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The MSc in Human Resource Development (International Development) enables you to critically understand the role of human resource development (HRD) in enhancing performance within your own institutions and societies. Read more
The MSc in Human Resource Development (International Development) enables you to critically understand the role of human resource development (HRD) in enhancing performance within your own institutions and societies. Emphasis is placed on how HRD can support economic and social advancement by improving public services, and in building capabilities within individuals, organisations and communities to effectively cope with social change. The programme aims to develop students' critical appreciation of globalisation processes, policy initiatives and development management plans to support skills development, competitiveness and human capabilities, including development issues associated with eradicating gender inequalities, fostering human well being and maintaining sustainable livelihoods.

The course aims to develop your professional understanding of HRD strategies and development tools to support skill and knowledge acquisition, and build organization and community capabilities. A focus on developing human knowledge and skills enables you to appreciate how education supports skills development. Students also acquire knowledge of the role of International Organizations (through governments and MNCs) such as the World Bank and the UN in supporting education and development initiatives. There is a strong emphasis on acquiring cross cultural leadership knowledge, relevant for many social change and development projects in the public sector, or in the private sector, MNCs, NGOs or international organizations like the World Bank The objectives are that, by the end of the programme, participants will have:
-Knowledge and understanding of the linkage between international development, education and HRD practices and policies

-Knowledge of how approaches to national human resource development affect organisation and societal performance in developing and transitional economies

-Knowledge and understanding of comparative education policy and governance frameworks, for capacity building, the political economy of skills formation and how national HRD training systems affect organization, industrial and societal development, including gender national planning

-Knowledge of globalisation and cross-cultural factors affecting the application of HRD theories and methods in developing, transitional and newly industrialised countries

-An understanding of HRD and development policies in diverse geographic regions and how they enhance human capabilities and support poverty reduction, empowerment, help eradicate gender inequality and advance human well being especially within transitional and developing country contexts

-A critical understanding of cutting edge international HRD policies including talent management, knowledge management, private sector management and entrepreneurship, corporate social responsibility (CSR), social justice and ethics, social capital, and strategies for managing inequality including gender and other differences

-Knowledge of leadership for development (lead4dev) and different HRD strategies for the building of leadership skills in the workplace/society, especially those from disadvantaged/marginalized groups including the poor and women

-An understanding of how to analyse and design HRD strategies at societal and organisational level, including gender national planning and empowerment

The programme is designed for individuals of any professional background in international organisations, public administration, transnational organisations and private sector companies who are involved in the HRD, leadership and capacity planning aspects of organisations in developing and transitional countries. These may include managers/leaders of HRD/training/learning, HRD and education in government administration; direct trainers, staff of training centres, staff involved in human development planning in governments; HRD and Leadership consultants involved in change projects, change consultants involved in community development; NGO managers and line managers concerned with the development of their staff.

Aims

You will gain:
-Knowledge and understanding of the linkage between international development and HRD practices and policies
-Knowledge of globalisation and cross-cultural actors affecting the application of HRD and education theories and methods in developing, transitional and newly industrialised countries
-Knowledge of education and HRD interventions and their role in building leadership skills and capacity
-Knowledge of how approaches to national human resource development (NHRD) affect organisation and societal performance in developing and transitional economies
-Knowledge of how new approaches to HRD strategies including private sector management and development, social capital, knowledge management, gender planning affect the context for competence and performance enhancement in organisations and societies
-Understanding of how to analyse and design HRD strategies at societal and organisational level
-Understanding of your own learning and leadership skills and how they may be improved

Special features

The course usually includes a field visit to a UK or overseas destination, enabling you to visit public sector organisations, companies and agencies to learn about HRD systems and practices. The cost of the visit is included in the course fee.

Career opportunities

Graduates acquire a range of skills and knowledge valuable in the global economy and relevant for a variety of professional careers in international development. Recent graduates have gained positions including: HRD consultants/managers/directors in Ministries of HRD or Ministries of Education and as NGO Leaders (Middle East, Thailand, Indonesia, Latin America); Knowledge Management Consultants (Middle East, Canada); university HRD and training directors (Middle East, Africa); leadership and capacity development advisors in the public sector (Africa, Asia), education and HRD leadership consultants (Pakistan, Middle East). Some go on to work for the UN or World Bank, for example, gender and HRD specialist, or capacity building advisers (Kazakhstan, India, USA, China) and development project leaders (Nigeria). Some students progress to PhD study and a career in academia.

The course is unique as it demonstrates understanding of institutional HRD practices within the context of globalisation, social change and economic development so graduates acquire relevant development, HRD, leadership and education knowledge for directing culture and social change.

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Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Gender and Culture at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Gender and Culture at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

The MA in Gender and Culture offers an innovative interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary approach to the study of Gender and Culture.

Key Features of MA in Gender and Culture

This is an interdisciplinary MA scheme in Gender and Culture taught by Gender specialists across the Arts and Humanities – in the subject areas of Development Studies, Political and Cultural Studies, English Literature, Egyptology, European Languages, History, Media Studies, and Political and Cultural Studies.

If you are interested in gender and gender relations in politics, literature, culture, and history, like engaging in discussion and intellectual argument, and are excited about the idea of working within and across different subject areas, this MA in Gender and Culture is ideal for you.

The MA Gender and Culture examines the production, reproduction and transformation of gender in culture and society.

The Gender and Culture degree is supported by the research activity of GENCAS, the Centre for Research into Gender in Culture and Society in the College of Arts and Humanities. The College of Arts and Humanities has a Graduate Centre. The Graduate Centre fosters and supports individual and collaborative research activity of international excellence and offers a vibrant and supportive environment for students pursuing postgraduate research and taught masters study. The Centre provides postgraduate training to enhance academic and professional development and facilitates participation in seminar programmes, workshops and international conferences.

The full-time Gender and Culture course comprises three modules taken in each academic semester (a total of six modules) and then a dissertation over the summer. In part one, students study three compulsory modules and three optional modules. In part two, students are required to write the dissertation component which draws on issues and themes developed throughout the year.

Part-time study is available for the Gender and Culture programme.

Gender and Culture Programme Aims

To develop independent thinking and writing. You devise your own essay projects in consultation with a gender specialist - this combines the benefits of expert guidance with the rewards of shaping an intellectual project for yourself. To sharpen and develop your skills and take them to a new level by providing the chance for original thinking and intellectual freedom in writing the ‘dissertation’ element, where you complete your own research project.

Modules

Modules on the Gender and Culture programme include:

• Women and Politics
• Civil Society and International Development
• Critical Security Studies
• Rights-Based Approaches to Development
• War, Technology and Culture
• Approaches to IR
• Violence, Conflict & Development
• Governance, Globalization and Neoliberal Political Economy
• Human Rights and Humanitarian Intervention
• The Policy Making Process
• State of Africa
• Politics in Contemporary Britain
• War in Space
• Politics and Public Policy in the New Wales
• Postcolonialism, Orientalism and Eurocentrism
• War, Identity and Society
• Approaches to Political Theory
• International Security in the Asia Pacific
• Gender Trouble: the Medieval Anchorite, and Issues of Wombs and Tombs
• Women Writers of the 1940’s
• Women Writing India
• ‘The Great Pretender’: Masculinity in Contemporary Women’s Fiction
• ‘The Unsex’d Females’: Women Writers and the French Revolution
• British Women’s Fiction 1918-1939
• Contemporary Women’s Writing
• Angela Carter
• Gender in Contemporary European Culture
• Literature in Social Context
• Women and Gender in Ancient Egypt
• Nature’s Stepchildren: European Medicine and Sexual Dissidents, 1869-1939
• The making of Modern Sexualities, 1650-1800

Who should Apply?

Students interested in Gender and Culture from a Classics and Ancient History, English, European Languages, History, Media Studies, and Political and Cultural Studies or related background. Professionals interested in the challenge of digital studying Gender and Culture. Students interested in preparation for postgraduate research, MPhil or PhD, or who wish to develop skills and knowledge related to gender and culture.

Career Prospects

Career expectations are excellent for Gender and Culture graduates. Our graduates are employed in diverse and dynamic vocations such as education, business, law and finance, marketing, sales and advertising; commercial, industrial and public sectors; media and PR; creative and professional writing; social and welfare professions; heritage and tourism; government and politics; foreign affairs and diplomatic corps; humanitarian organisations and some go on to study a PhD.

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Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Gender and Culture at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Gender and Culture at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

Key Features of MA in Gender and Culture

This is an interdisciplinary MA scheme in Gender and Culture taught by Gender specialists across the Arts and Humanities – in the subject areas of Development Studies, Political and Cultural Studies, English Literature, Egyptology, European Languages, History, Media Studies, and Political and Cultural Studies.

If you are interested in gender and gender relations in politics, literature, culture, and history, like engaging in discussion and intellectual argument, and are excited about the idea of working within and across different subject areas, this MA in Gender and Culture is ideal for you.

The MA Gender and Culture examines the production, reproduction and transformation of gender in culture and society.

The Gender and Culture degree is supported by the research activity of GENCAS, the Centre for Research into Gender in Culture and Society in the College of Arts and Humanities. The College of Arts and Humanities has a Graduate Centre. The Graduate Centre fosters and supports individual and collaborative research activity of international excellence and offers a vibrant and supportive environment for students pursuing postgraduate research and taught masters study. The Centre provides postgraduate training to enhance academic and professional development and facilitates participation in seminar programmes, workshops and international conferences.

The full-time Gender and Culture course comprises three modules taken in each academic semester (a total of six modules) and then a dissertation over the summer. In part one, students study three compulsory modules and three optional modules. In part two, students are required to write the dissertation component which draws on issues and themes developed throughout the year.

Part-time study is available for the Gender and Culture programme.

The Extended MA (EMA) in Gender and Culture is a 240-credit postgraduate qualification that is equivalent to 120 ECTS (European Credit Transfer System) and is thus a recognised Masters qualification throughout the European Union. The EMA is a standard UK MA plus an additional 60 credits (30 ECTS) and this additional coursework is undertaken in one semester at a partner institution overseas. The EMA is therefore not only an EU recognised postgraduate qualification it also adds a study abroad experience thus enhancing the qualification’s employability credentials.

The partner institution for EMA Gender and Culture is the University of Regensburg. Founded in 1962, Regensburg is a renowned international centre of teaching and research. Although it has over 21,000 thousand students, the university offers a broad range of disciplines of study, as well as having excellent infrastructure and a favourable staff-student ratio. Regensburg is also active in research, with six special research areas supported by the German Research Society and a strong presence in German- and EU-funded research initiatives. The university has a significant international presence, offering exchange links with more than 200 European institutions and 45 overseas universities. Students will have access to the complete range of services and facilities offered at the university, along with inclusion in the many academic and social activities that take place. Located right in the heart of the old town of Regensburg, a UNESCO World Heritage Site, the university is situated in the centre of a culturally and socially rich area with over 2000 years of history.

Gender and Culture Programme Aims

To develop independent thinking and writing. You devise your own essay projects in consultation with a gender specialist - this combines the benefits of expert guidance with the rewards of shaping an intellectual project for yourself. To sharpen and develop your skills and take them to a new level by providing the chance for original thinking and intellectual freedom in writing the ‘dissertation’ element, where you complete your own research project.

Modules

Modules on the Gender and Culture programme include:

• Women and Politics
• Civil Society and International Development
• Critical Security Studies
• Rights-Based Approaches to Development
• War, Technology and Culture
• Approaches to IR
• Violence, Conflict & Development
• Governance, Globalization and Neoliberal Political Economy
• Human Rights and Humanitarian Intervention
• The Policy Making Process
• State of Africa
• Politics in Contemporary Britain
• War in Space
• Politics and Public Policy in the New Wales
• Postcolonialism, Orientalism and Eurocentrism
• War, Identity and Society
• Approaches to Political Theory
• International Security in the Asia Pacific
• Gender Trouble: the Medieval Anchorite, and Issues of Wombs and Tombs
• Women Writers of the 1940’s
• Women Writing India
• ‘The Great Pretender’: Masculinity in Contemporary Women’s Fiction
• ‘The Unsex’d Females’: Women Writers and the French Revolution
• British Women’s Fiction 1918-1939
• Contemporary Women’s Writing
• Angela Carter
• Gender in Contemporary European Culture
• Literature in Social Context
• Women and Gender in Ancient Egypt
• Nature’s Stepchildren: European Medicine and Sexual Dissidents, 1869-1939
• The making of Modern Sexualities, 1650-1800

Who should Apply?

Students interested in Gender and Culture from a Classics and Ancient History, English, European Languages, History, Media Studies, and Political and Cultural Studies or related background. Professionals interested in the challenge of digital studying Gender and Culture. Students interested in preparation for postgraduate research, MPhil or PhD, or who wish to develop skills and knowledge related to gender and culture.

Career Prospects

Career expectations are excellent for Gender and Culture graduates. Our graduates are employed in diverse and dynamic vocations such as education, business, law and finance, marketing, sales and advertising; commercial, industrial and public sectors; media and PR; creative and professional writing; social and welfare professions; heritage and tourism; government and politics; foreign affairs and diplomatic corps; humanitarian organisations and some go on to study a PhD.

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This is a multidisciplinary MSc programme that brings together the areas of international business and economic development. Taught jointly by the School of Economics and Kent Business School, the programme benefits from the expertise and strong research in both schools. Read more
This is a multidisciplinary MSc programme that brings together the areas of international business and economic development. Taught jointly by the School of Economics and Kent Business School, the programme benefits from the expertise and strong research in both schools.

The programme provides an excellent postgraduate education in the core principles of international business and economic development and helps to develop a broad set of skills that are highly sought after by global employers. It provides a structured approach to developing the knowledge and skills required to pursue a career in international business and/or economic development. You have the chance to develop an international perspective on business and economic development issues through working with an international group of students, and build your own international network.

The MSc is particularly suited to Business students who are looking to acquire economics understanding and skills in order to pursue a career in multinational enterprises, international organisations and consultancy companies. It also offers opportunities for the development of managers who want to deepen their understanding of the international economic environment, and for those who wish to pursue further academic study at PhD level.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/773/international-business-and-economic-development

About the School of Economics

The School of Economics is dedicated to excellence in both teaching and research, demonstrated by results in the REF 2014 and recent student surveys. All academic staff are research active, and teaching and learning are informed by the School's thriving research culture and strong cosmopolitan academic community. Our taught programmes offer a combination of training in core economics with the opportunity to specialise in areas such as finance, econometrics, development, agriculture or the environment.

About Kent Business School

Kent Business School has over 25 years’ experience delivering business education. Our portfolio of postgraduate programmes demonstrates the breadth and depth of our expertise. Academic research and links with global business inform our teaching, ensuring a curriculum that is relevant and current. We are ranked as a top 30 UK business school for the standard of our teaching and student satisfaction. We also hold a number of accreditations by professional bodies.

Course structure

The International Business and Economic Development MSc can be studied over one year full-time or two years part-time and is divided into two stages: eight taught modules (seven of which are compulsory) and a dissertation on either International Business or Economic Development.

All of our MSc programmes require some mathematical analysis, and we recognise that students have widely differing backgrounds in mathematics. The first week of all our MSc programmes includes compulsory intensive teaching in mathematics, refreshing and improving your skills in order to equip you with the techniques you will need for the rest of the programme.

Students who successfully pass the taught element of the programme, proceed to the dissertation stage, where you undertake a supervised project of your choice on a Business or Economic Development issue. Advice on choice of dissertation topic and management is given during the taught stage of the programme. The dissertation stage develops students’ research skills and follows on from the Research Methods module. Student dissertations are supervised by academic staff.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

CB934 - Strategy (15 credits)
CB936 - Business in an International Perspective (15 credits)
EC817 - Research Methods (15 credits)
EC833 - Economic Principles (15 credits)
EC835 - Quantitative Methods for Economists (15 credits)
CB859 - Managing the Multinational Enterprise (15 credits)
CB900 - Corporate Responsibility and Globalisation (15 credits)
CB9083 - Dissertation in International Business (60 credits)

Assessment

Assessment is based on a combination of coursework assignments, projects, presentations, reports and written examinations (in May). The programme is completed by a research-based dissertation of 12,000 words on an approved topic between May and September.

Programme aims

The programme aims to:

- provide a pre-experience Master’s programme for those wishing to pursue a career in international business and economic development.

- equip future business specialists with knowledge and skills in economics, econometrics and international development

- prepare students for a career in international business and economic development by developing skills in international business, economics and development or as preparation for research. Add value to first degrees by developing in individuals an integrated and critically aware understanding of international business, economics and organisations in international environments.

- develop a deeper understanding of the way economics and quantitative techniques can be applied to problem solving in international business and development.

- develop in students the ability to apply economic knowledge, analytical tools and skills in range of theoretical and applied business and development problems.

- develop students’ knowledge and understanding of organisations, the economic context in which they operate and how they are managed.

- develop skills necessary for independent research in business and economic development.

- develop an appropriate range of cognitive, critical and intellectual skills, research skills and relevant personal and interpersonal skills.

- foster enhancement of lifelong learning skills and personal development so as to be able to work with self-direction and originality and to contribute to business and economic development of society at large.

- provide teaching and learning opportunities that are informed by high quality research and scholarship from within the Kent Business School and the School of Economics.

- provide information and advice on future employment and further postgraduate study.

- support national and regional economic success via the development opportunities offered by the programme, including those related to an understanding of international business practices and economic development.

Careers

Kent has an excellent record for postgraduate employment: over 96% of our postgraduate students who graduated in 2014 found a job or further study opportunity within six months.

A postgraduate degree in the area of economics and business is a particularly valuable and flexible qualification that can open the door to exciting careers in multinational enterprises, international organisations and consultancy companies.

The School's employability officers and the University's Careers and Employability Service are available throughout the year to offer one-to-one advice and help on all aspects of employability at any stage in your postgraduate studies. We also offer online advice on employability skills, career choices, applications and interview skills.

Professional recognition

Kent Business School is a member of the European Foundation for Management Development (EMFD), CIPD, CIM and the Association of Business Schools (ABS). In addition, KBS is accredited by the Association of MBAs (AMBA).

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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This programme is designed for those who want to understand global processes and development, and for those who want to work on, or analyse, development related tasks and issues. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

This programme is designed for those who want to understand global processes and development, and for those who want to work on, or analyse, development related tasks and issues. It is also highly relevant to anyone working, or intending to work, in development advocacy, policy making, and global development policy analysis, in the NGO sector, government agencies, and international development organisations.

We welcome students with a strong background in the social sciences in their first degree, but we also welcome students who have worked in the area of development, or in a related field.

This exciting programme offers a critical examination of the contemporary process of globalisation and how it influences the developing world, both before and after the ongoing global crisis. The MSc Globalisation and Development blends, in equal measure, critical analysis of mainstream thinking, alternative theories and practices, and case studies of political, social and cultural aspects of globalisation and development.

This degree draws its strength from the unrivalled expertise at SOAS in development problems and processes. The programme is of interest for development practitioners, activists, and students with a scholarly interest in how globalisation influences the developing world, and how the poor majority responds to these challenges.

Highlights include:

- Critical and historical approaches to globalisation and their relationship to neoliberalism, imperialism and US global hegemony.

- Contemporary globalising processes – capital flows, state-market relations, transnational corporations, global commodity chains, inequality and poverty on a global scale.

- Transformation of work in the age of globalisation – new types of work, informalisation and precarisation, labour migration, agrarian change and gender relations.

- Globalisation and imperialism – post-Cold War imperial and civil wars, global and regional challengers to US hegemony: China and Russia.

- Globalisation, democracy and culture – human rights, democratisation, cosmopolitanism, standardisation, homogenisation.

- Alternatives to neoliberal globalisation – global labour movement, transnational social movements and NGOs, environmental issues.

Students can draw on SOAS's unique expertise to specialise further in particular regions or topics. Please see 'Structure' for details on core and optional modules.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/development/programmes/mscglobdev/

Structure

- Overview
There are four main components to this degree: three taught modules and a 10,000 word dissertation. All students take a core module, Globalisation and Development. They then select one of two further modules: Political Economy of Development or Theory, Policy and Practice of Development. Through these modules students build their analytical skills and knowledge of the main issues and debates in Development Studies.

- Specialisation
Students also take optional modules (one full module or two half modules), allowing them to specialise in particular areas of development and possibly use them to develop a dissertation in a related theme. By tying optional modules to their individual dissertation topic, students design their degree to suit their own interests and career development goals.

Students should be aware that not all optional modules may run in a given year. Modules at other institutions are not part of the approved programme structure.

Programme Specification

Programme Specification 2015/16 (pdf; 76kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/development/programmes/mscglobdev/file101725.pdf

Materials

SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources.

Teaching & Learning

Modules are taught by a combination of methods, principally lectures, tutorial classes, seminars and supervised individual study projects.

The MSc programme consists of three taught modules (corresponding to three examination papers) and a dissertation.

- Lectures

Most modules involve a two hour lecture as a key component with linked tutorial classes.

- Seminars

At Masters level there is particular emphasis on seminar work. Students make full-scale presentations for each unit that they take, and are expected to write papers that often require significant independent work.

- Dissertation

A quarter of the work for the degree is given over to the writing of an adequately researched 10,000-word dissertation. Students are encouraged to take up topics which relate the study of a particular region to a body of theory.

Employment

A postgraduate degree in Globalisation and Development from SOAS provides graduates with a portfolio of widely transferable skills sought by employers, including analytical skills, the ability to think laterally and employ critical reasoning, and knowing how to present materials and ideas effectively both orally and in writing. Equally graduates are able to continue in the field of research, continuing their studies either at SOAS or other institutions. An MSc in Globalisation and Development is a valuable experience that provides students with a body of work and a diverse range of skills that they can use to market themselves with when they graduate.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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The MA in Visual Arts and Culture at Durham is a distinctive interdisciplinary programme that invites students to develop their knowledge and understanding of the visual arts and of visual culture. Read more
The MA in Visual Arts and Culture at Durham is a distinctive interdisciplinary programme that invites students to develop their knowledge and understanding of the visual arts and of visual culture. To study visual arts and culture is a way of paying attention to phenomena that are literally everywhere. The concept of ‘visual culture’ acknowledges the pervasive nature of visual phenomena, and signals openness towards both the breadth of objects and images, and the range of theoretical and methodological perspectives needed to understand them adequately. Drawing upon research strengths across the departments that contribute to the programme, the MA in Visual Arts and Culture encourages you to take a broad view of geographical and chronological scope, while allowing you to engage with a wide range of visual phenomena, including fine art, film, photography, architecture, and scientific and medical imaging practices.

The importance of critical visual literacy in the contemporary world cannot be exaggerated. ‘The illiterate of the future’, wrote the Bauhaus artist and theoretician László Moholy-Nagy, ‘will be the person ignorant of the camera as well as of the pen’. This observation was made in the 1920s, when photography was first used in the periodical press and in political propaganda. The rich visual world of the early twentieth century pales in comparison with the visual saturation that now characterises everyday experience throughout the developed societies and much of the developing world. But the study of visual culture is by no means limited to the twentieth century. Turning our attention to past cultures with a particular eye to the significance of visual objects of all kinds yields new forms of knowledge and understanding.

Our programme facilitates the development of critical visual literacy in three main ways. First, it attends to the specificity of visual objects, images and events, encouraging you to develop approaches that are sensitive to the individual works they encounter. Second, it investigates the nature of perception, asking how it is that we make meaning out of that which we see. Finally, it investigates how our relationships with other people, and with things, are bound up in the act of looking.

Course structure

The course consists of one core module, two optional modules and a dissertation. The core module sets out the intellectual framework for the programme, offering a broad overview of key conceptual debates in the field of Visual Culture, together with training in analysis of visual objects of different kinds, an advanced introduction to understanding museum practice, and key research skills in visual arts and culture. The optional modules provide further specialised areas of study in related topics of interest to individual students, and the 12,000-15,000 word dissertation involves detailed study of a particular aspect of a topic related to the broad area of visual culture.

Optional modules

Previously, optional modules have included:
-Critical Curatorship
-History, Knowledge and Visual Culture
-Representing Otherness
-Negotiating the Human
-Theorizing History and Historicising Theory: An Introduction to Photographic Studies
-Digital Imaging
-Cultural Heritage, Communities and Identities
-Current Issues in Aesthetics and Theory of Art
-Ethics of Cultural Heritage
-Monumental architecture of the Roman Empire in the Antonine and Severan periods
-Art in Ecological Perspective
-Texts and Cultures I: Visual and Verbal Cultures (Early Modern)
-Energy, Society and Energy Practices
-German Reading Skills for Research
-French Reading Skills for Research

The Centre for Visual Arts and Culture (CVAC) brings together scholars from across and beyond Durham University in order to provide a dynamic setting for wide-ranging interdisciplinary research and debates about visual culture, a field that entails the study of vision and perception, the analysis of the social significance of images and ways of seeing, and the attentive interpretation of a range of visual objects, from artworks to scientific images.

Centre for Visual Arts and Culture

The Centre brings together scholars from across and beyond Durham University in order to provide a vibrant and dynamic setting for wide-ranging interdisciplinary research and debates about visual culture. The Centre provides a focus for cutting-edge research on visual arts and cultures: it aspires to train new generations of scholars through innovative postgraduate programmes, it fosters informed debate both nationally and internationally, and it offers an engaging, open environment for researchers at all levels.

CVAC takes a generous view of what constitutes visual culture and it is broad in both geographical and chronological scope, encouraging debate about the range of approaches, methods and theories that are most generative for research on visual phenomena. Durham’s current visual culture research includes the study of word and image, art and religion, medicine and visual representation, film, the history of photography, architecture, urban culture, heritage and philosophical aesthetics. It also includes the development of pioneering visual research methods and the study of vision.

Durham’s location itself provides a rich and inspiring environment for this field of research. It is part of the UNESCO World Heritage Site that also includes Durham Cathedral; its acclaimed Oriental Museum is a significant asset which houses three Designated Collections, recognised by the Arts Council as nationally and internationally pre-eminent; alongside an outstanding collection of twentieth-century and contemporary art. CVAC has many established relationships with major national and international cultural organisations, and aims to develop further its links with museums, galleries and heritage sites.

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The Programme provides participants with the knowledge and skills for effective participation in the management of development projects. Read more
The Programme provides participants with the knowledge and skills for effective participation in the management of development projects. It explores the evolution of development theories and how successful national development needs to be founded on the integration of sound socio-economic analysis with an enabling legal environment. The contents are multi-disciplinary, ranging from exploration of key topics in development economics, to the rule-of-law and the foundation pillars for the creation and effective operation of development institutions. In addition, the Programme imparts a full spectrum of competencies needed for project cycle management (PCM).

CURRICULUM OF THE MASTER:

PART I -DISTANT LEARNING

A self-learning tutor-assisted period of 12 weeks’ duration designed to introduce the participants to the pre-requisite entry level knowledge in the disciplines of Part II, namely economics, institutional design, sociology, law and project management. The training materials will include selected chapters from key textbooks in addition to a number of articles from well-known journals. The learning content will be posted on the programme’s website while the participants will be provided with at least one prescribed textbook. Two weeks subsequent to arrival in Turin the participants will sit for two written examination covering the topics of Part I.

PART II - FACE-TO-FACE LEARNING

Module I: Introduction to developmentactors and institutions
• Introduction to development aid, international donor institutions – UN system, IMF and World Bank
• Project cycle management: logical framework approach, operational planning, budget, monitoring and evaluation

Module II: Economics of Development

• Economic development theories
• The global economic crisis
• Strategies of economic development: selected countries
• The role of FDI in development
• Environmental economics
• Inequality and poverty
• Cost and benefi t of migration in sending and destination countries

Module III: Legal concepts in development

• Enabling legal frameworks for effective and sustainable development
• The role and function of key actors in development, inter alia, multilateral and bilateral development agencies and NGOs.
• Human Rights based approach to development programming
• Labour Standards with emphasis on gender and prevention of child labour

Module IV: Institutional development and social analysis

• Factors infl uencing “institutional effi ciency “
• Political regimes and instruments of participation
• Development, politics and culture: perspectives from political science
• Family, gender and participation (special reference to problems of health and education)
• NGOs management

This face-to-face part is the core learning component of the Master. The participants will be asked to sit for three written exams in order to assess their learning achievement in the subject matter of Part II.

PART III - INDEPENDENT WORK- thesis preparation

This part is dedicated to individual or group formulation of a full-fledged project document in response to a perceived “development need” in a sector and country related to the participants’ work or field of interest.

Deadline for Application: 26 September 2015



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This Master's degree will be of particular interest to anyone wishing to develop an anthropological understanding of global development, policy and practice and their local impacts. Read more
This Master's degree will be of particular interest to anyone wishing to develop an anthropological understanding of global development, policy and practice and their local impacts. Its combination of anthropology with other international development disciplines provides a good grounding for anyone wishing to use an anthropological perspective when working in multidisciplinary teams. It provides a solid base for those planning a career in development agencies, the non-governmental sector and other international organisations, and for those working in such institutions who wish to take a larger role in the direct provision of services or policy development. It is also relevant for people interested in policy research, in journalism and in undertaking advanced research in international development, anthropology and related fields.

The programme will help you to develop a critical and theoretical understanding of the issues, processes and institutions central to global poverty, inequality and development. It will help you to develop a thorough understanding of theories and methods in anthropology and to apply these to the field of international development. It will enable you to contrast anthropological perspectives on development with those of other disciplines.

The programme's core modules aim to improve your skills in evaluation and analysis, enabling you to participate critically in debates on the changing nature of the multilateral, bilateral and non-governmental institutions designed to address development issues, the context in which they operate and the constraints they face.

You will also have the opportunity to choose from a range of thematic option modules and to undertake a dissertation that examines development from an anthropological perspective. The option modules and dissertation allow you to tailor your programme according to your personal or career interests.

The transferable skills you will develop/enhance during the programme include the capacity to analyse debates and issues in development, team-working, and written and oral communication. You will also learn to locate and analyse qualitative and quantitative data on development from printed and electronic sources.

Why study this course at Birkbeck?

We offer multiple approaches to the study of societies and cultures, human geography, and sustainability, poverty and development, as well as community and citizenship, at local, regional and global levels.
This programme is ideal if you want to further your knowledge of, or are planning a career in, development agencies, international organisations, NGOs, or related areas.
Develop transferable skills, including critical analysis of debates and issues in development, team-working, written and oral communication, and qualitative and quantitative data analysis.
One of the unique strengths of our Department of Geography, Environment and Development Studies is the breadth of research interests of our staff. Subsequently, we offer a very wide range of courses that reflect the disciplinary breadth of development and globalisation, while also allowing you to engage with other disciplines, such as anthropology and sociology.
You will be surrounded by committed fellow students from all cultures, backgrounds and career stages who are eager to share their experience and expertise with their peers.
Ours is a vibrant research culture, powered by a shared passion for learning and intellectual engagement among our academics and students. We have a strong commitment to social justice, which informs and shapes much of our cutting-edge research.
We have strong links with the London International Development Centre, which can enhance your employability.
We offer excellent student support and have a wide range of world-class research resources.

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Since the late 1990s governments and policy makers have increasingly recognised the importance of the contribution of culture to economic growth and other social benefits. Read more
Since the late 1990s governments and policy makers have increasingly recognised the importance of the contribution of culture to economic growth and other social benefits. Although culture is often associated with big firms and institutions most of the activity in the sector tends to be small scale. That is particularly true at the creative and enterprising phase of cultural processes. Therefore, understanding the dynamics of the creative phase is essential for people who wish to contribute to the production of culture, and
for the development of the cultural sector more generally. The course emphasises the importance of change and unpredictability
for the growth of the creative and cultural sector and locates that in broader social, economic and political processes.

The key aims of the MA are to deliver a qualification that:

- explains the contribution of the cultural and creative sectors to innovation, enterprise and employment;
- develops practical skills for the development of ideas into cultural and creative projects, enterprises and businesses;
- investigates the challenges and issues affecting the cultural and creative sector at an individual, national and global level;
- critically examines the political, economic and social dimensions of the cultural and creative sectors and
- provides an opportunity for students to collaborate with each other and with academic staff, and to connect with cultural and creative professionals from across the public and private sectors.

The course is designed for students who wish to develop and combine practical and intellectual skills at masters level. It will enable you to work individually and in small groups and require you to take initiative and responsibility for your individual development. The course is delivered by staff with both practical and research interests in the creative and cultural sector, including digital media production, theatre and performance, costume design, radio, popular music, contemporary art, culture industry and economy, cultural policy and management. It is supported by guest staff from both the public and private sector to provide the additional benefit of experience and insight.

The MA will particularly interest those who wish to develop careers in the cultural and creative sectors. A degree or background
that is related to the creative and cultural sector is relevant to be considered for admission but we welcome applications from graduates from other disciplines who can demonstrate that they have the relevant experience and motivation.

Teaching, learning and assessment

Teaching combines lectures, seminars, tutorials, case studies, simulation exercises and projects and covers a broad range of topics informed by research and a creative approach to problems. Performance is assessed through a variety of methods including essays, reports, presentations, portfolios and a dissertation or project. The final dissertation or project is designed to develop individual interest and curiosity. Class sizes will be around 15 students.

Teaching hours and attendance

Normally course modules require eight hours contact time per week. In most instances this will be delivered across two days full-time, one day part-time.

Links with industry/professional bodies

Course staff have a range of formal and informal relationships with individuals and organisations across the culture and creative sector who contribute advice, support and teaching.

Modules

The Creative Sector and Entrepreneurship/ Introduction to Culture and Economy/ Understanding Research/Writing Art and Culture/Creative Enterprise Development/ Work Organisation and Production in Culture and Creative Enterprise/ Option Modules
60 credits: Dissertation/Creative Development Project.

Careers

The course provides knowledge and insight for culture and creative enterprise development at whatever stage of the process applicants are at. The course is also suitable for people who are interested in developing knowledge of culture and creative enterprise for academic development, such as research and teaching, and support agency policy development.

Quick Facts

- Small cohort of students
- Established connections with external agencies, forms and networks
- Individual development support
- Funded places available for Scottish and EU residents

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This program is available on the Grenoble campus. The program is aimed at students wishing to pursue an international management career in a global context and. Read more

Objectives

This program is available on the Grenoble campus

The program is aimed at students wishing to pursue an international management career in a global context and:

- Acquire a specific knowledge and the understanding needed to work in HRM in an international context and to contribute to its development
- Experience a unique learning environment in working with people from different nationalities, culture and academic backgrounds and sharing the same interest in international people management
- Acquire an understanding of global business and culture and extend their international network.

The mission of the MSc International Human Resource Management and Organizational Development is to build the abilities and skills necessary for future managers to recruit, manage and enhance talent while facilitating change in multicultural and international environments. The program provides an understanding of the approach to handling international human resource management operations and the differences in international and domestic HRM.

Through a blending of theory and practice, using case studies and applied learning, students will develop the competencies to understand the HR issues facing business today and positively impact organizational structure and dynamics.

The MSc International Human Resource Management and Organizational Development focuses on the human resource and organizational issues facing companies that operate in the global market. It aims to train managers able to contribute to corporate performance and social responsibility through the effective management of the company's most valuable asset: its men and women.

A WORD FROM THE PROGRAM DIRECTOR

"The MSc in International Human Resource Management and Organizational Development combines theoretical knowledge with a strong technical and practical orientation to enable students to master key operational know-how and soft skills. Students will be able to apply this knowledge to decision-making in HR and organizational development within different geographical contexts. The program has an international focus, as an ever-increasing globalization of business impacts HRM.

Program delivery relies on a mixture of pedagogical methods and techniques from traditional to interactive lectures, e-learning activities, readings, exercises, case studies, presentations, simulations, individual and multicultural team-based work.

Students will also experiment a course based on a new pedagogy: serious games.

The Final Management Project - a supervised research paper of 20,000 words - allows students to become experts in an HR-related topic of their choice covering not only technical concepts, but also professional practices and implications."

Sabine Lauria

Program

The program explores how HR strategy fits into overall corporate strategy, the key differences between International Human Resource Management (IHRM) and domestic HRM, and the skills required to recruit, manage and enhance talent. It is designed for graduates who wish to pursue management careers at national and international levels.

Participants will develop the know-how and competencies to identify and understand the HR issues facing business today and develop appropriate strategies to ensure that effective people management strategies create competitive advantage and sources of value.

This program also emphasizes organizational development, as it is one of the new challenges in HR.

INTRODUCTION WEEK

- Introduction to the Program and to the role of HRM today.
- Study Skills and Techniques (Case Study Methodology, Academic and Professional Writing, Presentation Skills etc.)
- Team Building and integration activities
- Moodle e-learning platform user training
- Introduction to the Library and Computing Services at GGSB
- Student Administrative Issues
- Alumni Association information

THE FIVE MAIN COMPONENTS OF THE PROGRAM

1) Business Environment

- Global Business Environment and Strategic Management
- International Labor Economics
- Finance and Accounting for HR Managers

2) Fundamentals of HRM

- Fundamentals of Human Resource Management
- Compensation and Benefits
- HR Reporting
- Information Systems for HR Managers
- Staffing
- Recruitment Process and e-Recruitment
- Personality Tests and Interview Techniques

3) International HR Management and Contemporary Issues

- Strategic IHRM
- HR as a Business Partner
- HR Innovations (Serious Game)
- Managing an HR Department (Simulation)
- Legal Context
- Employee Relations, Grievances and Representation
- Comparative Legal Contexts of International HRM
- People Development
- Talent Development and Performance Management
- International Career Path and Expatriation
- Social Management
- Creating and Managing a Well-Balanced Workplace
- Managing Diversity and Ethics

4) International Organizational Development

- International Team Behavior
- Leadership, Group and Team Dynamics
- Intercultural Management
- Organizational Development
- Managing Corporate Culture and Structure
- Corporate Social Responsibility
- Change and Lean Management
- International Organization
- Company Profile

5) Research Methodology and Final Management Project Workshop

PERSONAL AND PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT WORKSHOPS

In addition to the core courses, students can attend personal and professional development workshops. These workshops cover current topics of interest, recent trends in management and career development. They serve as a complement to the core modules.

COMPANY ANALYSIS AND PROFILE

Students will select a company with international business located in different national culture. The purpose is to evaluate the impact of organization design on human resources roles and responsibilities. The objective is to gather public and internal information to develop their own analysis of the situation.

The program encourages effective teamwork as the major part of modules expects students to work in groups. These groups will consist of students of different nationalities and rhythms, as some students attend courses part-time.

RESEARCH TECHNIQUES AND PROJECT PROPOSAL

A research techniques module has been created to provide the skills required to effectively work on the Final Management Projects and on future professional projects.

FINAL MANAGEMENT PROJECT

The second year of the program is dedicated to the Final Management Project, a written work of approximately 20,000 words, conducted under the supervision of a tutor from GGSB. Students will choose an aspect of International HR Management and are encouraged to link the chosen subject matter to their future career. The project can be completed in parallel with full-time employment or an internship based in France or abroad.

FOREIGN LANGUAGES

Operating in an international environment requires foreign language fluency and therefore a foreign language module is an option on the program for all students.

Non-French speakers may study French (beginner to advanced level). This option is highly advised for those who are looking to become professionals in France. French speakers may choose from a number of other languages at beginner level.

Careers

Graduates of this MSc program will be qualified for posts in both multinational corporations and companies experiencing rapid expansion in international markets.

Graduates may equally enter the consulting field in the areas of HR and organizational development.

Admission

This postgraduate MSc program is open to both young and mature graduates from any field and with no or limited work experience. Candidates should have excellent interpersonal skills, good oral and communication written skills and a strong motivation for international relations and business.

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The Human Development, Learning, and Culture (HDLC) program at UBC addresses the interface of research and practice in education, weaving together theoretical models and concepts in their application to real world educational issues. Read more

Human Development, Learning, and Culture

The Human Development, Learning, and Culture (HDLC) program at UBC addresses the interface of research and practice in education, weaving together theoretical models and concepts in their application to real world educational issues. Investigations of learning and development, including the unique contributions of culture to these processes, are applied to a wide range of contexts including classroom, afterschool, work, and technological contexts. This work is interpreted through a variety of theoretical lenses (e.g., constructivist, cognitive, sociocultural, and social and emotional development). Students are encouraged to participate in research and teaching opportunities throughout their program.

Coursework emphasizes three primary areas: a) learning and development, b) culture and diversity, and c) research methods, including qualitative and quantitative, experimental and developmental. HDLC graduates have found careers in a variety of settings including university teaching and research, social policy analysis, curriculum and program evaluation, schools and community organizations, and corporate learning communities.

Quick Facts

- Degree: Master of Arts
- Specialization: Human Development, Learning, and Culture
- Subject: Arts, Social Sciences and Humanities
- Mode of delivery: On campus
- Program components: Coursework + Thesis required
- Faculty: Faculty of Education

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The Human Development, Learning, and Culture (HDLC) program at UBC addresses the interface of research and practice in education, weaving together theoretical models and concepts in their application to real world educational issues. Read more

Human Development, Learning, and Culture

The Human Development, Learning, and Culture (HDLC) program at UBC addresses the interface of research and practice in education, weaving together theoretical models and concepts in their application to real world educational issues. Investigations of learning and development, including the unique contributions of culture to these processes, are applied to a wide range of contexts including classroom, afterschool, work, and technological contexts. This work is interpreted through a variety of theoretical lenses (e.g., constructivist, cognitive, sociocultural, and social and emotional development). Students are encouraged to participate in research and teaching opportunities throughout their program.

Coursework emphasizes three primary areas: a) learning and development, b) culture and diversity, and c) research methods, including qualitative and quantitative, experimental and developmental. HDLC graduates have found careers in a variety of settings including university teaching and research, social policy analysis, curriculum and program evaluation, schools and community organizations, and corporate learning communities.

Quick Facts

- Degree: Master of Education
- Specialization: Human Development, Learning, and Culture
- Subject: Arts, Social Sciences and Humanities
- Mode of delivery: On campus
- Program components: Coursework + Major Project/Essay required
- Faculty: Faculty of Education

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For international organisations such as the World Bank and the United Nations World Tourism Organisation (UNWTO), and also national ministries and regional development agencies, tourism is an important means of economic diversification, poverty reduction and socio-economic integration. Read more

Course in brief

For international organisations such as the World Bank and the United Nations World Tourism Organisation (UNWTO), and also national ministries and regional development agencies, tourism is an important means of economic diversification, poverty reduction and socio-economic integration.

It offers a way to bring relative prosperity to a region through additional revenue streams and a raised public profile. UNWTO argue that developing countries in particular benefit from this process and make it their aim to faciliate it, all the while minimising the potentially negative impact on the environment and cultural integrity.

Our Tourism and International Development MSc aligns with the missions of UNWTO and focuses on the role of tourism as an agent of development and as a vehicle to sustainable change both at a micro and a macro level. The programme is delivered through the Tourism Policy, Practice and Performance (TPPP) hub, a research organisation and affiliate member of UNWTO.

Course structure

Full-time students attend classes two days per week, while part-time students usually attend once per week. Some modules and field-based activities may require attendance on consecutive days.

Teaching methods include lectures, seminars, workshops and live scenarios. You are also expected to engage in a high degree of self-directed learning.

For international students, the MSc also offers an extended masters route with English language study for between two and sixth months before the course begins.

Areas of study

Coming from diverse cultures and backgrounds and with a broad range of career histories, students can expect to gain valuable insights into themes such as: development in the era of globalisation; sustainable tourism development in local economies; tourism and structural economic and regional change; myths and realities of tourism development; international cooperation, philanthropy and consultancy; global and local conflicts in tourism; and tourism's role in poverty alleviation.

Modules

Tourism and Development: Critical Perspectives
Consultancy
Globalisation, Society and Culture
Ethical and Social Responsibility: Theory and Application

Two from:

Tourism and International Cooperation
Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Small Business Development
Risk and Crisis Management
Sport for International Development and Peace
Professional Enquiry
The Visual and Visuality: Performing Culture
Digital Marketing Strategies
Sport Tourism
Anthropology: Critical Perspectives
Tourism, Landscape and Materiality
Ethnography
Contemporary Issues in Cruise Management

Careers and employability

This course provides a solid grounding in international development and globalisation concepts, theories and approaches. It provides graduates with the skills needed to operate with organisations requiring knowledge about and strategic approaches to sustainable tourism development, for example tourism offices, NGOs, development agencies and consultancies.

Those thinking of starting a career in development or those already working in the sector who wish to consolidate and build on their professional experience will find in this MSc programme an excellent opportunity to gain theoretical and applied knowledge, to actively engage in development issues and debates from a interdisciplinary perspective and to work across sectors such as development policy, research and practice.

Extended masters route

This course offers the extended masters route. This involves English language study for between two and sixth months at the university before starting the MSc. Visit https://www.brighton.ac.uk/international/study-with-us/courses-and-qualifications/brighton-language-institute/courses/extended-masters-route/index.aspx

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This course looks at international development through a communications lens and the role media play in development and policy making. Read more
This course looks at international development through a communications lens and the role media play in development and policy making.

Who is it for?

This course is for students looking for an opportunity to explore the impact of media and communications on international policy and within sociological context.

The course will appeal to students with a general interest in communication studies and cross-disciplinary interests in development studies, sociology and politics.

Objectives

Communication is integral to development programmes. At a time when ideas about freedom of expression, democracy, human rights and access to natural and material resources guide development projects across the world, the question about the role of media and communications for social change becomes ever more pertinent.

Development is taken as a contested concept that translates into courses for advocating democratic forms of participation, policy initiatives and training activities in media and communications sectors in different geographical regions.

The International Communications and Development MA provides you with an interdisciplinary framework for understanding and critically assessing the role of communications for and in development projects.

It also gives you a broad interdisciplinary overview of developments in broadcasting, telecommunications, the press and information technology drawing on economics, political science, international relations, development theory, sociology and law.

On the course you will develop an ability to participate in policy making and evaluation in the context of changing national and global economic and political relations.

The Department of Sociology at City offers you an extensive range of module options. This enables you to specialise in your particular areas of interest, developing your critical skills and advancing your knowledge, culminating with you undertaking an extended piece of original research.

Teaching and learning

The educational aims are achieved through a combination of lectures, interactive sessions, practical workshops and small group classes supported by a personal tutorial system. You are encouraged to undertake extensive reading in order to understand the topics covered in lectures and classes and to broaden and deepen their knowledge of the subject. In the course of self-directed hours you are expected to read from the set module bibliography, prepare your class participation, collect and organize source material for your coursework, to plan and write your coursework.

The Department also runs a personal tutorial system which provides support for teaching and learning and any problems can be identified and dealt with early.

During the second term the Department offers a Dissertation Workshop to guide you on your dissertation outline.

Modules

The course focuses on the relationship between communication, development and democracy. Over the course of the year you will develop your knowledge of media and communication studies within the context of globalisation, Political communication and the work of international organisations and nongovernmental organisations in development communication.

Your will also cover more specific areas such as media representation (national and trans-national) and audiences and the communications policies that affect them.

You will take three 30-credit core modules and either two 15-credit modules or one 30-credit module elective modules.

Core modules
-Democratisation and Networked Communication SGM311 (30 credits)
-Research Workshop SGM302 (30 dredits)
-Communication, Culture and Development SGM312 (30 credits)

You must also complete a 60 credit dissertation in order to be awarded the Master's qualification. You are normally required to pass all taught modules before progressing to the dissertation.

Elective modules
-Developments in Communication Policy SGM309 (15 credits)
-Transnational Media and Communication SGM308 (15 credits)
-Celebrity SGM314 (15 credits)
-Development and World Politics IPM104 (15 credits)
-Religion in Global Politics (IPM119) (15 credits)
-Human Rights and the Transformation of World Politics IPM118 (30 credits)
-Global Political Economy - Contemporary Approaches IPM116 (30 credits)
-Evaluation Politics and Advocacy AMM420 (15 credits)
-Analysing Crime SGM301 (30 credits)
-Criminal Justice Policy and Practice (SGM303) (30 credits)
-Victims: Policy and Politics SGM305 (15 credits)
-Criminal Minds SGM304 (15 credits)

NB. Elective modules choices are subject to availability.

Career prospects

Graduates have entered a wide variety of careers in the civil service, broadcasting, press and telecoms networks, NGOs, the development sector and consultancies, advertising, marketing, politics, journalism, PR, media management and regulatory agencies. Recent graduate positions include; Fundraising and Communications Officer at Alone in London, Communications Specialist at Government Division of Health and Social Services and Civil Servant at Seoul Metropolitan Government.

Jessica Perrin who recently graduated with an MA in International Communications and Development is now Head of NGOs at Thomson Reuters Foundation.

Students have access to the expert services of our Careers, Student Development and Outreach Office. They regularly receive information about internship and job opportunities and are invited to participate in media fairs and panel discussions with alumni.

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The Master in International Cooperation and Development (MIC&D) offers a privileged framework for designing tentative solutions to poverty, inequality, conflict, instability and uncertainty which still affect the everyday life of a majority of the world population. Read more
The Master in International Cooperation and Development (MIC&D) offers a privileged framework for designing tentative solutions to poverty, inequality, conflict, instability and uncertainty which still affect the everyday life of a majority of the world population.

Learning objectives

The Master trains professionals to contribute to development cooperation with creativity, personality and competence by interpreting local and international events, interacting with stakeholders, identifying and managing environmentally and local culture-friendly interventions. This Master provides students with multidisciplinary training and specialized technical and managerial competences.

Career opportunities & professional recognition

Students who have completed the Master in International Cooperation and Development are working in various national and international institutions and organizations: NGOs, public administration, private companies, dealing with poverty eradication, emergency, development, migration, institution and democracy building in many different countries. The Master supports the students professional career in cooperation and development, building on their previous background and expertise.

Curriculum

The Master in International Cooperation and Development is structured as four complementary levels, fostering multidimensional training and integrating scientific methodologies and operative competences.

1st level - Scientific Training. Areas of study:
● Economic and human development
● Geopolitics
● Trade and finance for development
● Development law and institutions
● Project cycle management

2nd level - Professional Training. Areas of study:
● Development actors and strategies
● Crisis prevention, relief and recovery
● Development aid and governance
● Partnerships for human rights and development
● Enhancing cooperative skills

3rd level - Project Work
Students are required to develop a personal research project on a topic related to development cooperation, under the supervision of a MIC&D professor and/or a professional from a partner institution. The project work will often be connected to the internship experience.

4th level - Internship
The Master is completed with an internship within one of the ASERI partner institutions or other entities whose mission and activities are consistent with the program.

Faculty & teaching staff

The Master in International Cooperation and Development offers high quality training to a group of 25 students from all continents. The learning platform includes lectures, seminars and a tutored internship. A faculty composed of scholars and professionals from international institutions and non-governmental organizations shares its experience with the class.

Faculty members:

● Prof. Simona Beretta - MIC&D Director, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore
● Dr. Anni Arial - consultant in land governance, former FAO officer
● Dr. Sara Balestri - Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore
● Dr. Frank Cinque - ALTIS, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore
● Prof. Luigi Curini - Università degli Studi di Milano
● Prof. Paul H. Dembinski - University of Fribourg
● Dr. Giuliano Gargioni - Global Tuberculosis Programme, WHO, Geneva
● Dr. Christophe Golay - Geneva Academy of International Humanitarian Law and Human Rights
● Prof. Xuewu Gu - University of Bonn
● Prof. Marco Lombardi - Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore
● Prof. Mario Agostino Maggioni - Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore
● Dr. Alberto Monguzzi - International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies, Budapest
● Prof. Mathias Nebel - Institut Catholique de Paris
● Dr. Valeria Patruno - IAL Puglia s.r.l.
● Dr. Giovanna Prennushi - The World Bank, Washington
● Dr. Manuela Prina - European Training Foundation, Turin
● Prof. Riccardo Redaelli - Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore
● Prof. Javier Revilla Diez - Global South Studies Center, University of Cologne
● Prof. Michele Riccardi - Transcrime, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore
● Dr. Andrea Rossi - UNICEF, Kathmandu
● Dr. Javier Schunk - PCM Trainer
● Dr. Nicola Strazzari - Vision Plus Media Enterprises, Turin
● Dr. Manuela Tortora - UNCTAD, Geneva
● Prof. Teodora Erika Uberti - Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore
● Prof. Roberto Zoboli - Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore
● Professionals from international institutions, non-govern- mental organizations, applied researchers

ASERI - a center of excellence

Since its foundation in 1995, ASERI has formed young professionals in the fields of international relations and international cooperation, in a stimulating, multidisciplinary learning environment. Students from all over the world, faculty, and professionals find a unique space for discovering new opportunities for their professional enhancement and create a valuable network for future collaboration.

Our experts

Both academics and experienced professionals share their knowledge with students during group activities at ASERI, fostering critical and innovative thinking in facing development and emergency challenges.

Job ready

The Master in International Cooperation and Development provides an opportunity for learning critical and systematic analytical tools, and practical competences for international cooperation. Personal skills are developed in class work and enhanced during the curricular internship.

Global perspective

Students from all continents find at ASERI a unique opportunity for meeting an international faculty. They learn how to cooperate for a world of dignity, justice and peace by practicing cooperation with each other, in a rich and challenging multicultural environment.

Scholarships

All scholarships are assigned on a merit basis and will be mostly given to students who apply by the priority deadline. Some scholarships may also target specific geographic regions.

Scholarship value: €1875 - €3750

Language proficiency

Applicants whose first language is not English will need to have either: TOEFL iBT overall score of at least 80; or Academic IELTS overall score of at least 6.0; or successfully completed a degree program taught in the English language.

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