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Masters Degrees (Cultural Memory)

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The MA Cultural Geography (Research) is celebrating its 20th birthday in 2015-2016. The course was founded in 1995 as one of the first masters programmes in the world to offer students focused engagement with the then emerging sub-discipline of Cultural Geography. Read more
The MA Cultural Geography (Research) is celebrating its 20th birthday in 2015-2016. The course was founded in 1995 as one of the first masters programmes in the world to offer students focused engagement with the then emerging sub-discipline of Cultural Geography.

Twenty years later and Cultural Geography is one of the most dynamic sub-disciplines in contemporary geography. Our course reflects this dynamism. We combine core concepts with research methods training and interdisciplinary scholarship and practice. We develop this alongside innovative placements and research engagements with some of world’s top cultural institution, located on our doorstep in London.

Thematically cultural geography focuses on the interconnections between place,landscape, environment, mobilities and identity, and thus has profound relevance for the contemporary world. Our graduates go onto work in a range of sectors, including the arts and cultural sector, publishing, planning and urban policy, private and public sector research work as well as many carrying on to further doctoral study.

As profiles of our recent students (https://landscapesurgery.wordpress.com/2014/11/13/maculturalgeography/) show, the course attracts a diverse range of students from a range of backgrounds, not just those with geography degrees.

To see more about the activities around the MA Cultural Geography at Royal Holloway, please look at our research group blog Landscape Surgery - https://landscapesurgery.wordpress.com/ .

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/geography/coursefinder/maculturalgeography.aspx

Why choose this course?

- This well established course aims to provide research training and practice at Master’s level in Human Geography, with a particular emphasis on Cultural Geography; to prepare you for independent research at doctoral level in Human Geography; and to develop specialised knowledge and understanding of research, particularly involving cultural analysis, interpretation and practice.

- The course has a strong track record in gaining Research Council Funding for students. This includes ESRC 1+3 funding as well as funding from AHRC TECHNE. Please see the funding opportunities page for further details.

- The MA in Cultural Geography (Research) combines the vibrant research of the outstanding Social and Cultural Geography group with cutting edge teaching. The quality of our course was recognised by our external examiner as offering a gold-standard for the sector. Our teaching was nationally recognised by the student nominated award for “Best Teaching Team” (Arts and Humanities) at the National Prospects Post-Graduate Awards (2013).

- The programme includes cutting-edge conceptual teaching in themes such as theories of place and space, postcolonial geographies, geographies of knowledge, mapping and exploration, landscape, memory and heritage, geographies of consumption, material geographies, geographies of embodiment, practice and performance, critical urbanisms and creative geographies.

- At RHUL we are known for our commitment to collaborative research, offering you the chance to develop your seminar and tutorial-based learning alongside world leading cultural institutions. These include the Science Museum, V&A Museum, Museum of London, British Library, Natural History Museum, Royal Botanic Gardens Kew, Institute for International Visual Arts, and the Royal Geographical Society.

- You will be well prepared to continue to a PhD, building on the research you have completed on this course.

Department research and industry highlights

Social and Cultural Geography at Royal Holloway emphasises the cultural politics of place, space and landscape. The Group's research stresses theoretically informed and informative work, values equally contemporary and historical scholarship, and engages with diverse geographical locations within and beyond the UK.

SCG is home to a large and intellectually vibrant postgraduate community. There are around 40-50 postgraduates in the Group at any time. Many of the past graduates of the MA and SCG PhDs are now established academics in their own right.

SCG is well-known for its collaboration with a range of cultural institutions beyond the academy; recent partners include the the Science Museum, Victoria and Albert Museum, National Maritime Museum, British Library, British Museum, Museum of London and the Royal Geographical Society. The Group also has a tradition of including creative practitioners within its activities, as artists in residence, as research fellows and through participation in major research projects.

Many leading journals are edited by group staff, including Cultural Geographies, the Journal of Historical Geography, Geoforum, History Workshop Journal and GeoHumanities. Please see the Landscape Surgery blog for further information on Social and Cultural Geography activities at RHUL.

Course content and structure

The programme consists of four elements, all assessed by coursework.

- Element 1: Contemporary Cultural Geographies
This is a programme of seminars on current ideas, theory and practice in Cultural and Human Geography. It includes the following themes: theories of place; colonial and postcolonial geographies; biographies of material culture; embodiment, practice and place; geographies of consumption; culture, nature and landscape; space, politics and democracy; cultures of politics.

- Element 2: Methods and Techniques in Cultural Geography
This consists of a programme of workshops devoted to research methodologies and techniques in Cultural Geography. It includes research strategies and project design; reflexivity and ethics; ethnographic research; social survey; qualitative data analysis and computing; visual methodologies; interpreting texts; interpreting things; interpreting movement; negotiating the archives; the arts of cultural geography.

- Element 3: Research Training
You will be introduced to the culture of research in Human Geography and provided with a broad training for independent research within contemporary cultural geography. This element supplements the more specialised research training in research techniques in Element 2, and culminates in a 5,000 word research proposal for the Dissertation.

- Element 4: Dissertation
You will produce a substantial (15-18,000 word) research dissertation, under supervision.

On completion of the course graduates will have:
- advanced knowledge and expertise in the field of Cultural Geography and its current research questions
- advanced knowledge in the ideas, approaches and substantive themes of contemporary Cultural Geographies
- advanced knowledge of the research methods and techniques of Cultural Geography
- knowledge of the culture of research.

Assessment

Assessment is by coursework only. Formative feedback and detailed ongoing discussion of work before final submission is a central part of the teaching ethos of the course. Students also have significant autonomy in the selection of topics for coursework and dissertation allowing them to develop particular interests and specialisms.

Contemporary Cultural Geographies (Element 1)
Assessed by two course essays of up to 5,000 words (25% of final mark).

Methods and Techniques in Cultural Geography (Element 2)
Assessed by two workshop reports of up to 5,000 words (25% of final mark).

Research Training (Element 3)
Assessed by a 5,000-word dissertation proposal and satisfactory completion of modules taken in the element (Pass required).

Dissertation (Element 4)
Assessed by submission of a completed dissertation of 15-18,000 words. (50% of final mark).

Employability & career opportunities

Throughout the MA we spend time exploring possible career trajectories with our students.

This includes working on PhD applications – over 50% of our students go onto do PhDs and many go into academic position thereafter.

We also run a series of placement days with key cultural institutions in and around London including, British Library, Royal Geographical Society and Kew that help students develop skills, experience and contacts.

In recent years our graduates have entered a range of sectors, including the creative industries (advertising and marketing), the museum and research sectors (British Library, National Archive, and research assistantships in various academic projects).

We offer a series of course and activities to support career development:

1) Transferable Skills sessions

During the course staff on the MA not only teach key ideas and research methods, but also help students hone a series of transferable skills. As well as writing and presentation skills, activities on Element three enable the development of team-working and delegation skills. We also hold a series of dedicated skills sessions during the course including social media skills and networking skills run both by staff and by specialists from the careers office.

2) Career Development sessions and workshops

Both staff on the MA and the specialist staff at RHUL career centre offer tailored career development sessions. These might involve talking about developing an academic career, exploring careers in the cultural sector, as well as generic skills such as preparing your CV and developing a Linkedin profile.

3) Cultural Engagements and Placements

Staff on the MA course make the most of their research links with arts and cultural organisations to help students develop placement based work during their course.

Element three activities are designed to help students build up their CVs but also their contacts, and we are happy to help arrange shorter placements during element 1 and 2 pieces or longer-term placements for dissertation work. Past placements have seen students working with a range of key cultural institutions in and around London including the Royal Geographical Society, Kew Gardens, Furtherfield Digital Media and The British Museum.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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The postgraduate programme in Cultural History, Memory and Identity is concerned with the cultural practices and media of ‘history-making’; with the cultural representation and interpretation of ‘history’; and with the role of constructions of ‘the past’ within cultural and social formations. Read more
The postgraduate programme in Cultural History, Memory and Identity is concerned with the cultural practices and media of ‘history-making’; with the cultural representation and interpretation of ‘history’; and with the role of constructions of ‘the past’ within cultural and social formations. It is grounded in current interdisciplinary methodologies informed by cultural and critical theory, and draws on the course team’s specific areas of expertise within social, cultural and political history, cultural studies, literary studies, film and visual studies and the history of ideas. The programme develops a connection between critical understanding and analysis of the past, with a practical, ‘hands-on’ emphasis upon the skills and methods involved in the making of new historical accounts and representations. The programme incorporates interests and expertise spanning a wide range of cultural forms and practices, including oral history, life-story work and auto/biography, drama and performance, material artefacts, monuments, exhibitions, museums, written histories, imaginative literature, archival documents and records, painting, graphic design, photography, film, television, video, digital media, commemoration, and heritage.

These concerns are developed in relation to three pathways, each of which explores a particular field of enquiry with its own distinctive thematic and methodological focus: Cultural Memory; Making Histories; ‘Race’, Nation and Ethnicity. MA students enrol on one of these pathways; not all run every year. [For further details of the three pathways, see separate entries under these titles on this website.]

Each pathway comprises four component elements:

1: A compulsory core course unit that runs throughout the year and establishes the themes, issues and questions that characterize the field of enquiry, the theories and methods of its investigation and applies these to particular case studies:

For Cultural Memory the core course comprises: Cultural Memory: Concepts, Theories and Methods; Holocaust Memory; and Cultural Memory in Ireland.

For Making Histories the core course comprises: Public History, Heritage and the Representation of Brighton & Hove; Making the History of Slavery in the Atlantic World; and Making the History of the Second World War

For ‘Race’, Nation and Ethnicity the core course comprises: Constructions of Britishness: Histories, Cultures and Identities; The Making of the Black Atlantic; and Memory and Identity in Postcolonial Cultures.

2: Two optional units of 20 credits each, or one optional unit of 40 credits. These are usually taken from within the MA Humanities Programme, or from MA Programmes running elsewhere in the School of Humanities.

NB: these units may vary, and not all will be available in any one year. For up-to-date information, contact the Course Leader.

3. A Research Methods unit introducing relevant methods in cultural studies, historical inquiry, literary (textual) analysis, and cultural and critical theory; and guiding the formulation of a research topic with clear aims, methodology, sources, and a rationale for the intended treatment of the topic.


4: The Research Project enables students to investigate in depth a topic of their choice - a critical debate, or a body of cultural material, or an historical context - relevant to the broad concerns of the MA. Research normally leads to the production of a 20,000-word dissertation. The use of alternative modes of presentation - for example, the production of a video, an exhibition or a CD-Rom - may also be negotiated
.

Full-time students usually take two elements per term, part-time students usually take one. The pattern of study is flexible in order to allow all students to take advantage of the full range of options. Potential applicants are advised to discuss their particular interests with the Course Leader to explore how these might be accommodated. In cases where students’ preferred pathways or units are not available, there is usually scope to pursue these interests elsewhere on the programme, whether in relation to other units or through the Research Project.

A part-time student should expect to dedicate some 20 hours a week to their studies and a full-time student some 40 hours, mostly taken up by independent reading and writing. Teaching for all Core Courses normally takes place on weekday evenings and lasts 2 - 3 hours. Research Methods timetabling is negotiated with each group. The Research Project involves individual tuition at times agreed between student and supervisor.

The interdisciplinary course team are active researchers and leaders in their respective research fields. Please see their individual staff pages for further details of areas of research expertise and interest.
Visit Cultural History, Memory and Identity MA page on the University of Brighton website for more details!

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The aim of the programme is to offer grounding in the theories on Cultural Studies which draws on Marxism, Structuralism, Post-Structuralism, Post-Marxism, Feminism, and Post-Modernism and their use, application and adaption in the cross-cultural contexts of Africa, Asia and the Middle East. Read more
The aim of the programme is to offer grounding in the theories on Cultural Studies which draws on Marxism, Structuralism, Post-Structuralism, Post-Marxism, Feminism, and Post-Modernism and their use, application and adaption in the cross-cultural contexts of Africa, Asia and the Middle East. It provides an examination of the main historical concepts in Western culture such as ideology, power, class, identity, race, nation, subjectivity, representation, and memory and how these are challenged by scholars working in non-Western cultures of Africa, Asia and the Middle East. The aim is to explore the different and plural cultural histories and memories of these contexts to which Cultural Studies must adapt.

Theoretical paradigms covered will reflect on issues of class, ‘race’, gender, sexuality, ethnicity, representation and religion. The course will investigate central questions of epistemology and methodology in relation to the application of Cultural Studies theories in non-Western contexts. The programme is theory and practice based and therefore, it draws on case studies from a diversity of cultural practices, genres and contexts to elucidate complex theoretical concepts and challenge their limitations and/or validity in the context of Asia, Africa and the Middle East.

The programme aims to equip students with sufficient knowledge to understand and evaluate the way in which Cultural Studies theories and methods are used in cross-cultural contexts and hence develop analytic skills for undertaking their own research projects.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/cclps/degrees/macultstud/

Structure

The Programme will consist of modules valued at 3 units and a dissertation of 10,000 words.

Full-time students will be allowed to enrol for four units during term one (part-time students two or three), if one of the units is a language acquisition unit. At the end of term one they will have to withdraw from one unit, leaving units to the value of three (pro rata for part-time students) and a dissertation.

MA Cultural Studies Programme Specification 2012/2013 (pdf; 40kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/cclps/degrees/macultstud/file53952.pdf

Employment

A postgraduate degree in Cultural Studies from SOAS provides its students with expertise in non-European cultures, in-depth regional knowledge, and strong research and critical analysis skills. As well as subject expertise, Postgraduate students are equipped with the transferable skills needed to continue in research as well as the skills needed to enable them to find professional careers in the private and public sectors. These include familiarity with methods of research; the ability to absorb and analyse large quantities of information; organisational skills. A postgraduate degree is a valuable experience that provides students with a body of work and a diverse range of skills that they can use to market themselves with when they graduate.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

The Department

The SOAS Centre for Cultural, Literary and Postcolonial Studies (CCLPS) exists to promote the disciplines of Comparative Literature, Cultural Studies and Postcolonial Studies in relation to Africa, Asia and the Middle East. The Centre is housed in and administered by the Faculty of Languages and Cultures, but as a Centre dedicated to interdisciplinary study it is not subordinate to any single Department in the Faculty, either administratively or intellectually.

Many theorists and scholars in the different disciplines of Comparative Literature, Cultural Studies and Postcolonial Studies are stressing the need for a move toward the study of non-European literatures and non-European aesthetic and cultural practices. The range of expertise in non-European literatures and cultures offered at SOAS aims to respond and contribute to current critical and theoretical debates in these disciplines.

The mission of the CCLPS is therefore to promote research on non-European cultures and literatures in the disciplines of Comparative Literature, Cultural Studies and Postcolonial Studies, with the aim of having an impact on the debates and of eventually reinvigorating and pioneering certain dimensions of the disciplines. The SOAS CCLPS also aims to promote comparative critical thought and postgraduate research in critical methods derived from the study of non-European literatures and aesthetic and cultural practices, in addition to written literatures in European languages.

The SOAS CCLPS provides an administrative and intellectual home for the School’s MA Comparative Literature, MA in Cultural Studies and MA in Postcolonial Studies, as well as the MPhil/PhD programmes in these three disciplines. The Centre places its emphasis on the acquisition of critical theoretical skills and in-depth regional knowledge across disciplines. Members of the Centre and current research students work on an exceptionally wide range of topics, both theoretical and critical. Supervision for research students can be provided across this wide range. MPhil/PhD students may register for a degree in Comparative Literature, Cultural Studies or Postcolonial Studies while being supervised by an associate member based in a SOAS department.

The Centre organises a training programme in the three disciplines for research students, in coordination with the faculty wide Research Training Seminar, which is supported by regular Centre seminars. The Centre also liaises with other discipline-based centres and departments over the following MA degree programmes offered faculty wide: MA African Literature, MA Chinese Literature, MA Japanese Literature, MA Korean Literature, MA Arabic Literature, MA Gender Studies, MA Theory and Practice of Translation.

Membership of the SOAS Centre for Cultural, Literary and Postcolonial Studies is open to all academic staff and students at SOAS as well as to individuals based in other higher education institutions in the UK with an academic interest in the disciplines of Comparative Literature, Cultural Studies and Postcolonial Studies. Membership will operate on an annually renewable basis. Members will be listed under the following headings: Steering Committee, SOAS Staff (listed by discipline), SOAS Postgraduates (listed by discipline), International Advisory Board (to be invited by Chair through Steering Committee), Visiting Scholars and Affiliated Scholars. An up-to-date list of current members will be maintained by the Centre and will be subject to the Data Protection Act.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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The programme offers a comprehensive understanding of social sciences media and cultural analysis. Read more
The programme offers a comprehensive understanding of social sciences media and cultural analysis. Interdisciplinary in conception, it provides students with a critical introduction to key areas of media and cultural analysis, including the media and political economy; modernity and post-modernity; and cultural ‘difference’, prejudice and power.

While there are several core modules, students undertake research directly related to their specialist interests in the dissertation. There are also a number of optional modules, covering such areas as globalisation, visual cultures, media and nationalisms, citizenship, digital media, popular music, cultural policy, and consumption.

Core study areas include media and modernity, the politics of representation, production and reception analysis, media and cultural industries, textual analysis research techniques and a dissertation.

Optional study areas include citizenship and communications, media, nations and nationalisms, global communications, digital futures, media and cultural work, digital cultures, digital economies, cultural memory and the heritage industries, marketing politics.

See the website http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/social-sciences/media-cultural-analysis/

Programme modules

Compulsory Modules:
- Media and Modernity
- The Politics of Representation
- Production and Reception Analysis
- Media and Cultural Industries
- Textual Analysis Research Techniques
- Dissertation

Optional Modules:
- Popular Music and Modern Times
- Citizenship and Communications
- Media, Nations and Nationalisms
- Global Communications
- Digital Futures
- Media and Cultural Work
- Digital Cultures
- Digital Economics
- Cultural Memory and the Heritage Industries
- Marketing Politics

Assessment

Coursework plus a dissertation of 10,000 words on an agreed topic.

Careers and further study

Our students go on to work in media, marketing and PR divisions of major public and private institutions. They also go on to work in mainstream media careers such as journalism and broadcasting.

The comprehensive theoretical introduction to media, communications and culture that the programme provides makes it an ideal stepping stone into a research career. Many of our students have also gone on to do PhDs in media, communications and culture in the UK and abroad.

Why choose social sciences at Loughborough?

The Department of Social Sciences has long been recognised as an international centre of academic excellence and for its cutting-edge interdisciplinary work.

This recognition of excellence has been a major factor in enabling the Department to recruit a lively community of postgraduate students that currently numbers around 100.

In the Department of Social Sciences we offer a rich variety of taught postgraduate masters. The courses are delivered by an internationally renowned interdisciplinary team, through the use of contemporary case studies and research-informed applied teaching and learning.

The courses provide training in digital culture, media, communications, sociological and anthropological, theory, as well as quantitative and qualitative methods

- Research
All of our academic staff are active researchers, working within and across the following disciplinary boundaries – Communication and Media Studies, Criminology, Social Policy, Social Psychology, and Sociology.

Loughborough is home to the most world-leading, original and internationally excellent research in communication, media studies, sociology, and social psychology. Our research has excellent impact, with staff working with a wide range of public and third sector bodies (e.g., BBC Trust, the Metropolitan Police, the Electoral Commission, the College of Mediators, UK Drug Policy Commission, Department of Health). Our social policy and criminology research also has world-leading impact, particularly in services for children and minimum income standards.

- Career prospects
Our programmes prepare our graduates for the real world of the television industry, marketing, academia, publishing, plus many more industries. They go on to work for companies and organisations such as China Development Research Foundation, Elsevier Ltd, Image Line Communication, Institute of Psychiatry, Metropolitan Police Service, Oxfam and X-Pert Med GmbH.

Find out how to apply here http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/social-sciences/media-cultural-analysis/

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This programme offers a comprehensive understanding of current developments in digital media and their wider social significance. Read more
This programme offers a comprehensive understanding of current developments in digital media and their wider social significance. Smartphones; social networking, blogging and tweeting; online shopping; communication by email; and the delivery of news, film, music and e-books over the Internet: these are just some of the most striking ways in which the digital is penetrating and transforming contemporary society.

The programme is delivered by a diverse interdisciplinary team with a strong profile in, for example, digital culture, media, sociology, anthropology and communication studies.

Core study areas include media and cultural industries, digital futures, media and cultural work, textual analysis research techniques, production and reception analysis and a dissertation.

Optional study areas include politics of representation, media and modernity, communication and citizenship, sex industries, global communications, media, nations, and nationalisms, digital cultures, digital economies, cultural memory and the heritage industries, and marketing politics.

See the website http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/social-sciences/digital-media-society/

Programme modules

Compulsory Modules:
- Digital Cultures
- Digital Futures: explorations in new media
- Production and Reception Analysis
- Digital Economies
- Digital Methodologies
- Dissertation

Optional Modules:
A selection of the following options will be available:
- Media and Modernity
- Media and Cultural Industries
- The Politics of Representation
- Popular Music and Modern Times
- Citizenship and Communications
- Media, Nations and Nationalisms
- Global Communications
- Media and Cultural Work
- Tourism, Culture and Society
- Sex Industries
- Cultural Memory and the Heritage Industries
- Marketing Politics

Assessment

Coursework plus a dissertation of 10,000 words on an agreed topic.

Careers and further study

The degree is designed to develop specialist understanding of contemporary developments in digital media and culture. This will be relevant to anyone pursuing a professional career in this rapidly growing sector and to those with an interest in these significant social changes. Students will also acquire research skills which will be of value in both media-related and academic careers.

Why choose social sciences at Loughborough?

The Department of Social Sciences has long been recognised as an international centre of academic excellence and for its cutting-edge interdisciplinary work.

This recognition of excellence has been a major factor in enabling the Department to recruit a lively community of postgraduate students that currently numbers around 100.

In the Department of Social Sciences we offer a rich variety of taught postgraduate masters. The courses are delivered by an internationally renowned interdisciplinary team, through the use of contemporary case studies and research-informed applied teaching and learning.

The courses provide training in digital culture, media, communications, sociological and anthropological, theory, as well as quantitative and qualitative methods

- Research
All of our academic staff are active researchers, working within and across the following disciplinary boundaries – Communication and Media Studies, Criminology, Social Policy, Social Psychology, and Sociology.

Loughborough is home to the most world-leading, original and internationally excellent research in communication, media studies, sociology, and social psychology. Our research has excellent impact, with staff working with a wide range of public and third sector bodies (e.g., BBC Trust, the Metropolitan Police, the Electoral Commission, the College of Mediators, UK Drug Policy Commission, Department of Health). Our social policy and criminology research also has world-leading impact, particularly in services for children and minimum income standards.

- Career prospects
Our programmes prepare our graduates for the real world of the television industry, marketing, academia, publishing, plus many more industries. They go on to work for companies and organisations such as China Development Research Foundation, Elsevier Ltd, Image Line Communication, Institute of Psychiatry, Metropolitan Police Service, Oxfam and X-Pert Med GmbH.

Find out how to apply here http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/social-sciences/digital-media-society/

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Communication lies at the heart of politics and is essential to understanding it in contemporary media saturated countries. Read more
Communication lies at the heart of politics and is essential to understanding it in contemporary media saturated countries. This course focuses on political communication in a global context, looking at the development of message production, transmission, and reception across nations as well as key theories, themes and controversies.

In a multi-country perspective, it examines the strategies used by political advocates to build and maintain support, especially during election campaigns, and analyses the relationships between key political actors, media actors and citizens, as well as exploring the wider issues of influence and representation. The course draws on the enduring strength of the School’s research specialism in political communication and media studies.

Core study areas include global communications, marketing politics, politics of representation, textual analysis research techniques, production and reception analysis, and a dissertation.

Optional study areas include media and modernity, communication and citizenship, sex industries, global communications, media, nations and nationalisms, digital cultures, digital economies, cultural memory and the heritage industries.

See the website http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/social-sciences/global-political-communication/

Programme modules

Compulsory Modules:
- Global Communications
- Marketing Politics
- Politics of Representation
- Textual Analysis Research Techniques
- Production and Reception Analysis
- Dissertation

Optional Modules:
A selection of the following options will be available:
- Media and Modernity
- Communication and Citizenship
- Sex Industries
- Global Communications
- Popular Music and Modern Times
- Media, Nations and Nationalisms
- Digital Cultures
- Digital Economies
- Cultural Memory and the Heritage Industries

Assessment

Coursework plus a dissertation of 10,000 words on an agreed topic.

Careers and further study

The degree is designed to enhance specialist knowledge and methodological expertise of relevance to professionals working in communications, to students interested in global political communication and to those wishing to progress to a research degree in these fields.

Why choose social sciences at Loughborough?

The Department of Social Sciences has long been recognised as an international centre of academic excellence and for its cutting-edge interdisciplinary work.

This recognition of excellence has been a major factor in enabling the Department to recruit a lively community of postgraduate students that currently numbers around 100.

In the Department of Social Sciences we offer a rich variety of taught postgraduate masters. The courses are delivered by an internationally renowned interdisciplinary team, through the use of contemporary case studies and research-informed applied teaching and learning.

The courses provide training in digital culture, media, communications, sociological and anthropological, theory, as well as quantitative and qualitative methods

- Research
All of our academic staff are active researchers, working within and across the following disciplinary boundaries – Communication and Media Studies, Criminology, Social Policy, Social Psychology, and Sociology.

Loughborough is home to the most world-leading, original and internationally excellent research in communication, media studies, sociology, and social psychology. Our research has excellent impact, with staff working with a wide range of public and third sector bodies (e.g., BBC Trust, the Metropolitan Police, the Electoral Commission, the College of Mediators, UK Drug Policy Commission, Department of Health). Our social policy and criminology research also has world-leading impact, particularly in services for children and minimum income standards.

- Career prospects
Our programmes prepare our graduates for the real world of the television industry, marketing, academia, publishing, plus many more industries. They go on to work for companies and organisations such as China Development Research Foundation, Elsevier Ltd, Image Line Communication, Institute of Psychiatry, Metropolitan Police Service, Oxfam and X-Pert Med GmbH.

Find out how to apply here http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/social-sciences/global-political-communication/

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Are you fascinated by history and culture? Want to help shape today's cultural landscape? Find out what defines “heritage”? Learn how museums plan exhibitions or how heritage policies are created?. Read more
Are you fascinated by history and culture? Want to help shape today's cultural landscape? Find out what defines “heritage”? Learn how museums plan exhibitions or how heritage policies are created?

Memory produces identity. That is why heritage is crucial for our sense of continuity in rapidly changing societies.Governments, national and international organizations need to make sense of the past as they make policies for and invest in heritage. The aim of this master's degree is to give you the theoretical and practical education necessary to take an active role in this exciting and growing field.

Why study heritage at a faculty of Theology and Religious Studies? Because most of the heritage around us stems, one way or another, from religious practices and ideas. If you want to understand heritage in all its facets, you want to study with experts who know the full story behind material and intangible heritages both locally and abroad.

The track Religion and Cultural Heritage in the Master's Programme in Theology and Religious Studies combines broad cultural competence with a high-level academic research training and the practical skills relevant for today's job market. Through concrete projects and internships, you can gain hands-on experience in the field.

Why Groningen?

• rated best Master's programme in Theology & Religious Studies in the Netherlands
• top 100 university
• unique focus on religion within the field of cultural heritage
• combination of broad cultural competence and academic research skills with practical skills relevant for job market;
• strong heritage region
• excellent network for internships
• taught by internationally recognized experts in the field
• vibrant research hub with global links

Job perspectives

You can advise or write policy documents on heritage subjects, such as the preservation of old churches or the distribution of funding for cultural activities. You could work for cultural organisations, the government, in the tourist business or at an NGO. You may also work in the media or as a teacher of religion in secondary education after completing your Educational Master's programme.

Would you like to stay in academia, you can choose to apply for a placement in the Research Master.

Job examples

• Cultural Education
You can work within organizations that consult upon the content and organization within the field of arts and cultural education. Or you could work at an educational department within institutions such as a cultural centers or museums.

• Consulting & Policy
Your knowledge about religious heritage will enable you to advise upon or write policy documents on the conservation of religious heritage. You could find a job with central government but also at organizations and foundations in the cultural sector. This could, for example, be the Museum Catharijneconvent in Utrecht or the Stichting Oude Groninger Kerken.

• Education
Once you have completed this Master's track, you will have sufficient knowledge of the subject to be able to teach Religious Studies or Social Studies in secondary education. Alternatively, you could opt for a position in higher vocational education. As you also need didactic skills as a teacher or lecturer, it is advisable to do a Master's in Education after you have completed your regular Master's programme.

• Media & Journalism
A number of publishers have shown renewed interest in religion and society. With your knowledge and skills, you can make an expert contribution to publications in this field. You could also use your expertise as an editor at a broadcasting company, newspaper or current affairs magazine.

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Note. this MPhil can be developed into a PHD. Cultural policy is an interdisciplinary field characterised by a diversity of subjects and research methods. Read more
Note: this MPhil can be developed into a PHD.

Cultural policy is an interdisciplinary field characterised by a diversity of subjects and research methods. As a research student at the Centre you will be expected to make an original contribution to the field by critically reviewing existing knowledge and by challenging current assumptions (including your own). Your research should be a personal journey which engages with issues and ideas you feel are significant and which are challenging and relevant to those working in the cultural sector. As part of your programme of study, you may wish to participate in taught modules on the Centre’s three MA programmes.

Research Interests

Management and creativity; Intellectual property and the creative economy; Digital media and digital memory; Cultural and media organisations; Creative enterprise; Arts, media and sustainable development; Implicit cultural policy; The value of culture; Cities: the politics and aesthetics of urban spaces; Structure and agency in the museums and galleries sector; Cultural taste and the sociology of culture; Media, gender, emotion and ageing; Religion and cultural policy; Cultural pessimism and cultural optimism.

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This transdisciplinary programme supports a range of research topics in visual and urban cultural studies, with an interest in place, identity and memory… Read more

Research profile

This transdisciplinary programme supports a range of research topics in visual and urban cultural studies, with an interest in place, identity and memory; cultural translation and semiotic landscapes; materiality of writing and graffiti; photography, visual knowledges and curatorial practices; multimodality in representation of research; critical writing and critical pedagogies; cultural heritage of eastern Europe; and the post-socialist city.

The MSc by Research programme enables you to study cultural phenomena, practices and texts at an advanced level, critically engaging with theories and methodologies of transdisciplinary cultural research. The programme encourages enquiry into visual and urban cultures, visual knowledges and spatial practices, forms and practices of representation, and methodological innovation in cultural analysis.

You are required to complete two courses selected in discussion with your supervisor and providing methodological and theoretical grounding for your research project, and a 20,000-word dissertation based on independent research.

Students’ research projects benefit from academic collaborations across architecture and history of art in ECA, and from co-supervision with staff in sociology, comparative literature, Canadian studies, Chinese cultural studies, social history and religious studies. Students also benefit from our collaborative exchanges and contacts with local and international research networks, cultural and heritage institutions and archives.

Training and support

All of our research students benefit from ECA’s interdisciplinary approach and all are assigned two research supervisors. Your second supervisor may be from another discipline within ECA, or from somewhere else within the College of Humanities & Social Science or elsewhere within the University, according to the expertise required. On occasion more than two supervisors will be assigned, particularly where the degree brings together multiple disciplines.

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There are two routes through the MA. -The Cultural Heritage Research route which concludes with a dissertation. -The Professional Practice Route which concludes with an analytical case study report. Read more
There are two routes through the MA:
-The Cultural Heritage Research route which concludes with a dissertation.
-The Professional Practice Route which concludes with an analytical case study report.

Course modules

Cultural Heritage, Communities and Identities:
This module will explore the conceptual, intellectual and philosophical frameworks for tangible and intangible cultural heritages. Students will explore the social roles of cultural heritage in relation to community, identity and memory and examine the political, legal and economic context in which heritage institutions exist. Heritage will be debated in the context of conservation, tourism and sustainability.
Managing Cultural Heritage in Context (double unit running through two terms):
This module will draw on case studies and seminars from international heritage organisations including World Heritage Sites. Students will participate in student-led seminars in which each student will develop a case study including consideration of education and outreach in cultural heritage. It includes management of cultural heritage including strategic planning, financial management, people, collection and site management and disaster preparedness. A project-based placement (or equivalent) provides a professional practice element.
Dissertation or Analytical Case Study Report:
The programme concludes with a choice of modules. Students wanting to work in the profession may choose to prepare detailed and fully justified analytical case study report in a country or site of their choice. Students wishing to continue to explore theoretical issues in this complex subject or plan to pursue a career in other contexts, including taking a higher level degree, may choose the Dissertation module

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Learning how to make new discoveries that will contribute to a better understanding of the historical and social significance of works of art, artefacts and other cultural products from classical antiquity to the present. Read more
Learning how to make new discoveries that will contribute to a better understanding of the historical and social significance of works of art, artefacts and other cultural products from classical antiquity to the present.

Art is an expression of the human spirit. The study of art deals with cultural, social, religious, political and aesthetic meaning in the time it was created, the present and the eras in between. Think of how the Greek mythology of Narcissus – who has been portrayed in countless sculptures and paintings over the ages – was used by Freud to name a psychological disorder and is today used by politicians to symbolise the flaws of modern society. And think of how the destruction of art, be it by Byzantine iconoclasts, sixteenth-century Dutch protestants, or present-day adherents of IS, teaches us that the emotional and political significance of art goes far beyond the loss of objects.

The research Master’s in Art and Visual Culture studies the relationship between art, the past and the present from various angles, including the interpretation of the cultural contexts of visual expressions and their transformations throughout the ages up to now. This programme is geared towards classical archaeologists, art historians and cultural scholars alike. You’ll gain insight into general humanities methods and theories as well as those specific for those three fields. You can then go to focus on your own topic in the field of Art-Historical, Cultural Studies and Archaeology.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/arts-culture 

Europe and ‘its worlds’

The programme welcomes students with interest in all forms of art and visual culture. Our own research primarily focuses on Europe and ‘its worlds’, including how European artefacts interact with and differ from the rest of the world. Our research studies artefacts in the broadest sense, ranging from the more traditional forms as sculptures, paintings and architecture to modern ones as film, digital art, the performing arts and even fashion. All our research is performed in collaboration with scientists from other fields within the Institute for Historical, Literary and Cultural Studies (HLCS). We are joined in thirteen themed research groups .

Why study Art and Visual Culture at Radboud University?

- We teach you to look at the physical, artistic and visual qualities of an artwork or artefact, seen from the perspectives of three different disciplines: Classical Archaeology, Cultural Studies and Art History.
- In your first year, you take several courses with students from the other HLCS research Master’s specialisations in Historical Studies, and in Literary Studies. This unique construction will allow you to view your own field from the perspective of the other humanities.
- A personal tutor will guide you throughout the entire programme. He/she will give you advice on how to tailor our programme to best suit your interests, act as a sounding board for your research ideas, and help you make the right connections in the academic arena.
- You’ll receive thorough preparation for PhD research, including the writing of a publishable scholarly article and a proposal for a PhD project.
- This programme strongly encourages you to go abroad for at least a semester. Students can use our connections to other universities (IRUN network ) and research institutes to find a place that meet their academic interests.

Our research in this field

Any research done by students of the Master’s in Art and Visual Culture will be supervised by a researcher at the Institute for Historical, Literary and Cultural Studies (HLCS) in Nijmegen. HLCS research focuses around the theme Europe and its Worlds and questions whether ‘Europe’ consists of different worlds, how it is addressed, how it differs from the rest of the world, and how it interacts with other worlds. Researchers from a variety of humanities disciplines collaborate in thirteen different thematic groups to explore the spaces, cultural practices, beliefs, texts and ideas related to Europe and its World.

Thematic research groups
There are art and cultural scientists in many of these thematic groups. Although all the groups could be of interest to an art and cultural researcher, our experience is that the following generate a lot of interest among the Art and Visual Culture students:

- Matter And Culture: Analysis, Discourse & Aesthetics of/in Material Culture
The common framework of this group is research into material culture as the bearer of meaning in the broadest sense.

- Creative Industries: Society, Culture and Aesthetics in the 21st century
This group aims to gain a socio-cultural understanding of the creative industries. The group views the creative industries as a dynamic sector of autonomous and applied arts that range from theatre, music, media, literature and museums; to gaming, film, fashion and television, as well as to design, arts education, heritage and festivals.

- Memory, Materiality and Meaning in the Age of Transnationalism
This group studies the material as well as immaterial media and forms of embodiment through which we create memory through meaning-making and performative practices.

Master’s thesis topics in Art and Visual Culture:
For their Master’s thesis research, students can work together with researchers from one of the HLCS research groups or choose a topic in a non-related area. A small sample of thesis topics that you could research in this programme:
- Understanding the Post-Pompeian Era: Wall painting in the Roman Empire (AD 79-395)
- Crime in a Nordic Space: The Production of Space in Forbrydelsen
- William Marlowe in his time: an eighteenth-century view painter rediscovered
- Unravelling the Fabrics of Time: A New Materialist Perspective on Slow Fashion Becomings
- A Pyramidal Structure along the Via Appia. Documentation and reconstruction


See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/arts-culture 

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This MA introduces you to recent debates on gender in the disciplines of sociology and media and communications studies, and to the interdisciplinary domains of feminist social and cultural theory- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-gender-media-culture/. Read more
This MA introduces you to recent debates on gender in the disciplines of sociology and media and communications studies, and to the interdisciplinary domains of feminist social and cultural theory- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-gender-media-culture/

Drawing on the internationally recognised and pioneering expertise of staff in the Department of Sociology and Department of Media and Communications, the programme offers you the opportunity to develop cutting-edge critical skills in relation to cultural approaches to gender formation and gender theory.

As well as these theoretical and analytical points of orientation, the MA in Gender, Media and Culture aims to help you grasp the importance of epistemology and methodology for the evaluation of empirical investigations of gender formations.

The programme therefore introduces you to, and offers training in, the key socio-cultural methods for the study of gender in the contemporary world, including methods for the study of visual culture; the body and affect; and memory.

These two elements of the programme are brought together in a dissertation study, which involves tailored supervision in the application of research methods to a specific topic.

This programme relates to the following disciplines:

Sociology
Media and Communications
Humanities
Science and Technology Studies
Philosophy

Overall the programme has the following interrelated aims

to provide in-depth interdisciplinary knowledge of contemporary gender formations
to provide theoretical, analytical and methodological points of orientation for understanding gender and culture transnationally and across different societies and geo-political regions
to offer skilled supervision in the development and completion of a small research project which tests thoroughly a range of research skills
to expose students to a lively research environment and the relevant expertise of the research-led Departments of Sociology and Media and Communications

Convenors

Autumn term convener - Nirmal Puwar
Spring term convener - Sara Ahmed

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact the Postgraduate Programmes Officer.

Modules & Structure

Core components of the programme will familiarise you with the wide range of debates integral to the fields of gender studies, feminist theory, and cultural studies. These include:

questions about sexual difference and the performativity of gender
gender, science, debates on affect and emotion
gender and migration and the new international division of labour
feminism
You complete one core module and one option module each term, as well as a dissertation module in the spring term. The first core module introduces key debates and developments in feminist theory, cultural theory and, in particular, feminist cultural theory. It introduces both early debates which defined these fields and contemporary developments and departures. More specifically, you will be introduced to social constructivist and post-structuralist perspectives, to ‘new materialism’, to debates on feminism and the critique of universalism; to key questions in relation to feminism and biology; to debates on psycho-analysis and the emergence of queer theory and its intersection with feminist theory.

The second core module examines the place of gender, affect and the body in feminist theory and feminist practice. The course offers you different angles on what has become known as “the affective turn,” placing a strong emphasis on the history of feminist contributions to the study of affect and emotion as well as the body. We ask how bodies are constructed, experienced and lived from a variety of feminist perspectives, attending to questions of corporeal difference, as well as the intimacy of bodies, spaces, objects and technologies. We also reflect on the significance of affect and the body for feminist and queer cultural practices, as well feminist and queer activisms. This module therefore offers instruction in some of the most cutting edge issues in contemporary feminist theory. A team of leading feminist scholars based in the departments of Sociology and Media Communications at Goldsmiths teach this module on the basis of their research specialisms.

There will be a series of dissertation workshops to help you plan and develop your dissertation, especially in regard to issues of methodology and method. Each student will be assigned a supervisor who will work with you to develop your proposal and undertake independent research.

Option modules

You have 60 credits at your disposal, you can choose any 30 credit modules related to gender from postgraduate modules across the University. You can choose either a regular option (30 credits) or two ‘mini-options’ (2 x 15 credits).

For your other options, you can choose modules from either the Department of Sociology or the following Departments across Goldsmiths. Not all modules are suitable for students from all academic backgrounds; you will discuss your choices with the Programme Convenor at the start of your degree.

Assessment

Essays and dissertation.

Skills

Graduates from this programme gain conceptual and methodological knowledge of the key concepts and debates in the study of gender and culture; the skills of critical analysis; the ability to distinguish and appraise a range of socio-cultural research methodologies; the skills to design and develop a research project; and the ability to recognise and account for sensitive ethical issues relating to research and representation.

The two core courses provide you with the necessary skills to understand the relationships between early debates in the fields of gender studies, feminist theory and feminist cultural theory, and the ability to critically engage with new developments in these fields. Furthermore, you will gain a critical appreciation of the role and place of the body and affect in the development of feminist cultural theory and gender theory, and the challenges that contemporary socio-cultural changes bring to the theorisation of the body.

Careers

Previous graduates have embarked on professional careers in social research, think tanks, the arts and cultural sectors, government and public administration, development, human rights, NGOs, and in media and communications globally. They have also progressed to PhD study.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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A two-year international programme providing a combination of theoretical knowledge and practical training that will equip students to manage and curate the digital information & digital assets of organisations across the public and private sectors. Read more
A two-year international programme providing a combination of theoretical knowledge and practical training that will equip students to manage and curate the digital information & digital assets of organisations across the public and private sectors. Students study for one year at each of King’s and Humboldt University Berlin, and choose from an exceptional range of options covering different aspects of digital curation.

Reasons you should consider the MA in Digital Curation are:

- You will receive an outstanding education that will equip you to become a leader in the field of digital curation and information management.
- Employers are looking for skilled professionals with knowledge and expertise in managing and curating their valuable digital information and assets.
- You will study in two of Europe’s most exciting cities and will have the opportunity to engage with cultural and creative sectors in both cities.

Key benefits

- Students will study in two of Europe’s most vibrant cities spending a year in Berlin followed by a year in London. These unrivalled locations allow students to experience a variety of different cultures, and access to some of the greatest cultural heritage and arts institutions in the world. Both King’s and Humboldt have close links with a range of cultural heritage and memory institutions in London and Berlin respectively and are able to offer internship opportunities and up-to-the-minute knowledge of the subject area.

- The tutors offer cutting edge expertise in library, archive and information science, with specialist knowledge in digital technologies and processes. They come from diverse and highly interdisciplinary backgrounds, including running digital archives or working in the digital industries.

- The MA can lead to further research or to careers in a range of organisations, including libraries, museums, galleries, and archives; media organisations; publishing houses; government and industry; research institutions; healthcare and law firms.

Visit the website: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/digital-curation-ma.aspx

Course detail

- Description -

Throughout the programme, students will be provided with opportunities to engage with the rich cultural heritage of the cities, with guest speakers and visits to memory and cultural institutions such as the British Library, the Southbank Centre, and the Berlin State Library experiencing all that studying in Berlin and London can offer.

Digital content and digital technologies are a defining feature of our age. Digital data, information and knowledge are an asset for cultural heritage, memory institutions, industry, commerce and government. They are fundamental for research and practice in fields such as the law and medicine. As individuals we increasingly communicate and record our lives and our memories in digital form. But digital information is fragile and complex and requires ongoing and active curation as we seek to ensure its longevity, innovate in its use, and exploit its social, cultural and commercial value. It is a shared once-in-a-generation challenge.

This programme will provide students with the core skills, knowledge and competencies to become leaders in the rapidly expanding field of digital curation. Students will study a wide range of subjects including metadata, preservation, knowledge representation, digital libraries, ethics and rights management, and new digital technologies and methods, including cloud and crowd-sourcing technologies. Students will also have an opportunity to undertake an internship to gain workplace experience. We want students to acquire a great deal of practical knowledge, but even more we want them to develop their critical and reflective capacities, and to acquire an understanding of the inter-dependence between the developments in digital processes, technology and curatorial practice. The MA will also provide an excellent grounding for students interested in going on to a PhD in Digital Curation or related area.

- Course purpose -

The MA in Digital Curation is designed to prepare students for leadership roles in organisations and enterprises with significant volumes of digital information and knowledge. The programme responds to the increasing demand for digitally literate professionals to work in education and heritage institutions, as well as wider industry by equipping students with a range of strategic, technical and practical skills to provide direction and leadership in the curation of digital information and assets.

- Course format and assessment -

Lectures on theoretical topics; demonstrations; practical classes and exercises. Modules are assessed by coursework and/or examination.

Career Prospects:

All institutions concerned with the effective curation of digital information and digital assets, for example, libraries, museums, galleries, and archives; media organisations; publishing houses; government and industry; research institutions; healthcare and law firms.

How to apply: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/taught-courses.aspx

About Postgraduate Study at King’s College London:

To study for a postgraduate degree at King’s College London is to study at the city’s most central university and at one of the top 21 universities worldwide (2016/17 QS World University Rankings). Graduates will benefit from close connections with the UK’s professional, political, legal, commercial, scientific and cultural life, while the excellent reputation of our MA and MRes programmes ensures our postgraduate alumni are highly sought after by some of the world’s most prestigious employers. We provide graduates with skills that are highly valued in business, government, academia and the professions.

Scholarships & Funding:

All current PGT offer-holders and new PGT applicants are welcome to apply for the scholarships. For more information and to learn how to apply visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/pg/funding/sources

Free language tuition with the Modern Language Centre:

If you are studying for any postgraduate taught degree at King’s you can take a module from a choice of over 25 languages without any additional cost. Visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/mlc

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The MRes in Humanities offers students the opportunity to produce a substantial piece of independent research and writing, and to undertake wide-ranging, systematic training in research skills and project management. Read more

Overview

The MRes in Humanities offers students the opportunity to produce a substantial piece of independent research and writing, and to undertake wide-ranging, systematic training in research skills and project management. Students will write a dissertation in a specific field or prepare a portfolio of compositions, recital or a media project with a named supervisor.

Supervision is available in all disciplines where the School has expertise:
- American Studies
- English
- History
- Media, Communications and Culture
- Music and Music Technology
- Philosophy
- Russian

You will be able to develop your research topic within the context of current debates and methodologies in relevant disciplines and within the humanities generally. The course will develop practical, critical and analytical research skills that can be deployed in a variety of professional and intellectual contexts. The programme is tailored to your research and career plans, and we recommend that you contact us before making a formal application.

The MRes degree is intended for applicants who already have a clear dissertation project (or equivalent, e.g. composition portfolio, performance or software development plan). In liaison with the supervisor and discipline lead, a plan of work in semester 1 and 2 is agreed and serves as preparation for the project as well as assessed work in its own right. When you submit your online application, please use your personal statement to describe the dissertation (or equivalent) project you intend to carry out (500-700 words). Include specific research questions and aims. What does the project intend to elucidate? Is any hypothesis proposed? How will the research be carried out (i.e. methodology)?

See the website https://www.keele.ac.uk/pgtcourses/humanitiesmres/

American Studies

American Studies is a multidisciplinary department devoted to the analysis of the United States from the foundations of the republic to the present day. As a long-established centre of excellence in research and teaching, we aim to offer a supportive and lively environment for pursuing top-quality postgraduate courses.

American Studies at Keele enjoys an outstanding national and international reputation. At every level of the postgraduate programme our aim is to give both clear expectations and supportive guidance to enable you to achieve your goal.

Our tutors are all active in research, and our teaching reflects our specialist strengths. There is considerable cross-fertilization of ideas within the department, and consequently an interest in multidisciplinary work. In US History and Politics, tutors (Chris Bailey, Jon Herbert, Jon Parker, Laura Sandy and Axel Schafer) specialize in the history of the Civil War era and the American South, Cold War society, religion and politics, intellectual history, the politics of the environment, the US Congress, the American presidency, the politics of education, state and local government, and electoral politics.

In American Literature and Culture, tutors, (Ian Bell, Oliver Harris, James Peacock and Tim Lustig) have research interests in nineteenth- and twentieth-century, in contemporary fiction, relations between literature and science, African American literature, film noir, cultural theory and cultural memory, Anglo-American modernism, trauma theory, and the Beat generation.

Course Aims

To enable students to research and write an extended dissertation, whilst developing practical, critical and analytical research skills that can be deployed in a variety of professional and intellectual contexts. Students will develop an understanding of the place of a specific research topic within current debates and methodologies in relevant disciplines, and within the humanities generally. The course will promote the ‘project management skills’ of defining and planning a project, meeting deadlines, and recording and reflecting on outcomes.

Course Content

Students follow a tailor-made programme, comprising three components totalling at least 180 credits.
- A 20,000 word dissertation (or equivalent composition or artistic production) is at the heart of the programme (90 credits).

- Research Training covering research skills and reflective practice in the humanities (2 x 15 = 30 credits).

- Research methods in the field relevant to the thesis topic (30 credits)

- Individual Research Orientation: a module tailored to the needs of the student (30 credits).

Teaching & Assessment

Assessment is by coursework, culminating in the 20,000 word dissertation (or the equivalent composition or artistic production). Research Training is assessed by a portfolio consisting of an annotated bibliography, a project outline and a reflective diary. Each of the other modules will be examined through a 4,000-5,000 word essay or approved equivalent.

The pass mark is 50%. A merit will be awarded where students obtain 60% or over for the dissertation (or equivalent project or performance) and an average of 60% on their other coursework. A distinction will be awarded where students obtain 70% or over for the dissertation, (or equivalent project or performance) and an average of 70% in their other coursework.

Additional Costs

Apart from additional costs for text books, inter-library loans and potential overdue library fines we do not anticipate any additional costs for this post graduate programme.

Discretionary Award:
A sum of £6,250 has been made available to students enrolling on taught postgraduate course in History by a former member of Keele staff. The money will be distributed at the discretion of the relevant programme director(s) and is available to students entering the programme in 2015 and/or 2016. No application is required.

Find information on Scholarships here - http://www.keele.ac.uk/studentfunding/bursariesscholarships/

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This MA provides a broad based training in social science approaches to the analysis of material and visual media. Read more
This MA provides a broad based training in social science approaches to the analysis of material and visual media: ranging from art, photography, film and media within visual anthropology, to consumption, museum anthropology and cultural heritage, landscape and genres (such as clothing and the built environment), within material culture.

Degree information

The programme covers a range of contexts such as production, exchange and consumption, and uses anthropological perspectives based on the comparative study of societies, historically and culturally. Skills training is given in social anthropological field research and analysis, and in specific methods for the study of material and visual forms.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of one core module (45 credits), three optional modules (45 credits) and a research dissertation (90 credits).

Core modules
-Critical Issues

Optional modules - the following is a selection of possible option modules:
-Anthropology and Photography
-Advanced Topics in Digital Culture: Ethnographies of the Digital
-Documentary Film and the Anthropological Eye
-Anthropology of Art and Design
-Social Construction of Landscape
-Transforming and Creating the World
-Anthropology of the Built Environment
-Mass Consumption and Design
-Risk, Power and Uncertainty
-Anthropologies of Religion
-Issues in Power and Culture

Dissertation/report
All MA students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a 15,000-word dissertation.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, group presentations and discussion, tutorials, independent directed reading, interactive teamwork, laboratory and practical work, video, film and web based courses. There will also be visits to museums, galleries and other relevant sites. Assessment is through coursework, unseen examination and the dissertation.

Careers

The programme can lead to careers in a wide range of areas such as architecture, media, commerce and aspects of development work where an emphasis on the material and visual environment is central.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Senior Curator, Frifthdi School of Art, Design and Technology
-Research Executive, Basis Research
-Web Designer, Elena Boykova Sirakova
-MSc Anthropology, Københavns Universitet (University of Copenhagen)
-Associate Director, DA and Company

Employability
The programme is designed as an advanced research degree providing exposure to a vanguard and creative field within anthropology and related disciplines. Students learn how to apply ethnographic theory and methodology in material and visual culture to a wide range of case studies highlighting material culture in the wider world - ranging from art, through photography, clothing, consumption, cultural memory, monuments and the built environment.

The degree can lead to further doctoral research or careers in a wide range of areas such as architecture, media, museums, business and aspects of development work where an emphasis on the material and visual environment is central.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL Anthropology is the world's leading centre for the study of material and visual culture. We publish the Journal of Material Culture and several relevant book series, and have nine specialist staff in this field.

The department is one of the largest anthropology departments in the UK. Our excellent results in the 2008 Research Assessment Exercises and 2014 Research Excellence Framework show that we are the leading broad-based anthropology department in the UK.

Students are encouraged to take full advantage of the wider anthropological community in London and the department's strong links with European universities and international institutions.

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