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Masters Degrees (Cultural Heritage Conservation)

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Essential preparation for successful heritage careers. The cultural heritage sector offers a wide range of exciting opportunities in museums, local authorities and heritage agencies, organisations and consultancies. Read more
Essential preparation for successful heritage careers

Why choose this course?

The cultural heritage sector offers a wide range of exciting opportunities in museums, local authorities and heritage agencies, organisations and consultancies. This course offers essential training for professional roles throughout the sector.
-Understand all aspects of heritage management theory and practice.
-Gain practical work experience in the heritage sector.
-Develop knowledge and skills essential for today’s heritage-sector careers.
-Study in the heritage capital of Britain – see heritage-management in action.
-Access state-of-the-art facilities, including laboratories, archives and libraries.
-Use the latest techniques and equipment to build key practical skills.
-Receive heritage careers advice from staff with significant experience of recruiting within the sector.

York is one of the best places to study Archaeology, Heritage or Conservation. The Department has an excellent reputation and is one of the largest Archaeology teaching centres in the UK. The historic City of York is rich in architectural and archaeological treasures and resources which you will have easy access to during your studies.

What does the course cover?

Through a combination of academic studies, practical training, work placements and research projects, this course provides a thorough grounding in all aspects of heritage management theory and practice. You will address key issues such as:
-Why does the past matter and to whom?
-Who decides what constitutes heritage and what should be done with it?
-How should we present the past to the public?

The course focuses on providing you with highly valued and transferrable practical skills, knowledge and experience.

Who is it for?

This is a general programme of study, exploring the multi-disciplinary nature of the heritage environment. It is therefore suitable not just for students of Archaeology or History, but for anyone who wishes to pursue a career in the heritage sector. Recent students have included those with backgrounds in History, English, History of Art, Politics and Environmental Sciences.

What can it lead to?

The course places strong emphasis on employability. In recent years, and in spite of the economic downturn, it has successfully launched many students into heritage careers with organisations ranging from the National Trust, English Heritage and the Council for British Archaeology to museums, councils, heritage consultancies, and even travel book publishers.

Placement

The work placements provide a valuable opportunity to gain practical experience of working in the professional heritage sector. The two placements will draw on and contribute to the knowledge and experience you have gained on your taught courses, while enabling you to develop new insights, understanding and expertise in heritage management that will be extremely valuable in future employment.

Aims
-To provide students with experience of heritage management in a heritage sector working environment.
-To consolidate students’ knowledge and understanding of heritage-management procedures and issues gained from the taught modules.

Learning outcomes
Upon completing these placements you should have:
-Gained experience and knowledge of the implementation of heritage policy and principles in the workplace/cultural sector, under the guidance of experienced professionals.
-An understanding of the contexts in which heritage policy and principles are applied, and of real-world limitations.
-Developed experience in practical applications, facilitating critical reflection on the theoretical and philosophical issues raised in both core modules.

Careers

The MA in Cultural Heritage Management has a clear focus on employability. At the end of the course you will have:
-Enhanced your skills and knowledge, improving your chances of employment as a heritage practitioner;
-Developed intellectually and personally through direct contact with heritage professionals;
-Gained a critical understanding of the policies and practices underpinning heritage management;
-Developed an understanding of the nature of heritage and its relevance to society; and
-Received guidance on career opportunities across the heritage sector, including where to find jobs and how best to apply for them.

Course postgraduates have gone on to careers in archaeology and heritage-related organisations across the UK and abroad, including:
-English Heritage
-The National Trust
-York Archaeological Trust
-The Council for British Archaeology
-Highland Council
-Yorkshire Museums Trust
-Heritage consultancies
-The Science Museum Group
-The Royal Mint Museum
-Heritage Malta
-New South Wales Government

Others have used the skills gained to pursue careers in other sectors, including:
-Local government and development
-Chartered surveying
-Computing and IT services
-Business and administration
-Marketing and public relations
-Education
-Civil service, law and police authorities
-Accountancy and financial services
-Others have gone on to take PhDs at York, Stanford (USA) and other universities.

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Architectural conservation - the action of conserving built heritage while maintaining its values - is practiced differently across the world; sometimes not at all due to cultural and economic constraints. Read more

Why this course?

Architectural conservation - the action of conserving built heritage while maintaining its values - is practiced differently across the world; sometimes not at all due to cultural and economic constraints.

It is an emerging area of work which requires specialist training and knowledge to deal with its multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary nature. It also requires the development of a critical approach for the analysis and design of the intervention, informed by the shared international principles and the specific nature and context of the historic building to be conserved.

We need to attract new talent to the field of architectural conservation. To work with historic buildings is an enriching experience, which combines the creative aspects of designing a new building with the in-depth research required to understand in full the building and its context. Working with historic buildings is also a great training to improve the design of new buildings, as you learn a great deal about the importance of design ideas, innovation, durability and care. It is also a very sociable work, interacting with a variety of people from all backgrounds, joining forces in helping current generations to enjoy historic buildings, to create community identities around them, and to transmit the buildings and their values to the future.

Glasgow and its surrounding area provide an excellent location for the course, with architectural heritage from all periods, from Roman to Medieval, Georgian, Victorian and contemporary, without forgetting the better known C. R. Mackintosh and Alexander ‘Greek’ Thomson’s buildings. Strathclyde has a lively international community of staff and students and we enjoy a privileged position in the centre of Glasgow.

Study mode and duration:
- MSc: 12 months full-time; 24 months part-time
- PgDip: 9 months full-time; 18 months part-time
- PgCert: 5 months full-time; 9 months part-time

See the website https://www.strath.ac.uk/courses/postgraduatetaught/architecturaldesignfortheconservationofbuiltheritage/

You’ll study

The course is a platform for:
- collaboration with both practice and research partners
- architectural critique
- discussion and debate

All full-time students take instructional classes and a design project in the first two semesters. MSc students then complete a dissertation project.

Compulsory taught classes are delivered intensively, making them more accessible to part-time students and Continuing Professional Development (CPD). Areas explored in classes include:
- theory
- history
- survey
- investigations
- legislation
- materials
- structures

The course is informed by the outcomes of the research being carried out at the Architectural Design and Conservation Research Unit (ADCRU). It is a platform for collaboration with both practice and research partners; architectural critique, discussion and debate are fundamental parts of the course.

Open Access

Open Access modules are offered on individual modules from the MSc programme. They can be taken as stand-alone CPD options or gradually built towards a qualification.

Open Access students may transfer onto a part-time MSc or PgDip programme to complete their studies (subject to a maximum period of time).

Guest Lecturers/speakers

You’ll benefit from a large number of government, local authority and industry partners, who’ll lecture on up-to-date current practices, with a diverse point of views.

Facilities

- Studios
There are two fully-networked design studios; one dedicated to student self-study, the other to interactive design teaching.

- Library
In addition to the main University library, we have our own, on-site, reference library. Our collection is developed in direct response to the teaching delivered in the department.

- Workshop
A full range of hand and portable power tools are available (complete with instruction).

- PC Lab
Our lab computers have AutoCad and InDesign.

We also offer plotter printing, scanning and laser cutting services.

Accreditation

The course is fully recognised by the Institute of Historic Building Conservation (IHBC). The IHBC is the principal professional body for building conservation practitioners and historic environment specialists working in United Kingdom.

The course also conforms to the internationally recognised Guidelines for Education and Training in the Conservation of Monuments, Ensembles and Sites adopted by the International Council on Monuments and Sites (ICOMOS). These criteria are used by professional institutes for the assessment of evidence and professional accreditation in conservation.

Learning & teaching

The course is balanced between theory and practice. It’s delivered through:
- lectures
- workshops
- studio-based, and seminar-led learning, by staff and visiting experts from the UK and overseas

The course is a platform for collaboration with both practice and research partners; architectural critique, discussion and debate are fundamental parts of the course.

Assessment

Formative assessment will take place throughout the course.
You’ll be assessed through lectures, seminars, interim Studio Reviews and workshops, supported by student presentations, symposia and peer feedback.
Methods of teaching vary; some subjects are formally taught using lectures and seminars, others use a mix of methods which may incorporate small projects.
The main architectural conservation project is a studio based project which involves one-to-one tuition and appraisals in review seminars. Team teaching techniques are used in several projects and increasing use is made of student peer group reviews. Summative assessment will be through:
- studio reviews
- individual written essays and reports
- oral presentations
- dissertation - directly linked to the conservation project

Careers

Areas of employment for graduates are numerous. They can work as independent professionals in conservation or for architectural firms all over the worlds. The completion of the Masters will give a variety of opportunities:
- IHBC affiliate member with option to progress to full membership
- RIBA Conservation Registrant (CR) and/or RIAS Accredited Conservation Architect
- progress to RIBA Conservation architect (CA), RIBA Specialist Conservation architect (SCA) and/or RIAS Accredited or Advance Conservation Architect
- progress to Conservation Accreditation Register for Engineers (CARE), the joint register between the Institution of Civil Engineers (ICE) and Institution of Structural Engineers (IStructE)

"We work with a large number of government, local authority and industry partners, offering potential placement opportunities for students to work after their postgraduate degree study."

Heritage is recognised as a sector of international strategic importance. Local authorities and communities are also very interested in preserving their heritage. The conservation of historic buildings becomes more and more a day to day activity for architects and engineers.

Potential careers include:
- conservation architect in architectural firms
- conservation engineer in engineering firms
- conservation Officer in local authorities
- work in UK government agencies: Historic Scotland, English Heritage, CadW and the Environment and Heritage Service in Northern Ireland
- architect/conservation officer in other countries for government and local authorities
- work in UK and internationally architect/conservation officer for conservation organisations and charities such as UNESCO, ICOMOS, Council of Europe, ICCROM

Find information on Scholarships here http://www.strath.ac.uk/search/scholarships/

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Taking heritage management into the 21st century. Introduced in 2010 in response to the growth in digital heritage practices, this course provides training for professionals who wish to work in digital archiving, visualisation, and museums and heritage sector interpretation, curation and education. Read more
Taking heritage management into the 21st century

Why choose this course?

Introduced in 2010 in response to the growth in digital heritage practices, this course provides training for professionals who wish to work in digital archiving, visualisation, and museums and heritage sector interpretation, curation and education.

It draws on the Archaeology department’s strengths in both Archaeological Information Sciences and Cultural Heritage Management – offering a unique qualification that combines the theoretical and ground-level study of heritage management with practical training in new technologies, from database systems and virtual-reality modelling to social media platforms.

You will be working with a team of technology pioneers and computing scholars, who lead the field in researching and developing interpretative content and digital applications for the heritage sector worldwide.
• Gain practical experience in new and mobile technologies used to publish, archive, analyse, visualise and interpret archaeological information.
• Understand all aspects of heritage management theory and practice.
• Develop essential IT knowledge and skills required in heritage-sector careers.
• Gain practical work experience in the heritage sector.
• Access a full suite of research computing hardware and software
• Receive tailored careers advice from staff with significant experience of recruiting within the sector.

York is one of the best places to study Archaeology, Heritage or Conservation. The Department has an excellent reputation and is one of the largest Archaeology teaching centres in the UK. The historic City of York is rich in architectural and archaeological treasures and resources which you will have easy access to during your studies.

What does the course cover?

The course draws on the skills and expertise of leading scholars in heritage management, interpretation and digital media, alongside staff from the Archaeology Data Service, which has been the UK digital archive for heritage data since 1997. It also has strong links with museums and other cultural heritage institutions in York, and work placements are a key feature of the programme.

Through a combination of academic studies, practical training, research and work placements, you will:
• Explore how digital technologies are used to present and curate heritage information.
• Gain experience of using the digital and internet technologies in disseminating, publishing and archiving heritage information.
• Develop your practical skills in 3-D modelling, GIS, CAD and other heritage analysis and visualisation technologies.

Who is it for?

The MSc in Digital Heritage course is designed for people seeking professional training in digital archiving, visualisation, museums and heritage sector curation, interpretation, and education. It is ideally suited for graduates of Archaeology, History, Art History, Museum Studies, Education, Anthropology, Cultural Studies and related fields, and for candidates with proven IT experience.

What can it lead to?

The skills developed on this course lead graduates into careers in archaeological computing, archive management, education, marketing and IT services for commercial organisations, museums and the public sector. Equally, the course can be a stepping stone to further research at doctoral level.

Placement

Your work placement is a key feature of the course, offering you the chance to apply your digital skillset in a professional or academic setting.

Aims
-To provide experience of computer applications within a workplace in the heritage sector.
-To consolidate knowledge and understanding of computer applications from one or more of the taught modules.

Learning outcomes
Upon completing your placement you should have:
-Gained detailed knowledge of how information technology is applied in the workplace in the heritage sector, under the guidance of experienced professionals.
-Developed an understanding of the contexts in which IT is applied, and of real world limitations.
-Developed your IT skills in one or more of the core areas covered by the taught programme (i.e. database design, web technologies, digital archiving, electronic publication, CAD, GIS and virtual-reality modelling).

Placement opportunities
Although the organisations offering placements change from year to year, and you have the option of proposing other work providers that match your specific interests, the following list is a good indication of some of the choices available:
-Yorkshire Museums Trust
-Archaeology Data Service
-City of York Council
-Internet Archaeology
-York Archaeological Trust
-Centre for Christianity and Culture
-L-P: Archaeology
-On Site Archaeology
-Council for British Archaeology
-West Yorkshire Archaeology Service
-Historic England
-English Heritage
-National Trust

Careers

Graduates of the MSc in Digital Heritage will be well equipped to work in IT-related roles in heritage management or presentation, in museums and education, and with a range of other heritage organisations.

By the end of the course you will be able to:
-Plan, design and undertake a piece of independent research in the field of digital heritage;
-Critically evaluate claims made for different computer applications and select the correct application for a given problem;
-Locate and use relevant information on the internet and add materials to it;
-Create an electronic text;
-Design and implement a simple relational database;
-Create effective applications in CAD and VR;
-Evaluate the cultural significance of sites, places and artefacts;
-Recognise areas of potential conflict in heritage management and museum practice;
-Evaluate the implications of stakeholder values and interests for heritage management and heritage interpretation/education;
-Appraise the utility of interpretative and educational media both on site and in museums.

The course opens the door to a wide range of careers in heritage-related organisations and in many other sectors, including:
-Archive management
-Museum curation
-Social media management
-Local government and development
-Computing and IT services
-Business and administration
-Marketing and public relations
-Education

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The MA in Heritage Practice offers students an in-depth opportunity to gain a thorough understanding of the heritage sector from the perspective of different disciplines, including anthropology, archaeology and history. Read more
The MA in Heritage Practice offers students an in-depth opportunity to gain a thorough understanding of the heritage sector from the perspective of different disciplines, including anthropology, archaeology and history. It also enables students to gain critical acumen in exploring the meanings of heritage as a concept and how such concepts are applied in the UK and on a worldwide basis, thus providing valuable insights and an understanding of a sector that is gaining increased significance in today’s world.

Course Overview

The programme of study offers students a unique opportunity to explore a wide range of heritage issues. It combines broadly based compulsory modules with two distinct and specialised optional pathways in Cultural Heritage and Museums and Archives.

The Cultural Heritage pathway consists of two modules, focusing upon the notion of heritage as cultural practice. It enables students to explore important questions, for example where does heritage come from, how is it constructed, what does it do, how does it relate to the past and present, and what are its potential uses for the future? This pathway also encourages students to investigate relationships between heritage and the construction of identity, as well as the role of landscape, architecture and monuments in determining and embedding heritage.

The second pathway, on Museums and Archives, is also composed of two modules, which explore many of the issues surrounding the management, conservation, practice and legislation surrounding the operation of museums and archives.

In both pathways, students are encouraged to undertake a work placement at a museum or heritage site of their choice, while those on the Lampeter campus can undertake their placement in the Roderic Bowen Research Centre.

Students therefore gain understanding and appreciation in a broadly defined field of heritage in addition to a more concentrated and specialist knowledge based on a particular strand. Running through all these modules is a focus upon the practice based, employability side of heritage. The work placement module permits students to enter the work place, taking with them the knowledge and understanding from the course which they apply in a practical, hands-on setting.

Modules

Part 1
Compulsory modules:
-Research Methodologies (20 credits)
-Heritage: Representation and Interpretation (20 credits)
-Heritage Tourism Contexts (20 credits)

Optional modules:
-Exhibiting the Past Museums, Collections and Heritage (20 credits)
-Documenting the Past Archives: Libraries and Heritage (20 credits)
-Heritage and Architecture: Heritage and the Built Environment (20 credits)
-Heritage Project Management in the Modern World (20 credits)
-Work placement (20 credits)
-Independent project (20 credits)

Part 2
-Dissertation (60Credits)

Key Features

Teaching staff who deliver this programme rely upon their established research and expertise in heritage and heritage related concerns. The range of projects they have undertaken over a number of years, sometimes with partners in other institutions, includes:
-The excavation and conservation of the Newport Ship, Wales
-The excavation of a medieval bishop’s palace at Fetternear, Scotland, as well as the post-excavation research on and exhibition of the finds
-The development of a collaborative museum exhibition of Egyptian scarabs
-The excavation of the medieval abbey site at Strata Florida, with community and schools engagement
-Landscape heritage and interpretation
-The construction of social memory through war remembrance and memorials
-The Tregaron Elephant project, with its community engagement
-Research into ancient Andean textiles in association with the British Museum

This considerable bank of knowledge and skills underpins the programme, contributing to a high quality educational experience. As part of their research and project management, staff have worked with bodies including CADW, Historic England/English Heritage, Heritage Lottery Fund, National Trust, RCAHMW, UNESCO, Qatari Museums Authority, the British Museum, Blairs Museum (Aberdeenshire) and St Fagans National History Museum.

This experience feeds into teaching that offers unique insights into the heritage sector, its organisations and structures, its operational procedures and regulation, as well as its ethical and conservation considerations. It provides students with strong opportunities for entering heritage-related employment.

For residential students, most of the teaching takes place on the Lampeter campus, where the university is built round an archaeological site. Old Building is a listed building which backs onto a medieval motte.

Assessment

A range of assessment methods are used from essays and short written evaluation, to the creation of publicity flyers, feasibility reports on a heritage site, project designs, an exhibition, oral presentations and reflective pieces.

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This Programme offered in partnership with. Read more
This Programme offered in partnership with

UNESCO

aims to impart the necessary competencies and skills in the conservation and promotion of World Heritage Sites and in the conceptualization of sustainable projects designed around a wide spectrum of cultural activities in the fields of natural and cultural heritage, creative industries, museums and tourism. It explores the economic, social, institutional and legal considerations that govern the categories of UNESCO World Heritage Sites.
It also emphasis strategic management competencies for the preservation and promotion of these sites as well as monitoring the efficacy and adequacy of site management plans and associated cultural projects.

The Master has a strong international faculty including Professor Walter Santagata from University of Turin, Professor David Throsby from Macquarie University, Professor Allen Scott from UCLA, Professor Andy Pratt from Kings College, Professor
Françoise Benhamou from University Paris III, Professor Xavier Greffe from University Paris I-Sorbonne, and Professor Helmut Anheier from Heidelberg University. Officials from UNESCO, the World Bank and the ILO also teach on the Master.

CURRICULUM OF THE MASTER

The Master is divided into three major learning cycles. The first cycle consists of distance learning modules supported by a tutoring service. The second cycle is a face-to-face learning period that will be held in Turin, Italy, at the International Training Centre of the ILO. The third cycle is a research and study period during which the students may attend internships and are expected to finalize their final projects.

MODULE 1- Distance learning.

The introductory distance learning phase of the course lasts 10 weeks and is tutor-assisted. It includes two foundation modules on Cultural Heritage and Economic Development and the World Heritage System and Heritage Management.

MODULE 2- Culture and Economic Development

This module will introduce the participants to the following topics:
• The value chain of cultural and natural sites;
• Cultural capital and the theory of sustainable development;
• The role of culture in local development;
• Cultural and natural districts, property rights and sustainable economic development;
• Governance and cultural policies in cultural/creative industries;
• Micro enterprises, local entrepreneurship and micro fi nance;
• Gender-related economics; International organizations and cultural projects;
• Culture and natural resources as a strategic engines for local development.

MODULE 3 - Project Management in the Cultural Field

This module is intended to upgrade participants’ competences in the disciplines of project cycle design and management. . Ample opportunity will be given to the participants to practice the development of the project logical framework and project appraisal techniques. The role of international development agencies in promoting cultural initiatives will be explored, including their respective procurement guidelines and project supervision procedures.

MODULE 4 - Cultural Sectors and Creative Industries

This module investigates the main cultural sectors that come into play in cultural policies, namely:
• Management of museums;
• monuments and archaeological sites;
• Performing arts;
• Creative and Cultural industries;
• Economics of cultural tourism;
• National Parks and Protected areas.
Particular attention will be devoted to the role of International Agencies that deal with cultural programmes including the presentation of the relevant UNESCO Conventions

MODULE 5 - Tools for Strategic Planning and Evaluation

This module explores the tools needed for planning, management and evaluation of cultural resources, focusing on:
• Management Tools.
• Strategic Assessment and Monitoring.

MODULE 6 – Home research and study

This module will allow the students to further elaborate on their projects’ plans and prepare their final dissertation

Deadline for Application: 18 August 2015



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These programmes of study are designed for students who have a passion to pursue a conservation or heritage based research project defined by themselves, but with the support of an academic environment and supervisors. Read more
These programmes of study are designed for students who have a passion to pursue a conservation or heritage based research project defined by themselves, but with the support of an academic environment and supervisors.

As a research student, you will have access to support and training designed to develop the practical and critical skills necessary for investigation and study at doctoral level. Direction will be available from a supervisory team and you will have the opportunity to benefit from the School’s research expertise in a broad range of conservation and cultural heritage areas.

Strong links exist with the Colleges of Science and Arts, and an interdisciplinary research culture can facilitate collaboration with colleagues across a wide range of topics.

Current doctoral research topics include:
-How can architectural paint research and analysis enhance the conservation-restoration and historiography of cultural built heritage in the UK?
-Regarding mediocrity: conservation, interpretation and presentation of the Doddington Hall tapestries.
-Biodeterioration of limestone: role of microbial biofilms and possible intervention strategies (in collaboration with Dr Ronald Dixon, School of Life Sciences).
-Nineteenth-Century Amateur Art in Places of Christian Worship.
-Tennyson and the Archive.
-David Brewster and the Development of the Kaleidoscope.
-The Life and Work of William Logsdail.

Research Areas, Projects & Topics

Research areas covered within the School include:
-Archaeological conservation
-Architectural paint research
-Collections Management
-Conservation of a broad range of objects and material types
-Cultural heritage and climate change
-Material culture
-Paint and pigment analysis
-Preventive conservation

Previous areas of PhD study include:
-The Materials, Construction and Conservation of Eighteenth-Century Women’s Shoes.
-A Practical and Historical Examination of Jacob Christian Schaffer (1718-1790) and his Search for Non-rag Paper.
-An Analysis of the Success and Cultural Significance of Parian Ware Sculpture in Victorian England.
-'Curatorship and Conservation: A Theoretical Enquiry into the Scope of Each Realm, their Interaction and the Consequences for the Perception of Works of Art'.
-The History, Development and Conservation of Wrought Iron in Lincolnshire; the Significance of Minor Architectural Details.

How You Study

Study at MPhil/PhD level takes the form of supervised individual research. You are expected to work on one topic of your choice for the duration of the study period. On a regular basis, you are expected to produce appropriate written work, submit it to your supervisors, then meet with your supervisors to receive feedback on your submission and agree the next stage of work.

Due to the nature of postgraduate research programmes, the vast majority of your time will be spent in independent study and research. You will have meetings with your academic supervisor, however the regularity of these will vary depending on your own individual requirements, subject area, staff availability and the stage of your programme.

How You Are Assessed

The assessment at PhD level takes the form of an approximately 80,000 word thesis.

A PhD is awarded based on the quality of your thesis and your ability in an oral examination (viva voce) to present and successfully defend your chosen research topic to a group of academics. You are also expected to demonstrate how your research findings have contributed to knowledge or developed existing theory or understanding.

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The ways in which we understand and manage ‘heritage’ are changing rapidly, while the physical remains of our past – buildings, landscapes, city streets, archives, artefacts and archaeological sites – and the intangible associations of tradition, language and memory continue to shape the ways in which we live our lives. Read more
The ways in which we understand and manage ‘heritage’ are changing rapidly, while the physical remains of our past – buildings, landscapes, city streets, archives, artefacts and archaeological sites – and the intangible associations of tradition, language and memory continue to shape the ways in which we live our lives.

This course poses challenging questions about our thinking and practice, and offers students the opportunity to explore this through a series of practical projects, working in partnership with a wide range of local, regional and national heritage organisations. We will help you set heritage in its social, political and economic context, and support you in a series of placements so that you can see how this plays out on the ground, for real.

“I want to know the relationship between this wooden object ... and where it has been. I want to be able to reach the handle of the door and turn it and feel it open. I want to be able to walk into each room where this object has lived, to feel the volume of the space, to know what pictures were on the walls, how the light fell from the windows. And I want to know whose hands it has been in, and what they felt and thought about it – if they thought about it. I want to know what it has witnessed.”
Edmund de Waal, The Hare with Amber Eyes: A Hidden Inheritance (Chatto & Windus, 2010)

The hare with amber eyes – a tiny Japanese netsuke – is part of de Waal’s personal inheritance, knotted into the threads of family and world history, but the questions he asks of it belong to us all.

We will ask these questions of historic buildings, museum collections, parks and gardens, archaeological sites, public and private archives. We will consider the ways in which these resources are managed, presented and explained, and explores these through a series of encounters with heritage practitioners and heritage places. What challenges are heritage bodies currently facing? What choices do they make in dealing with them? How will pressures on public funding for heritage in the UK – and further afield – shape our experience of visiting and working in museums and heritage sites in the future? And how will our wider understanding of heritage change as a result?

Trying to answer such questions provides a framework for practical work in the sector, underpinned by hands-on, supportive teaching. As well as thinking about heritage, we want you to become involved in a range of projects, working with our extensive range of partners, and to gain experience on the ground. Examples of current placements and projects include English Heritage, the World Heritage Sites at Avebury and the City of Bath, Salisbury and South Wiltshire Museum, Wiltshire and Swindon History Centre, HMS Victory, ss Great Britain, the Roman Baths Museum and Churches Conservation Trust.

TEACHING METHODS AND RESOURCES

The course will be delivered mainly through intensive workshops. These will be complemented by guest lectures, offering you the chance to become involved in thinking about major heritage issues as they develop, or meetings with leading players in the sector. We also work closely with other departments within the University – for example, Business and Management and Publishing – to supplement and enhance our heritage teaching.

We make extensive use of the extraordinary heritage of Bath and the surrounding area, including the University’s own campuses at Corsham Court, where this course is based. There are two World Heritage Sites on the University’s doorstep: the iconic landscape of Stonehenge and Avebury and the City of Bath itself; and we have links with a wide range of different organisations across the country.

MODULES

Developing Heritage Thinking
This module introduces the key concepts we will use throughout the course, and provides the basis for asking how far heritage practice has kept pace with changes in heritage thinking and in society, politics and the economy. It draws on the extensive body of literature on heritage issues but, most importantly, encourages you to develop your own heritage thinking.

Policy, Strategy and Structures
What is the impact of heritage policy and strategy on current practice? How has this evolved over time? How might heritage policy develop in future?

Heritage Management: Practice and Planning
This module focuses on major areas of current practice, taught by leading practitioners in the field.

Understanding Current Practice
This research module involves the application of current thinking and policy to heritage practice. It is intended to take you beneath the surface of a new gallery, a restored garden, or a period interior, and ask you to consider: why this? It will enable you to develop a more sophisticated understanding of the ways in which the heritage sector really works, and the constraints it must work within.

Supported Placement
This might involve work on a specific project, or a broader introduction to the work of a particular organisation. We see this as the focal point of the course, and potentially of enormous value to you and to the organisations with whom you’ll be working.
Final project or dissertation

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

Careers in the heritage sector include roles in collections management, education and learning, exhibition planning and implementation, community engagement and outreach, and marketing and fundraising. You might also become involved in operational management, events planning, retail and visitor services.

Not everyone will want a job in the ‘heritage industry’ and competition for jobs is fierce. Therefore, the course includes a range of generic skills and opportunities which are aimed at increasing employability for Bath Spa postgraduates in the voluntary sector, social enterprises, fundraising, and a wide range of administrative and management roles. As well as studying heritage management, you will be fostering links with external partners and with other departments across the University. These may be the connections which help lead you into other roles, including the third sector, cultural industries and tourism, or to self-employment.

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Are you fascinated by history and culture? Want to help shape today's cultural landscape? Find out what defines “heritage”? Learn how museums plan exhibitions or how heritage policies are created?. Read more
Are you fascinated by history and culture? Want to help shape today's cultural landscape? Find out what defines “heritage”? Learn how museums plan exhibitions or how heritage policies are created?

Memory produces identity. That is why heritage is crucial for our sense of continuity in rapidly changing societies.Governments, national and international organizations need to make sense of the past as they make policies for and invest in heritage. The aim of this master's degree is to give you the theoretical and practical education necessary to take an active role in this exciting and growing field.

Why study heritage at a faculty of Theology and Religious Studies? Because most of the heritage around us stems, one way or another, from religious practices and ideas. If you want to understand heritage in all its facets, you want to study with experts who know the full story behind material and intangible heritages both locally and abroad.

The track Religion and Cultural Heritage in the Master's Programme in Theology and Religious Studies combines broad cultural competence with a high-level academic research training and the practical skills relevant for today's job market. Through concrete projects and internships, you can gain hands-on experience in the field.

Why Groningen?

• rated best Master's programme in Theology & Religious Studies in the Netherlands
• top 100 university
• unique focus on religion within the field of cultural heritage
• combination of broad cultural competence and academic research skills with practical skills relevant for job market;
• strong heritage region
• excellent network for internships
• taught by internationally recognized experts in the field
• vibrant research hub with global links

Job perspectives

You can advise or write policy documents on heritage subjects, such as the preservation of old churches or the distribution of funding for cultural activities. You could work for cultural organisations, the government, in the tourist business or at an NGO. You may also work in the media or as a teacher of religion in secondary education after completing your Educational Master's programme.

Would you like to stay in academia, you can choose to apply for a placement in the Research Master.

Job examples

• Cultural Education
You can work within organizations that consult upon the content and organization within the field of arts and cultural education. Or you could work at an educational department within institutions such as a cultural centers or museums.

• Consulting & Policy
Your knowledge about religious heritage will enable you to advise upon or write policy documents on the conservation of religious heritage. You could find a job with central government but also at organizations and foundations in the cultural sector. This could, for example, be the Museum Catharijneconvent in Utrecht or the Stichting Oude Groninger Kerken.

• Education
Once you have completed this Master's track, you will have sufficient knowledge of the subject to be able to teach Religious Studies or Social Studies in secondary education. Alternatively, you could opt for a position in higher vocational education. As you also need didactic skills as a teacher or lecturer, it is advisable to do a Master's in Education after you have completed your regular Master's programme.

• Media & Journalism
A number of publishers have shown renewed interest in religion and society. With your knowledge and skills, you can make an expert contribution to publications in this field. You could also use your expertise as an editor at a broadcasting company, newspaper or current affairs magazine.

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Kent’s new MA in International Heritage and Law is a distinct programme combining the study of heritage with an understanding of the legal frameworks which govern the management of our heritage. Read more
Kent’s new MA in International Heritage and Law is a distinct programme combining the study of heritage with an understanding of the legal frameworks which govern the management of our heritage.

Heritage is broad discipline, encompassing the wide spectrum of cultural inheritance from all civilisations and time periods. Heritage is also a major geopolitical issue in the world today, contributing to our sense of selves and communities, with law and development arguably the two most central issues in the field of heritage studies today. The MA engages you with both intellectual and practical approaches to key issues in heritage (including archaeology), with a particular focus on the protection of international heritage as well as development.

The programme is offered through a partnership between the Department of Classical & Archaeological Studies and the Kent Law School. Over the autumn and spring terms you take a core module on heritage, and choose optional modules that cover archaeology, heritage, human rights, international law, and law and development, before undertaking an extended dissertation over the summer.

This MA is of particular interest to those who wish to study cultural heritage as an academic subject, those who wish to pursue a career in international heritage and development, lawyers who want to specialise in cultural heritage issues or heritage specialists who want to acquire a better understanding of legal issues.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/759/international-heritage-law

Course structure

This MA programme is currently in development. The proposed list of modules includes International Heritage, Archaeology and Development; alongside Contemporary Archaeology: Theories, Methods and Substantive Issues; Artefacts in Archaeology; Research Skills in Ancient History: Understanding the City in Antiquity; Transmanche Archaeologies (themes in the Archaeology of the Transmanche Region through time); Cultural Heritage Law; International Protection of Human Rights; Legal Aspects of Contemporary International Problems; and Law and Development.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

Core Modules:
CL805 - Contemporary Archaeology: Theories, Methods and Substantive Issues (30 credits)
CL830 - International Heritage, Archaeology and Development (30 credits)
CL897 - Dissertation (60 credits)

Optional Modules:
CL805 - Contemporary Archaeology: Theories, Methods and Substantive Issues (30 credits)
CL900 - Research Skills in Ancient History: Understanding the City in Antiquity (30 credits)
CL897 - Roman Archaeology: Northern Provinces of the Empire from their Iron Age Origins (30 credits)
LW813 - Contemporary Topics in Intellectual Property (20 credits)
LW843 - International Human Rights Law (20 credits)
LW925 - Cultural Heritage Law (20 credits)
LW927 - Law and The Humanities1: Ethos and Scholarship (20 credits)
LW928 - Law and Humanities2: Current Issues (20 credits)

Study support

About the Department of Classical & Archaeological Studies
Classical & Archaeological Studies (http://www.kent.ac.uk/secl/classics/index.html) operates as a department of the School of European Culture and Languages (SECL) (http://www.kent.ac.uk/secl/index.html), and there are corresponding opportunities for a high level of interdisciplinary interaction (five modern languages, philosophy, theology and religious studies and comparative literature), in addition to the informal links with staff in the rest of the University researching medieval history, the history of science, and social anthropology. We have good partnerships with high-profile universities and organisations such as the Universities of Ghent and Lille 3, the Flemish Heritage Institute, UCLA, the Free University of Amsterdam and the Vrije Universitat Brussel (VUB).

We offer bursaries to enable students to participate in departmental fieldwork projects for three weeks at a time, covering travel, food and accommodation. Typically, around 30 students each year have been placed on research and training excavations in Britain, Italy (including Ostia, port of Rome) and Greece, relating to sites of Bronze Age Greek (Minoan), Iron Age, Roman, Late Antique and Anglo-Saxon date.

About Kent Law School
Kent Law School (KLS) (http://www.kent.ac.uk/law/) is the UK's leading critical law school. A cosmopolitan centre of world-class critical legal research, it offers a supportive and intellectually stimulating place to study postgraduate taught and research degrees.

In addition to learning the detail of the law, students at Kent are taught to think about the law with regard to its history, development and relationship with wider society. This approach allows students to fully understand the law. Our critical approach not only makes the study of law more interesting, it helps to develop crucial skills and abilities required for a career in legal practice.

You study within a close-knit, supportive and intellectually stimulating environment, working closely with academic staff. KLS uses critical research-led teaching throughout our programmes to ensure that you benefit from the Law School’s world-class research.

Global Skills Award
All students registered for a taught Master's programme are eligible to apply for a place on our Global Skills Award Programme (http://www.kent.ac.uk/graduateschool/skills/programmes/gsa.html). The programme is designed to broaden your understanding of global issues and current affairs as well as to develop personal skills which will enhance your employability.

Careers

This programme is ideal for those wishing to develop and focus their careers in law, heritage and development.

The International Council on Monuments and Sites (ICOMOS), the largest non-governmental organisation dealing with heritage protection (with more than 11,000 members), has highlighted the need for trained experts both in the legal aspects of heritage protection and in issues of heritage and international development.

The programme is ideal for careers in archaeology, museums and curation, preservation, conservation and the legal industries, as well as government bodies concerned with the preservation of architecture or the environment. It is also ideal for those wishing to develop a research career in heritage and law.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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The MRes in Heritage Practice is a programme with a 60-credit taught part and a Dissertation of 120 credits, which has an allowance of up to 30,000 words. Read more
The MRes in Heritage Practice is a programme with a 60-credit taught part and a Dissertation of 120 credits, which has an allowance of up to 30,000 words. The taught element enables students to engage critically with concepts of heritage and its practice in Wales as well as in other parts of the world. It enhances your skills, enabling you to develop research strategies for use in exploring your chosen angle on a sector that is gaining increased significance in today’s world.

Course Overview

The programme of study offers students a unique opportunity to explore a targeted range of heritage issues because the taught modules lead to a programme of research devised by the individual student, under the direction of a supervisor. All MRes students take the Research Methodologies module, but then their routes diverge as they select one module from each of two distinct and specialised pathways, one in Cultural Heritage and the other in Museums and Archives. This preparation leads to the student’s own dissertation project.

The Cultural Heritage pathway focuses upon the notion of heritage as cultural practice. It enables students to explore important questions, for example where does heritage come from, how is it constructed, what does it do, how does it relate to the past and present, and what are its potential uses for the future? This pathway also encourages students to investigate relationships between heritage and the construction of identity, as well as the role of landscape, architecture and monuments in determining and embedding heritage.

The second pathway, on Museums and Archives, explores many of the issues surrounding the management, conservation, practice and legislation surrounding the operation of museums and archives.

Students who complete the MRes programme are equipped with a sound basis for undertaking a research degree. Alternatively they may take their specific knowledge and understanding to apply in the workplace or in other settings.

Modules

Students will choose three modules. Below is an illustrative list of modules available:
-Research Methodologies
-Heritage: Representation and Interpretation
-Heritage Tourism Contexts
-Exhibiting the Past Museums, Collections and Heritage
-Documenting the Past Archives: Libraries and Heritage
-Heritage and Architecture: Heritage and the Built Environment
-Heritage Project Management in the Modern World
-Work placement
-Independent project

Key Features

Teaching staff who deliver this programme rely upon their established research and expertise in heritage and heritage related concerns. The range of projects they have undertaken over a number of years, sometimes with partners in other institutions, includes:
-The excavation and conservation of the Newport Ship, Wales
-The excavation of a medieval bishop’s palace at Fetternear, Scotland, as well as the post-excavation research on and exhibition of the finds
-The development of a collaborative museum exhibition of Egyptian scarabs
-The excavation of the medieval abbey site at Strata Florida, with community and schools engagement
-Landscape heritage and interpretation
-The construction of social memory through war remembrance and memorials
-The Tregaron Elephant project, with its community engagement
-Tesearch into ancient Andean textiles in association with the British Museum

This considerable bank of knowledge and skills underpins the programme, contributing to a high quality educational experience. As part of their research and project management, staff have worked with bodies including CADW, Historic England/English Heritage, Heritage Lottery Fund, National Trust, RCAHMW, UNESCO, Qatari Museums Authority, the British Museum, Blairs Museum (Aberdeenshire) and St Fagans National History Museum.

This experience feeds into teaching that offers unique insights into the heritage sector, its organisations and structures, its operational procedures and regulation, as well as its ethical and conservation considerations. It provides students with strong opportunities for entering heritage-related employment.

For residential students, most of the teaching takes place on the Lampeter campus, where the university is built round an archaeological site. Old Building is a listed building which backs onto a medieval motte.

Assessment

A range of assessment methods are used from essays and short written evaluation, to the creation of publicity flyers, feasibility reports on a heritage site, project designs, an exhibition, oral presentations and reflective pieces.

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The Principles of Conservation MA offers students an introduction to the context of heritage conservation, of how conservation works, and of the issues and constraints which affect conservation practice. Read more
The Principles of Conservation MA offers students an introduction to the context of heritage conservation, of how conservation works, and of the issues and constraints which affect conservation practice. The programme explores the principles, theory, ethics and practicalities relating to the care and conservation of a wide variety of objects and structures.

Degree information

Students gain an in-depth understanding of approaches to collections care, preventive conservation, risk assessment, conservation strategies, ethics, management and professionalism, and develop critically aware perspectives on professional practice and research processes.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of four core modules (60 credits), optional modules (30 credits) and a research dissertation (90 credits).

Core modules - students are required to take the following:
-Issues in Conservation: Context of Conservation
-Issues in Conservation: Understanding Objects
-Conservation in Practice: Preventive Conservation
-Skills for Conservation Management

Optional modules - students choose to follow further optional modules up to the value of 30 credits from the following list of related options (the degree coordinator may seek to guide the option choices made by those intending to carry on for the MSc in Conservation for Archaeology and Museums):
-Approaches to Artefact Studies
-Archaeology and Ethnicity
-Archaeolmetallurgy 1: Mining and Extractive Technology
-Archaeometallurgy 2: Metallic Artefacts
-Archaeological Ceramics Analysis
-Archaeological Glass and Glazes
-Interpreting Pottery
-Materials structure and deterioration of craft materials

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 15,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of seminars, lectures, small-group tutorials, workshops and practical projects. Some modules include visits to conservation workshops and museums, including the British Museum, National Trust and the Museum of London. Assessment is through coursework, essays, poster, portfolio, project reports and the dissertation.

Careers

The Institute of Archaeology has a long history of training in conservation, and many of its graduates are now employed in key posts around the world. Many students go on to take the Conservation for Archaeology and Museums MSc. Others pursue careers in preventive conservation and collections management in local and national museums, art galleries and heritage organisations (mainly in Europe, North America and Asia). Some students have also used this degree as a platform to become a PhD candidate at both UCL and elsewhere.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Conservator/Preparator, The Natural History Museum
-Assistant Curator, Tower of London
-MLitt Art, Style and Design, Christie's Education
-Historic Property Steward, English Heritage

Employability
Knowledge and skills acquired during the programme include the understanding of the roles conservators play in the care and study of cultural heritage, and the ethical issues involved. This is complemented by a basic understanding of raw materials, manufacturing technologies, assessment of condition and the ways in which different values and meanings are assigned to cultural objects. The student will be able to perform visual examination techniques as well as assessments and monitoring of museum collections. They will also be proficient in various types of documentation, analysis of numerical data, report writing, and presentation of conservation issues through posters, social media, talks and essays.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Institute of Archaeology is the largest and most diverse department of archaeology in the UK, and provides a stimulating environment for postgraduate study. Its conservation programmes have an international reputation.

Students benefit from the institute's lively international involvement in archaeology and heritage, from its well-equipped facilities, and access to UCL's extensive science, art and archaeology collections.

The institute's conservation laboratories provide a modern and pleasant learning environment, while the Wolfson Archaeological Science Laboratories provide excellent facilities for the examination and analysis of a wide variety of archaeological materials.

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The MSc in Architectural Conservation is a taught course aimed at professionals and academics world-wide with an interest in architectural heritage including architects, engineers, archaeologists, art historians, geographers and surveyors. Read more
The MSc in Architectural Conservation is a taught course aimed at professionals and academics world-wide with an interest in architectural heritage including architects, engineers, archaeologists, art historians, geographers and surveyors.

This course is fully recognised by The Institute of Historic Building Conservation (IHBC). The course provides both a thorough understanding of architectural heritage and the skills required to contribute to the preservation and development of historic sites. Benefiting from its location in the historic town of Canterbury, the programme combines the study of conservation theory and philosophy with an exploration of the technical aspects of repair and reconstruction. The city’s stunning Cathedral provides students with an education resource, giving them the opportunity to learn from the conservation of a World Heritage Site.

Open to students and professionals with an interest in architectural heritage, the course represents an ideal gateway to a career in demanding professional fields, such as conservation-oriented architectural practice, conservation consultancy and heritage management. As the future leaders in these fields, the course’s graduates are expected to play a central role in disciplines that lie at the centre of the current economic, environmental and social agendas.

This programme is offered jointly within two faculties, Humanities and Sciences.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/362/architectural-conservation

About Kent School of Architecture

Research at Kent School of Architecture achieves excellence in both the history and theory of architecture and in sustainable urban, peri-urban and environmental design. School staff have design expertise and specialist knowledge; they are at the forefront of current architectural issues, including sustainability, technology, professional practice and research. Our staff are active at academic and professional conferences, both nationally and internationally, and appear and publish in local and national media. The School promotes innovative and interdisciplinary research, emphasising sustainable design.

Much of the project work involved in the Kent School of Architecture is located on 'live' sites in the local region, using real clients and engaging challenging issues. Students in all stages of the school have been introduced to real urban and architectural design challenges in Lille, Margate, Folkestone, Dover, Rye, Chatham and, of course, Canterbury. Much of this work involves liaising with external bodies, such as architects, planners, council and development groups.

Course structure

The MSc is composed of four taught modules (two modules per term full-time, one module per term part-time) and a dissertation on the topic of your own choice.

The programme has a varied curriculum which reflects the multidisciplinary nature of conservation. The autumn term cultivates a critical understanding of historic buildings and provides an introduction to conservation philosophy and policy. The acquisition of a strong theoretical background is the basis for the study of practical techniques for the survey and preservation of architectural heritage.

Case studies and workshops carried out in collaboration with Canterbury Cathedral introduce you to the properties of historic building materials and the techniques employed in the repair of historic buildings. This aspect of the programme benefits from cutting-edge survey equipment and the use of conservation laboratories. A conservation project offers you the opportunity to design an intervention to an existing historic site in the historic centre of Canterbury. The dissertation that concludes the programme invites you to study an aspect of the conservation cycle of your choice, employing a high standard of scholarship.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

AR841 - Structural Appraisal of Historic Buildings (30 credits)
AR842 - The Legislative Framework (30 credits)
AR843 - Intervention at Historic Buildings (30 credits)
AR844 - Conservation Principles (30 credits)
AR898 - Dissertation: MSc in Architectural Conservation (60 credits)

Assessment

Assessment is mostly through coursework, with essays, reports, projects and the dissertation.

Programme aims

The programme aims to:

- ensure you are equipped with academic, professional, and personal skills and qualities that enable you to make a positive contribution related to the preservation of historic buildings.

- cultivate an appreciation of the different values that people can attach to historic buildings and places.

- promote an awareness of traditional building crafts as a valuable cultural resource.

- develop a thorough understanding of the processes that maintain and enhance historic places and the activities that change them.

- develop knowledge of the theoretical, historical, and professional context of architectural conservation.

- promote multidisciplinary collaboration and interaction with a wide range of professional bodies and individuals who have a role to play in the development of the built environment.

- ensure graduates develop the knowledge and confidence necessary to provide informed and specialist advice and to cultivate an awareness of their responsibility as consultants in the field of architectural conservation.

- understand the role that architectural conservation has to play as part of the modern ecological agenda.

- encourage the observation of the historic environment as a whole and its use as an educational resource.

- provide teaching informed by research and scholarship.

- develop an understanding of how the boundaries of knowledge are advanced through research.

- enable you to develop strategies for self-improvement and commitment to research and learning.

- build on close ties within Europe and elsewhere, reflecting Kent’s position as the UK’s European university.

- promote the understanding and preservation of local and national architectural heritage.

Careers

Our Master’s programmes have been devised to enhance your prospects in a competitive world. Professionals in the architectural, planning, environmental design and conservation fields who develop higher-level skills, accredited by relevant bodies, will find themselves well-placed to progress in their field. Our students have gone on to work for major public agencies and universities, as well as leading practitioners in the private sector.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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There are two routes through the MA. -The Cultural Heritage Research route which concludes with a dissertation. -The Professional Practice Route which concludes with an analytical case study report. Read more
There are two routes through the MA:
-The Cultural Heritage Research route which concludes with a dissertation.
-The Professional Practice Route which concludes with an analytical case study report.

Course modules

Cultural Heritage, Communities and Identities:
This module will explore the conceptual, intellectual and philosophical frameworks for tangible and intangible cultural heritages. Students will explore the social roles of cultural heritage in relation to community, identity and memory and examine the political, legal and economic context in which heritage institutions exist. Heritage will be debated in the context of conservation, tourism and sustainability.
Managing Cultural Heritage in Context (double unit running through two terms):
This module will draw on case studies and seminars from international heritage organisations including World Heritage Sites. Students will participate in student-led seminars in which each student will develop a case study including consideration of education and outreach in cultural heritage. It includes management of cultural heritage including strategic planning, financial management, people, collection and site management and disaster preparedness. A project-based placement (or equivalent) provides a professional practice element.
Dissertation or Analytical Case Study Report:
The programme concludes with a choice of modules. Students wanting to work in the profession may choose to prepare detailed and fully justified analytical case study report in a country or site of their choice. Students wishing to continue to explore theoretical issues in this complex subject or plan to pursue a career in other contexts, including taking a higher level degree, may choose the Dissertation module

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The MA Conservation of Cultural Heritage is a hands-on programme, taught by experts in the field, giving you the opportunity to develop a wide range of advanced conservation skills in preparation for a career in the heritage sector. Read more
The MA Conservation of Cultural Heritage is a hands-on programme, taught by experts in the field, giving you the opportunity to develop a wide range of advanced conservation skills in preparation for a career in the heritage sector.

The University of Lincoln aims to provide an ideal environment in which to advance your knowledge and conservation skills at postgraduate level.

You will have access to a wide variety of historic materials and can choose to focus on remedial treatment, preventive conservation or collections management.

For those already working in conservation, a blended learning option allows submission of practical projects derived from your current place of employment.

The School of History & Heritage has strong links with museums, professional bodies and agencies in the heritage field, which can provide opportunities for placements and study abroad.

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Still accepting applications for 2016/17. The Postgraduate Diploma brings together practical, theoretical, scientific and technical studies into a unified approach to the treatment and preservation of furniture and related objects. Read more
Still accepting applications for 2016/17

The Postgraduate Diploma brings together practical, theoretical, scientific and technical studies into a unified approach to the treatment and preservation of furniture and related objects. Further develop your specialist craft and conservation skills. Evaluate methodologies, critique and propose new hypothesis. Plan and implement technically complex projects. Completion of the first component of the course can serve as a pathway onto the MA Conservation Studies.

::You can expect::

- To develop excellent practical skills through object-based treatments
- To work on technically complex projects
- To study preventative conservation
- To work on live historic projects

::Learning environment::

- High tutor: student ratio
- Workshop access 7am-10pm, 7 days a week
- Interdisciplinary environment
- Teaches students to understand and apply Icon's Professional Standards in Conservation
- Visits from specialists from the heritage and private sectors
- Visits to museums and active links with heritage bodies

Programme Aims

The aims of the programme are to provide:

Practical:

1. A context for the analysis, assessment and treatment of historical furniture and related objects

2. The opportunity to further develop existing specialist craft and conservation skills

3. A research environment for the development and public dissemination of innovative
approaches to the conservation of furniture and related objects

::Theoretical::

1. The opportunity to contribute to the development of historical, cultural and contextual
understanding of furniture through primary research and investigation

2. The opportunity to evaluate methodologies, develop critiques and propose new hypotheses

3. A context for individual inquiry and informed debate across conservation specialisms

::Professional::

1. A context for the development of a range of verbal, written and visual skills appropriate for the
communication and documentation of conservation projects and research

2. A context for the development of, and critical reflection upon, personal and professional codes
of practice

3. Opportunities to plan and implement a range of projects that are increasingly technically
complex, and which present challenges of a compound nature

Careers

From the Postgraduate Diploma students usually progress to MA Conservation Studies - https://www.westdean.org.uk/study/school-of-conservation

Graduates go on to work as conservators with public and private collections within the heritage sector nationally and internationally, with conservation businesses or as independent conservators, furniture-makers, designers or restorers.

Facilities

You will work in our specialist Furniture workshop and have access to an analytical laboratory. Collaboration with other conservation specialisms makes for a uniquely enriched learning environment.

The on-site Art and Conservation Library puts thousands of specialist books and journals within your reach and you can access specialist databases in the IT suite.

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