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Are you looking to develop skills that will enable you to be innovative and enterprising, creative, flexible and able to spot new opportunities and develop them into sustainable practice?. Read more
Are you looking to develop skills that will enable you to be innovative and enterprising, creative, flexible and able to spot new opportunities and develop them into sustainable practice?

The MA Creative and Cultural Industries Management course offers a practical and vocational approach to working in this rapidly developing sector. Enhanced programme flexibility enables you to select a culture sector specialism to suit your interests, which you will take alongside caption: Hadrians Wallcore cultural and creative industries management modules.

The four specialisms available are Music, Festivals and Events; Arts and Media; Cultural Heritage and Museums; and Galleries and Visual Arts. Options are selected during the course Induction phase.

The course is enhanced by strong partnerships and links with leading cultural organisations and practices in the North East of England and beyond - many of which are now employing our previous graduates.

An eight-week placement in a creative or heritage organisation of your choice can also enhance your degree of specialism and employability whilst providing an opportunity to experience real-time working in a cultural organisation.

This course has several available start dates and study methods - for more information, please view the relevant web-page:
2 years part time (September) - https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/study-at-northumbria/courses/creative-and-cultural-industries-management-dtpcci6/

2 years part time (January) - https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/study-at-northumbria/courses/creative-and-cultural-industries-management-dtpccw6/

1 year full time distance learning (September) - https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/study-at-northumbria/courses/creative-and-cultural-industries-management-dtdcci6/

2 years part time distance learning (September) - https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/study-at-northumbria/courses/creative-and-cultural-industries-management-dtdccv6/

2 years part time distance learning (January) - https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/study-at-northumbria/courses/creative-and-cultural-industries-management-dtdcck6/

Learn From The Best

Our teaching team are all actively engaged with specialist practice and research in the cultural sector, and remain active in their fields of expertise. That specialist knowledge is reflected in all teaching and learning activities and is evident in areas such as cultural leadership, cultural enterprise, networking and relationship management, stakeholder and audience engagement, project planning and management.

You will benefit from their active partnerships and relationships with the region’s key cultural organisations, whilst surrounded by excellent examples of culture-led regeneration from those who put these policies into practice.

Our team will be on-hand at every step of your degree, ensuring you leave with confidence and a full understanding of all aspects of this fast-moving field.

Teaching And Assessment

Throughout this course you will explore and consider the tensions and challenges inherent in the bringing together of cultural activity and management practice, helping find ways to bring creative talent to a marketplace without impairing the creative process on the way.

The ability to spot opportunities and to be entrepreneurial are skills that the course seeks to nurture and develop at each level, to best equip you to enter the professional world of work – whether it be creating your own cultural enterprise or working with existing ones.

Assessment methods include written essays and reports, as well as presentations, ‘live briefs’ and project work. The final dissertation is a student led piece of work that provides the opportunity to establish yourself as an expert in the field you have selected to specialise in.

Module Overview
EF0126 - E.S.A.P. in FADSS Level 7 (Optional, 0 Credits)
VA7006 - Cultural Management, Enterprise & Leadership (Core, 30 Credits)
VA7007 - Framing the Creative Industries (Core, 30 Credits)
VA7008 - Work Placement (Core, 30 Credits)
VA7009 - Music, Festivals & Events (Optional, 30 Credits)
VA7010 - Arts & Media (Optional, 30 Credits)
VA7011 - Cultural Heritage and Museums (Optional, 30 Credits)
VA7012 - Galleries and Visual Arts (Optional, 30 Credits)
VA7013 - Cultural and Creative Industries Management Dissertation (Core, 60 Credits)

Learning Environment

Throughout the duration of your course you will have access to all of the resources you will need to guide you through your learning experience.

This includes facilities such as our university library – which is ranked in the top three in the UK – in addition to other facilities such as our well equipped working space, The Hub, which is open 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Diverse facilities such as Gallery North @ University Gallery, dedicated performance studios and BALTIC 39 offer research and learning space to enable you to develop your creative skills.

Technology is central to supporting your everyday learning activities, whether you are a campus-based or distance learning student.

Throughout your course you will have access to our e-learning platform, Blackboard, which offers access to collaboration tools and video/audio-enhanced features, electronic feedback, discussion boards, blogs and student websites.

We provide a supportive and informal learning environment, offering feedback at all key stages of your course.

Research-Rich Learning

The MA Creative and Cultural Industries Management course, which is part of our Visual and Material Culture research cluster, blends management theory with arts, culture, heritage, visual culture, humanities, sociology, geography and policy studies.

Throughout the duration of your studies you will be encouraged to develop your own research skills to advance your understanding of the complex contexts and debates of the cultural and creative industries, and how these practices apply from a range of theoretical perspectives.

You will conduct increasingly independent investigations in response to set tasks, or investigate your own topics of interest within the sector, leading to a self-directed dissertation that will be focused around a subject area of your choice.

You will also be encouraged to take your place as a partner by contributing your knowledge to our learning community.

Give Your Career An Edge

Emphasising cultural leadership, enterprise and entrepreneurship, the skills and knowledge you will learn on this course will help you develop the professional competencies required to successfully pursue a career within cultural and creative industries management.

As an MA Creative and Cultural Industries Management graduate you will be part of an active global network that is enriched and supported by our partnerships with leading cultural providers in the region and beyond.

The ability to tailor your learning will also provide enhanced career edge, allowing you to focus on the areas of this course that closely match your own interests and career aspirations.

Throughout the duration of your course you will benefit from our close relationships with the cultural sector and cultural partnerships such as Tyne & Wear Archives and Museums, BALTIC Centre for Contemporary Art, LIVE Theatre, New Writing North, Tyneside Cinema and National Trust. Your eight-week placement will leave you with added insight into the day-to-day workings of the cultural and creative industries, and how your skills and knowledge apply in a real-world environment.

Your Future

This course will prepare you for employment across a wide range of the cultural and creative industries, in positions within visual and performing arts, architecture, museums and galleries, heritage, music, broadcast, cultural practice, historic environment, education and social policy, cultural events, sport or local authorities.

You will leave this course with a detailed understanding of cultural management and leadership techniques, which will benefit employability and progression into more senior positions.

The employment patterns within the cultural sector are constantly evolving, with freelance, self-employment, enterprise, project and portfolio working being increasingly common ways of working. This course will equip you with highly developed interpersonal skills, intercultural awareness, leadership and management understanding and competencies that will allow you to successfully work within this sector.

This course will also equip you with the necessary foundation to progress your qualification to PHD level.

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The Master of Cultural Economy is a program built on the recognition that contemporary culture is a growing economy. Music, film, new media, computer games, publishing, music, the visual and performing arts, tourism, crafts, design and fashion all offer dynamic careers now and in the future. Read more
The Master of Cultural Economy is a program built on the recognition that contemporary culture is a growing economy. Music, film, new media, computer games, publishing, music, the visual and performing arts, tourism, crafts, design and fashion all offer dynamic careers now and in the future. Policymakers at city, national and international levels understand that the benefits of the cultural economy go beyond monetary value and are essential for social well-being. Cultural pursuits are the markers of contemporary civilised societies. 'Cultural economy' helps you understand how the cultural and the economic fit together – for without the culture, there would be no economy.

The Master of Cultural Economy offers an individual roadmap to dynamic careers in the independent arts and creative/cultural industries; working in cultural policy, governance and community development; and/or seeking to place cultural economies in an historical context, and its implications for contemporary practice.

The course offers a research or internship project component, which provides the opportunity to work in interdisciplinary contexts to combine theory and practice in responding to local and global issues at individual, community, corporate and government levels. For instance, you may participate in the unit Shanghai City Lab, a unique program aimed at immersing students in the cultural economy of Asia's new global metropolis.

As a student in the Master of Cultural Economy, you will be taught by academic staff who are widely regarded as leading experts in their respective fields. Further, you will attend regular presentations from a range of policymakers, industry practitioners, cultural activists, urban planners and community groups. These include Renew Newcastle and Renew Australia; Melbourne cultural policy representatives; live music campaigners; cultural consultants working with indigenous groups; and creative industry practitioners and advisors.

Visit the website http://www.study.monash/courses/find-a-course/2016/cultural-economy-a6004?domestic=true

Course Structure

The course is structured in three parts. Part A. Foundations for advanced cultural economy studies, Part B. Core Master's study and Part C. Advanced expertise. All students complete Part B. Depending upon prior qualifications, you may receive credit for Part A or Part C or a combination of the two.

[Note that if you are eligible for credit for prior studies you may elect not to receive the credit.]

PART A. Foundations for advanced cultural economy studies
These studies will introduce you to cultural economy studies at advanced undergraduate or graduate level. They are intended for students whose previous qualification is not in a cognate field.

PART B. Core Master's study
These studies draw on best practices within the broad realm of cultural economy studies practice and research to further your understanding of the complex ecosystem in which cultural and economic goals and dynamics combine in ways that transgress traditional disciplinary and policy boundaries.

PART C. Advanced expertise
The focus of these studies is professional or scholarly work that can contribute to a portfolio of professional development. You have two options.

The first option is a program of coursework study where you select the units to suit your own interests. This option includes the opportunity to undertake an internship in the field.

The second option is a 24 point research thesis. Students wishing to use this Masters course as a pathway to a higher degree by research should take this second option.

Students admitted to the course, who have a recognised honours degree in a cognate discipline including humanities or social sciences, will receive credit for Part C, however, should they wish to complete a 24 point research project as part of the course they should consult with the course coordinator.

For more information visit the faculty website - http://www.study.monash/media/links/faculty-websites/arts

Find out how to apply here - http://www.study.monash/courses/find-a-course/2016/cultural-economy-a6004?domestic=true#making-the-application

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The programme offers a comprehensive understanding of social sciences media and cultural analysis. Read more
The programme offers a comprehensive understanding of social sciences media and cultural analysis. Interdisciplinary in conception, it provides students with a critical introduction to key areas of media and cultural analysis, including the media and political economy; modernity and post-modernity; and cultural ‘difference’, prejudice and power.

While there are several core modules, students undertake research directly related to their specialist interests in the dissertation. There are also a number of optional modules, covering such areas as globalisation, visual cultures, media and nationalisms, citizenship, digital media, popular music, cultural policy, and consumption.

Core study areas include media and modernity, the politics of representation, production and reception analysis, media and cultural industries, textual analysis research techniques and a dissertation.

Optional study areas include citizenship and communications, media, nations and nationalisms, global communications, digital futures, media and cultural work, digital cultures, digital economies, cultural memory and the heritage industries, marketing politics.

See the website http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/social-sciences/media-cultural-analysis/

Programme modules

Compulsory Modules:
- Media and Modernity
- The Politics of Representation
- Production and Reception Analysis
- Media and Cultural Industries
- Textual Analysis Research Techniques
- Dissertation

Optional Modules:
- Popular Music and Modern Times
- Citizenship and Communications
- Media, Nations and Nationalisms
- Global Communications
- Digital Futures
- Media and Cultural Work
- Digital Cultures
- Digital Economics
- Cultural Memory and the Heritage Industries
- Marketing Politics

Assessment

Coursework plus a dissertation of 10,000 words on an agreed topic.

Careers and further study

Our students go on to work in media, marketing and PR divisions of major public and private institutions. They also go on to work in mainstream media careers such as journalism and broadcasting.

The comprehensive theoretical introduction to media, communications and culture that the programme provides makes it an ideal stepping stone into a research career. Many of our students have also gone on to do PhDs in media, communications and culture in the UK and abroad.

Why choose social sciences at Loughborough?

The Department of Social Sciences has long been recognised as an international centre of academic excellence and for its cutting-edge interdisciplinary work.

This recognition of excellence has been a major factor in enabling the Department to recruit a lively community of postgraduate students that currently numbers around 100.

In the Department of Social Sciences we offer a rich variety of taught postgraduate masters. The courses are delivered by an internationally renowned interdisciplinary team, through the use of contemporary case studies and research-informed applied teaching and learning.

The courses provide training in digital culture, media, communications, sociological and anthropological, theory, as well as quantitative and qualitative methods

- Research
All of our academic staff are active researchers, working within and across the following disciplinary boundaries – Communication and Media Studies, Criminology, Social Policy, Social Psychology, and Sociology.

Loughborough is home to the most world-leading, original and internationally excellent research in communication, media studies, sociology, and social psychology. Our research has excellent impact, with staff working with a wide range of public and third sector bodies (e.g., BBC Trust, the Metropolitan Police, the Electoral Commission, the College of Mediators, UK Drug Policy Commission, Department of Health). Our social policy and criminology research also has world-leading impact, particularly in services for children and minimum income standards.

- Career prospects
Our programmes prepare our graduates for the real world of the television industry, marketing, academia, publishing, plus many more industries. They go on to work for companies and organisations such as China Development Research Foundation, Elsevier Ltd, Image Line Communication, Institute of Psychiatry, Metropolitan Police Service, Oxfam and X-Pert Med GmbH.

Find out how to apply here http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/social-sciences/media-cultural-analysis/

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Within a rapidly changing domestic and international environment, the work of arts and cultural managers is becoming more complex and significant. Read more
Within a rapidly changing domestic and international environment, the work of arts and cultural managers is becoming more complex and significant. The creative industries are growing rapidly and patterns of cultural work are changing. Cultural organisations and festivals are in a period of fundamental, pervasive and long-term change; managers must deal with a host of dramatic, often contradictory demands and challenges. This leads to a situation where there is a need for graduates with more holistic and integrated perspectives regarding the management of cultural organisations and the political, economic, social and environmental conditions in which they function. This course has been developed in response to this need and is rooted in a belief that great leaders in the acknowledging that approaches may need to be adapted to meet the particularities of cultural organisations and festivals. Through encouraging you to become critically reflective, the course will develop your knowledge of the contemporary issues affecting the management of arts organisations and festivals while equipping you with the practical management skills that are essential for developing a career in the field. Mindful of the need for students to develop vocational skills, a number of assignments are orientated towards developing the knowledge and skills required to become an effective practitioner in the field. In addition, students are encouraged to arrange and undertake practical experience within cultural organisations to complement their studies.

This MA is designed as a conversion degree and we welcome applicants from non-business related subjects. It is suitable for both graduates who wish to add a vocational management emphasis to their first degree and those with equivalent professional qualifications or experience. It is likely to be of interest to those who studied the arts and humanities at undergraduate level or those with significant workplace experience who would like to gain a formal qualification in a flexible manner.

We also offer a block taught PgCert

Teaching, learning and assessment

Teaching comprises a combination of lectures, seminars, tutorials, case studies, simulation exercises, field trips and projects. You will also be required to arrange a period of industry based learning. Your performance on the course will be assessed by essays, reports, exams, presentations and a dissertation or project (MA only). Normally, there are around 30 to 35 students undertaking the course each year.

Teaching hours and attendance

Each module will require you to attend classes and carry out independent work. Most modules consist of two to three hours of class time each week of the semester. Where possible, all teaching takes place over two days per week. Your specific timetable will depend on whether you study full or part time. Flexible study options and a diverse curriculum mean that this course is suited to both those already working in the arts and those who are looking to start a career in the sector.

Links with industry/professional bodies

Part of our strength comes from our location; being based in Edinburgh means that the course has been developed over time in co-operation with key national cultural agencies and other bodies with a strategic interest in the development of arts organisations and festivals. Our location in the ‘festival city’ also allows for strong practical links between the course and the many arts, festival and cultural organisations based in and around Edinburgh, across Scotland and the UK.

Modules

15 credits: Critical Issues in Cultural Management and Policy/ Managing Cultural Projects and Festivals/ Marketing Cultural Organisations and Festivals/ Strategic Management and Finance/ Fundraising and Development in Cultural Organisations and Festivals/ People Management, Governance and Law/ Arts Management in Practice (subject to validation)/ Understanding Research/ Dissertation or project (60 credits) (MA only)

Careers

You will be qualified for a broad range of management positions within a wide spectrum of cultural organisations and festivals. Previous graduates have gone on to work in theatres, performing arts organisations, galleries, local government, and cultural agencies. In addition, many now work in festivals within the UK, Europe and internationally. Potential careers might include producing, fundraising, marketing, programming, or audience development, as well as many other roles across the cultural industries.

Quick Facts

- Small cohort of students working closely and collaboratively with staff.
- Range of guest lecturers and field trips to key cultural organisations and festivals.
- The only postgraduate course of its kind in Scotland.

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Global media and cultural industries are important sources of employment and economic growth internationally. They are also important carriers of meaning about the world. Read more
Global media and cultural industries are important sources of employment and economic growth internationally. They are also important carriers of meaning about the world. This programme focuses on the growth of these global industries and the roles that states play in governing them. The products of media and cultural industries are increasingly produced, governed, and consumed transnationally.

The programme draws on the enduring strength of transnational and comparative research as well as research in the political economy of communication within the Department.

Core study areas include media and cultural industries, digital futures, media and cultural work, textual analysis research techniques, production and reception analysis, and a dissertation.

Optional study areas include politics of representation, media and modernity, communication and citizenship, sex industries, global communications, media, nations, and nationalisms, digital cultures, digital economies, political marketing, heritage industries, and capitalism and culture.

See the website http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/social-sciences/global-medial-cultural-industries/

Programme modules

Compulsory Modules:
- Media and Cultural Industries
- Digital Futures
- Media and Cultural Work
- Textual Analysis Research Techniques
- Production and Reception Analysis
- Dissertation

Optional Modules:
- Politics of Representation
- Media and Modernity
- Communication and Citizenship
- Sex Industries
- Global Communications
- Popular Music and Modern Times
- Media, Nations, and Nationalisms
- Digital Cultures
- Digital Economics
- Cultural Memory and the Heritage Industries
- Marketing Politics

Assessment

Coursework plus a dissertation of 10,000 words on an agreed topic.

Careers and further study

The degree is designed to enhance specialist knowledge and methodological expertise of relevance to professionals working in communications, to students interested in media and cultural studies, and those wishing to progress to a research degree in these fields.

Why choose social sciences at Loughborough?

The Department of Social Sciences has long been recognised as an international centre of academic excellence and for its cutting-edge interdisciplinary work.

This recognition of excellence has been a major factor in enabling the Department to recruit a lively community of postgraduate students that currently numbers around 100.

In the Department of Social Sciences we offer a rich variety of taught postgraduate masters. The courses are delivered by an internationally renowned interdisciplinary team, through the use of contemporary case studies and research-informed applied teaching and learning.

The courses provide training in digital culture, media, communications, sociological and anthropological, theory, as well as quantitative and qualitative methods

- Research
All of our academic staff are active researchers, working within and across the following disciplinary boundaries – Communication and Media Studies, Criminology, Social Policy, Social Psychology, and Sociology.

Loughborough is home to the most world-leading, original and internationally excellent research in communication, media studies, sociology, and social psychology. Our research has excellent impact, with staff working with a wide range of public and third sector bodies (e.g., BBC Trust, the Metropolitan Police, the Electoral Commission, the College of Mediators, UK Drug Policy Commission, Department of Health). Our social policy and criminology research also has world-leading impact, particularly in services for children and minimum income standards.

- Career prospects
Our programmes prepare our graduates for the real world of the television industry, marketing, academia, publishing, plus many more industries. They go on to work for companies and organisations such as China Development Research Foundation, Elsevier Ltd, Image Line Communication, Institute of Psychiatry, Metropolitan Police Service, Oxfam and X-Pert Med GmbH.

Find out how to apply here http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/social-sciences/global-medial-cultural-industries/

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This Postgraduate Certificate is designed to appeal to professionals working in all sectors of education, as well as in cultural institutions such as theatres, museums and galleries. Read more
This Postgraduate Certificate is designed to appeal to professionals working in all sectors of education, as well as in cultural institutions such as theatres, museums and galleries. It has been developed to help improve the quality of creative and cultural education in schools and enhance the relationship between schools and arts organisations.

The programme will immerse you in the nature and significance of culture in human social living, develop your understanding of the tensions and policy imperatives surrounding contemporary cultural work, analyse the reach, merits and role of culture in society with a particular focus on developing countries, and critically analyse the complex cultural environment of one school and one cultural institution.

The aim is to encourage the generation of advanced professional practice and dynamic activity, integrating professional development and practice through new concepts, new relationships and new methodologies, empowering teachers and creative professionals to design, implement and evaluate creative practice for cultural education.

What will I study?

You will be introduced to concepts of culture as functions of ideas, practices and policies and will be invited to locate your own cultural formation among those features of contemporary living.

The programme will question what constitutes cultural work and consider who is included in the term ‘cultural worker’. You will analyse cultural practices and practitioners across a broad spectrum, from professional art form practice to pedagogy, teasing out tensions arising in institutional sites. Comparative case studies provide the opportunity to explore cultural practices in developmental contexts and contemporary arts activism.

The culmination of the programme is a cultural advocacy project, allowing you to apply your knowledge and skills to real-time, real-world tasks.

How will I study?

There will be a combination of learning environments across all three modules. These include lectures, seminars, practical sessions, workshops, placements and fieldwork.

Two of the three modules involve placements in schools and cultural institutions, enabling you to explore your own relationship to influential ideas of art and culture, consider key contemporary issues and debates, and design, implement and evaluate a work-based cultural advocacy initiative.

Precise patterns of attendance and placement design will be negotiated to provide optimum blending with work commitments.

How will I be assessed?

You will be assessed through a combination of essays, presentations, portfolios and reports.

Who will be teaching me?

You will be taught by staff who have extensive experience of the school system and other applied settings. This will enable significant networks and partnerships to be sustained which inform the department’s approaches to curriculum, research and knowledge exchange.

In addition to this, experts from the Department of Media and Department of Social Sciences will provide lectures and seminars in culture, providing a unique comparative context for your studies.

Visiting lecturers will also contribute to the programme which will be further enriched by the input of staff from Curious Minds, a charity and creative social enterprise that works to improve the lives of children and young people by increasing opportunities for their active participation in arts, culture and creative learning.

What are my career prospects?

This programme will enhance your existing practice and focus your educational and creative potential, enabling you to explore new strategies and widen your understanding of both arts organisations and schools.

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The MA in Cultural Politics is designed to meet the needs of students who wish to study at the intersection between the creative and professional cultural industries and who envisage a career in the arts and policy worlds, in government, industry or in academia. Read more

Summary

The MA in Cultural Politics is designed to meet the needs of students who wish to study at the intersection between the creative and professional cultural industries and who envisage a career in the arts and policy worlds, in government, industry or in academia.

Introducing your course

This is the course page for MA Cultural Politics at the University of Southampton. Find out everything about Cultural Politics and what studying here involves.

In this course page we explain a range of key information about the course. This includes typical entry requirements, modules you can take and how assessment works. We also suggest career opportunities open to you as a University of Southampton graduate of MA Cultural Politics.

If you still have questions, please get in touch and we’ll be happy to answer any enquiries. See our contact us page for our telephone, email and address information.

This MA programme offers a broad and accessible interdisciplinary approach to the study of contemporary cultural politics. Students are introduced to a variety of cultural perspectives and political traditions in addition to the creative interface between these disciplines. Gradually addressing numerous central themes, ranging from mass media culture to the politics of globalization, the MA in Cultural Politics combines the essential themes and leading figures of classical and present-day cultural and political studies along with the latest developments in cultural and political theory.

The MA in Cultural Politics is studied over one year, full-time, and comprises a mix of core and option modules.

Career Opportunities

The MA Cultural Politics is good preparation for any role that requires an extra qualification as a mode of distinction involving research, media, culture, communication, and politics. Graduates pursue opportunities in research, media (journalism), cultural and public policy, marketing, political parties, international organisations, and institutions, business, education and (teaching). Graduates also go on to research degrees (PhD), at either the University of Southampton or elsewhere.

Learning & Assessment

Learning and teaching:

This MA offers students the benefits of being taught jointly by experts in creative and cultural contexts and Politics and International Relations. In this dynamic research environment, you will study the relations between culture, media, and politics, understanding how culture and media become related to political theory and practice, and how politics influences culture and media.
You will experience a directed and diverse mix of lectures and guided seminars during the first two semesters and then work over the summer on a self-directed dissertation.

Assessment:

Assessment is based on a mix of methods, including essays, exams, presentations, seminar research papers, and a dissertation.

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The Cultural History pathway encourages you to investigate artefacts and ideas, material objects and mentalities, medical documents and museums, photographs and films and explore key themes that have shaped the past, including national identity, gender, race, sexuality and modernity. Read more
The Cultural History pathway encourages you to investigate artefacts and ideas, material objects and mentalities, medical documents and museums, photographs and films and explore key themes that have shaped the past, including national identity, gender, race, sexuality and modernity.

On this absorbing MA programme you’ll study one of the most exciting fields of historical inquiry; cultural history examines the culture of the time in order to understand how people made sense of the world they inhabited.

It will introduce you to the specialist research methods used by cultural historians, to ongoing historiographical and theoretical debates and to related disciplines such as cultural studies, literary studies, history of art and sociology. You will also get the opportunity to explore the area of cultural history that interests you most in your dissertation.

The MA draws together case studies from across Britain and continental Europe, the European Empires and North America from the 18th century to the present day. Taking the Cultural History MA will:

- Deepen your understanding of the cultural history of Britain and its Empire, continental Europe and North America since the 18th century
- Encourage you to think about a broad range of questions and debates in cultural history
- Allow you to engage with current debates on such themes as gender, modernity, national identity, sexuality and the politics of culture
- Give you the chance to work closely with a dynamic group of young historians and established scholars who themselves research and write about the cultural history of Britain, continental Europe and North America.

Students study two 30-credit core modules and four 15-credit research training modules, culminating in a 60-credit dissertation.

Why History?

Breadth of expertise

The interests of our staff and PhD students are extremely diverse and span the medieval, early modern and modern periods.

Their work encompasses political, social, cultural, economic, military and diplomatic history, across Europe, Africa, Asia, Australia and the Americas.

Active seminar programmes, linked to our research centres and MA programmes, enable staff and postgraduates to present their work and listen to eminent visiting speakers.

These are our on-going seminar series:

Medieval and Renaissance Studies
Eighteenth-Century Worlds
Contemporary Cultural and Social
History
International Slavery
Contemporary History and Policy
New Research (run by our postgraduate students)
Recent conferences and workshops have addressed ‘Religion in the Spanish Baroque’, ‘Text and Place in Medieval and Early Modern Europe’, ‘Re-thinking Post- Slavery’ and ‘British Nuclear Culture’.

Taught programmes that prepare you for future research

By pursuing our programmes you’ll gain the skills and knowledge you need to carry out further research towards a PhD.

Our MA programmes are taught by research-active experts who bring their knowledge of, and passion for, their subjects into the seminar room.

Teaching takes place in small-group seminars or workshops and through one-to-one tutorials, as we believe this leads to the best collaboration between students and staff.

We offer programmes in:-

Cultural History
Eighteenth-Century Worlds
International Slavery Studies
Medieval and Renaissance Studies
Twentieth-Century History
You can also pursue an MRes in History or a vocational Masters in Archives and Records Management.

Support and skills training for PhD students

As a postgraduate research student you’ll receive comprehensive skills from the Graduate School, the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences and History Department.

This will equip you with the research skills you need to successfully complete your PhD.

Our PhD programmes place a strong emphasis on independent research and study, culminating in a 100,000-word dissertation. Two supervisors (normally experts in your chosen field) who will advise and support you through the process.

Our commitment to postgraduate students

We welcome enquiries from all postgraduate students interested in studying here and will give you all the academic, practical and pastoral support we can.

Students have a voice here and are represented on the School Postgraduate Committee. There’s also a dedicated staff – student liaison committee to oversee our MA and PhD programmes.

Postgraduate studentships and bursaries are often available.

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The MA in Anthropology and Cultural Politics is an interdisciplinary programme in anthropology, directed at students from a wide range of disciplines in the humanities, social and political sciences, artists, and professionals in the media and cultural sectors. Read more
The MA in Anthropology and Cultural Politics is an interdisciplinary programme in anthropology, directed at students from a wide range of disciplines in the humanities, social and political sciences, artists, and professionals in the media and cultural sectors. http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-anthropology-cultural-politics/

The objective of the MA is to address contemporary issues in culture and politics from an anthropological perspective, drawing on the commitment of the Department of Anthropology at Goldsmiths to build a public anthropology.

The MA is organised around a critical investigation of the central thematic concepts of its title: 'culture', 'power', and 'politics', as well as 'anthropology' itself.

Each of these terms are posited in this programme as questions for critical reflection and students are encouraged to pursue independent research projects that investigate the meanings attributed to these terms in contemporary social contexts.

The programme is particularly interested in the intersections of 'culture' and 'power', and the consideration of what may be called 'cultural politics'.

- How and when does 'culture' become apprehensible as 'political'?
- How and when does 'power' operate upon or within 'culture'? Is it even tenable to uphold and retain this distinction?
- If so, what are the analytical or interpretive benefits?
- What may be the disadvantages or pitfalls?
- If not, what is implicated in the politicisation of 'culture' or the culturalisation of 'power' and 'politics'?
- How can these concerns be studied in the ongoing struggles over 'culture' in everyday life?

In addition to the core modules, options can be selected from several departments and centres.

See the website http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-anthropology-cultural-politics/

Core Modules

The MA is made up of four parts:
- Anthropology and Cultural Politics (30 credits)
- Anthropology Theory (30 credits)
- Option modules [within the Department of Anthropology, or the Departments of English and Comparative Literature, Media & - Communications, Politics, Sociology, or Centre for Cultural Studies] (60 credits)
- Dissertation (60 credits)

- Anthropology and Cultural Politics:

What is the relationship between culture and power?; How is power manifested or articulated 'culturally'?; In what ways may culture be understood to be 'political'?

This module is centrally preoccupied with social and political theories organised around the question of 'culture' and its relation to 'power', and vice versa, and with comprehending what may be the stakes of the politics of 'culture'. The module elaborates upon the problem of 'politics' and its always complex configuration with respect to what comes to be deemed to be 'cultural', specifically in relation to creative and productive labour, alienation, capitalism and commodification, the state, ideology, and hegemony.

We also consider the concepts of the critique of everyday life, the society of the spectacle, and the production of space. While principally concerned with a series of theoretical problems, the module will nonetheless also marshal the insights that may be gleaned from ethnography, in the effort to situate the discipline of socio-cultural anthropology in relation to the problems posed by or for 'cultural politics'.

- Anthropological Theory:

The aims and objectives of this module are to introduce you to major subfields of modern anthropology and to do so in a broadly historical and comparative framework.

The lectures will enable you to see how different anthropologists approach a number of central contemporary issues. The topics chosen will focus upon some of the theoretical developments and methodological strategies pursued in response to profound and widespread social transformations. Each week the module will focus on a single technique, methodology or strategy in anthropology in the work of a specific anthropologist.

Assessment

Dissertation – a thorough critical discussion of existing knowledge in a relevant area; reports; take-home papers. Options may require a presentation or production of visual material.

Department: Anthropology

Investigate a variety of fascinating areas that have real relevance to modern life.

As a department we’re interested in pushing the discipline forward. We’re known for pioneering new fields including visual anthropology and the anthropology of modernity. And we tackle other contemporary issues like urban planning, development, emotions and aesthetics, and new social movements.

Skills & Careers

The programme is great preparation for any role that involves research and communication. Graduates have pursued opportunities in journalism, other media, policy, education and public debate; they have also gone on to research degrees, either at Goldsmiths or elsewhere.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/apply/

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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On this MA you will interrogate digital culture as you develop and think through your own projects in our bespoke Centre for Cultural Studies media lab. Read more
On this MA you will interrogate digital culture as you develop and think through your own projects in our bespoke Centre for Cultural Studies media lab. You will undertake research and writing that incorporates contemporary art, software studies, critical theory, philosophy and cultural studies. http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-digital-culture/

Our modes of art, experimentation, work, sociability, politics and economies are changed in tandem with the development of digitality. Many of us are now continuously wired into our networks for fun, at work, and at home. We often find ourselves at the margins of networked relationships where different flows of power form from the residue we leave behind in electronic memories. On one hand we find ourselves policed by the ability to sort large amounts of information on the move, on the other, new spaces grow from technical innovation, experimentation and artistic methods.

Join our MA Digital Culture and help create new insights within these logics. Your writing and projects will be supported in an interdisciplinary environment. You do not necessarily need to have an initial project in mind, nor a technical background, just an enthusiasm for learning and experimentation. Each year we have a very lively mix of students who bring prior experience from across the arts, humanities, and sciences.

The MA in Digital Culture helps students develop and realize innovative projects and prepare for, or to create a bridge towards, a critical career in the cultural, creative, educational, analytical, and computational sectors.

This program is based on the research excellence in cultural studies (Scott Lash), software studies (Matthew Fuller), media philosophy (Luciana Parisi) and critical practices (Graham Harwood).

The MA in Digital Culture grew out of the prior MA Interactive Media: Critical Theory and Practice.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact the Centre for Cultural Studies.

Modules & Structure

We use art methodologies alongside those from computing and cultural theory. A key method adopted in the Lab is to make the space between theory and practice ambiguous. The class makes and explores things, attempting to explain the phenomena being looked at or thought about. Explanation in this context is not necessarily a reduction of phenomena to literature or a system of logics, but can instead be thought of as knowledge incorporated into a thing that we create, look at or point to, through figuring out a proposition.

In practice this means we may:

-Learn MySQL databases and explore how their integral model of entities and relations create new forms of governance and aid in the performance of different scales of power
-Build simple telephony systems while taking inspiration from early/current data networks and their relationship to cultural change, resource wars and political insurrection
-Explore systematic failure within computation by exploring hacking and security issues such as creating fork bombs, doing penetration testing and reviewing the need for cryptography post-Snowden

We actively work with cultural theory in a world with computation as a central pillar. The Digital Culture Unit in the Centre for Cultural Studies, under whose auspices this programme is run, has been a pioneer of practice-led theory. This method pursues a form of working on projects that at the same time undertakes research and writing that incorporates contemporary cultural theory, philosophy and cultural studies. The Masters, therefore, is also ideal for students with primarily theoretical interests who wish to ground these with concrete knowledge and experience.

Building on the Digital Culture Unit's research excellence in software studies, media philosophy and digital art, students will learn to employ cutting edge research and practice-based methodologies to enhance their own skill set. The programme gives you the opportunity to develop critical and speculative theoretical and practice-based research on the ways computational media technologies are embedded in the technical, cultural, aesthetic, and political structures of society and how we interact with them. The applications of such work are highly diverse. The degree helps students to prepare for or to create a bridge towards a critical career in the cultural, creative, educational, analytical, and computational sectors.

Skills

You'll develop skills in:

Theoretical and practice-based research methodologies
Software and hardware production including basic electronics, programming, networking, telephony, relational database analyses
Group working skills
Event planning and production

Careers

The programme helps students to prepare for a critical career in the cultural, creative, educational, analytical, computational sectors.

Find out more about employability at Goldsmiths.

What our alumni are doing now

-Joao Wilbert (2008/9) has a background in web design and is now a Creative Technologist working at Google Creative Labs. http://www.jhwilbert.com
-Maria Beatrice Fazi (2008/9) has a BA in Philosophy and is now completing her PhD on Computation and Aesthetics at the Centre for Cultural Studies.
-Lisa Baldini (2010/11) is a New York based curator. In 2012 she has curated Code of Contingency.
-Loes Borges (2010/11) has a BA in Media and Cultural Studies and is now lab manager at the Digital Art Lab in Zoetermeer, (NL). http://www.loesbogers.com
-Tom Keene (2011/12) has a BA in Fine Arts and is now collaborating with Furtherfield, London-based media arts organisation, co-director of Brixton Remakery, a community-led recycling initiative. http://www.theanthillsocial.co.uk
-Marcos Chitelet (2011/12) has a BA in Design and is co-founder of the design agency DID, as well as political web platform Sentidos Comunes, and FaceEnergy, a start-up developing projects on energy efficiency for the city of Santiago, Chile.

Prizes and awards

In 2011, Alexandra Sofie Joensoon and Cliff Hemmet – both students from the MA – won a prestigious prize at the media arts festival Ars Electronica. Alex and Cliff created a low cost DIY telephony server together with sex workers activist group X-talk. Today the project is a platform for critical reflection on how communication practices and structures are materialised in the sex industry.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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Are you fascinated by history and culture? Want to help shape today's cultural landscape? Find out what defines “heritage”? Learn how museums plan exhibitions or how heritage policies are created?. Read more
Are you fascinated by history and culture? Want to help shape today's cultural landscape? Find out what defines “heritage”? Learn how museums plan exhibitions or how heritage policies are created?

Memory produces identity. That is why heritage is crucial for our sense of continuity in rapidly changing societies.Governments, national and international organizations need to make sense of the past as they make policies for and invest in heritage. The aim of this master's degree is to give you the theoretical and practical education necessary to take an active role in this exciting and growing field.

Why study heritage at a faculty of Theology and Religious Studies? Because most of the heritage around us stems, one way or another, from religious practices and ideas. If you want to understand heritage in all its facets, you want to study with experts who know the full story behind material and intangible heritages both locally and abroad.

The track Religion and Cultural Heritage in the Master's Programme in Theology and Religious Studies combines broad cultural competence with a high-level academic research training and the practical skills relevant for today's job market. Through concrete projects and internships, you can gain hands-on experience in the field.

Why Groningen?

• rated best Master's programme in Theology & Religious Studies in the Netherlands
• top 100 university
• unique focus on religion within the field of cultural heritage
• combination of broad cultural competence and academic research skills with practical skills relevant for job market;
• strong heritage region
• excellent network for internships
• taught by internationally recognized experts in the field
• vibrant research hub with global links

Job perspectives

You can advise or write policy documents on heritage subjects, such as the preservation of old churches or the distribution of funding for cultural activities. You could work for cultural organisations, the government, in the tourist business or at an NGO. You may also work in the media or as a teacher of religion in secondary education after completing your Educational Master's programme.

Would you like to stay in academia, you can choose to apply for a placement in the Research Master.

Job examples

• Cultural Education
You can work within organizations that consult upon the content and organization within the field of arts and cultural education. Or you could work at an educational department within institutions such as a cultural centers or museums.

• Consulting & Policy
Your knowledge about religious heritage will enable you to advise upon or write policy documents on the conservation of religious heritage. You could find a job with central government but also at organizations and foundations in the cultural sector. This could, for example, be the Museum Catharijneconvent in Utrecht or the Stichting Oude Groninger Kerken.

• Education
Once you have completed this Master's track, you will have sufficient knowledge of the subject to be able to teach Religious Studies or Social Studies in secondary education. Alternatively, you could opt for a position in higher vocational education. As you also need didactic skills as a teacher or lecturer, it is advisable to do a Master's in Education after you have completed your regular Master's programme.

• Media & Journalism
A number of publishers have shown renewed interest in religion and society. With your knowledge and skills, you can make an expert contribution to publications in this field. You could also use your expertise as an editor at a broadcasting company, newspaper or current affairs magazine.

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The MA Cultural Management explores where cultural theory meets management practice. It provides a framework of understanding of the needs of cultural organisations including their social and cultural context, the business and funding environment and aesthetic aims and concerns. Read more

About this course

The MA Cultural Management explores where cultural theory meets management practice. It provides a framework of understanding of the needs of cultural organisations including their social and cultural context, the business and funding environment and aesthetic aims and concerns. It considers the Cultural and Creative Industries in a critical manner.

The MA offers an innovative approach to creative and cultural leadership, including operational and strategic management with a specialist focus. The programme offers professional development at a high level, encouraging learners to critically reflect on policies, procedures and practices informed by theory, considering audience engagement and development, income generation, customers and consumers. Innovative partnerships with cultural organisations provide practical opportunities.

As Cultural Managers often create their own work, the programme provides opportunities to consider the skills needed for engagement with all aspects of the dynamic businesses, practices and organisations that make up the rapidly evolving Cultural and Creative Industries.

See the website https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/study-at-northumbria/courses/cultural-management-fts-dtfcmn6/

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The Master of Cultural Studies investigates the changing meanings of culture in our everyday world. It explores the studying of culture not as a monolithic, self-evident construct, but as a constantly shifting field through which life is experienced and negotiated. Read more
The Master of Cultural Studies investigates the changing meanings of culture in our everyday world. It explores the studying of culture not as a monolithic, self-evident construct, but as a constantly shifting field through which life is experienced and negotiated. You will gain insight into the ideologically charged meanings of identity, self‑expression and embodiment.

Our Cultural Studies program allows you to engage critically with culture in its manifest expressions. Using real-world examples across the topics of popular culture, media, gender, sexuality, globalisation and consumer culture, you will analyse cultural forms and debate their significance in relation to given contexts.

Cultural Studies will lead you to question identity, community, representation, power, values and the practice of everyday life. The course draws on diverse critical perspectives as you gain the theoretical tools to understand how culture is produced, circulated and lived.

The Master of Cultural Studies is the only specialised program in Australia. Housed in the internationally recognised Department of Gender and Cultural Studies – a leading centre for research into gender and culture – you will critically engage in a dynamic postgraduate community and learn under the guidance of esteemed researchers in the field.

An optional cultural studies internship also gives you the opportunity to undertake cultural research in a business, government or non-governmental body, enhancing your appreciation of applied cultural work.
The Master of Cultural Studies assumes no background in the field; however those familiar with the discipline are also welcome to extend their knowledge.

To ask a question about this course, visit http://sydney.edu.au/internationaloffice/

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The aim of the Master's program Management of Cultural Diversity at Tilburg University is. First, to equip students with the necessary expertise, tools and skills to analyze cases of cultural diversity in organizations and societal fields like education, health care, labor market and arts and culture. Read more
The aim of the Master's program Management of Cultural Diversity at Tilburg University is:
First, to equip students with the necessary expertise, tools and skills to analyze cases of cultural diversity in organizations and societal fields like education, health care, labor market and arts and culture.
Second, based on such an analysis they will be able to design management interventions to neutralize the risks and to take advantage of the opportunities stemming from cultural diversity.

A master's program about the impact of globalization and intercultural communication:
Globalization means movement. People, images, symbols, information, capital, goods and so on increasingly move from one corner of the world to another and people communicate with other people many miles away. As a consequence, individual people are increasingly being confronted with (all kinds of) different influences and ideas from other parts of the world.

About collaboration between people with different cultural backgrounds and world views:
Global communication media like the internet and means of rapid transportation facilitate such encounters. The same holds true for multinational organizations that expand globally and thus incorporate people with all kinds of cultural orientations in their workforce.
Organizations and societal fields such as the labor market, education, health care and arts and culture are increasingly made up of employees and citizens with different identities and have to deal with customers and citizens with diverse orientations and world views.

Numerous questions are raised in this multicultural, multinational framework, such as:
•What does it mean to a hospital when patients with various religious beliefs need tailor-made care?
•How are production and service delivery affected when people from all parts of the world come together to communicate and work in a company?
•What are the consequences when citizens representing different identities, traditions, languages and beliefs send their children to mixed schools?
•Do people with different ethnic backgrounds get equal opportunities in the labor market?

Cultural diversity entails both risks and opportunities
•Risks: think of miscommunication, conflict and exclusion.
•Opportunities: think of innovating ideas, creativity and renewal of production and service delivery.

Consequently, there is need for management, policy and intervention to deal with these risks and opportunities, i.e. to neutralize the risks and take advantage of the opportunities presented by cultural diversity.

Do you want to identify these issues and provide management and policy solutions?
There are as yet no management and policy solutions available. New answers need to be developed in each specific case, place, organization or field based on a sound understanding of the issues involved at that moment and in that particular context.
Tilburg University is well-positioned to offer such a program. It has at its disposal of high-level and internationally oriented expertise in the various relevant academic fields, embodied by teaching staff firmly embedded in and intellectually nourished by relevant research programs.

Career Perspective Management of Cultural Diversity

The program offers a Master’s career to prepare students for jobs focusing on management and policy intervention regarding cultural diversity in organizations and societal fields. The program will have an explicit international orientation so students are expected to find a place on the labor market in a variety of countries in Europe and beyond. Your work will either focus on management of a culturally diverse workforce within companies and organizations (profit and non-profit) or you will be working on policy development and implementation regarding issues of cultural diversity in society within governmental organizations or NGOs.

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The new MA in Creative and Cultural Entrepreneurship programme, with an exit route at Postgraduate Diploma level, will be attractive to undergraduates who… Read more
The new MA in Creative and Cultural Entrepreneurship programme, with an exit route at Postgraduate Diploma level, will be attractive to undergraduates who either wish to develop a business arising from an existing creative practice or to understand how to create the infrastructure and environment for new creative businesses in the fields of Computing, Design, Media and Communications, Music, or Theatre and Performance to flourish in a variety of contexts (eg city, rural, regional, national)- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-creative-cultural-entrepreneurship-design/

The MA will be taught in partnership by a number of departments within Goldsmiths and with key individuals and organisations in the creative and cultural industries sector. Our collective approach is to integrate entrepreneurship within the development of creative practices and to take a ‘creative’ approach to the development of new businesses and the infrastructure that supports them. This programme is designed to allow you to continue to innovate, but also to provide the requisite business/entrepreneurial skills and attributes to commercialise your creative and cultural practices and/or knowledge. You’ll be able to build on a historical and theoretical understanding of cultural and creative industries and the development of a cultural economy to create your own creative initiatives, which might be research-based, policy-based, practice-based, or a combination of any or all of these.

What you study:

The programme contains four taught modules and a further dissertation/portfolio component. You will have a range of choices throughout the degree enabling you to design a pathway that is most relevant to your academic, business and career ambitions. All students take 'Theories of the Culture Industry: Work, Creativity and Precariousness' and 'Entrepreneurial Modelling', and your chosen pathway will determine the 'Creative Practice' course and 'Entrepreneurial Practices and Modes of Production' course that you take. In order to enable collaborative learning amongst those seeking to develop creative and cultural businesses and those already within them, we intend wherever possible to teach all students together, irrespective of the particular route on which you are registered.

Careers:

The programme will enable those who have previously studied an area of creative study/practice, such as music, media, theatre, design, or computer games, to start a career developing a business arising from an existing or new creative practice. This may relate directly to a 'product' or 'process' arising from you own practice or to a form of 'expertise', 'consultancy' or 'knowledge'. The programme will also equip those who wish to work within organisations that develop the infrastructure and environment for new creative businesses with the capacity to flourish in a variety of contexts.

Skills:

You can expect to develop an independence and integrity in developing creative ideas. You will be able to apply entrepreneurial approaches to creative projects and demonstrate an understanding of different business models to establish a creative enterprise. You will also develop team-working and leadership skills, and effective business and communication skills.

Entrance requirements:

You should normally have an undergraduate degree of at least upper second class standard in design, architecture, art, computing, engineering, education, social sciences or any other discipline that has a demonstrable relationship to design and/or research. Applicants with relevant work experience will also be considered. You must demonstrate in your written application and in interview that you have a capacity for creative and cultural entrepreneurship, and that you are able to meet the intellectual demands of the programme. Your application will not be considered unless it includes a design portfolio which should be uploaded electronically as part of your main application.

If your first language is not English you need a minimum score of 7.0 in IELTS (including 7.0 in the written element) or equivalent.

Deadline:
Deadline: 30 June (1 March if you are applying for external funding). We advise early applications, but may consider applications after the closing date. When applying, please specify your preferred pathway: Computing (games and entertainment), Design, Media and Communications, Music, or Theatre and Performance. You must demonstrate in your written application and in interview that you have a capacity for creative and cultural entrepreneurship, and that you are able to meet the intellectual demands of the programme.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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