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Masters Degrees (Cultural Planning)

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The MA in Cultural Policy, Relations and Diplomacy is a trans-disciplinary programme that addresses the theory and practice of cultural policy, cultural relations, and cultural and public diplomacy- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-cultural-policy-relations/. Read more
The MA in Cultural Policy, Relations and Diplomacy is a trans-disciplinary programme that addresses the theory and practice of cultural policy, cultural relations, and cultural and public diplomacy- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-cultural-policy-relations/

This broad area of study and the terminology applied to it is fluid and expanding. Having culture as the underlying thread, the programme explores areas such as:

arts policy and management
globalisation
cultural relations
public diplomacy
cultural and arts diplomacy
external communications
place branding
This will provide a unique perspective into this field of study, and will examine topics such as mobility of cultural practitioners, cultural identity, intercultural dialogue, mutuality, propaganda, soft power, hegemony, influence and perceptions.

Goldsmiths' location in provides you with a unique experience of living in a multicultural world city, which is of great relevance to the study of cultural policy, relations and diplomacy.

You'll study in the Institute for Creative and Cultural Entrepreneurship (ICCE). ICCE's individual and institutional links with an extensive network of organisations, policy advisors and cultural practitioners in those areas in London and in Europe allow you to experience exceptional research and study resources.

Industry links

ICCE’s established organisational links include, for example, the British Council, Visiting Arts, EUNIC London Hub and Demos. ICCE is also a member of ENCATC (the leading European network on Cultural Management and Cultural Policy education). The Institute is also responsible for fostering the sharing of information and discussion of issues related to international cultural relations across disciplines on the JISCMail list cultural-relations-diplomacy.

Expert staff and invited professionals

Our staff and invited academic and professional experts will enhance your learning. They'll discuss relevant literature and will present case studies and practical examples with local, national and global dimensions involving a range of individuals and organisations, including corporations, governments, international bodies and NGOs.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact ICCE.

Modules & Structure

This MA is a 180-credit programme consisting of four 30-credit modules and a 60-credit dissertation.

The two main modules of the programme, Cultural Policy and Practice and Cultural Relations and Diplomacy are complemented by a module on Contemporary Issues in Cultural Policy that brings to the fore present themes that require further study.

The fourth module of the programme is an option from a selection of modules covering arts engagement, media, business, languages and politics - this is designed to allow you to tailor the programme to your own particular skills and/or interests.

The teaching methodologies used in these modules will be conducive to creative and independent in-depth and collaborative learning. They'll culminate in the production of a final dissertation in which you will explore in detail a topic building on your interests and knowledge.

The programme allows and encourages you to engage in work placements while attending the modules. These are not a formal part of the programme, but some support will be provided building on ICCE’s extensive experience of internship management and network of contacts.

Skills

Graduates of this programme develop a wide range of skills and competencies.

Knowledge and understanding

You'll be able to:

Describe and understand a range of practices, policies, structures and systems in the cultural policy and international cultural relations areas involving a variety of stakeholders (individuals, NGOs, foundations, corporations, governments, international and supranational organisations)
Define and understand the use of theories and key concepts in cultural policy, cultural relations and cultural and public diplomacy, such as culture, identity, globalisation, soft power, hegemony, influence, propaganda, mutuality, trust, intercultural dialogue, nation building/branding
Discuss the importance of cultural policy in relation to international cultural relations
Understand the diverse and changing relationships between culture/arts, politics and international relations
Build on your existing experience and/or interest to develop knowledge within cultural policy and international cultural relations

Cognitive and thinking skills

You'll be able to:

Analyse and evaluate the role of the 'actors' and their practices, as well as the structures and systems framing cultural policy and international cultural relations
Discern how to apply a range of trans-disciplinary concepts and theories to the understanding of policies, practices, structures and systems in the areas of cultural policy, cultural relations and cultural diplomacy
Identify and critically analyse contemporary issues
Build on your existing experience and/or interest to further develop analytical, critical and conceptual skills within cultural policy and international cultural relations

Practical skills

You'll be able to:

Analyse public policies in the areas of culture and international cultural relations at micro and macro levels
Devise, develop, conduct and deliver an independent piece of research relevant to cultural policy and international cultural relations, using a self-reflective approach
Demonstrate the origins of your thinking in cultural policy and international cultural relations by adequately referencing sources that have been evaluated for credibility, objectivity, accuracy and trustworthiness
Communicate effectively and succinctly through oral presentation and express yourself in writing for academic and other audiences, employing when necessary the appropriate ICT tools and skills

Key transferable skills

You'll be able to:

Share and exchange expertise and skills with other students and the tutors on the course employing effective written and oral communication skills
Demonstrate you are an independent and creative learner able to exercise initiative and personal responsibility for your own learning and planning processes
Conduct research methodically to find an answer that is complete, accurate and authoritative
Work effectively as part of a team

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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Are you looking to develop skills that will enable you to be innovative and enterprising, creative, flexible and able to spot new opportunities and develop them into sustainable practice?. Read more
Are you looking to develop skills that will enable you to be innovative and enterprising, creative, flexible and able to spot new opportunities and develop them into sustainable practice?

The MA Creative and Cultural Industries Management course offers a practical and vocational approach to working in this rapidly developing sector. Enhanced programme flexibility enables you to select a culture sector specialism to suit your interests, which you will take alongside caption: Hadrians Wallcore cultural and creative industries management modules.

The four specialisms available are Music, Festivals and Events; Arts and Media; Cultural Heritage and Museums; and Galleries and Visual Arts. Options are selected during the course Induction phase.

The course is enhanced by strong partnerships and links with leading cultural organisations and practices in the North East of England and beyond - many of which are now employing our previous graduates.

An eight-week placement in a creative or heritage organisation of your choice can also enhance your degree of specialism and employability whilst providing an opportunity to experience real-time working in a cultural organisation.

This course has several available start dates and study methods - for more information, please view the relevant web-page:
2 years part time (September) - https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/study-at-northumbria/courses/creative-and-cultural-industries-management-dtpcci6/

2 years part time (January) - https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/study-at-northumbria/courses/creative-and-cultural-industries-management-dtpccw6/

1 year full time distance learning (September) - https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/study-at-northumbria/courses/creative-and-cultural-industries-management-dtdcci6/

2 years part time distance learning (September) - https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/study-at-northumbria/courses/creative-and-cultural-industries-management-dtdccv6/

2 years part time distance learning (January) - https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/study-at-northumbria/courses/creative-and-cultural-industries-management-dtdcck6/

Learn From The Best

Our teaching team are all actively engaged with specialist practice and research in the cultural sector, and remain active in their fields of expertise. That specialist knowledge is reflected in all teaching and learning activities and is evident in areas such as cultural leadership, cultural enterprise, networking and relationship management, stakeholder and audience engagement, project planning and management.

You will benefit from their active partnerships and relationships with the region’s key cultural organisations, whilst surrounded by excellent examples of culture-led regeneration from those who put these policies into practice.

Our team will be on-hand at every step of your degree, ensuring you leave with confidence and a full understanding of all aspects of this fast-moving field.

Teaching And Assessment

Throughout this course you will explore and consider the tensions and challenges inherent in the bringing together of cultural activity and management practice, helping find ways to bring creative talent to a marketplace without impairing the creative process on the way.

The ability to spot opportunities and to be entrepreneurial are skills that the course seeks to nurture and develop at each level, to best equip you to enter the professional world of work – whether it be creating your own cultural enterprise or working with existing ones.

Assessment methods include written essays and reports, as well as presentations, ‘live briefs’ and project work. The final dissertation is a student led piece of work that provides the opportunity to establish yourself as an expert in the field you have selected to specialise in.

Module Overview
EF0126 - E.S.A.P. in FADSS Level 7 (Optional, 0 Credits)
VA7006 - Cultural Management, Enterprise & Leadership (Core, 30 Credits)
VA7007 - Framing the Creative Industries (Core, 30 Credits)
VA7008 - Work Placement (Core, 30 Credits)
VA7009 - Music, Festivals & Events (Optional, 30 Credits)
VA7010 - Arts & Media (Optional, 30 Credits)
VA7011 - Cultural Heritage and Museums (Optional, 30 Credits)
VA7012 - Galleries and Visual Arts (Optional, 30 Credits)
VA7013 - Cultural and Creative Industries Management Dissertation (Core, 60 Credits)

Learning Environment

Throughout the duration of your course you will have access to all of the resources you will need to guide you through your learning experience.

This includes facilities such as our university library – which is ranked in the top three in the UK – in addition to other facilities such as our well equipped working space, The Hub, which is open 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Diverse facilities such as Gallery North @ University Gallery, dedicated performance studios and BALTIC 39 offer research and learning space to enable you to develop your creative skills.

Technology is central to supporting your everyday learning activities, whether you are a campus-based or distance learning student.

Throughout your course you will have access to our e-learning platform, Blackboard, which offers access to collaboration tools and video/audio-enhanced features, electronic feedback, discussion boards, blogs and student websites.

We provide a supportive and informal learning environment, offering feedback at all key stages of your course.

Research-Rich Learning

The MA Creative and Cultural Industries Management course, which is part of our Visual and Material Culture research cluster, blends management theory with arts, culture, heritage, visual culture, humanities, sociology, geography and policy studies.

Throughout the duration of your studies you will be encouraged to develop your own research skills to advance your understanding of the complex contexts and debates of the cultural and creative industries, and how these practices apply from a range of theoretical perspectives.

You will conduct increasingly independent investigations in response to set tasks, or investigate your own topics of interest within the sector, leading to a self-directed dissertation that will be focused around a subject area of your choice.

You will also be encouraged to take your place as a partner by contributing your knowledge to our learning community.

Give Your Career An Edge

Emphasising cultural leadership, enterprise and entrepreneurship, the skills and knowledge you will learn on this course will help you develop the professional competencies required to successfully pursue a career within cultural and creative industries management.

As an MA Creative and Cultural Industries Management graduate you will be part of an active global network that is enriched and supported by our partnerships with leading cultural providers in the region and beyond.

The ability to tailor your learning will also provide enhanced career edge, allowing you to focus on the areas of this course that closely match your own interests and career aspirations.

Throughout the duration of your course you will benefit from our close relationships with the cultural sector and cultural partnerships such as Tyne & Wear Archives and Museums, BALTIC Centre for Contemporary Art, LIVE Theatre, New Writing North, Tyneside Cinema and National Trust. Your eight-week placement will leave you with added insight into the day-to-day workings of the cultural and creative industries, and how your skills and knowledge apply in a real-world environment.

Your Future

This course will prepare you for employment across a wide range of the cultural and creative industries, in positions within visual and performing arts, architecture, museums and galleries, heritage, music, broadcast, cultural practice, historic environment, education and social policy, cultural events, sport or local authorities.

You will leave this course with a detailed understanding of cultural management and leadership techniques, which will benefit employability and progression into more senior positions.

The employment patterns within the cultural sector are constantly evolving, with freelance, self-employment, enterprise, project and portfolio working being increasingly common ways of working. This course will equip you with highly developed interpersonal skills, intercultural awareness, leadership and management understanding and competencies that will allow you to successfully work within this sector.

This course will also equip you with the necessary foundation to progress your qualification to PHD level.

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The MA Cultural Geography (Research) is celebrating its 20th birthday in 2015-2016. The course was founded in 1995 as one of the first masters programmes in the world to offer students focused engagement with the then emerging sub-discipline of Cultural Geography. Read more
The MA Cultural Geography (Research) is celebrating its 20th birthday in 2015-2016. The course was founded in 1995 as one of the first masters programmes in the world to offer students focused engagement with the then emerging sub-discipline of Cultural Geography.

Twenty years later and Cultural Geography is one of the most dynamic sub-disciplines in contemporary geography. Our course reflects this dynamism. We combine core concepts with research methods training and interdisciplinary scholarship and practice. We develop this alongside innovative placements and research engagements with some of world’s top cultural institution, located on our doorstep in London.

Thematically cultural geography focuses on the interconnections between place,landscape, environment, mobilities and identity, and thus has profound relevance for the contemporary world. Our graduates go onto work in a range of sectors, including the arts and cultural sector, publishing, planning and urban policy, private and public sector research work as well as many carrying on to further doctoral study.

As profiles of our recent students (https://landscapesurgery.wordpress.com/2014/11/13/maculturalgeography/) show, the course attracts a diverse range of students from a range of backgrounds, not just those with geography degrees.

To see more about the activities around the MA Cultural Geography at Royal Holloway, please look at our research group blog Landscape Surgery - https://landscapesurgery.wordpress.com/ .

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/geography/coursefinder/maculturalgeography.aspx

Why choose this course?

- This well established course aims to provide research training and practice at Master’s level in Human Geography, with a particular emphasis on Cultural Geography; to prepare you for independent research at doctoral level in Human Geography; and to develop specialised knowledge and understanding of research, particularly involving cultural analysis, interpretation and practice.

- The course has a strong track record in gaining Research Council Funding for students. This includes ESRC 1+3 funding as well as funding from AHRC TECHNE. Please see the funding opportunities page for further details.

- The MA in Cultural Geography (Research) combines the vibrant research of the outstanding Social and Cultural Geography group with cutting edge teaching. The quality of our course was recognised by our external examiner as offering a gold-standard for the sector. Our teaching was nationally recognised by the student nominated award for “Best Teaching Team” (Arts and Humanities) at the National Prospects Post-Graduate Awards (2013).

- The programme includes cutting-edge conceptual teaching in themes such as theories of place and space, postcolonial geographies, geographies of knowledge, mapping and exploration, landscape, memory and heritage, geographies of consumption, material geographies, geographies of embodiment, practice and performance, critical urbanisms and creative geographies.

- At RHUL we are known for our commitment to collaborative research, offering you the chance to develop your seminar and tutorial-based learning alongside world leading cultural institutions. These include the Science Museum, V&A Museum, Museum of London, British Library, Natural History Museum, Royal Botanic Gardens Kew, Institute for International Visual Arts, and the Royal Geographical Society.

- You will be well prepared to continue to a PhD, building on the research you have completed on this course.

Department research and industry highlights

Social and Cultural Geography at Royal Holloway emphasises the cultural politics of place, space and landscape. The Group's research stresses theoretically informed and informative work, values equally contemporary and historical scholarship, and engages with diverse geographical locations within and beyond the UK.

SCG is home to a large and intellectually vibrant postgraduate community. There are around 40-50 postgraduates in the Group at any time. Many of the past graduates of the MA and SCG PhDs are now established academics in their own right.

SCG is well-known for its collaboration with a range of cultural institutions beyond the academy; recent partners include the the Science Museum, Victoria and Albert Museum, National Maritime Museum, British Library, British Museum, Museum of London and the Royal Geographical Society. The Group also has a tradition of including creative practitioners within its activities, as artists in residence, as research fellows and through participation in major research projects.

Many leading journals are edited by group staff, including Cultural Geographies, the Journal of Historical Geography, Geoforum, History Workshop Journal and GeoHumanities. Please see the Landscape Surgery blog for further information on Social and Cultural Geography activities at RHUL.

Course content and structure

The programme consists of four elements, all assessed by coursework.

- Element 1: Contemporary Cultural Geographies
This is a programme of seminars on current ideas, theory and practice in Cultural and Human Geography. It includes the following themes: theories of place; colonial and postcolonial geographies; biographies of material culture; embodiment, practice and place; geographies of consumption; culture, nature and landscape; space, politics and democracy; cultures of politics.

- Element 2: Methods and Techniques in Cultural Geography
This consists of a programme of workshops devoted to research methodologies and techniques in Cultural Geography. It includes research strategies and project design; reflexivity and ethics; ethnographic research; social survey; qualitative data analysis and computing; visual methodologies; interpreting texts; interpreting things; interpreting movement; negotiating the archives; the arts of cultural geography.

- Element 3: Research Training
You will be introduced to the culture of research in Human Geography and provided with a broad training for independent research within contemporary cultural geography. This element supplements the more specialised research training in research techniques in Element 2, and culminates in a 5,000 word research proposal for the Dissertation.

- Element 4: Dissertation
You will produce a substantial (15-18,000 word) research dissertation, under supervision.

On completion of the course graduates will have:
- advanced knowledge and expertise in the field of Cultural Geography and its current research questions
- advanced knowledge in the ideas, approaches and substantive themes of contemporary Cultural Geographies
- advanced knowledge of the research methods and techniques of Cultural Geography
- knowledge of the culture of research.

Assessment

Assessment is by coursework only. Formative feedback and detailed ongoing discussion of work before final submission is a central part of the teaching ethos of the course. Students also have significant autonomy in the selection of topics for coursework and dissertation allowing them to develop particular interests and specialisms.

Contemporary Cultural Geographies (Element 1)
Assessed by two course essays of up to 5,000 words (25% of final mark).

Methods and Techniques in Cultural Geography (Element 2)
Assessed by two workshop reports of up to 5,000 words (25% of final mark).

Research Training (Element 3)
Assessed by a 5,000-word dissertation proposal and satisfactory completion of modules taken in the element (Pass required).

Dissertation (Element 4)
Assessed by submission of a completed dissertation of 15-18,000 words. (50% of final mark).

Employability & career opportunities

Throughout the MA we spend time exploring possible career trajectories with our students.

This includes working on PhD applications – over 50% of our students go onto do PhDs and many go into academic position thereafter.

We also run a series of placement days with key cultural institutions in and around London including, British Library, Royal Geographical Society and Kew that help students develop skills, experience and contacts.

In recent years our graduates have entered a range of sectors, including the creative industries (advertising and marketing), the museum and research sectors (British Library, National Archive, and research assistantships in various academic projects).

We offer a series of course and activities to support career development:

1) Transferable Skills sessions

During the course staff on the MA not only teach key ideas and research methods, but also help students hone a series of transferable skills. As well as writing and presentation skills, activities on Element three enable the development of team-working and delegation skills. We also hold a series of dedicated skills sessions during the course including social media skills and networking skills run both by staff and by specialists from the careers office.

2) Career Development sessions and workshops

Both staff on the MA and the specialist staff at RHUL career centre offer tailored career development sessions. These might involve talking about developing an academic career, exploring careers in the cultural sector, as well as generic skills such as preparing your CV and developing a Linkedin profile.

3) Cultural Engagements and Placements

Staff on the MA course make the most of their research links with arts and cultural organisations to help students develop placement based work during their course.

Element three activities are designed to help students build up their CVs but also their contacts, and we are happy to help arrange shorter placements during element 1 and 2 pieces or longer-term placements for dissertation work. Past placements have seen students working with a range of key cultural institutions in and around London including the Royal Geographical Society, Kew Gardens, Furtherfield Digital Media and The British Museum.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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Spatial Planning determines the design of places, the relationships between land uses, and identifies infrastructure requirements. Read more
Spatial Planning determines the design of places, the relationships between land uses, and identifies infrastructure requirements. The planning process makes provision for the needs of households and the requirements of the economy, and planning aims to mitigate the adverse impacts of development upon our natural environment.

The planning system is currently undergoing change to be better able to address the challenges of competitiveness and sustainability. There is a pressing requirement in both the public and private sectors for planners with appropriate understanding and skills to plan for development and protect the environment.

The University is a long-established provider of planning education. MSc Spatial Planning will be attractive to individuals with a real interest in tackling the challenges of important urban planning issues; MSc Spatial Planning with Sustainable Urban Design is designed to equip graduates with the professional skills for resolving environmental, economic, social, cultural and spatial dimensions in designing for sustainable development.

Why choose spatial planning?

Spatial Planning is concerned with creating sustainable places. Planners achieve this in a number of ways:

Planners work with building firms and housing organisations to help make available sites addressing the housing needs of local areas. They meet with local communities to learn about their concerns and to discuss ways of tackling issues such as the protection of homes from flood risk. They provide guidance on how to promote quality in the design of places and buildings.

Planning makes possible investment in sustainable economic development. Through preparing medium and long-term plans, planners ensure that land is available for development within and around our cities and towns. Planners often lead on regeneration projects and work in partnership with engineers to bring forward the infrastructures necessary to relieve transport congestion and to provide for long-term energy solutions.

Climate change is making achieving sustainability increasingly important. Planners, work with the environmental agencies and with conservation interests to ensure that the potential environmental impacts arising from development proposals are first established and then they use planning powers to promote a sustainable balance between social and economic development and the protection of the environment.

Who becomes a planning student?

Spatial Planning is a multi-disciplinary activity and attracts a wide mix of graduates. Often these are geography graduates, but increasingly graduates with social science, law, architecture and surveying degrees, as well as graduates from the environmental sciences find that Spatial Planning makes use of their knowledge and training.

Aims of the Programme

The Spatial Planning programmes are designed to provide the knowledge, skills and understanding required for graduates wishing to enter into professional careers in urban planning and development.

Programme Content

Semester 1:
Spatial Analysis has two key components. The first component analyses built and natural environments particularly from a conservation perspective. The second part of the module focuses on socio-economic analysis of data at a city scale and the relevance of this to planning.

Statutory Planning. is a practice based approach to learning processes processes of plan-making and the management of development.Property Development Processes deals with complexities and challenges in the property development sector and the role of different stakeholders involved.

Semester 2:
Concepts of spatial planning introduces students to the role of planning and planning systems. The other part of this module introduces students to various planning theories and their relevance to practice..

Sustainability in Contemporary Cities examines various challenges facing the growth of cities globally and the implications of these to planning of cities and the countryside.

The third second semester module is optional depending on the selected specialism. Students select one specialist module from the following:

Environmental Assessment
Marine Spatial Planning
Sustainable Urban Design
Urban Conservation
Applied Geographic Information Systems and Geospatial Data Analysis

Semester 3:
A 60 credit dissertation in line with the selected specialism

Methods of Assessment

Assessment methods cover a mix of formats including 'live' project-work and a research project. There are no written examinations. The educational aims are to develop subject understanding and to equip students with research and practice skills. Assignments call for visioning, problem-solving, forward-planning and critical reflection. Assignments are informed by students making effective use of available literature, conducting investigations and accessing sources of data. Attention is paid to building the effective communication and partnering skills vital for practicing professional planners.

Sources of Funding

Information about the School of the Environment scholarships can be found on the School of the Environment scholarships webpage. Other sources of funding for postgraduate students can be found on our Scholarships webpage.
SAAS tuition fee loans are available for this course for students who meet the eligibility criteria. Visit our SAAS tuition fee loan webpage for more information and links.

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The MSc International Planning and Development aims to provide a broad education in international planning and development, enabling you to acquire the knowledge and critical understanding to make a significant contribution to the management of human settlements and urban systems. Read more
The MSc International Planning and Development aims to provide a broad education in international planning and development, enabling you to acquire the knowledge and critical understanding to make a significant contribution to the management of human settlements and urban systems. The course is suitable for those who want to work in the planning profession and especially those who want to gain an international perspective on planning and development issues.

The course tackles the challenges of urbanisation in the 21st century. Since 2008, more than half the world's population has lived in cities. Cities are crucibles of culture, knowledge and innovation, but also harbour poverty and exclusion; globalisation, environmental pollution, and climate change all threaten the well-being of urban residents.

This course spans the disciplines of spatial planning and development studies, enabling you to acquire the knowledge and critical understanding to make a significant contribution to the design and management of cities.

Core teaching focuses on issues of development and underdevelopment, city futures in a globalising world, and creation of space and place within different political, cultural, economic and environmental contexts. Options enable you to follow specialisms in urban design, real estate and housing – or a general route with options in planning, environment, transport, real estate, site planning, regeneration and housing. The dissertation is an opportunity for you to develop your specialist interests.

Distinctive features

• The course capitalises on the research and teaching links the School has with countries throughout Europe and the world. Staff have experience and long-standing academic and professional links in Europe, Asia, Africa and the Americas.

• Accredited by the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS), allowing completion of the educational requirement for RICS membership.

• This is a combined planning course, fully recognised by the Royal Town Planning Institute (RTPI). Successful completion of the MSc, followed by a period in practice as indicated in the RTPI’s Assessment of Professional Competence, allows direct membership entry.

• No previous planning education or experience is required to undertake the course.

Structure

This course is offered full-time over 12 months and is divided into two parts:

• Part one includes the taught programme of core and optional modules, allowing you to develop specialist skills and knowledge to support a range of career paths. Cutting-edge techniques in planning and international development are taught where relevant.
• Part two is the individual dissertation which allows you to develop advanced postgraduate research skills.

Your taught modules will have a credit value of 120 and the dissertation is 60 credits. Acquisition of 120 credits will lead to an award of a Diploma in International Planning and Development, and acquisition of 180 credits to the award of MSc International Planning and Development.

Core modules:

Development and Urbanisation Processes
Planning City Futures
Researching Spatial Planning and International Development
Space and Place: International Planning Practice
Dissertation

Optional modules:

Site Planning, Design & Development
Environmental Policy and Climate Change
Planning and Real Estate
Designing Cities
Housing in a Globalising World
Planning for Sustainability
Sustainable Transport Policies

Teaching

Core teaching focuses on issues of development and underdevelopment, city futures in a globalising world, and creation of space and place within different political, cultural, economic and environmental contexts.

Optional modules will enable you to follow specialisms in urban design, real estate and housing – or a general route with options in planning, environment, transport, real estate, site planning, regeneration and housing.

The dissertation provides an opportunity for you to develop your specialist interests.

Assessment

Modules are summatively assessed by way of coursework. Assessment methods used may include essays, reports, project work and verbal presentations.

Essays and reports will be used to test your core knowledge and powers of analysis. They will allow you to employ knowledge generated during the modules in pieces of policy evaluation or sustainable development in action.

Project work will develop your skills in project design and implementation, and spatial awareness to test subject skills in planning.

Seminar presentations and debates will encourage you both to develop and clarify your understanding of core knowledge (in order to defend a debating a position) and give you an opportunity to enhance your oral presentation skills.

Career Prospects

This course offers the knowledge and expertise for a career in academia, government and the private sector, in a wide variety of organisations including international agencies, central or local government, consultancy and NGOs.

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JCU’s tropical urban and regional planning programs are designed for planners in urban, shire and regional settings. They also provide scope for allied professionals to widen their knowledge in the field of planning. Read more
JCU’s tropical urban and regional planning programs are designed for planners in urban, shire and regional settings. They also provide scope for allied professionals to widen their knowledge in the field of planning.
Emphasis is placed on the interactions of humans and the environment, and the particular characteristics of settlements and issues in remote and tropical environments.
The course has been designed in consultation with the Planning Institute of Australia, Australian Institute of Landscape Architects, Australian Institute of Architects, and state and commonwealth departments and organisations. The Master of Applied Science is professionally accredited by the Planning Institute of Australia.

Course learning outcomes

The graduates of James Cook University are prepared and equipped to create a brighter future for life in the tropics world-wide.
JCU graduates are committed to lifelong learning, intellectual development, and to the display of exemplary personal, professional and ethical standards. They have a sense of their place in the tropics and are charged with professional, community, and environmental responsibility. JCU graduates appreciate the need to embrace and be acquainted with the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples of Australia. They are committed to reconciliation, diversity and sustainability. They exhibit a willingness to lead and to contribute to the intellectual, environmental, cultural, economic and social challenges of regional, national, and international communities of the tropics.
Graduates of the Master of Tropical Urban and Regional Planning at James Cook University will be able to:
*Integrate and apply an advanced body of theoretical and technical knowledge, including understanding of recent developments, in urban and regional planning in the tropics
*Retrieve, analyse, synthesise and evaluate complex information, concepts and theories from a range of sources
*Plan and conduct reliable, evidence-based laboratory and/or field experiments/practices by selecting and applying methods, techniques and tools, as appropriate to urban and regional planning in the tropics
*Organise, analyse and interpret complex planning data using advanced mathematical, statistical, qualitative and technological skills
*Communicate theoretical propositions, methodologies, social science and scientific data, arguments and conclusions clearly and coherently to specialist and non-specialist audiences through advanced written and oral English language skills and a variety of media
*Identify, analyse and generate solutions to unpredictable or complex problems, especially related to tropical, rural, remote or Indigenous contexts, by applying planning knowledge and skills with initiative and expert judgement
*Critically review regulatory requirements, ethical principles and, where appropriate, cultural frameworks, to work effectively, responsibly and safely in diverse contexts
*Reflect on current skills, knowledge and attitudes to manage their professional learning needs and performance, autonomously and in collaboration with others
*Apply knowledge of research principles, methods, techniques and tools to plan and execute a substantial research-based project, capstone experience and/or piece of scholarship.

Award title

MASTERS OF TROPICAL URBAN AND REGIONAL PLANNING (MTURP)

Entry requirements (Additional)

English band level 1 - the minimum English Language test scores you need are:
*Academic IELTS – 6.0 (no component lower than 5.5), OR
*TOEFL – 550 (plus minimum Test of Written English score of 4.0), OR
*TOEFL (internet based) – 79 (minimum writing score of 19), OR
*Pearson (PTE Academic) - 57

If you meet the academic requirements for a course, but not the minimum English requirements, you will be given the opportunity to take an English program to improve your skills in addition to an offer to study a degree at JCU. The JCU degree offer will be conditional upon the student gaining a certain grade in their English program. This combination of courses is called a packaged offer.
JCU’s English language provider is Union Institute of Languages (UIL). UIL have teaching centres on both the Townsville and Cairns campuses.

Minimum English language proficiency requirements

Applicants of non-English speaking backgrounds must meet the English language proficiency requirements of Band 1 – Schedule II of the JCU Admissions Policy.

Why JCU?

James Cook University brings together a team of academic and associate staff across multiple disciplines.
*Nationally-recognised leader in geoscience
*major research centres including the Centre for Tropical Urban and Regional Planning
*internationally-acclaimed academic teaching staff
*strong collaboration with industry and research organisations, both locally and internationally.

Career Opportunities

A postgraduate qualification from JCU can enhance your career prospects, enable you to reskill and change careers completely, or develop a specialist area of expertise and personal interest.
The tropical north, in particular northern Queensland, is experiencing a wave of population and economic growth which drives urban and infrastructural development. New developments create substantial planning challenges that span social, economic and environmental spheres. Currently, there is a critical nationwide shortage of planners.
Qualifications from the Centre for Tropical Urban and Regional Planning’s (CTURP) industry oriented courses will open plenty of opportunities for graduates as planners, policy makers, consultants, researchers, and impact assessors for government agencies at federal, state and local levels, environmental planning firms, environmental assessment consultants, property development companies, regional development organisations, and non-government agencies (e.g. overseas aid organisations).

Application deadlines

*1st February for commencement in semester one (February)
*1st July for commencement in semester two (mid-year/July)

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This programme offers you the chance to engage with the key issues in the formulation of arts and cultural policy and the administration of the arts, in particular those relating to the performing arts- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-arts-admin-cultural-policy/. Read more
This programme offers you the chance to engage with the key issues in the formulation of arts and cultural policy and the administration of the arts, in particular those relating to the performing arts- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-arts-admin-cultural-policy/

This MA from the Institute for Creative and Cultural Entrepreneurship will enable you to develop an awareness of and a critical approach to the discipline, by studying arts policy and practice in Europe, audience development, fundraising, arts education, cultural tourism, regeneration through arts, arts diversity and social inclusion, copyright and the role of the arts in relations and diplomacy as well as national and cultural identity.

There are modules in:

Cultural Policy and Practice
Management and Professional Practice 1: Work placement
Management and Professional Practice 2: Business Planning for Arts
An option module in a complimentary area
Practitioners from many companies, venues and national organisations teach on the programme, providing a direct link with the profession. See our our partners in learning.

Through individual research and placement with an arts company or management organisation you will develop essential practical skills to enhance your potential and your employability as an arts administrator.

The programme also offers you one module in a complementary area. These at present are:

From the Institute for Creative and Cultural Entrepreneurship:

Entrepreneurial Modelling
Interpretation, Education and Communication in the Art Museum
Cultural Relations and Diplomacy
Cultural and Creative Tourism
Culture, Tourism and Regeneration
From the Department of Theatre and Performance:

Disability Theatre
Sociocultural Analysis of the Musical
Radical Performance
From the Department of Music - modules from MMus programmes. This also includes a module in Music Management.

From the Department of Design:

Enterprising Leadership: An Introduction to the Discourse of Contemporary Leadership, Enterprise, and Innovation

Music Pathway

It's also possible to follow a Music Pathway in this programme, which allows you to broaden your musical knowledge and skills through largely theory and/or history-based modules.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact the ICCE Administrator

Modules

Autumn term

You take four modules taught over two-and-a-half days (for full-time students).

Cultural Policy and Practice- 30 credits
Introduction to Audience Development- n/a
Introduction to Fundraising- n/a
Seminar Series- n/a

Spring term

You will study three modules on the programme over two days.

You choose one 'Shared Module', and then you take the Management and Professional modules which are broken up into Business Planning for Arts Organisations and an Internship.

The Shared Modules will allow you to continue to develop your understanding of a creative practice, or a specialist area of management. This module, therefore, comprises studies in one area of creative practice eg. Music, Theatre and Performance, Visual Arts, Entrepreneurship, or Cultural Diplomacy. (For some modules it will be necessary for a student to have a background in the area they wish to study as they are primarily concerned with the discipline rather than its administration/management – for example in music).

Summer term

Taught one day a week, you will have lectures and seminars that cover contemporary arts management issues such as: copyright and performing rights; touring; cultural leadership and diplomacy; and further develops some areas introduced earlier in the year, such as arts and tourism. During the term there are also timetabled sessions for individual tutorials relating to your dissertation.

MA in Arts Administration & Cultural Policy Dissertation- 60 credits

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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The MSc European Spatial Planning & Environmental Policy prepares you for a career in environmental and spatial planning in Europe. Read more
The MSc European Spatial Planning & Environmental Policy prepares you for a career in environmental and spatial planning in Europe. It is designed to give you a better understanding of the influences of the European Union and international developments on space, the environment and the economy. You will develop skills to address large-scale spatial challenges such as climate change or transnational river management.

If you are interested in becoming a ‘European Spatial Planner’ who can effectively engage with the international policy context and in cross-cultural communication, this is the course for you. You will explore EU policy and legislation for spatial planning, environmental policy and regional economic development in European countries and regions.

The course will provide you with sound methodological skills, in particular for undertaking international comparative research, and independently conducted research on a topic in the field of European spatial planning, EU environmental policy and/or regional economic development.

Interactive teaching and learning on this course will challenge and stimulate you. You will work in small groups on contemporary themes and learn to think critically about new developments.

Distinctive features:

• The course is a two-year (120 European Credits) joint Masters Programme of Radboud University Nijmegen, Blekinge Institute of Technology and Cardiff University.

• You will have opportunities to specialise in particular environmental or economic aspects of policy or spatial planning.

• This course is recognised by the Royal Town Planning Institute (RTPI) as a 'specialist' masters, allowing those who have completed a three year RTPI recognised undergraduate spatial planning degree to complete the RTPI's educational requirements for membership.

Structure

YEAR ONE

Core modules:

Planning for Sustainability
Researching Sustainability

Optional modules:

Environmental Management
Urban and Regional Development in Practice
Sustainable Food Systems

YEAR TWO

Core modules:

Dissertation
Professional development

Teaching

An array of teaching and learning styles are used throughout this programme.

You will attend lectures, participate in seminars and discussions, and attend field study visits. Most of the taught modules in the programme are compulsory, though there is some scope for choice in the second semester at Cardiff University.

You should attend all timetabled sessions of the programme – lectures, seminars and presentations – but are also expected to engage in independent study of at least 20 hours per week.

In the third semester (first semester of the second year), you will participate in a professional work placement, giving you the opportunity to engage with a substantive planning problem.

You will also receive detailed training in social science research methodologies to enable you to complete your dissertation. You will choose your own dissertation topic under the guidance of your allocated supervisors.

Assessment

You will be assessed through the following in-course assessments:

Written reports
Essay;
Oral presentations
Exams
Reflective journals
Dissertation (not more than 20,000 words).

Career prospects

On completion of this course you will be well prepared for the new challenges of undertaking spatial and environmental planning in the EU and an important asset for the European labour market and employers in the field.

Graduates of this programme have gone on to work in EU institutions, national and regional public authorities, private companies and NGOs dealing with spatial planning, regional policy and environmental planning.

The international orientation and the thorough academic foundation of this programme means you will also be well prepared to pursue an academic career.

Placements

In the third semester (first semester of the second year), you will participate in a professional work placement, giving you the opportunity to engage with a substantive planning problem.

It is your responsibility to identify your work placements but you will be aided in this task by the partner universities.

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Delivered from one of the world’s cultural capitals, this MA is designed to meet the complex needs of today’s arts and cultural manager. Read more

Delivered from one of the world’s cultural capitals, this MA is designed to meet the complex needs of today’s arts and cultural manager. With its distinctive mix of theoretical, and arts-based knowledge and skills development, you will learn how to apply creative leadership in managing artistic excellence, cultural heritage, audience diversity and financial sustainability at local and global levels.

Key benefits

  • Head start your career through focused teaching.
  • Insights into management, planning and leadership.
  • Gain knowledge of arts and culture across national and international contexts.
  • Strong links with London’s cultural organisations.
  • Lectures and workshops from leading arts and cultural industry professionals.
  • Emphasis on creativity and arts-based learning.

Description

This innovative new master's course is specifically designed to meet the needs of the arts and cultural manager. 

You will learn the vital importance of creativity, given the increasingly global nature of competition, as well as the opportunities and threats posed by new technologies. 

Our Arts & Cultural Management MA is suitable for you whether you are new to the field or if you already have relevant professional experience. The course works in partnership with a range of arts organisations from across the city to offer you unparalleled exposure to the practicalities of cultural management. Through our required modules, you will engage with experienced cultural managers and leading London-based arts organisations. We will also assist you in undertaking an internship, where you can gain work experience in the arts or creative industries and develop the skills, knowledge and motivation needed to build a career.

Previous students from within the Department have interned at the National Theatre, Barbican Centre, British Council, British Film Institute, Hayward Gallery, National Portrait Gallery, Screen Digest, The British Museum, CIDA (Cultural Industries Development Agency), MTV, Donmar Warehouse, Google and the V&A Museum, which gives you an idea of the exciting opportunities on offer.

Course purpose

The MA in Arts & Cultural Management is suitable for those new to the field as well as individuals with existing arts and cultural work experience. It provides a critical understanding of arts and cultural management for graduates seeking a career in arts management or for professionals wishing to enhance their existing knowledge and career prospects. 

Course format and assessment

Teaching

If you’re a full-time student we will provide you with 140 hours of teaching over the course through lectures and seminars. We will expect you to undertake 1668 hours of independent study.

If you’re a part-time student, in your first year we will provide 76 hours of teaching, and we will expect you to undertake 540 hours of independent study. In your second year, we will provide 78 hours of teaching, and we will expect you to undertake 1128 hours of independent study.

Assessment

We will assess your performance entirely through coursework and a dissertation.



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The MA in Anthropology and Cultural Politics is an interdisciplinary programme in anthropology, directed at students from a wide range of disciplines in the humanities, social and political sciences, artists, and professionals in the media and cultural sectors. Read more
The MA in Anthropology and Cultural Politics is an interdisciplinary programme in anthropology, directed at students from a wide range of disciplines in the humanities, social and political sciences, artists, and professionals in the media and cultural sectors. http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-anthropology-cultural-politics/

The objective of the MA is to address contemporary issues in culture and politics from an anthropological perspective, drawing on the commitment of the Department of Anthropology at Goldsmiths to build a public anthropology.

The MA is organised around a critical investigation of the central thematic concepts of its title: 'culture', 'power', and 'politics', as well as 'anthropology' itself.

Each of these terms are posited in this programme as questions for critical reflection and students are encouraged to pursue independent research projects that investigate the meanings attributed to these terms in contemporary social contexts.

The programme is particularly interested in the intersections of 'culture' and 'power', and the consideration of what may be called 'cultural politics'.

- How and when does 'culture' become apprehensible as 'political'?
- How and when does 'power' operate upon or within 'culture'? Is it even tenable to uphold and retain this distinction?
- If so, what are the analytical or interpretive benefits?
- What may be the disadvantages or pitfalls?
- If not, what is implicated in the politicisation of 'culture' or the culturalisation of 'power' and 'politics'?
- How can these concerns be studied in the ongoing struggles over 'culture' in everyday life?

In addition to the core modules, options can be selected from several departments and centres.

See the website http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-anthropology-cultural-politics/

Core Modules

The MA is made up of four parts:
- Anthropology and Cultural Politics (30 credits)
- Anthropology Theory (30 credits)
- Option modules [within the Department of Anthropology, or the Departments of English and Comparative Literature, Media & - Communications, Politics, Sociology, or Centre for Cultural Studies] (60 credits)
- Dissertation (60 credits)

- Anthropology and Cultural Politics:

What is the relationship between culture and power?; How is power manifested or articulated 'culturally'?; In what ways may culture be understood to be 'political'?

This module is centrally preoccupied with social and political theories organised around the question of 'culture' and its relation to 'power', and vice versa, and with comprehending what may be the stakes of the politics of 'culture'. The module elaborates upon the problem of 'politics' and its always complex configuration with respect to what comes to be deemed to be 'cultural', specifically in relation to creative and productive labour, alienation, capitalism and commodification, the state, ideology, and hegemony.

We also consider the concepts of the critique of everyday life, the society of the spectacle, and the production of space. While principally concerned with a series of theoretical problems, the module will nonetheless also marshal the insights that may be gleaned from ethnography, in the effort to situate the discipline of socio-cultural anthropology in relation to the problems posed by or for 'cultural politics'.

- Anthropological Theory:

The aims and objectives of this module are to introduce you to major subfields of modern anthropology and to do so in a broadly historical and comparative framework.

The lectures will enable you to see how different anthropologists approach a number of central contemporary issues. The topics chosen will focus upon some of the theoretical developments and methodological strategies pursued in response to profound and widespread social transformations. Each week the module will focus on a single technique, methodology or strategy in anthropology in the work of a specific anthropologist.

Assessment

Dissertation – a thorough critical discussion of existing knowledge in a relevant area; reports; take-home papers. Options may require a presentation or production of visual material.

Department: Anthropology

Investigate a variety of fascinating areas that have real relevance to modern life.

As a department we’re interested in pushing the discipline forward. We’re known for pioneering new fields including visual anthropology and the anthropology of modernity. And we tackle other contemporary issues like urban planning, development, emotions and aesthetics, and new social movements.

Skills & Careers

The programme is great preparation for any role that involves research and communication. Graduates have pursued opportunities in journalism, other media, policy, education and public debate; they have also gone on to research degrees, either at Goldsmiths or elsewhere.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/apply/

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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We offer a flexible range of opportunities for postgraduate research. We welcome MPhil proposals in any topic related to architecture, planning, or landscape. Read more
We offer a flexible range of opportunities for postgraduate research. We welcome MPhil proposals in any topic related to architecture, planning, or landscape.

We offer supervision in the following areas.

Architectural and planning education

We conduct research into innovative teaching methods, the integration of theory and practice, and learn from related creative disciplines.

The Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE) has funded research into effective skills transfer. This activity is strengthened through our involvement in the:
-European Association for Architectural Education (EAAE)
-Association of European Schools of Planning (AESOP)
-European Council of Landscape Architecture Schools (ECLAS) including the Le NOTRE EU Network

Architectural science and environmental design

-Design related aspects of construction and the use of buildings
-Non-destructive testing
-Simulation
-Measurement of energy
-Environmental performance

Cities and technology

-The changing relationship between utilities, the development, planning and management of contemporary cities
-Culture and the built environment, including cultural change and transformation of the built environment

Design history and theory

-Architectural history
-Architectural theory
-Material culture

Environmental economics

-Environmental economics
-Valuation
-Benefit appraisal

Environmental management

-Our research in this area covers environmental planning, management, impact assessment, sustainability, and Local Agenda 21 issues.

Housing and community

-Social housing
-Community development

Information technology in construction

-Computer-based information search
-Retrieval systems
-Building product modelling with a philosophy of taking basic and applied research through to the end users

Landscape architecture, landscape planning, landscape design and landscape management

-Landscape architecture theory, philosophy and environmental ethics
-Sustainable landscape planning, design and management
-The history and development of the designed and cultural landscape

International urban development

-Interpreting and managing change in diverse urban contexts
-Improving the environment and quality of life in the cities of the developing world

Planning processes and policy

-Contemporary policy and practice issues in planning
-Development and urban regeneration, in the context of theoretical developments and European experiences

Spatial analysis

-Spatial change
-Spatial statistics
-The use of GIS

Urban design

-City design and development
-Design control
-Urban public space
-Public art in cities
-Meaning in the built environment
-Conservation
-Urban regeneration
-Urban design

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This programme builds on London's position as one of the most important musical centres in the world, with a diverse range of concert halls, theatres, cultural institutions and arts events that reflect its cosmopolitan and multicultural society- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-arts-admin-cultural-policy-music-pathway/. Read more
This programme builds on London's position as one of the most important musical centres in the world, with a diverse range of concert halls, theatres, cultural institutions and arts events that reflect its cosmopolitan and multicultural society- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-arts-admin-cultural-policy-music-pathway/

Although professional management practice is a major element of the programme, the 'creative arts event' is the starting point for all teaching.

A music pathway has been added to the MA in Arts Administration and Cultural Policy, which is run by the Institute for Creative and Cultural Entrepreneurship at Goldsmiths.

Instead of specialist theatre modules you take one 30 credit module from the MA Music or MMus programmes, and your dissertation/placement/business-plan will be directed towards musical organisations.

The MA introduces the key issues that concern the management of culture and in particular those within the performing arts.

Through both analysis of contemporary and recent practice, and practical work in a range of areas, you will develop a critical approach to the discipline.

The pathway provides an overview of the following areas:
arts funding structures in the UK (with reference to EU countries and the USA)
marketing for the arts
audience development
sponsorship
education programmes within the arts
programming
culture and tourism
cultural policy (including the role of the arts in national and cultural identity) and principles and structures of management
The aim of taught modules, projects and placements is to introduce you to new models of practice. These will be investigated and evaluated as a way of developing an understanding of management principles. Through this process, you will also be equipped with the necessary practical skills to enhance your potential as arts administrators.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Gerald Lidstone

Modules

Modules within ICCE

Cultural Policy and Practice- 30 credits
Introduction to Audience Development- n/a
Introduction to Fundraising- n/a
Seminar Series- n/a
The Management and Professional Practice 1: Internship- n/a
Management and Professional Practice 2: Business Planning for Arts Organisation- n/a
MA in Arts Administration & Cultural Policy Dissertation- 60 credits

Music Pathway option modules

The modules currently available include:

Contemporary Ethnomusicology- 30 credits
Critical Musicology and Popular Music- 30 credits
Material, Form and Structure- 30 credits
New Directions in Popular Music Research- 30 credits
Philosophies of Music-30 credits
Popular Music: Listening, Analysis and Interpretation-30 credits
Post-Tonal Theory and Analysis- 30 credits
Sound Agendas- 30 credits
Sources and Resources- 30 credits
Soviet and Post-Soviet Music and Politics- 30 credits
Strategies for Performance- 30 credits
Working with Original Musical Documents- 30 credits

Careers

This pathway allows you to pursue your interests in music, acting as a supplementary course to the main body of the Arts Administration programme.

Graduates typically go on to careers in the following areas:

Cultural policy: researching, developing, writing, analysing and evaluating policy for government agencies at national, regional and local level and for ‘think tanks’ concerned with culture and society
Management in building-based and touring theatre, dance, music and visual arts organisations
Arts education, arts regeneration and arts for social and community purposes
Audience development, fundraising, programming and planning
Independent producing in theatre, music or gallery-based organisations
Many students from this programme now have careers in major arts organisations worldwide or have progressed to MPhil/PhD degrees.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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Creating pathways for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples' participation in planning education and community and regional planning initiatives in Northern Australia. Read more
Creating pathways for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples' participation in planning education and community and regional planning initiatives in Northern Australia.
This course addresses a large void in the education market place, namely how the planning system can support the range of 'Close the Gap’ initiatives and will educate practicing planners on how to plan with, for and in Indigenous Communities, and provide an insight into the planning system for Indigenous people.

Who is it for?

This course is well placed to support the Aboriginal and Islander Councils in Queensland, and Aboriginal Organisations and Shire Councils in the Northern Territory, and will support International Development initiatives in the Pacific and South East Asia.
On completion of this you will have gained an understanding of, and an appreciation for:
*The political, legal and institutional contexts of planning in, with and for Indigenous communities;
*The importance of Indigenous knowledge, culture and perspectives in planning processes;
*Place based planning theory and methods that legitimises and respects Indigenous people’s connection to land, flora, fauna and water;
*Indigenous peoples’ property rights and the procedures and institutions established pursuant to legislation developed by both Commonwealth and State or Territory jurisdictions;
*The concept of cultural heritage, what it means to Indigenous people;
*The involvement of Indigenous people in making decisions about cultural heritage and intellectual property rights;
*The main ethical issues and principles involved in the conduct of decision making and planning in indigenous communities.

Award title

Graduate Certificate of Planning and Indigenous Communities (GCertPlanIndigComm)

Entry requirements (Additional)

English band level 1 - the minimum English Language test scores you need are:
*Academic IELTS – 6.0 (no component lower than 5.5), OR
*TOEFL – 550 (plus minimum Test of Written English score of 4.0), OR
*TOEFL (internet based) – 79 (minimum writing score of 19), OR
*Pearson (PTE Academic) - 57

If you meet the academic requirements for a course, but not the minimum English requirements, you will be given the opportunity to take an English program to improve your skills in addition to an offer to study a degree at JCU. The JCU degree offer will be conditional upon the student gaining a certain grade in their English program. This combination of courses is called a packaged offer.
JCU’s English language provider is Union Institute of Languages (UIL). UIL have teaching centres on both the Townsville and Cairns campuses.

Minimum English language proficiency requirements

Students of non-English speaking backgrounds must have an adequate English language capacity assessed under the Australian International English Language Testing System (IELTS). The IELTS score required for admission to this course is 6 (with no component lower than 5.5) or Band 1. The scores associated with each band at JCU can be found in Schedule II of the JCU Admissions policy.

Application deadlines

*1st February for commencement in semester one (February)
*1st July for commencement in semester two (mid-year/July)

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The MA Program in Cultural Diplomacy and International Music is a one year program offered by the University of the West of Scotland in partnership with the Academy for Cultural Diplomacy. Read more
The MA Program in Cultural Diplomacy and International Music is a one year program offered by the University of the West of Scotland in partnership with the Academy for Cultural Diplomacy.

Credits - 90 ECTS Credits

Length - 2 Trimesters (plus Dissertation)

Location - Paisley, Scotland and Berlin, Germany

Tuition - €9,000

The opportunity exists to create a programme to educate professionals who intend to become involved in international diplomatic relations which function using the “soft power” of music. These individuals may be involved in planning and co-ordinating the staging of international live events (International music festivals, opening ceremonies for international sports events), recording or broadcast of international music projects (War Child charity, Eurovision Song Contest) or managing long-running cross-border / cross-cultural initiatives (Nerve Centre in Derry, British Council music events). These projects often work across boundaries where trade and political diplomacy have failed, hence retaining communication channels and inter-cultural connections. The emerging professional requires not just an understanding of music and diplomacy but also entrepreneurship, the global music industries, social media communication and distribution platforms, project management, negotiation skills, language skills and team management abilities. In addition to this they may find themselves working with local and national governments. They should therefore also be able to communicate clearly and effectively and understand the language of policy and exchange. The work may be focused on raising national prestige on a global stage, social re-generation, multi-culturalism or cultural liaison (or all of these). Projects are likely to require international music project management, enhanced communication (verbal and digital) skills and an understanding of global creative communities.

The program addresses contemporary international issues, with classroom seminars and lectures, as well as educational & cultural events, conferences, professional trainings, tours, visits and meetings with foreign officials, which are further incorporated into the curriculum. Students will meet with leading experts working in international organizations, embassies, and academic institutions, and will engage with specialists in the areas of International Relations & Economics, Business, Communication, Politics, Human Rights, Culture, Peace Building, Multilateral Diplomacy, Conflict Resolution, and Development.

The program provides students with practical experience for both academic and professional development, preparing students for careers in diverse fields, such as international relations, the humanities, politics, and culture, foreign policy and international economics. On a practical level, the international environment of the Center for Cultural Diplomacy Studies offers students a unique opportunity to interact with leading experts and academics at a wide variety of international organizations and research centers. This exceptional learning environment leads to original research and independent study opportunities. It allows students to create a solid professional network and form a concrete base for future academic and professional career choices, preparing students for engagement in the international arena, civil society, politics, governmental organizations and international economic organizations, as well as the private sector.

Program Structure
The program consists of 90 ECTS credits in total and has duration of two trimesters, and a Thesis to be submitted towards the completion of the program. The first trimester of the program is hosted by the University of the West of Scotland in Paisley and the second trimester is hosted by the Institute for Cultural Diplomacy in Berlin. This unique structure of the program provides the students with the advantage of learning in 2 different major European cities and thus the opportunity to gain academic, professional and personal experience from living in different cultures. Furthermore, the program’s structure provides a unique opportunity to benefit from the study environment in both an international non-governmental organization and a traditional public University.

For start Winter 2017 (February 8th, 2017)

Deadline for late admissions: December 31st, 2016

Next start:

Spring Semester 2017 - April 11th, 2017, Deadline for admissions: January 15th, 2017


For further information please visit: http://www.ccds-berlin.de.

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There are two routes through the MA. The . Cultural Heritage Research.  route which concludes with a dissertation. The . Read more

There are two routes through the MA:

  • The Cultural Heritage Research route which concludes with a dissertation.
  • The Professional Practice Route which concludes with an analytical case study report.

Course modules

  • Cultural Heritage, Communities and Identities: This module will explore the conceptual, intellectual and philosophical frameworks for tangible and intangible cultural heritages. You will explore the social roles of cultural heritage in relation to community, identity and memory and examine the political, legal and economic context in which heritage institutions exist. Heritage will be debated in the context of conservation, tourism and sustainability.
  • Managing Cultural Heritage in Context (double unit running through two terms): This module will draw on case studies and seminars from international heritage organisations including World Heritage Sites. You will participate in student-led seminars in which each student will develop a case study including consideration of education and outreach in cultural heritage. It includes management of cultural heritage including strategic planning, financial management, people, collection and site management and disaster preparedness. A project-based placement (or equivalent) provides a professional practice element.
  • Dissertation or Analytical Case Study Report: The programme concludes with a choice of modules. Students wanting to work in the profession may choose to prepare detailed and fully justified analytical case study report in a country or site of their choice. Students wishing to continue to explore theoretical issues in this complex subject or plan to pursue a career in other contexts, including taking a higher level degree, may choose the Dissertation module.

Career Opportunities

Many of our postgraduates move into an academic career, either teaching or by taking up post-doctoral research positions in universities. Others join museums or national and regional heritage organisations. Some work in professional archaeology, in national or local planning departments, while others elect to use their analytical and presentation skills to gain positions in industry, commerce and government.



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