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Masters Degrees (Culture Industry)

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Our MA in Culture Industry will allow you to explore the interface between contemporary economics and culture, from the scale of a start-up or artwork to that of governmental policy, a city, or the global marketplace.- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-culture-industry/. Read more
Our MA in Culture Industry will allow you to explore the interface between contemporary economics and culture, from the scale of a start-up or artwork to that of governmental policy, a city, or the global marketplace.- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-culture-industry/

Taking full advantage of the UK’s leading role in the creative industries, and London’s status as a world city, this course creates opportunities for you to:

do placements
make projects
go on field trips
meet leading creative practitioners and theorists
This will give you first-hand experience of the fast moving creative economy.

Teaching team

A collaboration between the Department of Media and Communications and the Centre for Cultural Studies, the teaching team includes Professor Scott Lash, Professor Angela McRobbie, and Dr Josephine Berry.

Engage with the cultural sector

Within the accelerated climate of digital networks and globalisation, the forms and behaviour of culture are mutating, converting the workshop into the handheld device and the cinema and gallery into the bedroom. This course is aimed at creative practitioners, entrepreneurs and theorists wanting to experiment with these changes, and set them into a historically and discursively rich framework.

Through participant observation, critical theory, and playful experiment, the course will not just prepare you for a career in the cultural sector, but help you to engage with it imaginatively, critically and tactically.

Placements

Students on the Culture Industry MA have secured placements at the BBC, Stephen Graham Gallery, White Cube gallery, SHAPE Arts, Chinatown Oral History Project, Maximum Rock n Roll, the British Council, Black Dog Publishing, Resonance FM, Glasgow Biennale, London Architecture Week, Glastonbury Festival, London Film Festival, the British Museum, South Bank Centre, Grizedale Arts, the Japan Foundation, the London Anime and Gaming Con, and Sound and Music.

Students' projects

Our students’ projects are very diverse, and have included exhibitions, publications, websites, photographic projects, market stalls, travel guides, films, novels, app prototypes, ethnographies, and community resource projects.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Dr Josephine Berry.

Modules & Structure

Practices of the Culture Industry- 30 credits
Theories of the Culture Industry: work, creativity and precariousness- 30 credits
Minor Placements / Minor Projects- 30
Research Lab- tbc
MA in Culture Industry Major Placements / Major Projects / Dissertation- 60

Assessment

Essays; project report and documentation/placement report and documentation; research lab participation.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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The MSc in Cultural Studies and Entrepreneurship is a collaboration between the Department of Cultural Studies and the Nottingham University Business School. Read more
The MSc in Cultural Studies and Entrepreneurship is a collaboration between the Department of Cultural Studies and the Nottingham University Business School. Its aims are to provide students with a critical understanding of cultural studies, its principles and practices, and with the skills to explore various models for the development of creative enterprises. Students aquire an understanding of the importance of the culture industry and market analysis while developing an ability to carry out financial analysis of a cultural enterprise. They become fluent in the financial, marketing and managerial aspects of the culture industry and gain knowledge of leading edge culture industry fields. They come to appreciate the interrelationships that exist between fundamental research and its practical application, and acquire the critical, analytical, technological and business background to enable them to make a significant contribution to today's cultural and creative sector of the economy.

Course structure

The full-time MSc in Cultural Studies and Entrepreneurship lasts 12 months and is divided into two semesters, and a summer period, with students taking two modules per semester. A research project is then completed over the summer and submitted in September. Part-time students complete the programme within 24–36 months. The 120 credits of taught modules include the following:

Modules may include:
• Creative Problem Solving
• Cultural Studies: Theory and Practice
• Finance and Accounting
• Innovation Management
• Marketing for Entrepreneurs
• Project Management
• Research Methods
• Science, Technology, Arts and Business
• Working in the Culture Industry

All students are assigned personal tutors as well as dissertation tutors to guide them through their coursework. Information about staff research interests and publications can be found at http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/clas/Research/index.aspx

Teaching and assessment

Teaching for the MA programme takes place during the day but we do our best to accommodate the needs of part-time students. Taught modules are assessed by a 5,000-word assignment and students also submit a 20,000-word dissertation. There are no examinations.

Careers

Written coursework encourages the development of a wide range of analytical tools and transferable skills. The course also provides students with a high degree of awareness of the financial, marketing and managerial aspects of the culture industry, ¨preparing them for careers in the cultural and creative sectors of the economy.

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The MA in Book History and Publishing Culture is aimed at anyone interested in the history of the book and the publishing industry, from the introduction of the paperback to the advent of the ebook. Read more
The MA in Book History and Publishing Culture is aimed at anyone interested in the history of the book and the publishing industry, from the introduction of the paperback to the advent of the ebook. It draws on theories of print culture and book history to identify the ideological challenges to the culture of publishing and the ways in which contemporary practice has been shaped by social, economic and technological developments. The course is taught by specialists in the field and is closely linked to our renowned MA in Publishing. The core programme focuses on the theory and practice of authorship, textual production, dissemination and reception in the period 1870 to the present day.

In addition,you have the opportunity to take elective MA modules in Publishing, English and History, enabling the study of the interrelations between these disciplines.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/book-history-and-publishing-culture/

Why choose this course?

- The MA in Book History and Publishing Studies provides you with the academic skills and knowledge to extend your studies in this burgeoning and interdisciplinary field.

- This programme provides you with access to a specific selection of the vocationally oriented modules on the master's publishing programmes.

- The Oxford International Centre for Publishing Studies (within the School of Arts) at Oxford Brookes offers the largest range of postgraduate courses in publishing studies and print culture in Europe. We offer full-time and part-time courses with a variety of exit awards to suit your needs and career aspirations.

- Studying any of the publishing programmes at Oxford Brookes gives you excellent employment prospects, opportunities for extensive industry links and networking in the global publishing centre of Oxford, unrivalled access to work experience and international internships, and specialist careers advice including our Working in Publishing Day.

- You will be part of large faculty with a variety of research interests and extensive industry expertise which will provide you with comprehensive coverage of publishing, from mass market books to magazines; print and digital dissemination.

- You will have access to a wide range of visiting speakers from the publishing industry who regularly contribute to the programmes, and access to unique research resources and specialist publishing collections; The Book Prize Archive; André Deutsch Collection, African Publishing Collection; the Bodleian Library.

- You will have the opportunity to visit international book fairs including Frankfurt, London and Bologna, and to attend an international Summer School in Florence with students from Slovenia, Germany, Italy and France.

- There is an industry advisory board attached to the publishing courses with representatives from major publishers such as Bloomsbury, Faber, HarperCollins, Hodder and Random House. Additionally, we have links with publishing organisations such as the Independent Publishers Guild, OPuS (Oxford Publishing Society) and the Society of Young Publishers – regular events are held at Oxford Brookes.

Teaching and learning

We use a variety of teaching and learning methods across the course. Most modules use more than one learning and teaching method. This ensures that you are exposed to a range of different learning opportunities, which helps maintain your motivation and interest.

Some of the key teaching methods we use are:
- lectures designed to provide students with the foundation knowledge and a framework for study that will enable them to achieve the learning outcomes for the module

- seminars and workshops designed to encourage students to engage in discussion with tutors and peers to test their understanding and ability to apply ideas, to develop their transferable skills and to encourage deeper learning

- field trips to book fairs, libraries and publishing archives to enable students to undertake research in print culture and publishing history

- individual supervision in support of self-directed outcomes for dissertations or major projects

- resource-based learning materials in several of our modules and virtual learning environment to support student learning through Computer Assisted Assessment and Computer Assisted Learning.

Approach to assessment

Assessment for the programme is by written course work. The assignments include researched essays, project work and the opportunity to contribute to an online journal.

Specialist facilities

Students on the course have access to the Bodleian Library and archives of local publishers, including the Oxford University Press, for research. The library at Oxford Brookes has an extensive collection of texts and journals about publishing, as well as a special collection on publishing in Africa. It also houses the Booker Archive and the André Deutsch Archive.

Field trips

A place on the tutor-led field trip to Frankfurt Book Fair which is held in October is available for applicants who have accepted their place by mid-July. The Bologna Book Fair, which occurs in the spring is also tutor-led with arranged interviews with publishers, but students organise their own flights and accommodation. The London Book Fair, also held in the spring, offers students volunteer opportunities in addition to meetings with publishers and access to many of the seminars that are held during the fair.
Attendance pattern
Attendance at lectures and seminars varies with your chosen modules. In most cases, you will have at least two days in the week without formal tutor contact hours. These times are emphasised here because you can use this time for work experience with local publishers and with fellow students in group work as preparation for presentations and reports.

How this course helps you develop

Academic writing and research skills are honed to a high level during this programme. In the second semester, assessment for the compulsory module involves contribution of a research article for an online journal. Students are also involved in the academic editing and design of the journal which is available to the public. This practice enables student to demonstrate excellence in archival and secondary research activities.

Careers

The course provides excellent prospects for students interested in further academic study in the interdisciplinary fields of media, publishing studies, cultural production and book history. In addition, students go on to work in academic publishing and are equipped to succeed in editorial positions in publishing.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

Research highlights

The Oxford International Centre for Publishing Studies (OICPS) is one of the leading centres for publishing education in the world. Our staff and students contribute to a vibrant research environment that is interdisciplinary in emphasis and international in scope. We focus on areas such as book consumption and the life cycle of books, book trade and publishing history (especially 18th-21st centuries), museum publishing, serials publications, pedagogy and publishing education, and the future of the industry. Members of staff have published award-winning monographs, key pedagogical textbooks, and a range of scholarly articles and edited collections.

Students pursuing doctoral studies with us are investigating such topics as girls' magazines in the cultural and consumer marketplace, the future of university libraries, German publishing in the First World War, and marketing strategies for children’s literature in the Middle East. We also supervise students for the PhD by Publication. Most of our research students are based in Oxford, but a number work on their studies from a distance with regular contact in person and by email.

Research is supported by the resources of Oxford Brookes Library –especially its Special Collections featuring the Booker Archive, the Publishing in Africa Collection, the Rainbird Archive, and the Peter Stockham Collection of Children’s Books—as well as by other local and regional archives and university libraries.

OICPS carries out independent research and training with the international publishing industry. Recent research and consultancy clients include the British Council, Hewlett Packard, the Society of Experimental Biology and Sports Books.

If you have a topic relating to publishing that you would like to study at doctoral level, please contact us with a preliminary synopsis.

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MA Film & Television at Falmouth University reflects and interrogates the highly fluid nature of the contemporary screen media environment. Read more
MA Film & Television at Falmouth University reflects and interrogates the highly fluid nature of the contemporary screen media environment.

Our MA is distinguished from traditional courses in that it specifically addresses the diversity and crossover of today's film and television culture with the aim of producing adaptive thinkers and highly creative practitioners. Our academic focus engages and interrogates film and television's status in the 21st century, which is often defined in terms of the digital age and digital culture.

On the course you will be required to examine, interpret and contest the notion of digital culture historically, socially, politically and artistically through both your research and creative practice. You will interrogate the increasingly blurred boundaries between film and television, art and technology, production and consumption, with the outcome being a fracturing of traditional categorisations. We reflect an era in which screenwriters Aaron Sorkin (Newsroom, The West Wing) and Lena Dunham (Girls, Tiny Furniture) experiment with dialogue and narrative, while conceptual artists Sam Taylor-Wood (Nowhere Boy, Love You More) and Steve McQueen (12 Years a Slave, Shame) have shifted from the art gallery to the cinema. Directors such as Ben Wheatley (A Field in England, Sightseers) and companies such as Curzon and Film4 are making use of multi-platform release schedules, and brands including HBO, Amazon and Netflix are shaping the very nature of not only what, but how, we watch. MA Film & Television understands this fundamentally shifting zeitgeist.

In examining industrial structure and visual form you will theorise the shifting dynamics of an age where anyone with a phone and a laptop has the ability to record, edit and disseminate visual projects. Such 'democratisation' has arguably made both creative uniqueness and clear industry pathways less discernable, but has provided a new and fruitful framework for those who have the ideas, talent, dedication and adaptability to embrace such immense transitional potential. However, despite these multitudinous transformations attributed to digital culture, the ethos of our MA contends that fundamental skills remain the basis of both sound academic work and creative practice. Rather than being fearful of what is to come, or nostalgic for the past, this course gives you the confidence to look at film and television critically, and acquire cutting edge creative skills in order to produce intelligent, innovative and inspirational visual work.

Our philosophy is one of flexibility, so you'll shape the curriculum around your own interests, whether in theory, creative practice, or a combination of the two. Drawn from the fundamentals of history, theory and criticism, our theoretical strand develops tomorrow's cineastes, cultural commentators, journalists and academics. This also underpins our approach to practice. The most successful film and television makers are students of their chosen medium, highly knowledgeable of historical legacy and social-political context. You'll not only learn how to develop, write, produce, shoot, record, direct and edit well, but why, philosophically and creatively, your ideas are worth being made.

Visit the website https://www.falmouth.ac.uk/film-television-ma

How the course is taught

Our passion is reflected both in the teaching and research track record of our academics, our industry connections and visiting speakers, and the quality of our film and television professionals. Crossing disciplinary areas such as cultural studies, sociology, journalism, English, philosophy and, of course, film and television studies, our MA offers academically-minded students comprehensive supervision and guidance for moving onto PhD research.

Industry and academic links

We have a strong visiting lecturer programme with recent guests including critics Dr Mark Kermode, Professor Linda Ruth Williams and Dr Will Brooker. Our practice tutors are active writers, producers, directors, editors, sound designers and cinematographers who create substantive work across all screen media. We have a wide range of contacts and industry specialists who contribute to the course, including Tony Grisoni (writer of Southcliffe, Red Riding, and How I Live Now), Mary Burke (producer of For Those in Peril, Berberian Sound Studio and The Midnight Beast), and James Henry (writer for Campus and Green Wing).

Falmouth University also recently hosted the Channel 4 Talent Day and we are active in developing work placements and internships for our students. We have sent many of students to Warp Films and TwoFour since 2009, and regularly update our webpages with work experience opportunities and jobs. Our graduates have proceeded to further study and jobs across the film and television industry, for HBO, Sky, ITV, Disney and have worked on major feature films, most recently including About Time (Richard Curtis, 2013) The World's End (Edgar Wright, 2013), The Double (Richard Ayoade, 2014) and Disney's forthcoming Cinderella (Kenneth Branagh, 2015). Falmouth University's MA in Film & Television is for students who to place themselves at the cutting edge of screen culture.

Course outline

The course is divided into three semesters of 15 weeks. Each semester offers the fundamentals vital to every academic and practitioner, and elective choices so you can shape your own learning.

What you'll do

- Study block 1
Foundation
The first semester consists of three core units, offering a diverse entry point to all aspects of the study of film and television, and the interrelationship of theory and practice:

Theorising Contemporary Film & Television Culture (Theory)

In this module you will explore the theoretical conceptualisations of film and television in the context of contemporary academic thought and popular discourse around the concept of digital culture. We will start from a point of questioning the multi-layered and contested effects of digital culture on film and television as discrete forms. You will consider the interrelationship and fusion between media in terms of production, distribution and exhibition examining the advent of new forms of representation and interaction. But we will also look at how traditional notion of film and television are being preserved and even being popular as a reaction to the effects of the digital. The module will also assess and interrogate the economic and technological developments of a more integrated and interactive media environment in terms of the cross-pollination of form and content, and socio-cultural effects on contemporary audiences.

Film & Television Industry Case Study (Theory/Practice)

In this module you will explore the industrial parameters of contemporary film and television based around the experience and expertise of current professionals. The module will utilise the School of Film & Television's many industry links to bring in guest speakers from the BBC, Channel 4, Sky, TwoFour Broadcast, Warp Films, Sheffield Doc Fest, Cornwall Film Festival, Doc Heads, BFI, Pinewood Studios, Dogbite and EngineHouse VFX. You will then have an opportunity to question these professionals about their respective sectors as a basis for a case study. Alternatively, you can investigate the sector/practitioner of your own choosing, with tutor support. The module will also contain workshops on the fundamentals of creative industry research and methodology. The module is designed so that you learn both the challenges and values of networking, and researching specific job roles and industry backgrounds in order to effectively plot your own career trajectory.

Creative Practices (Practice)

This module will engage you in the production workflow, focusing on how creative, professional and technical roles shape a final film or television project. Your weekly seminars and workshops will guide you through pre-production, production and post-production processes, enabling you to devise, develop and produce a short filmed project as part of a small crew of four to six students. You will, therefore, develop your technical skills and production practices in order to devise and deploy modes of creative practice which may include, but are not limited to, research and development, screenwriting, production management, producing, directing, cinematography, lighting, editing and the recording and design of sound.

- Study block 2
Specialisms
The second semester gives you the opportunity to specialise, choosing from a ranging of theory, practice or combination modules. Assessment of combination modules is either through an academic essay or a practice project. Potential optional modules include:

- Cultural Studies to Digital Sociology (Theory/Practice)
- Screen Futures (Theory/Practice)
- Globalisation in Film & Television (Theory/Practice)
- Factual Film & Television (Theory/Practice)
- Screenwriting for Film & Television (Theory/Practice)
- Work Placement (Theory/Practice)

- Study block 3
Expertise
Depending on your chosen specialism, in the third semester you'll produce either:

- Dissertation (Theory)
- Film & Production Portfolio (Theory/Practice)
- Conceptual Project (Theory/Practice)

Facilities

The purpose-built film school facilities include:

- 116-seat cinema, with Christie M Series HD projection (as used in Vue cinemas) and 7.2 surround sound

- Equipment store with a range of Blackmagic, Red, Panasonic, JVC, GoPro, Canon DSLR and C100 cameras and lenses, jibs, tracks and dollies

- Digital production suites equipped with Final Draft (screenwriting), Movie Magic (production management) and a range of edit software, including Adobe Creative Cloud/Suite, Final Cut and AVID

- Avid Unity MediaNetwork Edit server

- Recording and sound edit studios equipped with Pro Tools audio editing and Foley traps

- 14x8m TV studio with three studio cameras, full gallery facility, Chromatte grey screen, blue/green screen and full lighting rig

- Centroid 3D (Pinewood-networked) Motion Capture studio/research lab

- Virtual Studio using the latest technology

- 23,500-title TV and film library

Experience you'll get

- Highly flexible, student-focused curriculum

- Mentoring with industry professionals

- Opportunities for placement and work experience

- Creative environment for collaboration

- Using industry-standard software

- A vibrant visiting speaker programme

- Student experience-centred ethos

Assessment

- Continuous assessment with no formal examinations
- Core theory based on written assignments
- Core practice assessed on visual project and accompanying portfolios
- Elective modules all with theory/practice options
- Dissertation and/or major project in final semester

Careers

- Research, teaching or postgraduate study in art/humanities subject areas

- All technical/creative roles linked with direction, production, cinematography, editing, sound, lighting; writing for the screen; film and television criticism; research for film and TV

- Film and TV marketing, distribution and sales – digital and social media content/distribution

- Film festival and arts curatorship – media-based project management

Find out how to apply here - https://www.falmouth.ac.uk/apply

Visiting Us

We hold open days throughout the year so you can meet current students and staff, view our campuses and facilities, and find out more about studying at Falmouth.

Find out more - https://www.falmouth.ac.uk/open-days

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This is the only degree which offers students the opportunity to specialise as a translation expert in audiovisual translation and in the translation of popular culture. Read more
This is the only degree which offers students the opportunity to specialise as a translation expert in audiovisual translation and in the translation of popular culture.

Who is it for?

This course is for you if you:
-Are interested in popular culture, films, TV, literature, comics or graphic novels
-Love languages, other cultures and their differences
-Are interested in translation and want to learn about systematic decision-making
-Know about translation and want to specialise
-Have an amateur or fan background in translation and want to become a professional
-Have studied foreign languages, linguistics, literature, media, film, theatre, drama or cultural studies.
-Are looking for a thorough grounding in the theory and practice of translation.
-Want to gain an insight into professional practice in audiovisual translation or in literary translation.

The course aims to make students fit for the market as properly trained and highly qualified translation experts.

Objectives

This course:
-Provides you with training in audiovisual translation techniques.
-Uses industry-standard software for subtitling, dubbing and voice over.
-Specialises in the translation of children’s literature; crime fiction; science fiction and fantasy; comics, graphic novels, manga and video games.
-Introduces you to the different conventions and styles associated with popular culture in its varied forms and genres.
-Focuses on the specifics of genre translation and how these shape translation decisions.
-Provides a theoretical framework for the practical application of translation, working with a wide range of source texts from different popular genres and media.

The course:
-Aims to give you a secure foundation in theoretical strategies underpinning and supporting the practice of translation.
-Develops your awareness of professional standards, norms and translational ethics.
-Works closely with professional translators and the translation industry helping you to develop a professional identity.
-Has optional modules in dubbing, translation project management, screenplay translation and publishing.

Placements

There are no course-based placements on this course. Literary translation does not offer placements, while audiovisual companies offer internships which are competitive.

We support and guide our students through the application process for audiovisual translation internships and have a very good record of achievement. Each year, several of our students win one of these very competitive internships and they tend to be offered full time work on completion.

The course is very industry-oriented and we work closely with the translation industry. Industry professionals teach on the course, supervise students or give guest seminars and lectures.

Academic staff have run Translation Development courses, for example in genre translation for professional translators for the Chartered Institute of Linguists, and they are involved in running Continuing Professional Development courses in specialised translation.

We run a preparatory, distance learning course for the professional Diploma in Translation examined by the Chartered Institute of Linguists. We organise a Literary Translation Summer School each July which is taught by professional, literary translators and with lectures by prestigious translators, academics or writers.

The Translation department runs the John Dryden Translation Competition for the British Comparative Literature Association. The competition is sponsored by the British Centre for Literary Translation and the Institut Français. We offer one internship per year in working on this Translation Competition, interacting with translators, translation judges, managing competition entries and learning about the judging process.

Teaching and learning

The course is taught by academics, industry professionals (for example, audiovisual translation project manager) and translation professionals (for example, award winning literary translators, experienced subtitlers).

Teaching is delivered in a combination of lectures, seminars, practical workshops and lab-based sessions for audiovisual translation. In workshop sessions students work individually, in pairs, group work or plenary forum in a multilingual and multicultural environment.

In all translation modules, there is also a translation project prepared in independent guided study under the supervision of a translation professional in the student’s language pair and language directionality. You can expect some on-line learning, supported by seminar sessions, and industry visits to audiovisual translation companies.

In the Translation project management module, students work in project groups performing real-life translation roles and tasks in a collaborative environment.

Assessment

Assessment is 100% coursework – there are no examinations.

Coursework assignments are a mixture of essays, translation projects, translation commentaries, subtitling and voice over files or project work. The dissertation is 12,000 to 15,000 words long and can either be a research project on any topic relevant to Audiovisual Translation or Popular Literary Translation / Culture or it can be practice oriented: a translation of an extended text or AV clip with critical introduction to and analysis of the translation.

Coursework assignments: 66.6% (120 credits)

Dissertation: 33.3% (60 credits)

Modules

There are five compulsory taught modules plus three elective taught modules, selected by the student from a pool of module choices, plus a dissertation which can be a research dissertation or a practice-oriented dissertation of an extended translation with critical introduction and analysis.

Each taught module is an estimated 150 hours of study. Teaching consists of lectures, seminars and workshops plus independent individually supervised work.

The first part of the translation modules is taught in three-hour sessions (lecture + seminar + practical workshop). In the second part of each translation module, students work on a translation project which is individually supervised by a translation professional who gives written feedback on drafts and provides tailored advice and guidance in individual supervision sessions.

Students can expect between ten and 12 hours of classroom-based study per week, plus time spent on preparatory reading, independent study and research, preparation of assignments.

The dissertation is 60 credits and an estimated 600 hours of study. There are four two-hour research method seminars guiding students through the process of writing a dissertation, plus individual supervision sessions.

All taught modules are in term 1 and term 2 (January – April). Term 3 is dedicated to the dissertation (and completion of assignments from term 2 modules).

Core modules
-Principles and practice of translation theory (15 credits)
-Translating children’s literature (15 credits)
-Subtitling (15 credits)
-Translating crime fiction (15 credits)
-Translating science fiction and fantasy (15 credits)

Elective modules - choose three:
-Principles of screenwriting and the translation of screenplays (15 credits)
-Creating and managing intellectual property (15 credits).
-Dubbing and voice over (15 credits)
-Translation project management (15 credits)
-Translating multimodal texts (comics, graphic novels, manga, video games) (15 credits)
-International publishing case studies (20 credits)

Dissertation - 60 credits
-Dissertation option A (discursive/research)
-Dissertation option B (extended translation with critical introduction and analysis)

Career prospects

The degree is designed to produce graduates who are fit for the market, either working in translation agencies / companies or as a freelancer, addressing the need for properly trained and highly qualified translation experts.

Career options come in a wide range of jobs in the translation industry, ranging from self-employed translator, staff translator or localisation expert to editor, researcher or project manager.

Recent graduate destinations include: video game testing and localisation at Testronic Laboratories; video game translation at Sega; Dubbing, subtitling and voice over at VSI London; translation at the World Health Organisation; project management at Maverick Advertising and Design and at Deluxe Media Europe; freelance translator creative and literary texts.

The degree also lays the foundation to continue to a research degree / doctoral study in any area of translation studies. Currently, graduates from the course are pursuing doctoral study at City, specialising in crime fiction translation.

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Our innovative MA in Film and Television builds on its prestigious heritage as the longest running degree programme of its kind in the UK. Read more
Our innovative MA in Film and Television builds on its prestigious heritage as the longest running degree programme of its kind in the UK. We aim to equip you with wide-ranging skills, knowledge and critical awareness to meet your career aspirations in sectors in which moving images play a central role. Our curriculum incorporates an exciting variety of learning and teaching activities designed to foster your capacity for researching and rigorously analysing different aspects of film, television and moving images. You will have the opportunity to develop key skills for communicating about and with moving images across a range of contexts and platforms. You can choose to have a broad-based learning experience in film, television and moving image, or you can specialise in moving image curation and screenwriting via our suggested pathways.

The core teaching team consists of members of the University’s Westminster School of Media, Arts and Design. The course has close links with the Centre for Research and Education in Arts and Media (CREAM), the leading research centre in the UK for arts and design, whose members include internationally renowned filmmakers, film and television theorists and historians, and moving image artists and curators. We combine research-enhanced teaching with classes delivered by film and television industry and moving image art professionals, in order to make sure that you develop skill sets and the full range of critical awareness that are in demand and to deliver an exciting learning experience for you.

Course content

The course combines core and optional taught modules. The design and delivery of our taught modules draw on CREAM’s research excellence in documentary, Asian and European cinema, moving image curation, and television history. The coursework requirements for some modules are research essays or a combination of research essays and research-informed blog posts and presentations. Other modules require a broad range of research-informed professional modes of writing such as a screenplay treatment, a curatorial proposal or an exhibition review. You will also undertake a substantial piece of independent research as a major part of your MA studies. In order to provide you with the flexibility to undertake a piece of independent research suited to your career aspiration, the final project module offers you the choice between writing a traditional dissertation or completing a theoretically-informed professional project such as a curating a film programme, writing and producing a series of themed blog posts, or writing a long-form screenplay.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of what you will study on this course.

The course is taught in two modes: full-time and part-time. Full-time Postgraduate students study 180 credits per year. For the award of MA in Film and Television: Theory, Culture and Industry, you must complete two core taught modules, four optional modules and a 60-credit final project module, for a total of 180 credits. Core modules provide you with a set of key skills for the theoretical, critical and reflective understanding of moving images. Optional modules give you the freedom to choose areas of specialisation. The course leaders can advise on which modules best fit your interests. You have the choice to pursue specialised interests through your choice of optional modules and coursework assignments. If you are not sure which optional modules to choose or fit your interests best, or which types of final project work to produce to best develop your area of specialisation, you should discuss this question individually with the course leaders and you should aim to do so early on in the academic year.

The course structure includes two suggested pathways for those wishing to specialise in film programming and moving image curation, or in screenwriting.

You will be able to choose among the following modules:
-Cinema Distribution and Exhibition (option)
-Contemporary Issues in Moving Image and Screen Studies (core)
-Documentary Aesthetics, Sites and Spectatorship (option)
-Film Programming and Moving Image Curation (option)
-Final Project (core)
-Key Concepts in Film, Television and Moving Image (core)
-Introduction to Scriptwriting (option)
-Longform Screenplay Preparation and Short Documents (option)
-Modern and Contemporary European Cinema (option)
-Researching Histories in Asian Cinema (option)
-Television Art: Aesthetics and Quality (option)

Associated careers

Our graduates have found employment in small- and large-scale film and television companies as filmmakers, producers, distributors, and exhibitors. Others have gone on to organise film festivals, or to work in film-related magazines and journals as well as in international arts and culture sectors. Some of our recent graduates have gone on to pursue academic careers as researchers or doctoral students at the University of Westminster and elsewhere. As the UK’s longest-running postgraduate programme in film and television several of our alumni are pioneers of the discipline of film and television studies.

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Do you have a passion for creative communication? Would you like to improve your employability within the advertising industry? This challenging master’s programme focuses on the development of hands-on creative advertising techniques, helping you to build a set of skills that you’ll use throughout your career. Read more

Overview

Do you have a passion for creative communication? Would you like to improve your employability within the advertising industry? This challenging master’s programme focuses on the development of hands-on creative advertising techniques, helping you to build a set of skills that you’ll use throughout your career. You’ll also develop a thorough understanding of relevant academic theory, exploring popular culture and the ways in which it is shaped by promotional media.

- The teaching team maintain strong links with industry, providing students with the chance to participate in live briefs, networking events, and guest lectures.
- The course allows plenty of time and support for portfolio development, helping students to secure creative roles after graduation.
- Advertising at Solent has been supported by local and national advertising agencies including Thinking Juice, Five by Five, EHS 4D Group, Fallon, Beattie McGuinness Bungey, Karmarama, We Are Social and The Work Club. The course team continue to build new relationships.
- Students are invited to pitch for work at Solent Creatives, our on-campus creative agency. These projects involve real businesses and are ideally suited for portfolio development.
- Southampton Solent’s advertising staff encourage students to work on projects in collaboration with those from other creative disciplines, mirroring industry practices.
- Students will work on competition briefs for organisations such as the Design & Art Directors Association (D&AD) and the Young Creative Network (YCN).
- The course concludes with a final master’s project. Students will work on either a dissertation or a practical project, focusing on an area that is relevant to their future career ambitions.
- Students will have access to a range of specialist facilities throughout their studies. These include Mac computers, professional creative software, digital printing facilities and traditional printing presses.
- Solent also provides a comprehensive media loans scheme, giving students access to high-end photographic equipment.

The industry -

The evolution of the internet has created an explosion in the number of advertising channels available to businesses, creating even more chances for motivated graduates to pursue a career in advertising.
Advertising career progressions are known to be varied and interesting, offering a range of different positions including art direction, copywriting, account management and strategic campaign planning.

The programme -

Southampton Solent University’s MA Creative Advertising curriculum focuses on industry relevant workplace skills, teaching students to function as part of a professional advertising business. These skills include idea generation, working to a brief, research, copywriting, strategy and presentation. Students will also complete a master’s project, which is an ideal opportunity to focus on the specific areas of advertising that interest them. For further details on the course’s academic content, please visit the ‘course content’ tab.

Students benefit from creative guidance throughout the course, receiving regular feedback from the tutoring team, other students and specially invited advertising professionals. This feedback helps students to craft a portfolio of commercially appealing work, and encourages them to reflect on their own creative process.

Advertising students at Southampton Solent may get their first taste of the industry by freelancing at Solent Creatives, an on-campus advertising and marketing agency that specialises in connecting students with business clients. This offers students the opportunity to gain work experience, create additional work for their portfolios and make industry contacts.

Students are encouraged to take on work experience throughout their studies. Advertising students have previously secured placements at Saatchi & Saatchi, McCann Erickson, EHS 4D, Chemistry Communications, B&Q, Channel 4 (Jersey) and Palmer Hargreaves.

Course Content

Programme specification document - http://mycourse.solent.ac.uk/course/view.php?id=6152

Teaching, learning and assessment -

The course is taught through seminars and workshops, with an emphasis on creativity and critical thinking.

Work experience -

We’ll encourage you to complete work experience as part of the Professional Practice unit. Through this you’ll gain real-world experience of working in an agency environment, helping you to plan your future career. You’ll also have the chance to develop your industry connections and freelance portfolio through working for Solent Creatives, our in-house creative agency.

Assessment -

Assessment includes: creative portfolios, presentations, reflective portfolios and essays, using industry-standard media production facilities.

Our facilities -

We have a fully equipped IT centre, with both PC and Mac computers featuring industry-standard software packages including Adobe Creative Suite, and video and audio editing programmes. Training and access to photographic equipment is also available.

Web-based learning -

Solent’s virtual learning environment provides quick online access to assignments, lecture notes, suggested reading and other course information. We also have our own e-learning facilities, social networking sites and blogs.

Why Solent?

What do we offer?

From a vibrant city centre campus to our first class facilities, this is where you can find out why you should choose Solent.

Facilities - http://www.solent.ac.uk/about/facilities/facilities.aspx

City living - http://www.solent.ac.uk/studying/southampton/living-in-southampton.aspx

Accommodation - http://www.solent.ac.uk/studying/accommodation/accommodation.aspx

Career Potential

Following this course, you will be well placed for a variety of careers in national or international advertising agencies.

Suitable roles for graduates include:

- Copywriting
- Media buying
- Account management
- Art direction.

Links with industry -

Our experienced teaching team has strong links with high-profile professional bodies, enabling you to develop useful contacts in the advertising world and to meet key industry figures.
You will be encouraged to complete work experience and we’ll help you to find a suitable placement, if possible at a top agency. Leading creative directors will be among those to critique your work, giving you valuable feedback.

Industry guest lectures, agency visits and careers events will help to boost your insight into the advertising industry and your network of contacts.
You’ll also have the chance to develop your industry connections and freelance portfolio through real-world work for Solent Creatives, our in-house creative agency.

Transferable skills -

You will develop a range of skills, encompassing creative thinking, problem-solving, writing and art direction, along with experience in presentation and teamwork.

Tuition fees

The tuition fees for the 2016/2017 academic year are:

UK and EU full-time fees: £4,635

International full-time fees: £11,260

UK and EU part-time fees: £2,320 per year

International part-time fees: £5,630 per year

Graduation costs -

Graduation is the ceremony to celebrate the achievements of your studies. For graduates in 2015, there is no charge to attend graduation, but you will be required to pay for the rental of your academic gown (approximately £42 per graduate, depending on your award). You may also wish to purchase official photography packages, which range in price from £15 to £200+. Graduation is not compulsory, so if you prefer to have your award sent to you, there is no cost.
For more details, please visit: http://www.solent.ac.uk/studying/graduation/home.aspx

Next steps

Could your career prospects benefit from a postgraduate advertising degree? Southampton Solent’s MA Creative Advertising programme will help equip you with the creative skills and industry awareness required to thrive in a range of in-house, agency or freelance advertising roles.

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This course is ideal if you wish to pursue media, communications and cultural inquiry in order to develop a media-based career. Read more

Summary

This course is ideal if you wish to pursue media, communications and cultural inquiry in order to develop a media-based career.

On this course you will cover all aspects of media, communications and cultural studies, from exploring cultural theories and concepts such as Marxism, post-Marxism, feminism, psychoanalysis, post-colonialism and globalisation, to the developments and debates around media and cultural industries such as TV, film, print media and the internet. You will analysis the politics of identity in the context of media and cultural representations, especially in the changing media and web landscape.

You’ll be taught by staff who have strong research profiles with publications in the area of cultural studies theory, culture and politics, tabloid culture, reality television, psychoanalysis, television history and industry, the globalisation of media and culture, contemporary trends in the television industry, as well as travel writing.

You will become a member of the Centre for Research in Film and Audiovisual Cultures (CRFAC), giving you access to a diverse programme of research seminars, symposia and special events organised in collaboration with institutions such as the British Film Institute. Your studies are complemented by visiting lectures given by media and cultural industry professionals such as film makers and scholars from other institutions.

Roehampton's location in London is ideal for media and culture students as you can take advantage of your location by immersing yourself in the wealth of creative cultural institutions and media companies that the capital has to offer, unrivalled by any other city in the UK.

Content

On the course, you will gain an in depth understanding of the role of the media in everyday life, and of its relation to culture and formations of identity and subjectivity.

You will be introduced to, and evaluate, a number of influential and important communication theories and concepts associated with the public sphere, globalisation, promotional culture, media organisations and new media, as well as discourse analysis.

You will engage with the politics of identity in the context of media and cultural representations and explore debates around social difference through a consideration of various defining conditions including gender, class, ethnicity, history, nationality, sexuality, taste and consumer choices.

You will also explore the representation of social reality and the social self in both mass and new media. By focusing on a range of non-fiction formats including reality television, ‘unscripted’ video, user-generated content and the development of the social web, you will address established and newer scholarly debates concerning ‘truth telling’, confession, surveillance and the production of knowledge about the self and its place in the world.

You’ll end the year by undertaking a dissertation or research project which will give you the opportunity to deepen your research skills and knowledge about a topic of particular interest to you.

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This course will equip you with the strategic decision-making, leadership and problem-solving skills you will need to become an entrepreneurial and visionary fashion business leader of the future. Read more
This course will equip you with the strategic decision-making, leadership and problem-solving skills you will need to become an entrepreneurial and visionary fashion business leader of the future. It continues the University’s fashion tradition of a commitment to excellence in developing highly effective, talented and committed professional fashion graduates.

Working closely with fashion industry professionals, role models and mentors, you will receive a relevant, well-grounded, high-quality education and skill base that will enable you to have a wider, clearer understanding of the business you are already involved in. The course offers inside knowledge of industry strategies and cultures on a global basis, combined with key business skills and essential fashion industry management knowledge.

Course content

This course equips you for a business management career in the domestic or international fashion industry. Delivered by a teaching team with a wide range of experience both in industry and academia, the course offers an innovative and relevant fashion business curriculum that focuses on preparing your entry into senior roles in business and management within the industry.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of what you will study on this course.

Core modules, semester 1
-FASHION BUSINESS AND SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT
-CREATIVE TEAM BUILDING
-STRATEGIC FASHION BUSINESS MANAGEMENT

Core modules, semester 2
-FINANCE AND ENTREPRENEURSHIP
-FASHION MARKETING AND BRAND MANAGEMENT
-MANAGING CHANGE AND INNOVATION
-MAJOR FASHION BUSINESS MANAGEMENT PROJECT

Industry links

The idea of a Fashion Business Management MA was formulated in discussion with industry leaders. Building on the success of our Fashion Merchandise Management courses and in particular the close collaboration with industry we spoke extensively to senior fashion executives. Many felt that although doing an MA in Fashion Business Management would not ensure promotion, potential candidates who learn how to apply the knowledge they gain from the course can become leaders who can inspire others. Those candidates need to understand the values and culture of the industry and, most importantly, recognise the difference between information and knowledge and have clearly defined goals.

This support from industry is important both for you as a student and for the future development and relevance of the MA. We will continue to foster and maintain these important links with the fashion industry, and ensure that our Fashion Business Management MA stays at the forefront of education for the future leaders in the fashion industry. We will also continue to invite many prestigious and eminent guest speakers from the industry to participate on all the modules, ensuring that the course remains relevant, informed and up-to-date with current industry practice.

Associated careers

The course is designed to attract applicants with a recognised design, retail management or distribution/manufacturing background. With guidance from the academics and professionals in this field it is anticipated that you will go on to enter senior management positions and move up the career ladder.

Our alumni can be found working in senior positions all over the world in many fashion roles and include such well-known brands such as Aldo, Dior, Dunhill, Harrods, Hermes, Louis Vuitton, Marks and Spencer, Nordstrom, Prada Hong Kong and many more.

Several of our alumni, have also gone on to study at PhD level and to further academic research. Others have set up their own business or successfully taken over a family run business.

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The UK has a mature and highly successful TV industry with exports of programmes and formats worth over £1.3 billion annually. Broadcasting is still an expanding industry in many parts of the world, and is a crucial driver for the creative and cultural industries more generally. Read more
The UK has a mature and highly successful TV industry with exports of programmes and formats worth over £1.3 billion annually. Broadcasting is still an expanding industry in many parts of the world, and is a crucial driver for the creative and cultural industries more generally. This course provides the wide perspectives and specific skills that are essential for success in the broadcasting industry.

This innovative course examines the different ways in which broadcasting is organised around the world. It has a particular emphasis on the production techniques of British television, approaching them through a comparative international lens. Students study a major BBC drama series in depth (currently the Saturday evening series Casualty) from conception, through to scripting and production organisation. The course includes visits to the production base in Cardiff as well as crucial skills training in the industry-standard MovieMagic budget and schedule software.

Each student takes creative control of their own television or radio production to complete the course. The Media Arts department’s extensive range of industry-standard equipment, our TV production studio, state-of-the-art Mac Labs and location store (all of which has recently benefited from a £100,000 investment), is available to all students and training is provided in using it as part of the course.

Located near London, the course provides students with a privileged insight into the production practices of the UK television industry. You will have guest lecturers from both production and management in the broadcasting industry. The wide range of past guest lecturers include:

- Alex Graham (CEO of Wall to Wall TV, executive producer of Who Do You Think You Are),
- Karen Mullins (Project Manager for Channel 4 Racing, London Olympics, Rugby World Cup)
- James Quinn (Executive Producer My Big Fat Gypsy Wedding)
- Pip Clothier (Producer of undercover documentaries including BBC’s Panorama: Cash for Questions).

What you will study:
- The nature of television as a medium: scheduling, genres, formats
- How to produce your own short television or radio programme, using industry-standard equipment
- The changing ways in which digital programming is being produced and delivered
- The ways in which formats and programming are traded globally
- The organisation and regulation of broadcasting around the world
- The differing industrial structures of TV
- The crucial skills of scheduling and budgeting, including training on the industry standard Movie Magic software.
- TV series narrative arcs and character development
- The TV production process, planning and execution, (including lectures by the producers of BBC’s Casualty

You will be taught by world-leading scholars including:
- Professor John Ellis (author of Visible Fictions, Seeing Things; independent TV producer; formerly deputy chair of PACT, the UK independent producers’ trade organisation)

- Dr George Guo (graduate of Westminster University and Communication University of China who publishes on TV drama in China)

- Dr James Bennett (author of Television as Digital Media, Television Personalities)

- Mike Dormer (producer of The Whale (2013), Blue Murder (2007-9) New Tricks (2003-5))
a team that combines an international perspective, substantial experience in the TV industry, and innovative theoretical thinking.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/mediaarts/coursefinder/mainternationaltelevisionindustries.aspx

Why choose this course?

- You will develop an international outlook on broadcasting, equipping you to pursue a career in the broadcasting industry, both in the UK or abroad

- You'll be taught by renowned scholars and experienced practitioners

- The MA is taught in a department devoted to TV and film production and its study

- There is an in-depth focus on the UK and its excellence in broadcast production

- You will be trained and develop advanced skills in the use of our industry-standard equipment, which includes Final Cut Studio 2 editing systems, Sony HVR-V1E cameras, Sennheiser radio microphone kits and a selection of professional quality sound recording and lighting equipment.

Department research and industry highlights

The Media Arts department at Royal Holloway has a vibrant production culture. Most staff members have substantial production experience in TV and cinema. Around 300 undergraduate and 60 postgraduate students every year are engaged in making their own productions, including MA International Television Industries students.

Staff include the feature film director John Roberts (War of the Buttons, Day of the Flowers), award-winning documentary maker Marc Isaacs (All White in Barking, The Road), former controller of BBC1 and head of BBC Drama, Jonathan Powell.

You will be taught by leading independent producers Professor John Ellis (Brazil: Beyond Citizen Kane, Cinema in China) and Mike Dormer (The Whale, New Tricks, The Bill).

On completion of the programme graduates will have:

- a thorough understanding of the world broadcasting market and its organisation
- a thorough understanding of the main issues in broadcasting culture
- a deep knowledge of the main genres and forms of broadcast programming
- a detailed understanding of the nature of British TV series drama and the production processes that are involved in realising a TV drama series
- an invaluable experience of production to a broadcast standard
- a critical self-knowledge gained from analysing the process of producing their own work

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including:
- seminar presentations
- written essays
- research portfolios
- project work
- self-assessment documents

Employability & career opportunities

On graduation, you will have a range of knowledge and a portfolio of written and media work which will be invaluable in finding employment in the broadcasting industry, particularly in those territories where the business is expanding rapidly.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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This exciting degree offers you the opportunity to study one of the major areas in contemporary media and communications – branding- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-brands-communication-culture/. Read more
This exciting degree offers you the opportunity to study one of the major areas in contemporary media and communications – branding- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-brands-communication-culture/

The unique programme introduces you to the variety of ways in which brands are developed and used, and helps you to understand how the growth of branding – in business, but also in politics, government, sport and culture – has changed the societies we live in.

What happens when the state starts to use branding techniques to communicate with its citizens?

And how does the rise of digital and social media change the relationship between brands and their publics?

What, for example, are the consequences of understanding political parties, artists or sports teams as ‘brands’?

An introduction to contemporary branding debates

The MA in Brands, Communication and Culture aims to provide you with a comprehensive understanding of the history and development of brands and branding, and their relationship to contemporary forms of communication and culture. Specifically, you should acquire an in-depth knowledge of the social, political and economic backdrop against which branding has become so important, and an understanding of the key themes and debates surrounding its development and use, including the relationship between brands and intellectual property, and the extent to which branding promotes or inhibits openness and transparency within organisations.

You will also improve your ability to think critically and creatively about contemporary communications and cultural practices. When you have completed the programme you will have at your disposal a range of tools that will enable you to analyse contemporary communications, to make judgments about their significance and value and be able to thoughtfully contribute to contemporary communications.

A unique approach to the study of brands

This MA is not a conventional branding or marketing course. Instead it offers a unique approach to the study of brands. This is reflected in the topics taught on our core modules, which include:

The role of brands in and beyond markets
The rise of consumer culture
Critical perspectives on brand management and governance
Intellectual property
Immaterial labour and the rise of ‘branded workers’
Gender, colonial history and branding
Attachment, identity and emotions in branding
Ethics and transparency
The emergence of brand experiences and ‘staging’ of brands
Fair trade and accountability
Branded spaces and communities
Social media and open source cultures
Geodemographics and new forms of social classification
The MA Brands, Communication and Culture is taught across two departments: Media & Communications and Sociology. This gives you access to experts in many fields. In addition to the two core courses you will have the opportunity to customize your degree by choosing from a range of modules from different departments to allow you to explore your own interests and make wider connections.

We welcome students who bring to the course a range of experiences and interests in communication, management, politics, design and the cultural industries.

Recent dissertation topics include:

Branding post-capitalism? An investigation of crowdfunding platforms
Trespassed City: Mapping London’s privately owned public spaces
The rise of co-working spaces
Craft Entrepreneurs: an inquiry into the rise of artisanal production in post-industrial cities
Hashtags in photo sharing social media apps
Consumer culture in contemporary Shanghai
Branding of NGOs
Sustainable brand strategies - good for the environment or just a selling strategy?
Fashion bloggers and cultural capital
Medical tourism and branded healthcare
Intellectual property in the fashion industry
Branding London's districts

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Dr Kat Jungnickel.

Overview

The programme is made up of two core modules (60 credits in total), between two and four options modules (60 credits in total), and a dissertation (60 credits).

The first core module, Branding I, introduces you to contemporary definitions and theories of branding, its history and development, changes in the role of marketing, promotion and design, and their place in the global economy.

The second core module, Branding II, puts greater emphasis on contemporary themes and issues in branding, and their relationship to wider debates in society, economy and culture.

Throughout the core components of the degree, you will examine the wide range of ways in which branding is currently used, in organisations ranging from large corporations to public sector bodies, charities and other third sector organisations.

For the optional modules, you'll have an opportunity to explore some of the wider contexts for brands and branding by taking up to 60 credits of modules provided elsewhere in Media and Communications or neighbouring departments such as Sociology, Cultural Studies and Anthropology.

Part-time students typically take the two core modules in their first year, and the options modules plus the dissertation in their second year.

Vocational elements

The department offers some practice-based options in areas such as:

Media Futures
Online Journalism
Campaign Skills
Media Law and Ethics
Design Methods
Processes for Innovation

Assessment

The MA is assessed primarily through coursework essays and written projects. Practical modules may require audiovisual elements to be submitted. It will also include a dissertation of approximately 12,000 words.

Skills

The programme helps students to develop a high-level understanding of contemporary branding and communications techniques and their social, economic and political contexts. You will be encouraged to develop your critical reasoning skills and your understanding of contemporary cultural and media theory, but also to develop greater visual literacy and a capacity for creative thinking. Assessments are designed to ensure that you are able to apply these skills in practical ways.

Careers

The programme equips you with the skills necessary to pursue a wide range of careers related to branding and communication in the media and other industries. Students are encouraged to seek work experience and work placements during the programme as time allows. Regular seminars with visiting speakers will enable you to gain an understanding of how your degree can be used in a professional context. The MA also allows you to pursue further academic research in one or more of the areas covered on the programme.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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The MA in History and Culture will appeal if you have interests that cross the boundaries of history, popular culture, print culture and literature and would like to pursue this combined focus. Read more
The MA in History and Culture will appeal if you have interests that cross the boundaries of history, popular culture, print culture and literature and would like to pursue this combined focus.

The programme seeks to understand the modern world through perspectives derived from the study of history, literature, popular culture and print culture. You will pursue thematic subjects, such as empire, propaganda and gender, and examine select interdisciplinary ‘case studies’ such as the Victorian city, the Second World War and the Holocaust.

You will gain experience of the advanced study of history, develop the practical skills necessary to undertake work across subject boundaries and receive training in transferable research skills and methodologies. On graduation, you will be well placed to pursue a research-based higher degree, such as a PhD, should you wish to do so.

What will I study?

The programme consists of two core modules (20 credits each), four optional modules (20 credits each) and a compulsory dissertation (60 credits).

You will be guided to a combination of optional modules focused upon the interdisciplinary study of modern and contemporary history or a combination of these modules with others which have a strong literature and popular culture content.

You may combine period studies, focused, for example, on the Victorian period, the Second World War and the Holocaust, with more generic modules concerned with subject such as ‘transgressive women’ and empire.

How will I study?

You will learn through a combination of lectures, seminars, tutorials and guided independent learning. Taught sessions take place between 6pm-9pm on weekday evenings. If you are studying full-time you will attend two evenings per week and if you are studying part-time you will attend one evening per week.

How will I be assessed?]]

You will be assessed through a combination of assignments which, depending on the modules you choose, may include essays, critical reviews, critical diaries, online discussions, presentations and research-based projects and a dissertation.

Who will be teaching me?

You will be taught by a team of specialist tutors who are active researchers and committed teachers with interests in history, literature, popular culture and print culture.

What are my career prospects?

Graduates in the humanities with a higher degree find employment in a wide variety of careers such as teaching, arts organisation and management, the heritage industry, publishing, advertising, journalism, libraries and learning centres, and management/administration.

Alternatively, upon successful completion of the programme, you may wish to apply to progress onto a research degree such as an MPhil or PhD.

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Be part of a lively popular music research community that embraces everything from metal music to film scores with the opportunity to work alongside performers… Read more
Be part of a lively popular music research community that embraces everything from metal music to film scores with the opportunity to work alongside performers, composers and studio experts.This course is about the here and now - you will study everything from folk to jazz, right through to rock, hip-hop and dance, developing your knowledge of contemporary popular music.You'll join peers from backgrounds in cultural studies, sociology, music and the creative arts to explore today's local live music scene and its connection to the wider national and international industry. From getting out into the Leeds area and conducting ethnographic research into local gigs and events, to composing scores for film and television, you'll discover how a wide variety of communities fuse together to create what is recognised as a vibrant and expanding scene.Whether it's developing your music editing techniques in our studios, or organising events and liaising with artists at Leeds Festival, you'll gain the hands-on experience employers are looking for, gathering evidence for your major research project.This course is the perfect springboard to make contacts, help you discover the interconnectivity of popular music and culture, and really engage with a vibrant and varied scene which covers everything from metal right through to country.

Visit the website http://courses.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/popularmusicandculture_ma

Mature Applicants

Our University welcomes applications from mature applicants who demonstrate academic potential. We usually require some evidence of recent academic study, for example completion of an access course, however recent relevant work experience may also be considered. Please note that for some of our professional courses all applicants will need to meet the specified entry criteria and in these cases work experience cannot be considered in lieu.

If you wish to apply through this route you should refer to our University Recognition of Prior Learning policy that is available on our website (http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/studenthub/recognition-of-prior-learning.htm).

Please note that all applicants to our University are required to meet our standard English language requirement of GCSE grade C or equivalent, variations to this will be listed on the individual course entry requirements.

Careers

With more festivals and independent producers and artists than ever before, the need for live music and industry professionals has soared.

Employment opportunities could be open to you in sound engineering, performance, teaching, song writing, production, music for film and television, music journalism, marketing and PR, and events organisation.

Alternatively you may wish to further your research by studying for a PhD.

- Performer
- Songwriter
- Sound Technician
- Events Organiser

Careers advice: The dedicated Jobs and Careers team offers expert advice and a host of resources to help you choose and gain employment. Whether you're in your first or final year, you can speak to members of staff from our Careers Office who can offer you advice from writing a CV to searching for jobs.

Visit the careers site - https://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/employability/jobs-careers-support.htm

Course Benefits

As well as having access to modern, professional music studios, you'll benefit from being taught by a highly skilled and experienced teaching team, including Professor Karl Spracklen who is Secretary of the International Society for Metal Music Studies and the Editor of Metal Music Studies. You'll also have the chance to network with industry professionals during our guest lecture series. Previous speakers have included Leeds Festival boss Melvin Benn and chart-toppers Rudimental. We also have fantastic links with local and national music, arts and festival organisations, which help ensure you get the most from your course.

Core Modules

Popular Music as Leisure & Culture
Examine the importance of popular music as a form of leisure and culture. You will explore music subcultures through sociology, cultural geography, cultural studies and leisure theory.

Researching Popular Music & Culture
Develop an understanding of the strategies used in the study of popular music and culture, drawing on advanced approaches from sociology, musicology, cultural studies, ethnography, leisure and other relevant areas.

Popular Music Analysis
Examine performance, record production, video and reception and the meaning of music for your small scale, individual research project which focuses on the analysis of popular music artefacts.

Popular Music in Contemporary Culture
Engage in debate and discussion of how, where and why certain strands of musical productivity and creativity remain constantly part of the vocabulary of popular music.

Final Individual Project
Combine your learning into a significant piece of work, the nature of which will be determined by yourself and the course team.

Option Modules

Studio Production Skills
Produce a series of sound design projects and create your own systems for the purpose of manipulating/processing sound which will demonstrate your understanding of the concepts behind the tools used for sound design.

Creative Music Production
Develop a broad understanding of the creative possibilities of the studio environment by investigating a range of theoretical, technical, and creative approaches to the production process.

Music Industries in Context
Develop a range of theoretical perspectives drawing on contemporary research into the ecology of the music industries and how different stakeholders across the music sector work together.

Music Industries in Practice
Investigate a host of contemporary issues affecting the practice of operating in the music industries, focusing on one key area determined by your own interests.

Facilities

- Library
Our libraries are two of the only university libraries in the UK open 24/7 every day of the year. However you like to study, the libraries have got you covered with group study, silent study, extensive e-learning resources and PC suites.

- Broadcasting Place
Broadcasting Place provides students with creative and contemporary learning environments, is packed with the latest technology and is a focal point for new and innovative thinking in the city.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/postgraduate/how-to-apply/

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Development and expansion in undergraduate studies in religion and belief, together with the expansion of national and international ‘faith awareness’ initiatives, has resulted in a high demand for postgraduate studies within this discipline. Read more
Development and expansion in undergraduate studies in religion and belief, together with the expansion of national and international ‘faith awareness’ initiatives, has resulted in a high demand for postgraduate studies within this discipline.

The programme explores the impact and influence religion and belief has on social structures, community, politics, economics, policy (education), citizenship, culture & identity, sexuality, pluralism, spirituality, and national & international relationships. The MA also introduces critical analysis of ethics, systems of belief, human rights and social justice issues and the application of these concepts within lived environments from diverse religious perspectives.

The programme is of interest to both graduates and practitioners who wish to specialise further in Religion, Culture & Society. Graduates may wish to extend their knowledge to prepare for academic and professional careers in the private or public sector.

INDUSTRY LINKS

The RCS team at UCLan have a wide variety of links with local, national and international faith and intercultural forums, faith schools and academic institutions, all of which provide valuable contacts for students wishing to enter professions related to Teaching, Ministry, inter-faith and inter-cultural dialogue and relations. RCS also work with charity organisations both home and abroad and global outreach programmes. Further details and contacts are available from members of the RCS teaching team.

LEARNING ENVIRONMENT AND ASSESSMENT

Students may study the MA full time over one year or part time over two or three years. In either case students will be required to successfully complete six MA modules and one MA dissertation (the dissertation is equivalent to 3 x modules). Each module requires an estimated 2 hours class contact per week plus extensive reading and dedicated personal study.

We strive to give our students key employability and transferable skills which will serve them in the world of work. Our assessment practices illustrate a move away from exams and essays per se and incorporate a move towards a more inclusive assessment which benefits our diverse student body. Assessment strategies include coursework, individual and group presentations, individual and/or group projects, reviews and ICT interaction.

OPPORTUNITIES

Religion, Culture & Society (RCS) also includes field trips to national and international places of interest such as; Rome, Istanbul, Auschwitz, Liverpool Cathedrals, Ladywelle Pilgrimage and Shrine, the Hindu Temple etc. Although these trips are optional to MA students, they aim to draw attention to shared values, beliefs and practices, and supports students in achieving a mutual appreciation of different faiths and traditions. The international trips in particular aim to develop an experienced awareness of cultural heritage, traditions and practices of different faiths, and widen students’ appreciation of how those faiths and belief systems interact within lived environments, communities and in different social settings. Thus enhancing not only MA provision but also the learning experience and the environment where that learning experience takes place.

The programme is of interest to both graduates and practitioners who wish to specialise further in Religion, Culture and Society. Graduates may wish to extend their knowledge to prepare for academic and professional careers in the private or public sector, including local government, race relations officers, ministry, equality/diversity training officers, social services, social welfare, community development, youth work, research, education and communication support workers, lecturing in further or higher education. Practitioners may wish to update their knowledge or gain a higher qualification for personal or professional development. The programme will also appeal to working individuals who are interested in the range of topics offered and do not wish to specialise in a rigidly defined Theology based MA programme. In addition, many students are currently seeking Masters’ programmes as a way of weathering the economic recession.

RCS offers progression routes onto PGCE courses for graduates wishing to develop a career in teaching. There are also opportunities to further study for PhD or professional doctorate.

FURTHER INFORMATION

The MA in Religion, Culture & Society brings together disciplines of Theology, Philosophy, Sociology and International Relations – a very innovative, exciting and challenging post-graduate degree award.

The whole philosophy of the Religion, Culture and Society MA is to promote inclusively, encourage reflection on interfaith dialogue and highlight the important contribution religion and belief can make to community cohesion and the combating of religious prejudice and discrimination (QCA & DfES, 2004). The MA evaluates how and why the role of religion and culture has changed within society, and explores the impact and influence of religion and belief within economical, political and social constructs. Religion and faith is critically analysed within the framework of theistic and atheistic approaches to sexuality, spirituality, human rights, territory and space and cultural relationships. The application of classical and contemporary theological and philosophical concepts and theories of faith are examined in relation to lived environments.

The MA in Religion, Culture and Society embodies and supports the objectives outlined in the AHSS 2007-2012 strategy, is aligned to Theology and Religious Studies benchmarks, HEQ (2008) descriptors and is situated specifically within a social science framework. The course supports a pluralistic perspective on and within religion and belief traditions, and engages with a range of methods of study, explores a number of interesting and challenging modules and includes and a diversified range of assessment practices.

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Wherever in the world you want to work, the hospitality and tourism industry provides opportunities like few others. Read more
Wherever in the world you want to work, the hospitality and tourism industry provides opportunities like few others. The sector - ranging from international hotel chains, airlines and tour operators to conference venues, tourist boards and government organisations - is one of the most diverse and exciting industries around, providing management opportunities worldwide in business operations, marketing, sales, customer service, HR, research, logistics and policy. Employment in this sector is set to grow over the next few years and the demand for senior and specialised roles will increase.

To excel in this industry you need to be a good leader, manager, entrepreneur and show awareness of the ethical, cultural, environmental and social settings within which you are working.

This Masters degree helps prepare you for this. We encourage an entrepreneurial and questioning approach to the industry, examining growth and development through the prism of social responsibility and sustainability. The degree also emphasises the management of strategic issues that arise in the sector, through the specialist modules of marketing, business development and management, leadership and cross cultural management.

We examine the needs of both the commercial and non-commercial elements of the sector and the networks and partnerships that link them.

- Field trip
Postgraduate students enrolled in the MSc International Tourism and Hospitality Management join a residential five day trip Semester 2. For the last three years we have been to Belfast where we study the processes of city marketing. On your return we analyse the issues that the city faces in becoming a competitive destination and you write a City Marketing plan for Belfast.

International Tourism and Hospitality Management Top-up

If you already hold the Level 7 Postgraduate Diploma in Tourism and Hospitality Management from either the Confederation for Tourism and Hospitality (CTH) or the Organisations for Tourism and Hospitality Management (OTHM) you can top-up your qualification to a full MSc by studying a research methods module and researching and writing a 20,000 word dissertation.

The degree is jointly delivered with ESHotels in Paris enabling you to integrate with students from this course when you jointly participate on a field trip.

See the website http://www.lsbu.ac.uk/courses/course-finder/international-tourism-hospitality-management-msc

Modules

Year 1:
- Critical issues in tourism and hospitality industry
The module explores and analyses current policy issues in the tourism and hospitality sector as well as how these are interpreted by various stakeholders, how these stakeholders develop their policy preferences on these issues and how they deal with opposition and collaborations to further their goals.
The module will relate mostly to policy-making theory, but will also investigate the often chaotic and complex nature of the tourism and hospitality sector and what impacts this has on trying to set out a clear and unambiguous policy arena within which the industry and resources it depends upon can flourish.

- City marketing
Cities, be they historic, seaside, regional or capital, are the power houses of the tourism and hospitality industry. They shape and are shaped by tourism and hospitality which has become a major economic driver and re-imaging agent of city governance agencies as they seek to re-invent their themselves in the new global order. This module seeks to explain the role of tourism and hospitality and the visitor economy in the modern city and to critically analyse this in relation to a number of theoretical perspectives. The module will equip you with a critical understanding of broader perspectives required to manage and market tourism in the modern city and inform city marketing strategies.

- Cross-cultural management
This module examines concepts of culture and its multifaceted impacts on managerial behaviour in the tourism and hospitality industry. It reviews situations and issues that managers have to meet and resolve when working internationally. This module brings together knowledge, understanding, different interpretations and critical analysis of the contexts and issues relating to cross-cultural management.

- Business and management strategy
The module integrates the learning of management and enterprise theory with the practical processes of developing a business idea to the point of the completion of a business plan aimed to attract the financial backing.The module will cover theories of corporate strategy and strategic choice, human resource development, enterprise and business planning.

- Marketing strategy
Marketing is dynamic, pervasive and exciting. It steers innovation, strategy, revenue generation and profitability and, ultimately, drives economic development and corporate performance. This module, using theory and practice, explores how organisations in both the public and private sector address the key marketing challenges posed by an increasingly competitive environment. It looks at how they develop tactical and strategic responses, research and reach audiences, mount campaigns, create global brands, manage reputation and the importance of working in partnerships and networks to do this.

- Professional leadership
The module focuses on the active, professional aspects of leadership studies and starts from the assumption that all successful organised activity is initiated by leadership of some sort. Alongside engaging with contemporary theoretical perspectives, students will be encouraged to learn from their own and others experiences of leadership in practice, and to engage in classroom activities which enable them to develop their own leadership aptitude.

Optional placement year:

Year 2
Choose from the following options:

- Dissertation
The relevance of the final year project is to give you the opportunity to undertake a piece of primary research and analysis and to enable them to manage your own learning under the guidance of a tutor. You'll choose your own topic, which should show originality and should offer a worthwhile contribution to the existing 'body of knowledge'. The module is double weighted and will be supported by a taught research methods programme that will incorporate the elements crucial for the completion of an in depth research project.

- Extended management report
Part-time = two modules a year for three years then dissertation in Year 4; or four modules in Year 1 then two modules plus the dissertation in Year 2, with dissertation extending into Year 3.

Employability

- International Tourism as a career
Tourism is an international service industry and so you can probably expect a busy, fast-paced job wherever you decide to specialise, interacting with different people and organisations around the globe.

Our LSBU post graduates work around the world. Many work for international companies, tourist boards, policy and development institutes, acquiring senior management skills as they progress.

The nature of the industry - the large majority of organisations in the sector are small to medium enterprises (SMEs) - also provides opportunities for you to start your own business. Web-based tour operations, restaurants and events management companies are all popular options for start-ups. You certainly have choices over the route you take into this vast sector.

- Career progression
There is a worldwide shortage of well qualified tourism and hospitality managers, particularly in Asia, and this professional Masters qualification will help you to progress your career. If you are academically minded this could also be a positive step towards a PhD and academic career.

LSBU Employability Services

LSBU is committed to supporting you develop your employability and succeed in getting a job after you have graduated. Your qualification will certainly help, but in a competitive market you also need to work on your employability, and on your career search. Our Employability Service will support you in developing your skills, finding a job, interview techniques, work experience or an internship, and will help you assess what you need to do to get the job you want at the end of your course. LSBU offers a comprehensive Employability Service, with a range of initiatives to complement your studies, including:

- direct engagement from employers who come in to interview and talk to students
- Job Shop and on-campus recruitment agencies to help your job search
- mentoring and work shadowing schemes.

Professional links

We have a wide range of industry speakers on the course and you undertake a range of projects that bring you into contact with managers from the sector. In particular, you'll undertake a research project for the global attractions company Merlin Entertainments in Semester 1 where you analyse their operations and policies, develop solutions to a particular challenge and report back directly to their managers.

Placements

If you are a home or EU student you may wish to consider undertaking a voluntary year-long work placement in the UK or overseas to gain, extend or seek variety in your experience within the industry prior to studying with us. If you undertake such a placement you may use this as the basis for an extended industry-related management project instead of the traditional dissertation. This is subject to prior approval by the Course Director and must be an investigation into an aspect of management that is worthy of investigation and is subject to the usual academic discipline.

This option is not open to overseas students, as Home Office regulations mean that overseas students are unable to get a visa for the placement year.

Teaching and learning

Classroom teaching includes a mix of traditional lectures, seminars, workshops and guest lectures from industry stakeholders. We undertake a real life business development scenario with our industry partner Merlin Entertainments and undertake a residential field trip in Semester 2.

The nature of the teaching and assessment will allow you to apply the theories and processes learnt in class to their preferred setting (e.g. public or private sector; tourism or hospitality industries; UK, European or International).

We are currently negotiating a partnership with InHolland University, Amsterdam, where you could study Semester 1 in Amsterdam and complete Semester 2 and the dissertation at LSBU (This option is open to UK and EU students only).

Academic expertise

Department staff are experts in their respective fields of urban, environment, tourism, heritage and leisure and related educational policy. Many have professional affiliations, appointed positions and research links, for example with the Association for Tourism in Higher Education, Local Economy, The Landscape Research Group, The Organisation for Tourism and Hospitality Management (OTHM), the Confederation of Tourism and Hospitality, the Chartered Institute of Marketing and the Tourism Society. We integrate these links into our teaching wherever possible.

Tools and knowledge

The course develops the appropriate skills, tools and knowledge to operate innovatively in the global tourism and hospitality environments. The nature of the teaching and assessment allows you to apply the theories and processes learnt in class to your preferred setting (e.g public or private sector; tourism or hospitality industries; related policy and government organisations; UK, European or international).

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