrate learning throughout the course applied in practice
• Business simulation where you demonstrate the impact of your strategic decision making

Careers

The successful completion of your MBA provides a strong foundation for your professional prospects with potential to join an employer in a variety of positions and potential for fast track career progression opportunities.

The course has been designed to develop graduates who are able to:

• Apply contemporary approaches to strategic management and leadership in complex organisations to systematically and creatively evolve the business, while understanding real life challenges and uncertainties.

• Inspire collaboration and synergistic team work by managing relationships, sharing skills and experience and objective consideration and evaluation of alternative perspectives, in contributing to professional, ethical and innovative practice.

• Synthesise a range of information in the context of new situations using informed judgment to develop innovative approaches to organisational challenges and opportunities.

You will be in a good position to demonstrate your potential to employers. Recruiters value the skills to work in a team, the ability to continue to learn, analytical abilities and a broad understanding of management.

Whatever you decide to do, the successful completion of your MBA should have laid a strong foundation for you to become a positive change agent in any organisation and an obvious champion for the added value of a dynamic and innovative organisational culture.
You will also have had extensive and continuous opportunity for reflective and critical evaluation of your capability as a team worker and leader.

As part of a large and multi-cultural learning community, you should gain a valuable network of friends and contacts for the future. Our MBA Alumni organisation will help you keep in touch with your MBA contacts.

Further study

It is anticipated that you will enter employment after this course and the applied nature of the programme reflects that expectation. Later study options might include more specialist study as you develop your own functional focus or a DBA.

The tutors will always be there as a source of advice and help should you want to progress your development further.
Successful completion of the MBA also provides the foundation for progression to further study and research and many students continue to work towards the Doctor of Philosophy (PhD).

Funding

For information on available funding, please follow the link: https://www.beds.ac.uk/howtoapply/money/scholarships/pg

How to apply

For information on how to apply, please follow the link: https://www.beds.ac.uk/howtoapply/course/applicationform

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