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Masters Degrees (Cultural Planning)

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The MA in Cultural Policy, Relations and Diplomacy is a trans-disciplinary programme that addresses the theory and practice of cultural policy, cultural relations, and cultural and public diplomacy. Read more

The MA in Cultural Policy, Relations and Diplomacy is a trans-disciplinary programme that addresses the theory and practice of cultural policy, cultural relations, and cultural and public diplomacy.

This broad area of study and the terminology applied to it is fluid and expanding. Having culture as the underlying thread, the programme explores areas such as:

  • arts policy and management
  • globalisation
  • cultural relations
  • public diplomacy
  • cultural and arts diplomacy
  • external communications
  • place branding 

This will provide a unique perspective into this field of study, and will examine topics such as mobility of cultural practitioners, cultural identity, intercultural dialogue, mutuality, propaganda, soft power, hegemony, influence and perceptions.

Goldsmiths' location provides you with a unique experience of living in a multicultural world city, which is of great relevance to the study of cultural policy, relations and diplomacy.

You'll study in the Institute for Creative and Cultural Entrepreneurship (ICCE). ICCE's individual and institutional links with an extensive network of organisations, policy advisors and cultural practitioners in those areas in London and in Europe allow you to experience exceptional research and study resources.

Industry links

ICCE’s established organisational links include, for example, the British CouncilVisiting ArtsEUNIC London Hub and Demos. ICCE is also a member of ENCATC (the leading European network on Cultural Management and Cultural Policy education). The Institute is also responsible for fostering the sharing of information and discussion of issues related to international cultural relations across disciplines on the JISCMail list cultural-relations-diplomacy.

Expert staff and invited professionals

Our staff and invited academic and professional experts will enhance your learning. They'll discuss relevant literature and will present case studies and practical examples with local, national and global dimensions involving a range of individuals and organisations, including corporations, governments, international bodies and NGOs.

Modules & structure

Overview

This MA is a 180-credit programme consisting of four 30-credit modules and a 60-credit dissertation. 

The three main modules of the programme, Cultural Policy and Practice, Cultural Relations and Diplomacy I: Foundations and Cultural Relations and Diplomacy II: Explorations provide a strong basis to explore the complexity of this area of study, which is complemented by a varied module offer from across College that brings to the fore related and intersecting themes.

The fourth module of the programme is an option from a selection of modules covering arts engagement, media, business, languages and politics - this is designed to allow you to tailor the programme to your own particular skills and/or interests. 

The teaching methodologies used in these modules will be conducive to creative and independent in-depth and collaborative learning. They'll culminate in the production of a final dissertation in which you will explore in detail a topic building on your interests and knowledge.

The programme allows and encourages you to engage in work placements while attending the modules. These are not a formal part of the programme, but some support will be provided building on ICCE’s extensive experience of internship management and network of contacts.

Core modules 

Option modules

Skills

 Graduates of this programme develop a wide range of skills and competencies.

Knowledge and understanding

You'll be able to:

  • Describe and understand a range of practices, policies, structures and systems in the cultural policy and international cultural relations areas involving a variety of stakeholders (individuals, NGOs, foundations, corporations, governments, international and supranational organisations)
  • Define and understand the use of theories and key concepts in cultural policy, cultural relations and cultural and public diplomacy, such as culture, identity, globalisation, soft power, hegemony, influence, propaganda, mutuality, trust, intercultural dialogue, nation building/branding
  • Discuss the importance of cultural policy in relation to international cultural relations
  • Understand the diverse and changing relationships between culture/arts, politics and international relations
  • Build on your existing experience and/or interest to develop knowledge within cultural policy and international cultural relations

Cognitive and thinking skills

You'll be able to:

  • Analyse and evaluate the role of the 'actors' and their practices, as well as the structures and systems framing cultural policy and international cultural relations
  • Discern how to apply a range of trans-disciplinary concepts and theories to the understanding of policies, practices, structures and systems in the areas of cultural policy, cultural relations and cultural diplomacy
  • Identify and critically analyse contemporary issues
  • Build on your existing experience and/or interest to further develop analytical, critical and conceptual skills within cultural policy and international cultural relations

Practical skills

You'll be able to:

  • Analyse public policies in the areas of culture and international cultural relations at micro and macro levels
  • Devise, develop, conduct and deliver an independent piece of research relevant to cultural policy and international cultural relations, using a self-reflective approach
  • Demonstrate the origins of your thinking in cultural policy and international cultural relations by adequately referencing sources that have been evaluated for credibility, objectivity, accuracy and trustworthiness
  • Communicate effectively and succinctly through oral presentation and express yourself in writing for academic and other audiences, employing when necessary the appropriate ICT tools and skills

Key transferable skills

You'll be able to:

  • Share and exchange expertise and skills with other students and the tutors on the course employing effective written and oral communication skills
  • Demonstrate you are an independent and creative learner able to exercise initiative and personal responsibility for your own learning and planning processes
  • Conduct research methodically to find an answer that is complete, accurate and authoritative
  • Work effectively as part of a team

Find out more about employability at Goldsmiths



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Are you looking to develop skills that will enable you to be innovative and enterprising, creative, flexible and able to spot new opportunities and develop them into sustainable practice?. Read more
Are you looking to develop skills that will enable you to be innovative and enterprising, creative, flexible and able to spot new opportunities and develop them into sustainable practice?

The MA Creative and Cultural Industries Management course offers a practical and vocational approach to working in this rapidly developing sector. Enhanced programme flexibility enables you to select a culture sector specialism to suit your interests, which you will take alongside caption: Hadrians Wallcore cultural and creative industries management modules.

The four specialisms available are Music, Festivals and Events; Arts and Media; Cultural Heritage and Museums; and Galleries and Visual Arts. Options are selected during the course Induction phase.

The course is enhanced by strong partnerships and links with leading cultural organisations and practices in the North East of England and beyond - many of which are now employing our previous graduates.

An eight-week placement in a creative or heritage organisation of your choice can also enhance your degree of specialism and employability whilst providing an opportunity to experience real-time working in a cultural organisation.

This course has several available start dates and study methods - for more information, please view the relevant web-page:
2 years part time (September) - https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/study-at-northumbria/courses/creative-and-cultural-industries-management-dtpcci6/

2 years part time (January) - https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/study-at-northumbria/courses/creative-and-cultural-industries-management-dtpccw6/

1 year full time distance learning (September) - https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/study-at-northumbria/courses/creative-and-cultural-industries-management-dtdcci6/

2 years part time distance learning (September) - https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/study-at-northumbria/courses/creative-and-cultural-industries-management-dtdccv6/

2 years part time distance learning (January) - https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/study-at-northumbria/courses/creative-and-cultural-industries-management-dtdcck6/

Learn From The Best

Our teaching team are all actively engaged with specialist practice and research in the cultural sector, and remain active in their fields of expertise. That specialist knowledge is reflected in all teaching and learning activities and is evident in areas such as cultural leadership, cultural enterprise, networking and relationship management, stakeholder and audience engagement, project planning and management.

You will benefit from their active partnerships and relationships with the region’s key cultural organisations, whilst surrounded by excellent examples of culture-led regeneration from those who put these policies into practice.

Our team will be on-hand at every step of your degree, ensuring you leave with confidence and a full understanding of all aspects of this fast-moving field.

Teaching And Assessment

Throughout this course you will explore and consider the tensions and challenges inherent in the bringing together of cultural activity and management practice, helping find ways to bring creative talent to a marketplace without impairing the creative process on the way.

The ability to spot opportunities and to be entrepreneurial are skills that the course seeks to nurture and develop at each level, to best equip you to enter the professional world of work – whether it be creating your own cultural enterprise or working with existing ones.

Assessment methods include written essays and reports, as well as presentations, ‘live briefs’ and project work. The final dissertation is a student led piece of work that provides the opportunity to establish yourself as an expert in the field you have selected to specialise in.

Module Overview
EF0126 - E.S.A.P. in FADSS Level 7 (Optional, 0 Credits)
VA7006 - Cultural Management, Enterprise & Leadership (Core, 30 Credits)
VA7007 - Framing the Creative Industries (Core, 30 Credits)
VA7008 - Work Placement (Core, 30 Credits)
VA7009 - Music, Festivals & Events (Optional, 30 Credits)
VA7010 - Arts & Media (Optional, 30 Credits)
VA7011 - Cultural Heritage and Museums (Optional, 30 Credits)
VA7012 - Galleries and Visual Arts (Optional, 30 Credits)
VA7013 - Cultural and Creative Industries Management Dissertation (Core, 60 Credits)

Learning Environment

Throughout the duration of your course you will have access to all of the resources you will need to guide you through your learning experience.

This includes facilities such as our university library – which is ranked in the top three in the UK – in addition to other facilities such as our well equipped working space, The Hub, which is open 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Diverse facilities such as Gallery North @ University Gallery, dedicated performance studios and BALTIC 39 offer research and learning space to enable you to develop your creative skills.

Technology is central to supporting your everyday learning activities, whether you are a campus-based or distance learning student.

Throughout your course you will have access to our e-learning platform, Blackboard, which offers access to collaboration tools and video/audio-enhanced features, electronic feedback, discussion boards, blogs and student websites.

We provide a supportive and informal learning environment, offering feedback at all key stages of your course.

Research-Rich Learning

The MA Creative and Cultural Industries Management course, which is part of our Visual and Material Culture research cluster, blends management theory with arts, culture, heritage, visual culture, humanities, sociology, geography and policy studies.

Throughout the duration of your studies you will be encouraged to develop your own research skills to advance your understanding of the complex contexts and debates of the cultural and creative industries, and how these practices apply from a range of theoretical perspectives.

You will conduct increasingly independent investigations in response to set tasks, or investigate your own topics of interest within the sector, leading to a self-directed dissertation that will be focused around a subject area of your choice.

You will also be encouraged to take your place as a partner by contributing your knowledge to our learning community.

Give Your Career An Edge

Emphasising cultural leadership, enterprise and entrepreneurship, the skills and knowledge you will learn on this course will help you develop the professional competencies required to successfully pursue a career within cultural and creative industries management.

As an MA Creative and Cultural Industries Management graduate you will be part of an active global network that is enriched and supported by our partnerships with leading cultural providers in the region and beyond.

The ability to tailor your learning will also provide enhanced career edge, allowing you to focus on the areas of this course that closely match your own interests and career aspirations.

Throughout the duration of your course you will benefit from our close relationships with the cultural sector and cultural partnerships such as Tyne & Wear Archives and Museums, BALTIC Centre for Contemporary Art, LIVE Theatre, New Writing North, Tyneside Cinema and National Trust. Your eight-week placement will leave you with added insight into the day-to-day workings of the cultural and creative industries, and how your skills and knowledge apply in a real-world environment.

Your Future

This course will prepare you for employment across a wide range of the cultural and creative industries, in positions within visual and performing arts, architecture, museums and galleries, heritage, music, broadcast, cultural practice, historic environment, education and social policy, cultural events, sport or local authorities.

You will leave this course with a detailed understanding of cultural management and leadership techniques, which will benefit employability and progression into more senior positions.

The employment patterns within the cultural sector are constantly evolving, with freelance, self-employment, enterprise, project and portfolio working being increasingly common ways of working. This course will equip you with highly developed interpersonal skills, intercultural awareness, leadership and management understanding and competencies that will allow you to successfully work within this sector.

This course will also equip you with the necessary foundation to progress your qualification to PHD level.

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The MA Cultural Geography (Research) is celebrating its 20th birthday in 2015-2016. The course was founded in 1995 as one of the first masters programmes in the world to offer students focused engagement with the then emerging sub-discipline of Cultural Geography. Read more
The MA Cultural Geography (Research) is celebrating its 20th birthday in 2015-2016. The course was founded in 1995 as one of the first masters programmes in the world to offer students focused engagement with the then emerging sub-discipline of Cultural Geography.

Twenty years later and Cultural Geography is one of the most dynamic sub-disciplines in contemporary geography. Our course reflects this dynamism. We combine core concepts with research methods training and interdisciplinary scholarship and practice. We develop this alongside innovative placements and research engagements with some of world’s top cultural institution, located on our doorstep in London.

Thematically cultural geography focuses on the interconnections between place,landscape, environment, mobilities and identity, and thus has profound relevance for the contemporary world. Our graduates go onto work in a range of sectors, including the arts and cultural sector, publishing, planning and urban policy, private and public sector research work as well as many carrying on to further doctoral study.

As profiles of our recent students (https://landscapesurgery.wordpress.com/2014/11/13/maculturalgeography/) show, the course attracts a diverse range of students from a range of backgrounds, not just those with geography degrees.

To see more about the activities around the MA Cultural Geography at Royal Holloway, please look at our research group blog Landscape Surgery - https://landscapesurgery.wordpress.com/ .

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/geography/coursefinder/maculturalgeography.aspx

Why choose this course?

- This well established course aims to provide research training and practice at Master’s level in Human Geography, with a particular emphasis on Cultural Geography; to prepare you for independent research at doctoral level in Human Geography; and to develop specialised knowledge and understanding of research, particularly involving cultural analysis, interpretation and practice.

- The course has a strong track record in gaining Research Council Funding for students. This includes ESRC 1+3 funding as well as funding from AHRC TECHNE. Please see the funding opportunities page for further details.

- The MA in Cultural Geography (Research) combines the vibrant research of the outstanding Social and Cultural Geography group with cutting edge teaching. The quality of our course was recognised by our external examiner as offering a gold-standard for the sector. Our teaching was nationally recognised by the student nominated award for “Best Teaching Team” (Arts and Humanities) at the National Prospects Post-Graduate Awards (2013).

- The programme includes cutting-edge conceptual teaching in themes such as theories of place and space, postcolonial geographies, geographies of knowledge, mapping and exploration, landscape, memory and heritage, geographies of consumption, material geographies, geographies of embodiment, practice and performance, critical urbanisms and creative geographies.

- At RHUL we are known for our commitment to collaborative research, offering you the chance to develop your seminar and tutorial-based learning alongside world leading cultural institutions. These include the Science Museum, V&A Museum, Museum of London, British Library, Natural History Museum, Royal Botanic Gardens Kew, Institute for International Visual Arts, and the Royal Geographical Society.

- You will be well prepared to continue to a PhD, building on the research you have completed on this course.

Department research and industry highlights

Social and Cultural Geography at Royal Holloway emphasises the cultural politics of place, space and landscape. The Group's research stresses theoretically informed and informative work, values equally contemporary and historical scholarship, and engages with diverse geographical locations within and beyond the UK.

SCG is home to a large and intellectually vibrant postgraduate community. There are around 40-50 postgraduates in the Group at any time. Many of the past graduates of the MA and SCG PhDs are now established academics in their own right.

SCG is well-known for its collaboration with a range of cultural institutions beyond the academy; recent partners include the the Science Museum, Victoria and Albert Museum, National Maritime Museum, British Library, British Museum, Museum of London and the Royal Geographical Society. The Group also has a tradition of including creative practitioners within its activities, as artists in residence, as research fellows and through participation in major research projects.

Many leading journals are edited by group staff, including Cultural Geographies, the Journal of Historical Geography, Geoforum, History Workshop Journal and GeoHumanities. Please see the Landscape Surgery blog for further information on Social and Cultural Geography activities at RHUL.

Course content and structure

The programme consists of four elements, all assessed by coursework.

- Element 1: Contemporary Cultural Geographies
This is a programme of seminars on current ideas, theory and practice in Cultural and Human Geography. It includes the following themes: theories of place; colonial and postcolonial geographies; biographies of material culture; embodiment, practice and place; geographies of consumption; culture, nature and landscape; space, politics and democracy; cultures of politics.

- Element 2: Methods and Techniques in Cultural Geography
This consists of a programme of workshops devoted to research methodologies and techniques in Cultural Geography. It includes research strategies and project design; reflexivity and ethics; ethnographic research; social survey; qualitative data analysis and computing; visual methodologies; interpreting texts; interpreting things; interpreting movement; negotiating the archives; the arts of cultural geography.

- Element 3: Research Training
You will be introduced to the culture of research in Human Geography and provided with a broad training for independent research within contemporary cultural geography. This element supplements the more specialised research training in research techniques in Element 2, and culminates in a 5,000 word research proposal for the Dissertation.

- Element 4: Dissertation
You will produce a substantial (15-18,000 word) research dissertation, under supervision.

On completion of the course graduates will have:
- advanced knowledge and expertise in the field of Cultural Geography and its current research questions
- advanced knowledge in the ideas, approaches and substantive themes of contemporary Cultural Geographies
- advanced knowledge of the research methods and techniques of Cultural Geography
- knowledge of the culture of research.

Assessment

Assessment is by coursework only. Formative feedback and detailed ongoing discussion of work before final submission is a central part of the teaching ethos of the course. Students also have significant autonomy in the selection of topics for coursework and dissertation allowing them to develop particular interests and specialisms.

Contemporary Cultural Geographies (Element 1)
Assessed by two course essays of up to 5,000 words (25% of final mark).

Methods and Techniques in Cultural Geography (Element 2)
Assessed by two workshop reports of up to 5,000 words (25% of final mark).

Research Training (Element 3)
Assessed by a 5,000-word dissertation proposal and satisfactory completion of modules taken in the element (Pass required).

Dissertation (Element 4)
Assessed by submission of a completed dissertation of 15-18,000 words. (50% of final mark).

Employability & career opportunities

Throughout the MA we spend time exploring possible career trajectories with our students.

This includes working on PhD applications – over 50% of our students go onto do PhDs and many go into academic position thereafter.

We also run a series of placement days with key cultural institutions in and around London including, British Library, Royal Geographical Society and Kew that help students develop skills, experience and contacts.

In recent years our graduates have entered a range of sectors, including the creative industries (advertising and marketing), the museum and research sectors (British Library, National Archive, and research assistantships in various academic projects).

We offer a series of course and activities to support career development:

1) Transferable Skills sessions

During the course staff on the MA not only teach key ideas and research methods, but also help students hone a series of transferable skills. As well as writing and presentation skills, activities on Element three enable the development of team-working and delegation skills. We also hold a series of dedicated skills sessions during the course including social media skills and networking skills run both by staff and by specialists from the careers office.

2) Career Development sessions and workshops

Both staff on the MA and the specialist staff at RHUL career centre offer tailored career development sessions. These might involve talking about developing an academic career, exploring careers in the cultural sector, as well as generic skills such as preparing your CV and developing a Linkedin profile.

3) Cultural Engagements and Placements

Staff on the MA course make the most of their research links with arts and cultural organisations to help students develop placement based work during their course.

Element three activities are designed to help students build up their CVs but also their contacts, and we are happy to help arrange shorter placements during element 1 and 2 pieces or longer-term placements for dissertation work. Past placements have seen students working with a range of key cultural institutions in and around London including the Royal Geographical Society, Kew Gardens, Furtherfield Digital Media and The British Museum.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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Spatial Planning determines the design of places, the relationships between land uses, and identifies infrastructure requirements. Read more
Spatial Planning determines the design of places, the relationships between land uses, and identifies infrastructure requirements. The planning process makes provision for the needs of households and the requirements of the economy, and planning aims to mitigate the adverse impacts of development upon our natural environment.

The planning system is currently undergoing change to be better able to address the challenges of competitiveness and sustainability. There is a pressing requirement in both the public and private sectors for planners with appropriate understanding and skills to plan for development and protect the environment.

The University is a long-established provider of planning education. MSc Spatial Planning will be attractive to individuals with a real interest in tackling the challenges of important urban planning issues; MSc Spatial Planning with Sustainable Urban Design is designed to equip graduates with the professional skills for resolving environmental, economic, social, cultural and spatial dimensions in designing for sustainable development.

Why choose spatial planning?

Spatial Planning is concerned with creating sustainable places. Planners achieve this in a number of ways:

Planners work with building firms and housing organisations to help make available sites addressing the housing needs of local areas. They meet with local communities to learn about their concerns and to discuss ways of tackling issues such as the protection of homes from flood risk. They provide guidance on how to promote quality in the design of places and buildings.

Planning makes possible investment in sustainable economic development. Through preparing medium and long-term plans, planners ensure that land is available for development within and around our cities and towns. Planners often lead on regeneration projects and work in partnership with engineers to bring forward the infrastructures necessary to relieve transport congestion and to provide for long-term energy solutions.

Climate change is making achieving sustainability increasingly important. Planners, work with the environmental agencies and with conservation interests to ensure that the potential environmental impacts arising from development proposals are first established and then they use planning powers to promote a sustainable balance between social and economic development and the protection of the environment.

Who becomes a planning student?

Spatial Planning is a multi-disciplinary activity and attracts a wide mix of graduates. Often these are geography graduates, but increasingly graduates with social science, law, architecture and surveying degrees, as well as graduates from the environmental sciences find that Spatial Planning makes use of their knowledge and training.

Aims of the Programme

The Spatial Planning programmes are designed to provide the knowledge, skills and understanding required for graduates wishing to enter into professional careers in urban planning and development.

Programme Content

Semester 1:
Spatial Analysis has two key components. The first component analyses built and natural environments particularly from a conservation perspective. The second part of the module focuses on socio-economic analysis of data at a city scale and the relevance of this to planning.

Statutory Planning. is a practice based approach to learning processes processes of plan-making and the management of development.Property Development Processes deals with complexities and challenges in the property development sector and the role of different stakeholders involved.

Semester 2:
Concepts of spatial planning introduces students to the role of planning and planning systems. The other part of this module introduces students to various planning theories and their relevance to practice..

Sustainability in Contemporary Cities examines various challenges facing the growth of cities globally and the implications of these to planning of cities and the countryside.

The third second semester module is optional depending on the selected specialism. Students select one specialist module from the following:

Environmental Assessment
Marine Spatial Planning
Sustainable Urban Design
Urban Conservation
Applied Geographic Information Systems and Geospatial Data Analysis

Semester 3:
A 60 credit dissertation in line with the selected specialism

Methods of Assessment

Assessment methods cover a mix of formats including 'live' project-work and a research project. There are no written examinations. The educational aims are to develop subject understanding and to equip students with research and practice skills. Assignments call for visioning, problem-solving, forward-planning and critical reflection. Assignments are informed by students making effective use of available literature, conducting investigations and accessing sources of data. Attention is paid to building the effective communication and partnering skills vital for practicing professional planners.

Sources of Funding

Information about the School of the Environment scholarships can be found on the School of the Environment scholarships webpage. Other sources of funding for postgraduate students can be found on our Scholarships webpage.
SAAS tuition fee loans are available for this course for students who meet the eligibility criteria. Visit our SAAS tuition fee loan webpage for more information and links.

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The MA Cultural Geography (Research) was founded in 1995 as one of the first masters programmes in the world to offer students focused engagement with the then emerging sub-discipline of Cultural Geography. Read more

The MA Cultural Geography (Research) was founded in 1995 as one of the first masters programmes in the world to offer students focused engagement with the then emerging sub-discipline of Cultural Geography.

Twenty years later and Cultural Geography is one of the most dynamic sub-disciplines in contemporary geography. Our course reflects this dynamism, exploring the relationships between our physical world, human identity and mobility. We combine core concepts with research methods training and interdisciplinary scholarship and practice. We develop this alongside innovative placements and research engagements with some of world’s top cultural institution, located on our doorstep in London. 

The MA in Cultural Geography (Research) combines the vibrant research of the outstanding Social, Cultural and Historical Geography group with cutting edge teaching.

Thematically cultural geography focuses on the interconnections between place, landscape, environment, mobilities and identity, and thus has profound relevance for the contemporary world. Our graduates go on to work in a range of sectors, including the arts and cultural sector, publishing, planning and urban policy, private and public sector research work as well as many carrying on to further doctoral study.

The course attracts a diverse range of students from a range of backgrounds, not just those with geography degrees. To see more about the activities around the MA Cultural Geography at Royal Holloway, please look at our research group blog Landscape Surgery.

  • Study in a department ranked 2nd in the UK for research by the Research Excellence Framework 2014.
  • Enjoy placements and research engagements with top cultural institutions including the V&A Museum, the Museum of London, the British Library, the Natural History Museum, the Royal Botanic Gardens Kew and the Royal Geographical Society.
  • Graduate with excellent employability prospects or progress to doctoral study.

Course structure

Core modules

  • Cultural Geographies - Key Ideas
  • Cultural Geographies - Contemporary Debates
  • Social Science Methods for Cultural Geographers
  • GeoHumanities Research Methods for Cultural Geographers
  • Research Training
  • Dissertation

Optional modules

In addition to these mandatory course units there are a number of optional course units available during your degree studies. The following is a selection of optional course units that are likely to be available. Please note that although the College will keep changes to a minimum, new units may be offered or existing units may be withdrawn, for example, in response to a change in staff. Applicants will be informed if any significant changes need to be made.

  • Cultural Engagements
  • Cultural Engagements Placement

Teaching & assessment

Assessment is by coursework only. Formative feedback and detailed ongoing discussion of work before final submission is a central part of the teaching ethos of the course. Students also have significant autonomy in the selection of topics for coursework and dissertation allowing them to develop particular interests and specialisms.

  • Essay 1 and Essay 2 - 5000 words each (20 credits each)
  • Workshop Report 1 and Workshop Report 2 - 5000 words each (20 credits each)
  • Research proposal - 2000 words (20 credits)
  • Dissertation presentation - 20 minutes
  • Dissertation Viva - 1 hour - (0 credits)
  • Blog post (s) - 4000 words - (20 credits)
  • Video/podcast - 10 mins/30 mins
  • Placement Reflection - 5000 words (20 credits)
  • Dissertation - 15000 words (60 credits)

This programme is delivered in a single stage, equating to either one-year of full-time study or up to five years of part-time study.

Your future career

Study Cultural Geography (By Research) at Royal Holloway, University of London and you’ll be well placed to progress to PhD study or to a rewarding career in your chosen field. This research-based programme sees more than 50% of graduates progress to doctoral study.

This programme is structured to maximise graduate employability and further education prospects, with transferable skills sessions, career development sessions and workshops taking place to help graduates you achieve your career ambitions. We help our students to work on their PhD applications, and also help to arrange placements with some of the world’s top cultural institutions – including the V&A Museum, the Museum of London, the British Library, the Natural History Museum, the Royal Botanic Gardens Kew and the Royal Geographical Society.

  • 90% of Royal Holloway graduates in work or further education within six months of graduating.
  • More than 50% of Cultural Geography students progress to PhD study.
  • Transferable skills sessions, career development sessions and workshops help you to achieve your career ambitions. 


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Master's specialisation in Urban and Cultural Geography. Cities are the vibrant and dynamic focal points of today’s society. These diverse agglomerations of people, companies and organisations are both locations for innovation and for conflict. Read more

Master's specialisation in Urban and Cultural Geography

Cities are the vibrant and dynamic focal points of today’s society. These diverse agglomerations of people, companies and organisations are both locations for innovation and for conflict. Cities are regarded as creative places as well as conflictual places for divergent communities. In this Master's specialisation you will study how different actors influence the physical form of cities but also the way in which they present and understand the character and identity of cities and how they make use of the typical urban environment in their daily activities. They create and make cities.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/ucg

Entry Requirements (Additional)

The requirements for admission include:

- a bachelor degree in Human Geography received from Radboud University or another relevant bachelor degree with at least 24 EC in conflict studies and/or political geography

- Having successfully completed a course in social scientific research methods is highly recommended and will increase your chance of getting selected for this specialisation

- excellent proficiency in English

- a letter of motivation

- two letters of recommendation

- list of your grades obtained during previous training

Career prospects

The Master's specialisation Urban and Cultural Geography prepares students for a professional career in government, semi-government, and business. It also provides a stepping stone towards a research career in academia or consultancy. You will be able to apply the scientific insights and the practical skills you have acquired to topics including the development and marketing of cities, multi-culturality and integration, innovative and creative urban milieus, urban identities, cultural industries.

This would qualify you for a whole range of different jobs. Some of you might find a job in a government agency, e.g. as city-manager, city marketeer, city planner, integration agent, city-network manager, PR- manager, etc. Others will end up in semi-government agencies such as development agencies, cultural planning agencies, but also research institutes, etc. Finally also private industry offers a number of opportunities for urban and cultural specialists. One might think of jobs such as event manager, museum director, city marketeer, consultant, journalist, innovation consultant, communication manager or media specialist.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/ucg



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Urban planning is fascinating and tackles the challenges of change and development in an urbanising world, and this course is designed to help you shape your future career in professional practice. Read more

Urban planning is fascinating and tackles the challenges of change and development in an urbanising world, and this course is designed to help you shape your future career in professional practice.

Overview

The MSc International Planning and Development aims to provide a broad education in international planning and development, enabling you to acquire the knowledge and critical understanding to make a significant contribution to the management of human settlements and urban systems. The course is suitable for those who want to work in the planning profession and especially those who want to gain an international perspective on planning and development issues.

The course tackles the challenges of urbanisation in the 21st century. Since 2008, more than half the world's population has lived in cities. Cities are crucibles of culture, knowledge and innovation, but also harbour poverty and exclusion; globalisation, environmental pollution, and climate change all threaten the well-being of urban residents.

This course spans the disciplines of spatial planning and development studies, enabling you to acquire the knowledge and critical understanding to make a significant contribution to the design and management of cities.

Core teaching focuses on issues of development and underdevelopment, city futures in a globalising world, and creation of space and place within different political, cultural, economic and environmental contexts. Options enable you to follow specialisms in urban design, real estate and housing – or a general route with options in planning, environment, transport, real estate, site planning, regeneration and housing. The dissertation is an opportunity for you to develop your specialist interests.

Distinctive features

  • The course capitalises on the research and teaching links the School has with countries throughout Europe and the world. Staff have experience and long-standing academic and professional links in Europe, Asia, Africa and the Americas.
  • Accredited by the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS), allowing completion of the educational requirement for RICS membership.
  • This is a combined planning course, fully recognised by the Royal Town Planning Institute (RTPI). Successful completion of the MSc, followed by a period in practice as indicated in the RTPI’s Assessment of Professional Competence, allows direct membership entry.
  • No previous planning education or experience is required to undertake the course.

Learning and assessment

Core teaching focuses on issues of development and underdevelopment, city futures in a globalising world, and creation of space and place within different political, cultural, economic and environmental contexts.

Optional modules will enable you to follow specialisms in urban design, real estate and housing – or a general route with options in planning, environment, transport, real estate, site planning, regeneration and housing.

The dissertation provides an opportunity for you to develop your specialist interests.

Career prospects

This course offers the knowledge and expertise for a career in academia, government and the private sector, in a wide variety of organisations including international agencies, central or local government, consultancy and NGOs.



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Delivered from one of the world’s cultural capitals, this MA is designed to meet the complex needs of today’s arts and cultural manager. Read more

Delivered from one of the world’s cultural capitals, this MA is designed to meet the complex needs of today’s arts and cultural manager. With its distinctive mix of theoretical, and arts-based knowledge and skills development, you will learn how to apply creative leadership in managing artistic excellence, cultural heritage, audience diversity and financial sustainability at local and global levels.

Key benefits

  • Head start your career through focused teaching.
  • Insights into management, planning and leadership.
  • Gain knowledge of arts and culture across national and international contexts.
  • Strong links with London’s cultural organisations.
  • Lectures and workshops from leading arts and cultural industry professionals.
  • Emphasis on creativity and arts-based learning.

Description

This innovative new master's course is specifically designed to meet the needs of the arts and cultural manager. 

You will learn the vital importance of creativity, given the increasingly global nature of competition, as well as the opportunities and threats posed by new technologies. 

Our Arts & Cultural Management MA is suitable for you whether you are new to the field or if you already have relevant professional experience. The course works in partnership with a range of arts organisations from across the city to offer you unparalleled exposure to the practicalities of cultural management. Through our required modules, you will engage with experienced cultural managers and leading London-based arts organisations. We will also assist you in undertaking an internship, where you can gain work experience in the arts or creative industries and develop the skills, knowledge and motivation needed to build a career.

Previous students from within the Department have interned at the National Theatre, Barbican Centre, British Council, British Film Institute, Hayward Gallery, National Portrait Gallery, Screen Digest, The British Museum, CIDA (Cultural Industries Development Agency), MTV, Donmar Warehouse, Google and the V&A Museum, which gives you an idea of the exciting opportunities on offer.

Course purpose

The MA in Arts & Cultural Management is suitable for those new to the field as well as individuals with existing arts and cultural work experience. It provides a critical understanding of arts and cultural management for graduates seeking a career in arts management or for professionals wishing to enhance their existing knowledge and career prospects. 

Course format and assessment

Teaching

If you’re a full-time student we will provide you with 140 hours of teaching over the course through lectures and seminars. We will expect you to undertake 1668 hours of independent study.

If you’re a part-time student, in your first year we will provide 76 hours of teaching, and we will expect you to undertake 540 hours of independent study. In your second year, we will provide 78 hours of teaching, and we will expect you to undertake 1128 hours of independent study.

Assessment

We will assess your performance entirely through coursework and a dissertation.

Sign up for more information. Email now

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This programme offers you the chance to engage with the key issues in the formulation of arts and cultural policy and the administration of the arts, in particular those relating to the performing arts. Read more

This programme offers you the chance to engage with the key issues in the formulation of arts and cultural policy and the administration of the arts, in particular those relating to the performing arts.

This MA from the Institute for Creative and Cultural Entrepreneurship will enable you to develop an awareness of and a critical approach to the discipline, by studying arts policy and practice in Europe, audience development, fundraising, arts education, cultural tourism, regeneration through arts, arts diversity and social inclusion, copyright and the role of the arts in relations and diplomacy as well as national and cultural identity.

There are modules in:

  • Cultural Policy and Practice
  • Management and Professional Practice 1: Work placement
  • Management and Professional Practice 2: Business Planning for Arts
  • An option module in a complimentary area

Practitioners from many companies, venues and national organisations teach on the programme, providing a direct link with the profession. See our our partners in learning.

Through individual research and placement with an arts company or management organisation you will develop essential practical skills to enhance your potential and your employability as an arts administrator.

The programme also offers you one module in a complementary area. These at present are:

From the :

  • Entrepreneurial Modelling
  • Interpretation, Education and Communication in the Art Museum
  • Cultural Relations and Diplomacy
  • Cultural and Creative Tourism
  • Culture, Tourism and Regeneration

From the Department of Theatre and Performance

  • Disability Theatre
  • Sociocultural Analysis of the Musical
  • Radical Performance

From the Department of Music - modules from MMus programmes. This also includes a module in Music Management.

From the Department of Design:

  • Enterprising Leadership: An Introduction to the Discourse of Contemporary Leadership, Enterprise, and Innovation

Music Pathway

It's also possible to follow a Music Pathway in this programme, which allows you to broaden your musical knowledge and skills through largely theory and/or history-based modules. 

Skills

The programme enables you to develop the following skills:

  • Critical awareness of cultural policy issues
  • Preparation of specific audience development and fundraising strategies for arts organisations, and more generic strategic plans
  • Leadership and teamwork skills

Careers

Graduates typically go on to careers in the following areas:

  • Cultural policy: researching, developing, writing, analysing and evaluating policy
  • Management in building-based and touring theatre, dance, music and visual arts organisations
  • Arts education, arts regeneration and arts for social and community purposes
  • Audience development, programming and planning

Find out more about employability at Goldsmiths



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We offer a flexible range of opportunities for postgraduate research. We welcome MPhil proposals in any topic related to architecture, planning, or landscape. Read more
We offer a flexible range of opportunities for postgraduate research. We welcome MPhil proposals in any topic related to architecture, planning, or landscape.

We offer supervision in the following areas.

Architectural and planning education

We conduct research into innovative teaching methods, the integration of theory and practice, and learn from related creative disciplines.

The Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE) has funded research into effective skills transfer. This activity is strengthened through our involvement in the:
-European Association for Architectural Education (EAAE)
-Association of European Schools of Planning (AESOP)
-European Council of Landscape Architecture Schools (ECLAS) including the Le NOTRE EU Network

Architectural science and environmental design

-Design related aspects of construction and the use of buildings
-Non-destructive testing
-Simulation
-Measurement of energy
-Environmental performance

Cities and technology

-The changing relationship between utilities, the development, planning and management of contemporary cities
-Culture and the built environment, including cultural change and transformation of the built environment

Design history and theory

-Architectural history
-Architectural theory
-Material culture

Environmental economics

-Environmental economics
-Valuation
-Benefit appraisal

Environmental management

-Our research in this area covers environmental planning, management, impact assessment, sustainability, and Local Agenda 21 issues.

Housing and community

-Social housing
-Community development

Information technology in construction

-Computer-based information search
-Retrieval systems
-Building product modelling with a philosophy of taking basic and applied research through to the end users

Landscape architecture, landscape planning, landscape design and landscape management

-Landscape architecture theory, philosophy and environmental ethics
-Sustainable landscape planning, design and management
-The history and development of the designed and cultural landscape

International urban development

-Interpreting and managing change in diverse urban contexts
-Improving the environment and quality of life in the cities of the developing world

Planning processes and policy

-Contemporary policy and practice issues in planning
-Development and urban regeneration, in the context of theoretical developments and European experiences

Spatial analysis

-Spatial change
-Spatial statistics
-The use of GIS

Urban design

-City design and development
-Design control
-Urban public space
-Public art in cities
-Meaning in the built environment
-Conservation
-Urban regeneration
-Urban design

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An exciting new cross-disciplinary MA, which studies contemporary UK and international cities from socio-economic, cultural, theoretical and practical perspectives. Read more
An exciting new cross-disciplinary MA, which studies contemporary UK and international cities from socio-economic, cultural, theoretical and practical perspectives.

-Course available to study full time (1 year) and part time (2 years)
-Innovative, multidisciplinary programme taught by expert academics
-Links with leading arts, cultural and creative organisations locally, nationally and internationally
-Excellent pastoral and academic support
-Taught in Liverpool, one of the leading arts and cultural centres outside of London (European Capital of Culture in 2008, UNESCO World Heritage Site)

Through the course of your studies you will consider the importance of creative communities and leadership to the cultural and creative development of the urban environment.
You will gain an understanding of key urban theories, trends, policies and dynamics by drawing upon a range of contemporary local and global case studies to illustrate debates and policy responses. You will reflect on how urban images and identities are constructed and reconstructed, by whom and for what purpose, focusing on concepts such as city marketing, place identity, place brand and branding.

The programme will enable you to play a key role in developing approaches to study and knowledge application in the fields of creativity and culture in urban environment. Another aim of the programme is to develop graduates who have essential skills in research design, project management and relevant major quantitative and qualitative research methods. To examine how cultural policy fits with broader strategies for re-imagining and regenerating cities, you will use key skills to research and critically engage with the theories, principles, debates and intellectual paradigms that underpin the study of cities, culture and creativity. You will be expected to critically reflect on and communicate your research findings, knowledge and understanding throughout the degree.

What you will study on this degree

Please see guidance below on core modules for further information on what you will study.

Understanding Cities: Theory, Culture and Social Change

Critically evaluate and understand the main contemporary debates about cities' economic and social importance and wellbeing

Research Methods: Cities, Culture and Creativity

Understand the respective strengths and shortcomings of different aspects of research design

Creative Communities

Evaluate and critically analyse the contribution of creative communities to culture led regeneration, social impact and health and wellbeing

Re-imagining Cities: Using Cultural Policy and Place Marketing

Understand and evaluate the role and contribution of cultural planning and projects to re-imagining cities and the positive and more problematic aspects of such relationships

Dissertation

Design and apply appropriate research methodologies to develop a dissertation in a complex and specialised area. You will be assessed on how well you communicate the results of your research project

Further guidance on modules

The information listed in the section entitled 'What you will study' is an overview of the academic content of the programme that will take the form of either core or option modules. Modules are designated as core or option in accordance with professional body requirements and internal Academic Framework review, so may be subject to change. Students will be required to undertake modules that the University designates as core and will have a choice of designated option modules. Additionally, option modules may be offered subject to meeting minimum student numbers.

Academic Framework reviews are conducted by LJMU from time to time to ensure that academic standards continue to be maintained.

Please email if you require further guidance or clarification.

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Our MA in Global Culture and Creativity will enable you to develop research analysis on the 21st century cultural industries and creative economy, based on cultural diversity and individual creativity. Read more

Our MA in Global Culture and Creativity will enable you to develop research analysis on the 21st century cultural industries and creative economy, based on cultural diversity and individual creativity.

Overview

Our MA in Global Culture and Creativity will enable you to develop research analysis on the 21st century cultural industries and creative economy, based on cultural diversity and individual creativity.

It is suitable for applicants who would like to develop research understanding through building practical work experience with wide private and public art institutions. These include museums, theatres, digital media and publishing industries across the globe, including the UK, China, Japan, Africa, Latin America, North America and Europe. This is the first such MA and sits within the School of Modern Languages and provides graduates with forefront research narrative and distinctive career prospects globally.

We offer multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary approaches to deciphering the 21st century evolution of culture and creativity in a global context. Such new knowledge is built across three main disciplines:

  • Cultural and media studies
  • Geography
  • Area studies

Whilst culture industry, cultural production and consumption, creative economy and creative class are used as core theories, the programme incorporates wider literature and cultural models to contextualise theories. In addition, practical learning experiences are designed to enhance your learning experience. The optional modules available will further enhance your research skills and employability in global arts, cultural sectors and beyond.

The MA in Global Culture and Creativity sits within the School of Modern Languages at Cardiff University, which offers a wealth of global research and teaching resource, and provides forefront 21st century research discourse of cultural industries and the creative economy.

Distinctive features

There are four distinctive features of this programme:

  • Interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary teaching and learning: This programme bridges research and teaching fields between arts humanities and social sciences, as well as building the link between global literature texts and global cultural products.
  • Area studies set in a global context: This programme introduces wide area studies into individual subject learning, such as publishing houses, museums, theatres, digital media and others. You will have the rare opportunity to compare the making of texts and cultural products in different cultural settings, through individual and collaborative creativity across the globe.
  • Global arts institutions: This programme provides the opportunity to learn outside the classroom, as well as benefiting from guest speakers from private and public cultural industries. This will help you conceptualise research theories and develop research questions, as well as to establish valuable networks at the earliest opportunity.
  • Linguistic skills: You will have the opportunity to study optional modules from across our Undergraduate translation and languages portfolios. (Please note, these modules will not be credit bearing)

Learning and assessment

How will I be taught?

You will be taught through a combination of lectures, presentations, blogs, portfolios, tutorials and seminars. Lectures take a range of forms but generally provide a broad structure for each subject, introduce key concepts and convey relevant up-to-date information. You will also have access to recorded versions of some lectures.

In tutorials and seminars you will have the opportunity to discuss particular themes or topics, to consolidate and get feedback on individual learning and to develop skills in oral presentation. Communication skills are developed in tutorials, where you will make individual contributions to group study, for example by summarising a particular reading or debate for the group.

You will also participate in a range of small group work, including table top exercises. Participation in diverse learning activities, such as small-group discussions, debates, oral presentations, independent research tasks and written assignments will develop intellectual and presentation skills. This interaction is intended to build personal and professional networks in preparation for future careers.

Where possible, field trips from one of the three themed lectures/seminars will take place at appropriate cultural industrial venues and relevant industry staff will be invited to give talks.

How will I be supported?

Throughout the programme, subject tutors will provide a first point of contact if you have any academic queries. You will also be allocated a personal tutor who will help you to reflect on your performance and offer advice.

A range of other staff are available to provide further support, including the admin support team, specialist librarians and a Disability and Diversity Officer who ensures that reasonable adjustments are made for students with disabilities.

Study skills sessions will be made available, including an essay writing workshop and support for planning and executing a dissertation where, working closely with a supervisor, you will be guided through research design, fieldwork practices, ethical clearance considerations and the writing stage.

All modules within the Programme make extensive use of the University’s Virtual Learning Environment, Learning Central, where you can access discussion forums and find course materials including recordings of lectures, links to related materials and multiple-choice tests.

The programme convenor will also provide help with career planning (in conjunction with the University’s Careers Service).

For the internship, two members of the School’s professional services staff are delegated to provide the support. 

Career prospects

This is the first MA with a focus on cultural industries and creative economy to sit within a School of Modern Languages, particularly to include global area studies perspectives. Such distinction provides graduates with forefront research narrative and distinctive career prospects globally.

You will have benefited from excellent research training, enabling you to continue further research programmes should you wish.



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The MA Program in Cultural Diplomacy and International Music is a one year program offered by the University of the West of Scotland in partnership with the Academy for Cultural Diplomacy. Read more

The MA Program in Cultural Diplomacy and International Music is a one year program offered by the University of the West of Scotland in partnership with the Academy for Cultural Diplomacy.

Credits - 90 ECTS Credits

Length - 2 Trimesters (plus Dissertation)

Location - Paisley, Scotland and Berlin, Germany

Tuition - €9,000

The opportunity exists to create a programme to educate professionals who intend to become involved in international diplomatic relations which function using the “soft power” of music. These individuals may be involved in planning and co-ordinating the staging of international live events (International music festivals, opening ceremonies for international sports events), recording or broadcast of international music projects (War Child charity, Eurovision Song Contest) or managing long-running cross-border / cross-cultural initiatives (Nerve Centre in Derry, British Council music events). These projects often work across boundaries where trade and political diplomacy have failed, hence retaining communication channels and inter-cultural connections. The emerging professional requires not just an understanding of music and diplomacy but also entrepreneurship, the global music industries, social media communication and distribution platforms, project management, negotiation skills, language skills and team management abilities. In addition to this they may find themselves working with local and national governments. They should therefore also be able to communicate clearly and effectively and understand the language of policy and exchange. The work may be focused on raising national prestige on a global stage, social re-generation, multi-culturalism or cultural liaison (or all of these). Projects are likely to require international music project management, enhanced communication (verbal and digital) skills and an understanding of global creative communities.

The program addresses contemporary international issues, with classroom seminars and lectures, as well as educational & cultural events, conferences, professional trainings, tours, visits and meetings with foreign officials, which are further incorporated into the curriculum. Students will meet with leading experts working in international organizations, embassies, and academic institutions, and will engage with specialists in the areas of International Relations & Economics, Business, Communication, Politics, Human Rights, Culture, Peace Building, Multilateral Diplomacy, Conflict Resolution, and Development.

The program provides students with practical experience for both academic and professional development, preparing students for careers in diverse fields, such as international relations, the humanities, politics, and culture, foreign policy and international economics. On a practical level, the international environment of the Center for Cultural Diplomacy Studies offers students a unique opportunity to interact with leading experts and academics at a wide variety of international organizations and research centers. This exceptional learning environment leads to original research and independent study opportunities. It allows students to create a solid professional network and form a concrete base for future academic and professional career choices, preparing students for engagement in the international arena, civil society, politics, governmental organizations and international economic organizations, as well as the private sector.

Program Structure

The program consists of 90 ECTS credits in total and has duration of two trimesters, and a Thesis to be submitted towards the completion of the program. The first trimester of the program is hosted by the University of the West of Scotland in Paisley and the second trimester is hosted by the Institute for Cultural Diplomacy in Berlin. This unique structure of the program provides the students with the advantage of learning in 2 different major European cities and thus the opportunity to gain academic, professional and personal experience from living in different cultures. Furthermore, the program’s structure provides a unique opportunity to benefit from the study environment in both an international non-governmental organization and a traditional public University.

Next start Fall 2018 (September 2018)

Deadline for late admissions: August 15th, 2018

For further information please visit: http://www.ccds-berlin.de.



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This programme builds on London's position as one of the most important musical centres in the world, with a diverse range of concert halls, theatres, cultural institutions and arts events that reflect its cosmopolitan and multicultural society. Read more

This programme builds on London's position as one of the most important musical centres in the world, with a diverse range of concert halls, theatres, cultural institutions and arts events that reflect its cosmopolitan and multicultural society.

Although professional management practice is a major element of the programme, the 'creative arts event' is the starting point for all teaching.

A music pathway has been added to the MA in Arts Administration and Cultural Policy, which is run by the Institute for Creative and Cultural Entrepreneurship at Goldsmiths.

Instead of specialist theatre modules you take one 30 credit module from the MA Music or MMus programmes, and your dissertation/placement/business-plan will be directed towards musical organisations.

The MA introduces the key issues that concern the management of culture and in particular those within the performing arts.

Through both analysis of contemporary and recent practice, and practical work in a range of areas, you will develop a critical approach to the discipline.

The pathway provides an overview of the following areas:

  • arts funding structures in the UK (with reference to EU countries and the USA)
  • marketing for the arts
  • audience development
  • sponsorship
  • education programmes within the arts
  • programming
  • culture and tourism
  • cultural policy (including the role of the arts in national and cultural identity) and principles and structures of management

The aim of taught modules, projects and placements is to introduce you to new models of practice. These will be investigated and evaluated as a way of developing an understanding of management principles. Through this process, you will also be equipped with the necessary practical skills to enhance your potential as arts administrators.

Assessment

Music Pathway: the assessment for the specialist music component will be as given in the individual module descriptions.

Download the programme specification. If you would like an earlier version of the programme specification, please contact the Quality Office.

Please note that due to staff research commitments not all of these modules may be available every year.

Skills & careers

This pathway allows you to pursue your interests in music, acting as a supplementary course to the main body of the Arts Administration programme.

Graduates typically go on to careers in the following areas:

  • Cultural policy: researching, developing, writing, analysing and evaluating policy for government agencies at national, regional and local level and for ‘think tanks’ concerned with culture and society
  • Management in building-based and touring theatre, dance, music and visual arts organisations
  • Arts education, arts regeneration and arts for social and community purposes
  • Audience development, fundraising, programming and planning
  • Independent producing in theatre, music or gallery-based organisations

Many students from this programme now have careers in major arts organisations worldwide or have progressed to MPhil/PhD degrees.

Find out more about employability at Goldsmiths



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This MSc equips students with the analytical, methodological and practical expertise needed to positively contribute to development in countries where they are actively involved. Read more

This MSc equips students with the analytical, methodological and practical expertise needed to positively contribute to development in countries where they are actively involved. Students acquire the tools necessary to respond to a diverse range of problems including productive capacity, intersectoral integration, economic and social diversification, and self-sufficiency.

About this degree

Students develop the ability to analyse the development process and to formulate appropriate policies for meeting development goals. The field trip, conducted in a developing country, provides the opportunity to study the problems encountered in development, and the cultural, administrative and institutional context in which decisions are made.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of four core modules (90 credits), either one or two optional modules (30 credits) and dissertation (60).

A Postgraduate Diploma, four core modules (90 credits), optional modules (30 credits), full-time nine months, is offered.

A Postgraduate Certificate, four optional modules (60 credits), full-time 15 weeks or flexible study over a period of up to two years, is offered.

Core modules

Four core modules 

  • Contemporary Approaches to Development Management
  • Development in Practice
  • Critical Ideas of Development Conceptions and Realities
  • Society and Market: Private Agency for Development

Recommended optional modules include:

  • Adapting Cities to Climate Change in the Global South
  • Cost Benefit Analysis: Theory and Practice
  • Critical Urbanism Studio I - Learning from Informality: Case Studies and Alternatives
  • Critical Urbanism Studio II - Investigative Design Strategies for Contested Spaces
  • Disaster Risk Reduction in Cities
  • Food and the City
  • Gender in Policy and Planning
  • Housing as Urbanism: Housing Policy and the Search for Scale
  • Housing Policies: Practical Dimensions and Alternative Options
  • Industrialisation and Infrastructure
  • Land, Food and Agriculture
  • Neo-Structuralism and the Developmental State
  • Social Diversity, Inequality and Poverty
  • Social Policy and Citizenship
  • The City and Its Relations: Context, Institutions and Actors in Urban Development Planning
  • The Political Ecology of Environmental Change
  • Transport Equity and Urban Mobility
  • Transforming Local Areas: Urban Design for Development
  • Urbanisation and Development
  • Urban and Peri-Urban Agriculture: Knowledge Systems in the Global South

Or any other open MSc module in The Bartlett School of Planning.

Please note: not all optional modules listed above may be available.

Dissertation/report

All MSc students submit a 10,000-word paper on a topic related to the main themes of the programme. The topic is chosen by the student in dialogue with the Programme Director.

Teaching and learning

The programme consists of reading, essay writing and individual and group project work, in the context of lectures, seminars, workshops, case study analysis, and a field trip abroad. In recent years field trip destinations have included Uganda and Ethiopia. Student performance is assessed through coursework, unseen examinations and a final dissertation report.

Fieldwork

The overseas fieldwork trip is a practical research-based residential that helps draw the various elements of the degree together.

The DPU will cover the following costs of the field trip: return flights, visas, travel insurance, accommodation and fees, and costs of local experts and inputs. However, food, local travel and incidental expenses of a personal nature will not be covered by the DPU.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Development Administration and Planning MSc

Careers

Graduates are engaged in a diversity of professional activities including local, regional and national government, consultancy firms, national and international NGOs, United Nations programmes and international aid agencies. A small proportion of graduates pursue advanced research degrees while several work as academics in leading universities or as independent consultants.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Economic Development Intern, African Development Bank
  • Policy Making Intern, UNDP (United Nations Development Programme)
  • Policy Research Officer, Department for International Development (DFID)
  • Trade Negotiator, Ministry of Commerce of the Kingdom of Thailand
  • Consultant, United Nations Development Program (UNDP)

Employability

The central objective of this programme is to equip participants with the analytical, methodological and practical expertise necessary to make a positive contribution to the development effort in countries with which they are engaged. 

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The Development Planning Unit (DPU) at UCL is an international centre concerned with promoting sustainable forms of development, understanding rapid urbanisation and encouraging innovation in the policy, planning and management of cities and regions, especially in Asia, Africa and Latin America. Its programmes are supported by international agencies and by national and provincial governments.

This MSc examines and analyses the theory and practice of development administration at international, national and regional levels to provide participants with an understanding of the processes generating social change and with the skills and abilities to respond.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: Development Planning Unit

81% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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