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Masters Degrees (Culture)

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This course looks at the way that museums, galleries and other cultural institutions are changing to meet the needs of the 21st century. Read more

This course looks at the way that museums, galleries and other cultural institutions are changing to meet the needs of the 21st century. The MA has been designed for students who wish to work as curators, arts organisers, museum professional and other cultural managers and who want to know in particular how these institutions face contemporary issues. It looks at the changing role of cultural provision and how agencies, festivals and flexible organisations shape, house, fund, and disseminate culture today. The course also gives you the opportunity to immerse yourself in the contemporary debates about working practices in cultural institutions, and the changing context in which organisations operate.

The course concentrates on professional practice and you will work closely with institutions such as Tate Britain and the Museum of London, and conduct case studies into creative projects run by organisations as diverse as the Victoria and Albert Museum, smaller independent galleries and London-based festivals and arts organisations. Classes are taught off-site at other institutions, and involve professionals from the sector as much as possible to give you an understanding of vocational issues and a close involvement in the workplace.

You will examine key issues and themes in the museums and gallery sector, and explore how these are dealt with not just in theory, but also on a day-to-day basis by leading institutions. You will learn about the challenges faced by museums and galleries, how they confront them and how they are developing innovative practices in relation to their collections, exhibitions and audiences. 

Gaining professional knowledge is an important part of the course and you will be able to meet curators and museum professionals. The University also assists students to gain internships, work placements and to work on professional projects. 

The teaching team are curators, museum and gallery professionals, as well as university academics. You will be taught through seminars, tutorials, practical sessions and workshops, together with independent, student-directed study where students develop their own project. If you are interested in studying the broader theoretical context of museum and gallery issues you can also take modules from other courses taught in the Department, such as Art and Visual Culture MA.

Assessment methods include written coursework - essays, presentations, proposals and project reports as well as a final 10,000–12,000-word Major Research Project.

Course structure

The following modules are indicative of what you will study on this course.

You will choose five modules from the list of option modules below.

Core modules

Option modules

Partnerships

Modules on this course have been designed as partnerships with Tate and the Museum of London.

Career path

Graduates will have the skills to work in a variety of positions in the cultural sector, including in the post of curator, consultant, arts and media strategists and advisers, funding officers or education and interpretation officers.



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Our MA in Culture Industry will allow you to explore the interface between contemporary economics and culture, from the scale of a start-up or artwork to that of governmental policy, a city, or the global marketplace. Read more

Our MA in Culture Industry will allow you to explore the interface between contemporary economics and culture, from the scale of a start-up or artwork to that of governmental policy, a city, or the global marketplace. It will also provide the approaches in critical and theoretical analysis that will enable you to conduct further academic research in areas ranging from art history to urban studies and critical theory.

Taking full advantage of the UK’s leading role in the creative industries, and London’s status as a world city, this course creates opportunities for you to:

  • make projects
  • go on field trips
  • do placements
  • carry out academic learning and research
  • meet leading creative practitioners and theorists

This will give you first-hand experience of the fast moving creative economy, as well as giving you indispensable skills in understanding that economy from a cultural, philosophical and political standpoint.

Engage with the cultural sector

Within the accelerated climate of digital networks and globalisation, the forms and behaviour of culture are mutating, converting the workshop into the handheld device and the cinema and gallery into the bedroom. This course is aimed at creative practitioners, entrepreneurs and theorists wanting to experiment with these changes, and set them into a historically and discursively rich framework.

Through participant observation, critical theory, and playful experiment, the course will not just prepare you for a career in the cultural sector, but help you to engage with it imaginatively, critically and tactically.

Placements

Placements are student-led and supported by the research and organisational network of the course leaders. Students on the MA in Culture Industry have undertaken placements at the BBC, Stephen Graham Gallery, White Cube gallerySHAPE ArtsChinatown Oral History ProjectMaximum Rock n Roll, the British CouncilBlack Dog PublishingResonance FMGlasgow BiennaleLondon Architecture WeekGlastonbury FestivalLondon Film Festival, the British MuseumSouth Bank CentreGrizedale Arts, the Japan Foundation, the London Anime and Gaming Con, and Sound and Music.

Students' projects

Our students’ projects are very diverse, and have included exhibitions, publications, websites, photographic projects, market stalls, travel guides, films, novels, app prototypes, ethnographies, and community resource projects.

Modules & structure

Core modules

Recommended option modules

You take option modules to the value of 30 credits. This could include:

Assessment

Essays; project report and documentation/placement report and documentation; research lab participation.

Download the programme specification. If you would like an earlier version of the programme specification, please contact the Quality Office.

Please note that due to staff research commitments not all of these modules may be available every year.



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Conceived in the context of world-systemic transformation, this MA will give you the analytical tools to understand contemporary developments and world(s) through an encounter with post-colonial theory and international political economic issues. Read more

Conceived in the context of world-systemic transformation, this MA will give you the analytical tools to understand contemporary developments and world(s) through an encounter with post-colonial theory and international political economic issues.

We're witnessing today a tectonic shift in global geopolitics. The emergence of China, Brazil and India as global players, the development of global governance, the financial crisis, climate change – are all symptoms.

On this Masters you’ll grasp concepts like race, diaspora, hybridity, difference, grassroots development, HDI, multitude, immanence, and human rights.

These concepts are used to analyse practical, policy and activist issues arising from globalisation: global civil society, the role of international organisations (the IMF, WTO, UN and World Bank and global NGOs), intellectual property rights, social capital, financialisation, global governance and deep democracy.

You'll deal with issues like terrorism, microfinance, indigenous people, gender and sexuality, multiculturalism and environmental justice.

The MA is ideal for anyone pursuing careers in policy research, NGOs, advocacy, charities, international organisations, cultural and political activism, global media, art and curating, as well as for further academic work leading to a PhD.

Practical placement

The Masters includes a supervised and assessed practical placement. This may be with NGOs in India or Africa, arts and conservation organisations in China, indigenous activists in Latin America, London-based global NGOs, diasporic communities, think-tanks, environmental organisations, publishers or financial/microfinance organisations.

Leading theorists and visiting lecturers

You'll be taught by leading theorists and visiting lecturers drawn from a wide circle of activists, artists, film-makers, lawyers, economists, journalists and policy-makers.

Modules & structure

Core modules

Recommended option modules

You take option modules to the value of 30 credits. Modules can be chosen from across Goldsmiths departments and centres. Option modules are subject to availability and approval by the module lecturer/convenor.

We offer a wide range of option modules each year. Below are some examples of modules that are currently running. For a full list, please contact the Department of Media and Communications.

Other option modules, by department

You may prefer to look through the full range of optional modules available across Goldsmiths departments.

Please note that not all the modules listed below may be open to you - your final selection will depend upon spaces available and timetable compatibility.

Assessment

Essays and/or practical projects; dissertation.

Skills

The programme provides advanced training for labour market-relevant skills in transnational analysis of sovereignty, democracy, governmentality, financialisation, intellectual property rights, and the role of non-governmental organisations.

Careers

Suitable careers and areas of work for graduates of the programme include:

  • the academic sphere
  • government and non-government sectors
  • arts and art administration
  • publishing
  • journalism
  • media
  • the culture industry in general

Find out more about employability at Goldsmiths.



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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Gender and Culture at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Gender and Culture at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

The MA in Gender and Culture offers an innovative interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary approach to the study of Gender and Culture.

Key Features of MA in Gender and Culture

This is an interdisciplinary MA scheme in Gender and Culture taught by Gender specialists across the Arts and Humanities – in the subject areas of Development Studies, Political and Cultural Studies, English Literature, Egyptology, European Languages, History, Media Studies, and Political and Cultural Studies.

If you are interested in gender and gender relations in politics, literature, culture, and history, like engaging in discussion and intellectual argument, and are excited about the idea of working within and across different subject areas, this MA in Gender and Culture is ideal for you.

The MA Gender and Culture examines the production, reproduction and transformation of gender in culture and society.

The Gender and Culture degree is supported by the research activity of GENCAS, the Centre for Research into Gender in Culture and Society in the College of Arts and Humanities. The College of Arts and Humanities has a Graduate Centre. The Graduate Centre fosters and supports individual and collaborative research activity of international excellence and offers a vibrant and supportive environment for students pursuing postgraduate research and taught masters study. The Centre provides postgraduate training to enhance academic and professional development and facilitates participation in seminar programmes, workshops and international conferences.

The full-time Gender and Culture course comprises three modules taken in each academic semester (a total of six modules) and then a dissertation over the summer. In part one, students study three compulsory modules and three optional modules. In part two, students are required to write the dissertation component which draws on issues and themes developed throughout the year.

Part-time study is available for the Gender and Culture programme.

Gender and Culture Programme Aims

To develop independent thinking and writing. You devise your own essay projects in consultation with a gender specialist - this combines the benefits of expert guidance with the rewards of shaping an intellectual project for yourself. To sharpen and develop your skills and take them to a new level by providing the chance for original thinking and intellectual freedom in writing the ‘dissertation’ element, where you complete your own research project.

Modules

Modules on the Gender and Culture programme include:

• Women and Politics

• Civil Society and International Development

• Critical Security Studies

• Rights-Based Approaches to Development

• War, Technology and Culture

• Approaches to IR

• Violence, Conflict & Development

• Governance, Globalization and Neoliberal Political Economy

• Human Rights and Humanitarian Intervention

• The Policy Making Process

• State of Africa

• Politics in Contemporary Britain

• War in Space

• Politics and Public Policy in the New Wales

• Postcolonialism, Orientalism and Eurocentrism

• War, Identity and Society

• Approaches to Political Theory

• International Security in the Asia Pacific

• Gender Trouble: the Medieval Anchorite, and Issues of Wombs and Tombs

• Women Writers of the 1940’s

• Women Writing India

• ‘The Great Pretender’: Masculinity in Contemporary Women’s Fiction

• ‘The Unsex’d Females’: Women Writers and the French Revolution

• British Women’s Fiction 1918-1939

• Contemporary Women’s Writing

• Angela Carter

• Gender in Contemporary European Culture

• Literature in Social Context

• Women and Gender in Ancient Egypt

• Nature’s Stepchildren: European Medicine and Sexual Dissidents, 1869-1939

• The making of Modern Sexualities, 1650-1800

Who should Apply?

Students interested in Gender and Culture from a Classics and Ancient History, English, European Languages, History, Media Studies, and Political and Cultural Studies or related background. Professionals interested in the challenge of digital studying Gender and Culture. Students interested in preparation for postgraduate research, MPhil or PhD, or who wish to develop skills and knowledge related to gender and culture.

Career Prospects

Career expectations are excellent for Gender and Culture graduates. Our graduates are employed in diverse and dynamic vocations such as education, business, law and finance, marketing, sales and advertising; commercial, industrial and public sectors; media and PR; creative and professional writing; social and welfare professions; heritage and tourism; government and politics; foreign affairs and diplomatic corps; humanitarian organisations and some go on to study a PhD.



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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Gender and Culture (Extended) at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Gender and Culture (Extended) at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

Key Features of MA in Gender and Culture

This is an interdisciplinary MA scheme in Gender and Culture taught by Gender specialists across the Arts and Humanities – in the subject areas of Development Studies, Political and Cultural Studies, English Literature, Egyptology, European Languages, History, Media Studies, and Political and Cultural Studies.

If you are interested in gender and gender relations in politics, literature, culture, and history, like engaging in discussion and intellectual argument, and are excited about the idea of working within and across different subject areas, this MA in Gender and Culture is ideal for you.

The MA Gender and Culture examines the production, reproduction and transformation of gender in culture and society.

The Gender and Culture degree is supported by the research activity of GENCAS, the Centre for Research into Gender in Culture and Society in the College of Arts and Humanities. The College of Arts and Humanities has a Graduate Centre. The Graduate Centre fosters and supports individual and collaborative research activity of international excellence and offers a vibrant and supportive environment for students pursuing postgraduate research and taught masters study. The Centre provides postgraduate training to enhance academic and professional development and facilitates participation in seminar programmes, workshops and international conferences.

The full-time Gender and Culture course comprises three modules taken in each academic semester (a total of six modules) and then a dissertation over the summer. In part one, students study three compulsory modules and three optional modules. In part two, students are required to write the dissertation component which draws on issues and themes developed throughout the year.

Part-time study is available for the Gender and Culture programme.

The Extended MA (EMA) in Gender and Culture is a 240-credit postgraduate qualification that is equivalent to 120 ECTS (European Credit Transfer System) and is thus a recognised Masters qualification throughout the European Union. The EMA is a standard UK MA plus an additional 60 credits (30 ECTS) and this additional coursework is undertaken in one semester at a partner institution overseas. The EMA is therefore not only an EU recognised postgraduate qualification it also adds a study abroad experience thus enhancing the qualification’s employability credentials.

The partner institution for EMA Gender and Culture is the University of Regensburg. Founded in 1962, Regensburg is a renowned international centre of teaching and research. Although it has over 21,000 thousand students, the university offers a broad range of disciplines of study, as well as having excellent infrastructure and a favourable staff-student ratio. Regensburg is also active in research, with six special research areas supported by the German Research Society and a strong presence in German- and EU-funded research initiatives. The university has a significant international presence, offering exchange links with more than 200 European institutions and 45 overseas universities. Students will have access to the complete range of services and facilities offered at the university, along with inclusion in the many academic and social activities that take place. Located right in the heart of the old town of Regensburg, a UNESCO World Heritage Site, the university is situated in the centre of a culturally and socially rich area with over 2000 years of history.

Gender and Culture Programme Aims

To develop independent thinking and writing. You devise your own essay projects in consultation with a gender specialist - this combines the benefits of expert guidance with the rewards of shaping an intellectual project for yourself. To sharpen and develop your skills and take them to a new level by providing the chance for original thinking and intellectual freedom in writing the ‘dissertation’ element, where you complete your own research project.

Modules

Modules on the Gender and Culture programme include:

• Women and Politics

• Civil Society and International Development

• Critical Security Studies

• Rights-Based Approaches to Development

• War, Technology and Culture

• Approaches to IR

• Violence, Conflict & Development

• Governance, Globalization and Neoliberal Political Economy

• Human Rights and Humanitarian Intervention

• The Policy Making Process

• State of Africa

• Politics in Contemporary Britain

• War in Space

• Politics and Public Policy in the New Wales

• Postcolonialism, Orientalism and Eurocentrism

• War, Identity and Society

• Approaches to Political Theory

• International Security in the Asia Pacific

• Gender Trouble: the Medieval Anchorite, and Issues of Wombs and Tombs

• Women Writers of the 1940’s

• Women Writing India

• ‘The Great Pretender’: Masculinity in Contemporary Women’s Fiction

• ‘The Unsex’d Females’: Women Writers and the French Revolution

• British Women’s Fiction 1918-1939

• Contemporary Women’s Writing

• Angela Carter

• Gender in Contemporary European Culture

• Literature in Social Context

• Women and Gender in Ancient Egypt

• Nature’s Stepchildren: European Medicine and Sexual Dissidents, 1869-1939

• The making of Modern Sexualities, 1650-1800

Who should Apply?

Students interested in Gender and Culture from a Classics and Ancient History, English, European Languages, History, Media Studies, and Political and Cultural Studies or related background. Professionals interested in the challenge of digital studying Gender and Culture. Students interested in preparation for postgraduate research, MPhil or PhD, or who wish to develop skills and knowledge related to gender and culture.

Career Prospects

Career expectations are excellent for Gender and Culture graduates. Our graduates are employed in diverse and dynamic vocations such as education, business, law and finance, marketing, sales and advertising; commercial, industrial and public sectors; media and PR; creative and professional writing; social and welfare professions; heritage and tourism; government and politics; foreign affairs and diplomatic corps; humanitarian organisations and some go on to study a PhD.



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Social Media, Culture and Society MA offers a flexible, interdisciplinary exploration of key contemporary developments in the networked digital media environment. Read more

Social Media, Culture and Society MA offers a flexible, interdisciplinary exploration of key contemporary developments in the networked digital media environment. It will benefit those seeking to develop their understanding of contemporary communication and its societal, political, regulatory, industrial and cultural contexts.

Social Media, Culture and Society MA provides students with the opportunity to focus at postgraduate level on:

  • Studying the ways in which social media and the internet shape and are shaped by social, economic, political, technological and cultural factors, in order to equip students to become critical research-oriented social media experts.
  • Developing reflective and critical insights into how social media and the internet are used in multiple contexts in society, and into which roles social media can play in various forms of organisations that are situated in these societal contexts. The aim is that students are equipped to become reflective and critical social media practitioners.
  • Gaining in-depth knowledge and understanding of the major debates about the social and cultural roles of social media and the internet.
  • Acquiring advanced knowledge and understanding of the key categories, theories, approaches and models of social media's and the internet's roles in and impacts on society and human practices.
  • Obtaining advanced insights into practical activity and practice-based work that relate to how social media and the internet work and which implications they have for social and cultural practices.

This Master's is organised in the environment of the Communication and Media Research Institute (CAMRI) and its Centre for Social Media Research. CAMRI is a world-leading research centre that studies the role of media and communication in society. It has become known as the Westminster school of critical media and communication research. The analysis of social media, culture and society is one of its research specialisms. In the most recent UK government research audit, the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF), 42.2% of CAMRI’s research was classified as world-leading and 37.5% as internationally excellent, which makes it one of Britain’s four leading media and communication research institutions. 

Course structure

The following modules are indicative of what you will study on this course. 

In semester one, students must select two elective modules from the two thematic groups below (any combination of modules is applicable): 

  • Theory and Global Political Economy of Media and Communication 
  • Media Politics, Regulation and Business Strategies. 

In semester two, students must select two elective modules from two thematic groups below (any combination of modules is applicable): 

  • Media Politics, Regulation and Business Strategies 
  • Media, Culture and Everyday Life. 

More information on modules and groups to which they belong to can be found below.

Core modules (semester one)

Option modules (Semester One)

Core modules (Semester Two)

Optional modules (Semester Two)

Career path

The Social Media, Culture and Society MA will benefit those seeking to develop their understanding of contemporary communication and its social, political and cultural contexts. This degree will be of particular interest to those who plan to work in the creative industries, as well as those already working in this field. Social Media, Culture and Society MA will also be of interest to students working in non-profit sectors, including NGOs and advocacy groups. The degree will help those seeking a competitive edge in a careers market that values high-level skills in communication, research and critical thinking.

The course also provides an excellent preparation for those wishing to continue their studies to PhD level. Around 10% of graduates of the course are now undertaking PhDs. Others work in the social media start-up scene in London, or work as journalists and in a range of industries and non-profit sectors.



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This course is taught by researchers who are recognised leaders in their field. . Will help you develop the skills and independent critical thinking required for the ‘knowledge worker’ of the future. Read more
  • This course is taught by researchers who are recognised leaders in their field. 
  • Will help you develop the skills and independent critical thinking required for the ‘knowledge worker’ of the future.
  • Allows you to engage with contemporary developments and debate in media, communication and culture, including feminism, cultural identity and globalisation.

Summary

This course is ideal if you wish to pursue media, communications and cultural inquiry in order to develop a media-based career.

On this course you will cover all aspects of media, communications and cultural studies, from exploring cultural theories and concepts such as Marxism, post-Marxism, feminism, psychoanalysis, post-colonialism and globalisation, to the developments and debates around media and cultural industries such as TV, film, print media and the internet. You will analyse the politics of identity in the context of media and cultural representations, especially in the changing media and web landscape.

You’ll be taught by staff who have strong research profiles with publications in the area of cultural studies theory, culture and politics, tabloid culture, reality television, psychoanalysis, television history and industry, the globalisation of media and culture, contemporary trends in the television industry, as well as travel writing.

You will become a member of the Centre for Research in Film and Audiovisual Cultures (CRFAC), giving you access to a diverse programme of research seminars, symposia and special events organised in collaboration with institutions such as the British Film Institute. Your studies are complemented by visiting lectures given by media and cultural industry professionals such as film makers and scholars from other institutions.

Roehampton's location in London is ideal for media and culture students as you can take advantage of your location by immersing yourself in the wealth of creative cultural institutions and media companies that the capital has to offer, unrivalled by any other city in the UK.

Content

On the course, you will gain an in depth understanding of the role of the media in everyday life, and of its relation to culture and formations of identity and subjectivity. 

You will be introduced to, and evaluate, a number of influential and important communication theories and concepts associated with the public sphere, globalisation, promotional culture, media organisations and new media, as well as discourse analysis. 

You will engage with the politics of identity in the context of media and cultural representations and explore debates around social difference through a consideration of various defining conditions including gender, class, ethnicity, history, nationality, sexuality, taste and consumer choices.

You will also explore the representation of social reality and the social self in both mass and new media. By focusing on a range of non-fiction formats including reality television, ‘unscripted’ video, user-generated content and the development of the social web, you will address established and newer scholarly debates concerning ‘truth telling’, confession, surveillance and the production of knowledge about the self and its place in the world.

You’ll end the year by undertaking a dissertation or research project which will give you the opportunity to deepen your research skills and knowledge about a topic of particular interest to you.

Modules

Some of the modules we currently offer include:

Compulsory and Required modules

Compulsory and/or required modules may change when we review and update programmes. Above is a list of modules offered this academic year.

Optional modules

Optional modules, when offered as part of a programme, may vary from year to year and are subject to viability.

Career options

The MA helps students prepare for successful careers in communications and the cultural industries including film, journalism and publishing. Students may opt to do media research or further academic study.



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The MA in Visual Arts and Culture at Durham is a distinctive interdisciplinary programme that invites students to develop their knowledge and understanding of the visual arts and of visual culture. Read more

The MA in Visual Arts and Culture at Durham is a distinctive interdisciplinary programme that invites students to develop their knowledge and understanding of the visual arts and of visual culture. To study visual arts and culture is a way of paying attention to phenomena that are literally everywhere. The concept of ‘visual culture’ acknowledges the pervasive nature of visual phenomena, and signals openness towards both the breadth of objects and images, and the range of theoretical and methodological perspectives needed to understand them adequately. Drawing upon research strengths across the departments that contribute to the programme, the MA in Visual Arts and Culture encourages you to take a broad view of geographical and chronological scope, while allowing you to engage with a wide range of visual phenomena, including fine art, film, photography, architecture, and scientific and medical imaging practices.

The importance of critical visual literacy in the contemporary world cannot be exaggerated. ‘The illiterate of the future’, wrote the Bauhaus artist and theoretician László Moholy-Nagy, ‘will be the person ignorant of the camera as well as of the pen’. This observation was made in the 1920s, when photography was first used in the periodical press and in political propaganda. The rich visual world of the early twentieth century pales in comparison with the visual saturation that now characterises everyday experience throughout the developed societies and much of the developing world. But the study of visual culture is by no means limited to the twentieth century. Turning our attention to past cultures with a particular eye to the significance of visual objects of all kinds yields new forms of knowledge and understanding.

Our programme facilitates the development of critical visual literacy in three main ways. First, it attends to the specificity of visual objects, images and events, encouraging you to develop approaches that are sensitive to the individual works they encounter. Second, it investigates the nature of perception, asking how it is that we make meaning out of that which we see. Finally, it investigates how our relationships with other people, and with things, are bound up in the act of looking.

Course structure

The course consists of one core module, two optional modules and a dissertation. The core module sets out the intellectual framework for the programme, offering a broad overview of key conceptual debates in the field of Visual Culture, together with training in analysis of visual objects of different kinds, an advanced introduction to understanding museum practice, and key research skills in visual arts and culture. The optional modules provide further specialised areas of study in related topics of interest to individual students, and the 12,000-15,000 word dissertation involves detailed study of a particular aspect of a topic related to the broad area of visual culture.

Optional modules

Previously, optional modules have included:

  • Critical Curatorship
  • History, Knowledge and Visual Culture
  • Representing Otherness
  • Negotiating the Human
  • Digital Imaging
  • Cultural Heritage, Communities and Identities
  • Current Issues in Aesthetics and Theory of Art
  • Ethics of Cultural Heritage
  • Monumental architecture of the Roman Empire in the Antonine and Severan periods
  • Art in Ecological Perspective
  • Texts and Cultures I: Visual and Verbal Cultures (Early Modern)
  • Energy, Society and Energy Practices
  • German Reading Skills for Research
  • French Reading Skills for Research

The Centre for Visual Arts and Culture (CVAC) brings together scholars from across and beyond Durham University in order to provide a dynamic setting for wide-ranging interdisciplinary research and debates about visual culture, a field that entails the study of vision and perception, the analysis of the social significance of images and ways of seeing, and the attentive interpretation of a range of visual objects, from artworks to scientific images. 

Centre for Visual Arts and Culture

The Centre brings together scholars from across and beyond Durham University in order to provide a vibrant and dynamic setting for wide-ranging interdisciplinary research and debates about visual culture. The Centre provides a focus for cutting-edge research on visual arts and cultures: it aspires to train new generations of scholars through innovative postgraduate programmes, it fosters informed debate both nationally and internationally, and it offers an engaging, open environment for researchers at all levels.

CVAC takes a generous view of what constitutes visual culture and it is broad in both geographical and chronological scope, encouraging debate about the range of approaches, methods and theories that are most generative for research on visual phenomena. Durham’s current visual culture research includes the study of word and image, art and religion, medicine and visual representation, film, the history of photography, architecture, urban culture, heritage and philosophical aesthetics. It also includes the development of pioneering visual research methods and the study of vision.

Durham’s location itself provides a rich and inspiring environment for this field of research. It is part of the UNESCO World Heritage Site that also includes Durham Cathedral; its acclaimed Oriental Museum is a significant asset which houses three Designated Collections, recognised by the Arts Council as nationally and internationally pre-eminent; alongside an outstanding collection of twentieth-century and contemporary art. CVAC has many established relationships with major national and international cultural organisations, and aims to develop further its links with museums, galleries and heritage sites.

For further information on the Centre see http://www.durham.ac.uk/cvac



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This interdisciplinary programme will allow you to benefit from the expertise of both the School of Sociology and Social Policy and the School of Media and Communication, enabling you to gain an in-depth understanding of key issues, debates and theoretical perspectives, and to critically analyse the relationship between culture, media and society. Read more

This interdisciplinary programme will allow you to benefit from the expertise of both the School of Sociology and Social Policy and the School of Media and Communication, enabling you to gain an in-depth understanding of key issues, debates and theoretical perspectives, and to critically analyse the relationship between culture, media and society.

Taught by leading researchers in the field, this programme covers key issues and concepts such as: media and social media; consumerism; audiences; representation; globalisation; migration and place; tourism; creative work and material culture. Through its grounding in sociological approaches to the study of culture and media, a concern with questions of power, inequality and identity will be threaded through the course, enabling you to think critically about the relationship between gender, class, race and ethnicity, and the cultural realm.

In addition to developing a specialist knowledge in the field, you will also acquire key transferable skills in research, communication, analytical skills, self-management and group working, which will open up a range of career pathways within the media and creative industries and beyond.

Highlights

  • Benefit from the expertise of both the School of Sociology and Social Policy and the School of Media and Communication.
  • Gain specialist knowledge in the areas of consumerism, media and social media, globalisation, representation and more.
  • Tailor the programme according to your interests with optional modules which cover PR, journalism, identity, cultural history and reality TV.
  • Develop transferable skills including in research, analysis, group work and communication.
  • Prepare for careers in PR, communications and media policy, social and digital media, media market, audience research and others.

Course content

Compulsory modules on Researching Society and Culture, Understanding Society and Culture, and Sociology of Media and Culture, will provide a solid grounding in key sociological theories for the study of society, culture and media, and methodological debates and approaches.

In addition to the core compulsory modules, you will have the opportunity to choose from a range of optional modules delivered by the School of Media and Communication, enabling you to tailor the programme to pursue your specialist interests.

The final dissertation project will allow you to design, develop and implement your own critical research enquiry into an aspect of culture and media.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • Researching Culture and Society 30 credits
  • Understanding Society and Culture 30 credits
  • Sociology of Media and Culture 30 credits
  • Dissertation (Media & Culture) 60 credits

Optional modules

  • Public Relations, Culture and Society 30 credits
  • Communication and Public Opinion 30 credits
  • Journalism Practice and Policy 30 credits
  • The Cultural History of Promotional Communication 30 credits
  • Identity, Culture and Technology 30 credits
  • Urban Narratives 30 credits
  • Researching Inequality in the Media 30 credits
  • Reality TV: Truth or Fiction? 30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Society, Culture and Media MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Society, Culture and Media MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

Throughout the course you will be exposed to a variety of teaching methods including guest lectures, seminars, presentations, group work, blended learning and independent critical enquiry.

Assessment

Assessment will include a series of short quizzes, a group project, an essay and dissertation.

Career opportunities

The combined nature of the programme will equip you with key transferable skills and the specialist knowledge required to pursue a career in sociology or media and culture. The national and international growth of the media and creative industries has sparked greater demand for graduates who possess advanced skills and knowledge in the field, opening opportunities in communications and media policy, PR, social and digital media, media markets and audience research or other cultural and creative industries.

Additionally, the sociology element of the programme will allow you to apply your knowledge and skills in fields such as education, statutory and voluntary agencies, NGOs (non-governmental organisations), INGOs (international non-governmental agencies) and charities. The programme also provides a basis for progression onto a PhD in sociology and media studies, and a strong grounding for an interdisciplinary PhD.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



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As the only named Master’s programme within the UK devoted to Charles Dickens, this programme studies the author in a place that perhaps offers more Dickensian associations than anywhere else in the world. Read more
As the only named Master’s programme within the UK devoted to Charles Dickens, this programme studies the author in a place that perhaps offers more Dickensian associations than anywhere else in the world.

It combines a focus on both the local and the global author through compulsory modules contextualising the variety of ways in which Dickens engaged with the social, cultural and political issues of his age. Interdisciplinary approaches are employed, using Dickens as a focus, to consider the relationships between19th-century fiction and journalism, the Victorians’ engagement with material culture, and their fascination with the body and its metaphors.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/219/dickens-victorian-culture

About the School of English

The School of English has a strong international reputation and global perspective, apparent both in the background of its staff and in the diversity of our teaching and research interests.

Our expertise ranges from the medieval to the postmodern, including British, American and Irish literature, postcolonial writing, 18th-century studies, Shakespeare, early modern literature and culture, Victorian studies, modern poetry, critical theory and cultural history. The international standing of the School ensures that we have a lively, confident research culture, sustained by a vibrant, ambitious intellectual community. We also count a number of distinguished creative writers among our staff, and we actively explore crossovers between critical and creative writing in all our areas of teaching and research.

The Research Excellence Framework 2014 has produced very strong results for the School of English at Kent. With 74% of our work graded as world-leading or internationally excellent, the School is ranked 10th out of 89 English departments in terms of Research Intensity (Times Higher Education). The School also received an outstanding assessment of the quality of its research environment and public impact work.

Course structure

You take two modules in the autumn term and two in the spring term; two core modules and two optional modules. You are also expected to attend the Faculty and School Research Methods Programmes.

You then write a dissertation on a subject related to Dickens and/or Victorian culture between the start of the Summer Term and the end of August.

Modules

In 2015 the following three specialist modules were available: EN836 Dickens and the Material Culture of the Victorian Novel, EN876 Dickens and the Condition of England, EN835 Dickens, the Victorians and the Body. Students would be required to take at least two. These should be considered indicative of the types of modules available, which may vary from year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation.

EN835 - Dickens, The Victorians and the Body (30 credits)
EN836 - Dickens and the Material Culture of the Victorian Novel (30 credits)
EN876 - Dickens and the Condition of England (30 credits)
MT864 - Reading the Medieval Town: Canterbury, an International City (30 credits)
MT865 - Encountering the Holy: Devotion and the Medieval Church (30 credits)
EN842 - Reading the Contemporary (30 credits)
EN850 - Centres and Edges: Modernist and PostcolonialQuest Literature (30 credits)
EN852 - Colonial and Postcolonial Discourses (30 credits)
EN857 - Body and Place in the Postcolonial Text (30 credits)
EN862 - Contemporary Arab Novel (30 credits)
EN865 - Post-45: American Literature and Culture in the Cold War Era (30 credits)
EN866 - The Awkward Age: Transatlantic Culture and Literature in Transition, 18 (30 credits)
EN872 - Provocations and Invitations (30 credits)
EN888 - Extremes of Feeling: Literature and Empire in the Eighteenth Century (30 credits)
EN889 - Literary Theory (30 credits)
EN897 - Advanced Critical Reading (30 credits)
EN818 - American Modernism 1900-1930 (Teaching Period I) (30 credits)
EN832 - Hacks, Dunces and Scribblers: Authorship and the Marketplace in the Eig (30 credits)
EN834 - Imagining India (30 credits)

Assessment

Assessment is by a 5-6,000-word essay for each module and a 12,000 word dissertation.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- provide excellent postgraduate-level study that deepens and extends your understanding of work in the field of Dickens and Victorian culture

- develop your understanding of, and engagement with, the critical and methodological paradigms that inform the field of studies in Dickens and Victorian culture

- develop your independent critical thinking and judgement

- develop your research skills in the relevant field so as to provide a pathway for you to undertake PhD work in the area of Dickens and Victorian culture

- build upon and extend an already-established reputation at Kent for distinction in the learning and teaching of Dickens and Victorian culture.

Staff research interests

Full details of staff research interests can be found on the School's website (http://www.kent.ac.uk/english/staff).

- Dr Vybarr Cregan-Reid:

Lecturer in English and American Literature
Nineteenth-century literature and culture, especially representations of nature and the environment, time, history, queer theory; sublimity; ecology and psychogeography.

- Dr Sara Lyons:

Lecturer in Victorian Literature
Nineteenth-century literature and culture; Victorian poetry and critical prose; fin-de-siècle aestheticism and decadence; the interrelations between literature, religion, secularism in the long nineteenth century.

- Professor Wendy Parkins:

Professor of Victorian Literature
Victorian modernity; gender and sexuality in the 19th century; the Victorian novel (especially Dickens, Gaskell, Collins); literature of the fin-desiècle period; aestheticism and William Morris.

- Dr Catherine Waters:

Professor of 19th-Century Studies
Victorian literature and culture, especially fiction and journalism; Dickens; Sala; George Eliot; literature and gender.

- Dr Sarah Wood:

Senior Lecturer in English and American Literature
Creative critical writing; 19th and 20th-century poetry and fiction, especially Robert Browning and Elizabeth Bowen; writing and visual art; literary theory; deconstruction, especially Derrida; psychoanalysis; continental philosophy.

Careers

Many career paths can benefit from the writing and analytical skills that you develop as a postgraduate student in the School of English. Our students have gone on to work in academia, journalism, broadcasting and media, publishing, writing and teaching; as well as more general areas such as banking, marketing analysis and project management.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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This MA is designed for anyone working in education or a related field. It aims to enhance your understanding of educational theory and practice by focusing upon issues of culture, language and identity, and it is taught by internationally-renowned experts. Read more

This MA is designed for anyone working in education or a related field. It aims to enhance your understanding of educational theory and practice by focusing upon issues of culture, language and identity, and it is taught by internationally-renowned experts.

The programme aims to develop an inclusive and inter-cultural approach to teaching and learning across a wide range of educational styles, by interrogating current educational policies, curriculum frameworks, teaching practices and theoretical perspectives.

Its modular structure allows for specialisation in the areas of equity and social justice, curriculum policy and practice, language and culture in education, and the arts in education.

Modules & structure

Overview

You'll develop new perspectives on education through a process of reasoned critical reflection, and you will be encouraged to apply your developing understanding of educational practices and issues in your own institution and elsewhere.

You have to complete 180 credits, made up from:

  • a compulsory core module, Culture, Language and Identity in Education (30 credits)
  • option modules (30 credits each)
  • Dissertation (60 credits)

If you already have M level credits from your PGCE courses or elsewhere you can apply to have one or both of these included in your MA accreditation. In this case only a further 120 credits are needed.

If you are a former Goldsmiths student you should also be aware that you are eligible for a 30% discount on each module.

All sessions run in the evenings to accommodate professional teachers and educators with substantial existing commitments and workloads.

You may be awarded a Postgraduate Certificate if you exit after completing two modules (one third of the programme) or a Postgraduate Diploma if you complete four modules (two thirds of the programme).

Option modules

You'll select options from a list that currently includes:

Assessment

 Assessment is normally via a 5000 word essay.

The dissertation is a 15000 word assignment on a subject of your choice. 

Download the programme specification. If you would like an earlier version of the programme specification, please contact the Quality Office.

Please note that due to staff research commitments not all of these modules may be available every year.

Skills & careers

The programme will enable you to develop:

  • enhanced understanding and critical awareness of educational theory and practice
  • critical reflection skills
  • research skills

Find out more about employability at Goldsmiths.



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In the Master's program Arts, Culture and Media/ Mapping Arts in Society students examine the role of the arts in society. In particular, students gain insight into arts worlds and their organization, aesthetic dimensions, social impact and the efficacy of arts education for contemporary culture. Read more
In the Master's program Arts, Culture and Media/ Mapping Arts in Society students examine the role of the arts in society. In particular, students gain insight into arts worlds and their organization, aesthetic dimensions, social impact and the efficacy of arts education for contemporary culture. Further, students learn to analyse and interpret artistic expressions with an enhanced view of how arts phenomena convey, negotiate or hasten cultural change. Additionally, the program explores how the arts relate to economic, social and technical developments in an increasingly mediated world. Digitalization and globalization remain import concepts for this study.

As a student of this program you choose an arts framework:
- Arts Policy and Marketing
- Arts Analysis and Critique
- Arts Education

In addition, you choose an art form to situate your professional framework:
- Film
- Literature
- Music
- Theater

You complete the program with an internship and your thesis.
The one-year Master's program in Arts, Culture and Media is a specialization within the Master's degree in Arts and Culture.

Why in Groningen?

- Fully aims to develop analytical skills in evaluating the role performed by the arts in society
- Unique combination of practical skills and academic reflection
- Specialization in different art forms: Film and TV, Music, Theater, Literature
- Guest lectures by outstanding artists, art organizers, cultural critics and policy makers

Job perspectives

The Master's programme in Arts, Culture and Media ± Mapping the Arts in Society is highly relevant for those students who wish to pursue a career:
- as a cultural critic with a specific interest in the institutional and societal context of art production, art distribution and art presentation;
- as a policymaker;
- in culture consultancy;
- in a managerial position in the professional field of the arts.

Job examples

- Analysis and Criticism
Because writing and thinking about the role of the arts in society is especially important for this framework, a position such as arts journalist editor, researcher or editor is ideally suited for this tack. These positions are found within newspapers, magazines and media companies.
- Arts Education
If you choose for Arts Education, you will work within organizations that consult upon the content and organization within the field of arts and cultural education. Here, you will be ideally suited for a position in the national, provincial or local government or for an educational department within institutions such as a cultural centers or museums.
- Arts, Policy and Marketing
With arts, policy and Marketing you can work, for example, as a professional organizer, manager, marketing or publicity agent. These positions appear in city theaters, festivals, orchestras or publishers and museums. In this field, you could also provide support and consultation for policy and other arts-related advice functions relating to national, provincial or local governments.
- Other job possibilities
There are other employment possibilities such as a position by a media company or for the advertisement and commercial field. Prior students have also begun their own successful arts organization, advice bureau or research institution in the field of arts, culture and event organizations.

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This interdisciplinary degree allows the investigation of diverse aspects of literature, cinema, history of art, and cultural history and thought. Read more

This interdisciplinary degree allows the investigation of diverse aspects of literature, cinema, history of art, and cultural history and thought. The Centre for Multidisciplinary & Intercultural Inquiry at UCL is unique in offering graduate students the opportunity to investigate Europe in its entirety, from European integration and public policy to European cinema and poetry.

About this degree

The programme aims to equip students with the skills, methods, concepts and theories essential for most fields of European culture, society and thought, encompassing the events, traditions and texts of the entire continent. Students learn how to present material effectively, to analyse texts critically and to construct coherent arguments.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

Two pathways are offered: Taught and Research. The Taught pathway consists of two core modules (60 credits) four optional modules (60 credits), and a dissertation (60 credits). The Research pathway consists of two core modules (60 credits), two optional modules (30 credits), and a dissertation (90 credits).

A Postgraduate Diploma, two core modules (60 credits), four optional modules (60 credits), full-time nine months or part-time two years is offered.

A Postgraduate Certificate, two core modules (60 credits), full-time three months, part-time six months, is offered.

Core modules

  • Theoretical Issues in History and Literature
  • Topics in Cultural Studies

Optional modules

Students on the Taught pathway select four, and students on the Research pathway select two, of the following optional modules:

  • Modern Literary Theory
  • Comparative Literature Studies
  • Social Theory
  • Topics in Cultural Studies
  • Graduate modules from the Faculty of Arts & Humanities
  • Graduate modules from the Faculty of Social & Historical Sciences
  • Graduate modules from the School of Slavonic & East European Studies (SSEES)

Dissertation/report

All MA students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 12,000-words (Taught pathway) or 18,000-words (Research pathway).

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars and tutorials. All students receive guidance on how to identify, locate and use material available in libraries and archives. Students are assessed through a combination of coursework in the form of essays, unseen written examinations and the dissertation.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: European Culture and Thought: Culture MA

Careers

MPhil and PhD degrees often follow on from a Master's programme: both the Taught and Research pathways of the MAs offered by the Centre for Multidisciplinary & Intercultural Inquiry (CMII) are intended to allow this type of progression, as well as standing as degrees in their own right.

Many graduates of the programme have gone on to further study at UCL and other institutions, including the University of Edinburgh; London Consortium; Birkbeck, University of London; and the Louvre Museum.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • South Asia Researcher, Justice and Peace
  • Teacher, Unspecified Secondary School
  • Proof Reader, Profiles Creative

Employability

Graduates of this MA have used their extensive knowledge and understanding of European institutions, policies and society to obtain positions within the European Union. The high level of interdisciplinary training and research skills offered by the programme have equipped others for positions as researchers in UK and European universities, museums and non-governmental agencies. The emphasis on written and verbal communication, collation and presentation of research and analysis have provided transferable skills for the fields of accountancy, law and PR.

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The Centre for Multidisciplinary & Intercultural Inquiry (CMII) at UCL is in a unique position to combine a broad programme of study that unites the arts, humanities, and social and historical sciences, with immediate and easy access to the unrivalled cultural treasures and library holdings of London.

The central London location offers easy access to the British Library, British Museum, Institute of Germanic and Romance Studies, German Historical Institute, Goethe Institut, Institut Français, and other similar research and cultural centres.

Less than three hours away from Brussels and Paris, and with the wide range of resources available, this is a highly favourable location for the study of Europe.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Ancient History and Classical Culture at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Ancient History and Classical Culture at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

The MA in Ancient History and Classical Culture offers a wide range of modules on the history and culture of ancient Greece and Rome, drawing on the expertise of internationally recognised scholars.

Key Features

Every aspect of the modern world has its roots in the civilisations of the Classical world. This MA in Ancient History and Classical Culture allows students to study a range of topics related to the history and culture of the classical world, from the Mycenaean world to the later Roman Empire. The range of options within the Ancient History and Classical Culture MA allows students to specialise in history or literature, or to combine study of the two.

Students on the Ancient History and Classical Culture MA are encouraged to develop a methodological awareness and are introduced to key concepts and interpretative techniques that shape the study of the ancient civilisations in the modern world. This programme develops research skills needed for high-level work in any field of Ancient History and Classical Civilisation.

Students have the opportunity to study ancient Greek or Latin.

Students of the MA Ancient History and Classical Culture can take advantage of the College of Arts and Humanities' Graduate Centre which fosters and supports individual and collaborative research activity of international excellence and offers a vibrant and supportive environment for students pursuing postgraduate research and taught masters study. The Centre provides postgraduate training to enhance academic and professional development and facilitates participation in seminar programmes, workshops and international conferences.

Modules

Modules on the Ancient History and Classical Culture course typically include:

• Research Methodologies in Ancient History and Classical Culture

• Ancient Greek or Latin

• Being Greek under Rome: Greek Literature and Culture in the Imperial Period

• The Army in the Roman Empire

• The City in the Greco-Roman World

• Explorers, Travel and Geography

• Saints and Sinners in Christian Late Antiquity

• Greek and Roman Magic: Exploring the Sources

• Private Life in Ancient Egypt

• Romance Refracted and novels renewed

Student Quote

"I studied the BA Ancient History and then the MA in Ancient History and Classical Culture. I chose Swansea University because of the variety of courses on offer in Classics, Ancient History and Egyptology. During my study I immersed myself in both academic and extra-curricular student life. I took up archery and I was a regular member of the University archery team. I enjoy both reading and writing fiction and in my final year of study, I was selected as one of four finalists in the “Swansea Life Young Writing Category” of the “Dylan Thomas Prize”. I held several positions of responsibility in the Society of Ancient Studies which was amazing; and I organised social events such as visits to sites such as Hadrian’s Wall, the British Museum, Caerleon, and Rome. I also had the opportunity to work on the Church Hill archaeological excavation (a suspected Roman villa) and the excavation at Oystermouth Castle organised jointly by the Glamorgan-Gwent Archaeological Trust. I thoroughly enjoyed my four years at Swansea."

Shaun Mudd



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This course give you a unique opportunity to explore the many forms of digital culture and their profound effects on society from a number of different angles. Read more

This course give you a unique opportunity to explore the many forms of digital culture and their profound effects on society from a number of different angles. It aims to develop participants' skills in forming their own assessments of digital technologies and their impact on society and culture. 

Graduates of this coursewill have gained the analytical tools required to understand how digitisation and internet technologies have shaped and are shaping modern culture.

 Key Benefits

  • Develop an understanding of the role and impact of digital technologies in contemporary culture, broadly interpreted to include such areas of activity as performing arts, telecommunications, information technology, philosophy, law and education.
  • Study digital technologies within an interdisciplinary and cross-cultural framework, combining modules from participating departments.
  • Obtain on-the-job training in a month long internship within a relevant organisation.
  • Take field trips to major London cultural institutions, such as Tate Modern, National Gallery, Institute of Archaeology and the BBC Archives.

Description

On this Digital Culture & Society MA programme you will focus on how technology and culture are connected in today’s society. We broadly interpret this to include such areas of activity as performing arts, telecommunications, information technology, philosophy, law and education. We aim to develop and enhance your awareness and understanding of a range of subjects relevant to digital culture and technology, including:

  • The key information and communication technologies that shape contemporary society.
  • The key developments in contemporary cultural expression, specifically how these are driven, mediated or influenced by digital technologies.
  • The role of digital technologies in the study of culture and cultural artefacts from the past.
  • How digital technologies are shaping today’s society, including social intercourse, social structures, government, international politics, education and law.
  • The current critical and theoretical debates around digital culture and the role of technology in cultural life.
  • The ethical, moral and philosophical issues that arise from the role and impact of technology in cultural and social life.

Course purpose

The aim of the MA Digital Culture & Society programme is to develop participants’ understanding of the role and consequences of digital technologies in contemporary culture, broadly interpreted to include such areas of activity as performing arts, telecommunications, information technology, philosophy, law and education. The programme is conceived as fundamentally interdisciplinary, drawing for its teaching on four academic Schools: Arts and Humanities; Law; Physical Sciences and Engineering; and Social Science & Public Policy. It is aimed at a diverse range of participants, offering technological insights to those with non-technical backgrounds, and cultural perspectives to those who have not thought about digital culture in a systematic way.

Course format and assessment

Teaching Style

If you are a full-time student, we will provide 120 to 180 hours of teaching through lectures and seminars, and we will expect you to undertake 1674 hours of independent study.

If you are a part-time student, we will provide 90 hours of teaching through lectures and seminars in your first year, and 50 hours in your second. We will expect you to undertake 720 hours of independent study in your first year and 954 hours in your second.

Assessment

We will assess our modules entirely through coursework, which will mostly take the form of essays, with some project work.

Regulating body

King’s College is regulated by the Higher Education Funding Council for England.

Sign up for more information. Email now

Have a question about applying to King’s? Email now



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