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Masters Degrees (Cultural Heritage)

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This MA covers practical and theoretical approaches to the key issues and working practices in the field of cultural heritage. Read more
This MA covers practical and theoretical approaches to the key issues and working practices in the field of cultural heritage. Students benefit from the Institute of Archaeology's emphasis on the role of heritage in today's society, from the art and archaeology collections of UCL, and from the unrivalled resources of London's museums.

Degree information

Students are introduced to theoretical issues involved in cultural heritage and develop a critical understanding of the social and political context in which the processes for managing cultural heritage operate. The flexible programme structure allows students to design a theoretically based or practically based degree depending on each individual's needs and interests.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two core module (30 credits), optional modules (60 credits), an optional work placement and a research dissertation (90 credits).

Core modules - students are required to take the following core modules:
-Critical Perspectives on Cultural Heritage
-Cultural Heritage, Globalisation and Development

Optional modules - students then choose to follow futher option choices to the value of 60 credits. At least 30 credits must be taken from the list below. The remaining 30 credits may also come from this list or can be chosen from the outstanding range of Master's option choices offered by the UCL Institute of Archaeology.
-Antiquities and the Law
-Archaeology and Education
-Archaeologies of Modern Conflict
-Art: Interpretation and Explanation
-Beyond Chiefdoms: Archaeologies of African Political Traditions
-Cultural Memory
-Funerary Archaeology
-Intangible Dimensions of Museum Objects from Egypt
-Managing Archaeological Sites
-Managing Museums
-Museum and Site Interpretation

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 15,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, practical demonstrations, site visits and guest lectures, and includes a 20-day placement in a museum or other cultural heritage organisation. Assessment is through essays, projects reports, a heritage agency report following the placement, and the dissertation.

Placement
Students have the option to do a 20-day voluntary placement in a museum or other cultural heritage organisation. In recent years, these placements have included organisations such as English Heritage, The National Trust, Historic Royal Palaces, ICOMOS (Paris), World Monuments Fund (Paris), UNESCO World Heritage Centre (Paris) and the Museum of London. The placement is not formally assessed.

Careers

Recent graduates of this programme have gone on to work in policy areas and project areas for national and international organisations, such as English Heritage, the National Trust, ICOMOS and UNESCO. They have also worked in development control, consultancies (such as Atkins Global), and in museums, site interpretation and education. Many students have also gone on to further research in academic institutions around the world, such as Stanford, Athens and Leiden, or here at UCL.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Adult Learning officer, Museum of London
-Garden of Reason Assistant, Ham House and Garden
-Museum Curator, Haysrim Museum
-Researcher, Museo Nacional de Colombia (Colombian National Museum)
-Art and Finance, Sotheby's Institute of Arts, London

Employability
Graduates have a critical understanding of both the theoretical and operational aspects of heritage and its use of the past to enrich the present for the public. The interdisciplinary nature of cultural heritage studies leads to creativity and initiative. Graduates are highly motivated and articulate. They have an acute awareness of the moral and ethical issues that are inherent in cultural heritage which contributes to skilful negotiation of contested matters. These abilities are valued by employers and heritage agencies and contribute to innovative exhibitions, educational activities, public programming and policy and strategy development. The breadth of the degree widens the spectrum of employment opportunities.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Institute of Archaeology is the largest and most diverse department of archaeology in the UK, and provides a stimulating environment for postgraduate study.

We are international in outlook and membership, with students and staff from over 40 countries, and involvement in field research projects around the globe.

UCL is located in central London, within walking distance of the British Museum and the British Library. The institute's outstanding archaeological library is complemented by UCL's main library, University of London Senate House and other specialist libraries.

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The aims of the programme are. 1. To support students in the development of their intellectual and practical skills through the study and interpretation of cultural heritage artefacts, their historic societal significance and relationship with the landscape and the wider environment in the past and the present. Read more

AIM

The aims of the programme are:

1. To support students in the development of their intellectual and practical skills through the study and interpretation of cultural heritage artefacts, their historic societal significance and relationship with the landscape and the wider environment in the past and the present.

2. To demonstrate how geo-spatial technologies and techniques (including GIS, scanning and digitisation) play a central role in the recording, analysis, interpretation and management of cultural heritage across a range of scales from excavated items, archaeological sites, and paper records to historic buildings, monuments and their landscapes.

WHY QUEEN'S?

In the new programme the internationally recognised expertise within GAP with regard to the development and application of digitisation and scanning technologies will be more fully used and integrated into the student learning experience.

The integration of these skills with wider academic expertise in Archaeology and the Centre for Archaeological Fieldwork (CAF), and Geography and the Centre for Data Digitisation and Analysis (CDDA) will create a unique 'heritage' focused programme in which students will experience heritage in its widest context and will have the opportunity to acquire and practice a wide range of geo-spatial skills and explore the conceptual issues associated with their application.

PROGRAMME CONTENT

MSc: successfully complete the five taught modules (120 CATS) and undertake independent research for the dissertation (60 CATS).

PgDip: successfully complete the same five taught modules but do not take the dissertation module.

PgCert: successfully complete the two Semester 1 modules.

Semester 1
GIS Technologies: Application and Practice (30 credits)
Introduction to Cultural Heritage and GIS (30 credits)

Semester 2
Heritage Structures (20 credits)
Heritage Landscapes (20 credits)
Professional Practice Placement (20 credits)

Semester 3
Dissertation (60 credits)

LEARNING AND TEACHING

One of the modules included in the Cultural Heritage and GIS programme includes a residential field course (between 5-10 days).

CAREER PROSPECTS

The market for those with a qualification in Cultural Heritage and GIS can be defined as:

professionals who are involved in providing scientific understanding in the support of heritage protection
professionals engaged in dealing with the digital documentation and portrayal of heritage structures and landscapes
professionals seeking a targeted training in the use of digital data handling, especially through the application of GIS
those wishing to develop a career in cultural heritage conservation and/or management;
those already employed in cultural heritage management who require the updating of qualifications, or the improvement of existing ones, in order to reflect new developments in technology and thinking.

Queen's postgraduates reap exceptional benefits. Unique initiatives, such as Degree Plus and Researcher Plus bolster our commitment to employability, while innovative leadership and executive programmes alongside sterling integration with business experts helps our students gain key leadership positions both nationally and internationally.

ASSESSMENT & FEEDBACK

Teaching is achieved through various combinations of lectures, seminars, practical classes and fieldwork and is supported by intensive self-guided independent learning. All assessment is coursework based and will be individually undertaken. The dissertation submission is an independent piece of research undertaken by each student under the supervision of an academic member of staff. Both formative and summative feedback will be given through, as appropriate, oral and written means. The pass mark for all assessments is 50 per cent. Students must obtain an overall 50 per cent pass mark for this taught programme (five modules) before progression from the PG Diploma to Masters.

VISIT US

Visit Queen's to sense the atmosphere of our historic campus, tour our world-class facilities, and experience for yourself the exceptional learning environment we provide. Find out when our next Open Days are, or arrange a guided tour to suit you.

HOW TO APPLY

Applications for admission to the vast majority of postgraduate programmes are submitted online via the Postgraduate Direct Applications Portal. The online system also allows application for funding where appropriate.

If you have queries on course content please contact the school representative below.

Dr Paul Ell
School of Geography, Archaeology and Palaeoecology
Tel: 9097 3186
Email:
WWW: http://www.qub.ac.uk/gap

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There are two routes through the MA. -The Cultural Heritage Research route which concludes with a dissertation. -The Professional Practice Route which concludes with an analytical case study report. Read more
There are two routes through the MA:
-The Cultural Heritage Research route which concludes with a dissertation.
-The Professional Practice Route which concludes with an analytical case study report.

Course modules

Cultural Heritage, Communities and Identities:
This module will explore the conceptual, intellectual and philosophical frameworks for tangible and intangible cultural heritages. Students will explore the social roles of cultural heritage in relation to community, identity and memory and examine the political, legal and economic context in which heritage institutions exist. Heritage will be debated in the context of conservation, tourism and sustainability.
Managing Cultural Heritage in Context (double unit running through two terms):
This module will draw on case studies and seminars from international heritage organisations including World Heritage Sites. Students will participate in student-led seminars in which each student will develop a case study including consideration of education and outreach in cultural heritage. It includes management of cultural heritage including strategic planning, financial management, people, collection and site management and disaster preparedness. A project-based placement (or equivalent) provides a professional practice element.
Dissertation or Analytical Case Study Report:
The programme concludes with a choice of modules. Students wanting to work in the profession may choose to prepare detailed and fully justified analytical case study report in a country or site of their choice. Students wishing to continue to explore theoretical issues in this complex subject or plan to pursue a career in other contexts, including taking a higher level degree, may choose the Dissertation module

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The Cultural Heritage Studies program offers an interdepartmental and interdisciplinary MA program intended to educate individuals who wish to become heritage experts and practitioners. Read more

Course Description

The Cultural Heritage Studies program offers an interdepartmental and interdisciplinary MA program intended to educate individuals who wish to become heritage experts and practitioners. It is focused on developing aptitudes for the critical assessment of tangible and intangible cultural heritage as well as environmental heritage connected to human-nature interactions.

The program presents a variety of theoretical and methodological approaches with a strong emphasis on practical knowledge and skills. It offers two streams: Academic Research and Protection of Cultural Heritage and Cultural Heritage Management and Policy.
The program attracts students from a variety of related fields such as history, art history and management, archaeology, ethnography, anthropology, architecture, landscape design, monument protection, environmental science, and management studies.

DEPARTMENT OF MEDIEVAL STUDIES

The department provides intellectually challenging comparative and multidisciplinary postgraduate education on all aspects of the history and culture of the period between 300 and 1600 C.E. International faculty members cover Central and Western Europe as well as the Byzantine, Slavic, Jewish, Arab, and Ottoman worlds.

CAREER PATH

Graduates find employment in education and research, cultural institutions including museums and archives, as well as business and international organizations. Master’s students often continue their studies on the doctoral level at CEU and other international universities.

SCHOLARSHIPS

CEU is committed to attracting talented students and scholars from around the world. In 2014-2015, we provided generous funding to 80% of master’s and 92% of doctoral students, for which applicants from any country are eligible to apply.

For more information, see the contact information page: http://bit.ly/2iVly1w

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Learn the theory and practice of managing cultural heritage, including landscapes, historic houses, museums and archaeological sites. Read more
Learn the theory and practice of managing cultural heritage, including landscapes, historic houses, museums and archaeological sites. The course is specially tailored to respond to the local and international need for qualified, responsible and adaptable cultural heritage professionals, so you can be sure that your time with us will be a great investment in your ongoing career.

The course will also prepare you for more advanced research into the global and local problems and issues surrounding the management of cultural heritage, whilst also providing you with practical experience. You will graduate with the highly developed conceptual and analytical skills needed to succeed in this fascinating field.

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The management of museums, monuments and cultural heritage requires professionals to have specific knowledge related to the conservation, documentation, exhibition and dissemination of museum collections and cultural heritage. Read more
The management of museums, monuments and cultural heritage requires professionals to have specific knowledge related to the conservation, documentation, exhibition and dissemination of museum collections and cultural heritage. However, along with this, it is also essential that professionals are familiar with cultural management work processes: administering financial resources, designing and programming projects, marketing and communication strategies as well as the legal issues related to museums, heritage and intellectual property.

Cultural managers who are specialised in museums and cultural heritage should identify the potential of their heritage-related resources and combine this, on the one hand, with the needs and background of the potential audience, and, on the other hand, with the human and financial resources available to them, with the aim of designing policies and dissemination programmes for heritage which contribute to the cultural, social and economic development of the community which they find themselves in.

This programme is taught in Spanish.

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The Ironbridge International Institute for Cultural Heritage (IIICH), based at the University of Birmingham, takes a cross-disciplinary approach to the study of heritage. Read more
The Ironbridge International Institute for Cultural Heritage (IIICH), based at the University of Birmingham, takes a cross-disciplinary approach to the study of heritage.

The IIICH draws on a global network of researchers and practitioners, as well as its long established links with the Ironbridge Gorge World Heritage Site and one of the World’s largest independent museums run by the Ironbridge Gorge Museum Trust.

We offer promising candidates the opportunity to carry out research in all aspects of cultural heritage, heritage management and related areas and welcome ideas for research which are innovative, challenging and which push at the boundaries of the cultural heritage field.

Our research degrees require you to prepare a dissertation on a topic of your choice of up to 40,000 words for the MA or 80,000 words for the PhD, under expert supervision.

Distance learning

You can study an MA by Research or PhD programme on campus or by distance learning. Please note that if you are studying with us by distance learning, the programme includes a fully-funded annual visit to campus for each full year of your programme (every two years for part-time students).

Researchers are normally supervised by teams of two academic staff of the Institute but we are able to call upon a wide-range of University staff expertise and external advisors in order to provide the best possible support. In addition, a full programme of research training is provided through our College Graduate School.

About the School of History and Culture

The programmes in the School of History and Cultures offer students enquiry based learning within a rich and diverse environment to stimulate debate and challenge conventional thinking.
The programmes derive from departments which are all excellently rated by the QAA both in teaching and research terms (Medieval History 5, Modern History 5 and African Studies 5*). Our staff publish widely, and we are developing and consolidating a strong, supportive research culture in the School.
We are extremely proud to announce in June 2016, that History at Birmingham was ranked the top research department in the country by the Research Excellence Framework (REF). The national REF exercise assessed research publications and the public impact of research carried out in all universities in the UK between 2008-2014. Our department had an impressive 45% of its research judged to be ‘world-leading’.

Funding and Scholarships

There are many ways to finance your postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. To see what funding and scholarships are available, please visit: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/funding

Open Days

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open days.
Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/visit

Virtual Open Days

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

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Are you fascinated by history and culture? Want to help shape today's cultural landscape? Find out what defines “heritage”? Learn how museums plan exhibitions or how heritage policies are created?. Read more
Are you fascinated by history and culture? Want to help shape today's cultural landscape? Find out what defines “heritage”? Learn how museums plan exhibitions or how heritage policies are created?

Memory produces identity. That is why heritage is crucial for our sense of continuity in rapidly changing societies.Governments, national and international organizations need to make sense of the past as they make policies for and invest in heritage. The aim of this master's degree is to give you the theoretical and practical education necessary to take an active role in this exciting and growing field.

Why study heritage at a faculty of Theology and Religious Studies? Because most of the heritage around us stems, one way or another, from religious practices and ideas. If you want to understand heritage in all its facets, you want to study with experts who know the full story behind material and intangible heritages both locally and abroad.

The track Religion and Cultural Heritage in the Master's Programme in Theology and Religious Studies combines broad cultural competence with a high-level academic research training and the practical skills relevant for today's job market. Through concrete projects and internships, you can gain hands-on experience in the field.

Why Groningen?

• rated best Master's programme in Theology & Religious Studies in the Netherlands
• top 100 university
• unique focus on religion within the field of cultural heritage
• combination of broad cultural competence and academic research skills with practical skills relevant for job market;
• strong heritage region
• excellent network for internships
• taught by internationally recognized experts in the field
• vibrant research hub with global links

Job perspectives

You can advise or write policy documents on heritage subjects, such as the preservation of old churches or the distribution of funding for cultural activities. You could work for cultural organisations, the government, in the tourist business or at an NGO. You may also work in the media or as a teacher of religion in secondary education after completing your Educational Master's programme.

Would you like to stay in academia, you can choose to apply for a placement in the Research Master.

Job examples

• Cultural Education
You can work within organizations that consult upon the content and organization within the field of arts and cultural education. Or you could work at an educational department within institutions such as a cultural centers or museums.

• Consulting & Policy
Your knowledge about religious heritage will enable you to advise upon or write policy documents on the conservation of religious heritage. You could find a job with central government but also at organizations and foundations in the cultural sector. This could, for example, be the Museum Catharijneconvent in Utrecht or the Stichting Oude Groninger Kerken.

• Education
Once you have completed this Master's track, you will have sufficient knowledge of the subject to be able to teach Religious Studies or Social Studies in secondary education. Alternatively, you could opt for a position in higher vocational education. As you also need didactic skills as a teacher or lecturer, it is advisable to do a Master's in Education after you have completed your regular Master's programme.

• Media & Journalism
A number of publishers have shown renewed interest in religion and society. With your knowledge and skills, you can make an expert contribution to publications in this field. You could also use your expertise as an editor at a broadcasting company, newspaper or current affairs magazine.

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These programmes of study are designed for students who have a passion to pursue a conservation or heritage based research project defined by themselves, but with the support of an academic environment and supervisors. Read more
These programmes of study are designed for students who have a passion to pursue a conservation or heritage based research project defined by themselves, but with the support of an academic environment and supervisors.

As a research student, you will have access to support and training designed to develop the practical and critical skills necessary for investigation and study at doctoral level. Direction will be available from a supervisory team and you will have the opportunity to benefit from the School’s research expertise in a broad range of conservation and cultural heritage areas.

Strong links exist with the Colleges of Science and Arts, and an interdisciplinary research culture can facilitate collaboration with colleagues across a wide range of topics.

Current doctoral research topics include:
-How can architectural paint research and analysis enhance the conservation-restoration and historiography of cultural built heritage in the UK?
-Regarding mediocrity: conservation, interpretation and presentation of the Doddington Hall tapestries.
-Biodeterioration of limestone: role of microbial biofilms and possible intervention strategies (in collaboration with Dr Ronald Dixon, School of Life Sciences).
-Nineteenth-Century Amateur Art in Places of Christian Worship.
-Tennyson and the Archive.
-David Brewster and the Development of the Kaleidoscope.
-The Life and Work of William Logsdail.

Research Areas, Projects & Topics

Research areas covered within the School include:
-Archaeological conservation
-Architectural paint research
-Collections Management
-Conservation of a broad range of objects and material types
-Cultural heritage and climate change
-Material culture
-Paint and pigment analysis
-Preventive conservation

Previous areas of PhD study include:
-The Materials, Construction and Conservation of Eighteenth-Century Women’s Shoes.
-A Practical and Historical Examination of Jacob Christian Schaffer (1718-1790) and his Search for Non-rag Paper.
-An Analysis of the Success and Cultural Significance of Parian Ware Sculpture in Victorian England.
-'Curatorship and Conservation: A Theoretical Enquiry into the Scope of Each Realm, their Interaction and the Consequences for the Perception of Works of Art'.
-The History, Development and Conservation of Wrought Iron in Lincolnshire; the Significance of Minor Architectural Details.

How You Study

Study at MPhil/PhD level takes the form of supervised individual research. You are expected to work on one topic of your choice for the duration of the study period. On a regular basis, you are expected to produce appropriate written work, submit it to your supervisors, then meet with your supervisors to receive feedback on your submission and agree the next stage of work.

Due to the nature of postgraduate research programmes, the vast majority of your time will be spent in independent study and research. You will have meetings with your academic supervisor, however the regularity of these will vary depending on your own individual requirements, subject area, staff availability and the stage of your programme.

How You Are Assessed

The assessment at PhD level takes the form of an approximately 80,000 word thesis.

A PhD is awarded based on the quality of your thesis and your ability in an oral examination (viva voce) to present and successfully defend your chosen research topic to a group of academics. You are also expected to demonstrate how your research findings have contributed to knowledge or developed existing theory or understanding.

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The Master’s degree Programme prepares experts (conservation scientists) in the diagnostic and conservation of cultural heritage, providing solid interdisciplinary scientific training that combines chemistry, physics, biology, computer science and geology with innovative technologies for storage of artifacts. Read more
The Master’s degree Programme prepares experts (conservation scientists) in the diagnostic and conservation of cultural heritage, providing solid interdisciplinary scientific training that combines chemistry, physics, biology, computer science and geology with innovative technologies for storage of artifacts. The training course is designed to prepare a professional figure able to interact with experts in other disciplines involved in the process of the protection and conservation of cultural assets, acting as a technical and scientific reference.

The graduate will be able to design and test new technologies for restoration work, to develop projects for prevention of damage and maintenance of cultural heritage and to run diagnostic tests for the characterization of artifacts.

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Essential preparation for successful heritage careers. The cultural heritage sector offers a wide range of exciting opportunities in museums, local authorities and heritage agencies, organisations and consultancies. Read more
Essential preparation for successful heritage careers

Why choose this course?

The cultural heritage sector offers a wide range of exciting opportunities in museums, local authorities and heritage agencies, organisations and consultancies. This course offers essential training for professional roles throughout the sector.
-Understand all aspects of heritage management theory and practice.
-Gain practical work experience in the heritage sector.
-Develop knowledge and skills essential for today’s heritage-sector careers.
-Study in the heritage capital of Britain – see heritage-management in action.
-Access state-of-the-art facilities, including laboratories, archives and libraries.
-Use the latest techniques and equipment to build key practical skills.
-Receive heritage careers advice from staff with significant experience of recruiting within the sector.

York is one of the best places to study Archaeology, Heritage or Conservation. The Department has an excellent reputation and is one of the largest Archaeology teaching centres in the UK. The historic City of York is rich in architectural and archaeological treasures and resources which you will have easy access to during your studies.

What does the course cover?

Through a combination of academic studies, practical training, work placements and research projects, this course provides a thorough grounding in all aspects of heritage management theory and practice. You will address key issues such as:
-Why does the past matter and to whom?
-Who decides what constitutes heritage and what should be done with it?
-How should we present the past to the public?

The course focuses on providing you with highly valued and transferrable practical skills, knowledge and experience.

Who is it for?

This is a general programme of study, exploring the multi-disciplinary nature of the heritage environment. It is therefore suitable not just for students of Archaeology or History, but for anyone who wishes to pursue a career in the heritage sector. Recent students have included those with backgrounds in History, English, History of Art, Politics and Environmental Sciences.

What can it lead to?

The course places strong emphasis on employability. In recent years, and in spite of the economic downturn, it has successfully launched many students into heritage careers with organisations ranging from the National Trust, English Heritage and the Council for British Archaeology to museums, councils, heritage consultancies, and even travel book publishers.

Placement

The work placements provide a valuable opportunity to gain practical experience of working in the professional heritage sector. The two placements will draw on and contribute to the knowledge and experience you have gained on your taught courses, while enabling you to develop new insights, understanding and expertise in heritage management that will be extremely valuable in future employment.

Aims
-To provide students with experience of heritage management in a heritage sector working environment.
-To consolidate students’ knowledge and understanding of heritage-management procedures and issues gained from the taught modules.

Learning outcomes
Upon completing these placements you should have:
-Gained experience and knowledge of the implementation of heritage policy and principles in the workplace/cultural sector, under the guidance of experienced professionals.
-An understanding of the contexts in which heritage policy and principles are applied, and of real-world limitations.
-Developed experience in practical applications, facilitating critical reflection on the theoretical and philosophical issues raised in both core modules.

Careers

The MA in Cultural Heritage Management has a clear focus on employability. At the end of the course you will have:
-Enhanced your skills and knowledge, improving your chances of employment as a heritage practitioner;
-Developed intellectually and personally through direct contact with heritage professionals;
-Gained a critical understanding of the policies and practices underpinning heritage management;
-Developed an understanding of the nature of heritage and its relevance to society; and
-Received guidance on career opportunities across the heritage sector, including where to find jobs and how best to apply for them.

Course postgraduates have gone on to careers in archaeology and heritage-related organisations across the UK and abroad, including:
-English Heritage
-The National Trust
-York Archaeological Trust
-The Council for British Archaeology
-Highland Council
-Yorkshire Museums Trust
-Heritage consultancies
-The Science Museum Group
-The Royal Mint Museum
-Heritage Malta
-New South Wales Government

Others have used the skills gained to pursue careers in other sectors, including:
-Local government and development
-Chartered surveying
-Computing and IT services
-Business and administration
-Marketing and public relations
-Education
-Civil service, law and police authorities
-Accountancy and financial services
-Others have gone on to take PhDs at York, Stanford (USA) and other universities.

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This innovative course, taught jointly between the Management School and the Department of Archaeology, is the first of its kind in the UK. Read more

About the course

This innovative course, taught jointly between the Management School and the Department of Archaeology, is the first of its kind in the UK. This course combines the strengths of both departments, whilst actively forging close links with the heritage sector within our region, nationally and overseas. These links with industry form an integral feature of your studies, providing you with the opportunity to apply the principles you learn to real world situations.

Your future

Each of our masters courses is designed to equip you with valuable employment skills and prepare you for your future career. If you’re seeking to move into an archaeology-related field from a different academic or employment background, our courses and supportive staff will help you to realise your ambitions and develop professionally.

Graduates from our MA and MSc courses successfully compete for some of the most sought-after archaeological posts in the world. Our courses help students to develop essential transferable skills, and upon graduation they are also in demand by a wide variety of employers outside of the sector.Many of our graduates decide to continue their studies, carrying out doctoral research in their chosen specialist field, equipped with a solid theoretical and practical grounding from which to develop their research.

World-leading expertise

The character and strength of research carried out by Sheffield’s Archaeology department is captured under the following broad themes. These reflect the range of our research and its cross-disciplinary, embedded nature:

Funerary Archaeology
Landscape Archaeology
Bioarchaeology
Medieval Archaeology
Cultural Materials
Mediterranean Archaeology

Specialist facilities

The Archaeology department is situated on the edge of the main campus, near to Sheffield’s city centre. The department houses world-class reference collections and facilities to support teaching, learning and research in a range of archaeological disciplines. Facilities include specialist lab space dedicated to teaching and research, dedicated study spaces, and a student common room.

Fieldwork opportunities

We offer you the opportunity to get involved in our research projects in the UK, Europe and further afield.

How we will teach and assess you

Our students come from all around the world and the content of our courses reflects this. You can expect a balanced timetable of lectures, seminars and practicals. Many of our masters courses also include a fieldwork or project work component. Our teaching staff are leading scholars in their field. Through their research and field projects they are active in generating new knowledge that feeds directly into their teaching.

Funding, scholarships and bursaries

If you accept a place on one of our courses, you may be eligible to apply for WRoCAH and University of Sheffield studentships. There are also a number of departmental and programme-specific scholarships available each year. See our website for details.

Core modules

Heritage, History and Identity; Heritage, Place and Community; Research Design: Planning, Execution and Presentation; Introduction to the Creative and Cultural Industries; Cultural Marketing; Managing Museums and Cultural Heritage Sites; Dissertation.

Indicative optional modules

Landscapes in Archaeology: methods and perspectives; Accounting and Financial Management; Fundraising Management: sponsorship, philanthropy and the state; Critical Theories and Concepts in the Cultural and Creative Industries; Managing Creative Brands.

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The MA Conservation of Cultural Heritage is a hands-on programme, taught by experts in the field, giving you the opportunity to develop a wide range of advanced conservation skills in preparation for a career in the heritage sector. Read more
The MA Conservation of Cultural Heritage is a hands-on programme, taught by experts in the field, giving you the opportunity to develop a wide range of advanced conservation skills in preparation for a career in the heritage sector.

The University of Lincoln aims to provide an ideal environment in which to advance your knowledge and conservation skills at postgraduate level.

You will have access to a wide variety of historic materials and can choose to focus on remedial treatment, preventive conservation or collections management.

For those already working in conservation, a blended learning option allows submission of practical projects derived from your current place of employment.

The School of History & Heritage has strong links with museums, professional bodies and agencies in the heritage field, which can provide opportunities for placements and study abroad.

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Digital Humanities is a fast and growing interdisciplinary field at the cutting edge of 21st century research methods. It aligns traditional Humanities-based research with modern data-intensive computational methodologies to produce exciting new research avenues and questions in traditional fields of expertise. Read more

Overview

Digital Humanities is a fast and growing interdisciplinary field at the cutting edge of 21st century research methods. It aligns traditional Humanities-based research with modern data-intensive computational methodologies to produce exciting new research avenues and questions in traditional fields of expertise. The MA degree is transformative in nature and allows graduates from Arts and Humanities, Social Science, as well as Computer Science backgrounds, to enhance and complement their existing research skills with modern digital methods vital for the cultural heritage and information sectors. It is also excellent preparation for those wishing to pursue a computationally-enabled PhD in the arts and humanities, digital preservation, or digital cultural heritage.

Students have opportunities to:

Use State-of-the-art equipment to digitise, analyse and 3D print cultural heritage objects.
Explore alternative methods, theories, and technologies for undertaking a range of digitally-enabled cultural heritage projects and research
Get real-life experience through an internship in a cultural heritage institution or collaborating on a Digital Humanities project.
Be actively involved in our Digital Humanities projects, such as the Letters 1916, the first crowdsourcing project in Ireland, and Contested Memories, a computer graphic simulation of The Battle of Mount Street Bridge.
Create virtual worlds and get an expertise in computer graphics for cultural heritage.
Learn programming and markup languages used widely in the field
Get experience in encoding historical or literary sources and literature in the creation of Digital Scholarly Editions.
The course is delivered in our state-of-the-art facility in An Foras Feasa (Iontas Building, North Campus), which includes the MakersLab for Computational Imaging and 3D Printing projects, the Digital Humanities Lab with high-end desktop computers for computer graphics and image processing, and the Green Screen Studio for audio-visual recording.

A number of funding options are available including two An Foras Feasa Taught Masters Bursaries, the University wide Taught Masters Scholarships and the Maynooth University Taught Masters Alumni Scholarships. Further details may be found at: https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/foras-feasa/ma-and-phd-funding

Course Structure

90 ECTS are needed to complete the Masters. The course is comprised of the following elements:

Required Taught Modules: 20 ECTS*

Elective Taught Modules: 40 ECTS

Project and Dissertation: 30 ECTS

*Required modules include Digital Humanities Theory and Practice and Digital Humanities Practicum (10 ECTS each). Both modules are integral to the building of practical and theoretical knowledge of the discipline, its development and its intersection with public projects. The Digital Humanities Practicum module guarantees students a work placement at a cultural heritage institution or on a Digital Humanities project.

Part-time students are advised to register for ‘Digital Humanities Theory and Practice’ in the first semester, while working for the ‘Digital Humanities Practicum’ in the second year of the course.

Elective modules provide students with a variety of skills, methods, and theories. Students may choose to either specialise in a specific area, delving deeply into a specific set of methods, or to take a wider variety of modules hence gaining a broader understanding of the field.

Applicants with little previous programming experience, are advised to register for ‘Structured Programming’: an intensive 3-week 90-hour pre-semester laboratory-based programming course which runs in late August through to early September and counts as one elective module worth 10 ECTS.

The project and dissertation over the last semester of the course and will be individually supervised or co-supervised by an academic from one or both of the contributing departments. Student who wish not to write the final thesis have the opportunity to exit the course with a postgraduate diploma in Digital Humanities.

Career Options

Graduates of the MA in Digital Humanities at Maynooth University are ideally placed to use computational methods in arts and humanities research and research projects. Graduates also take up exciting positions across the areas of museum curating, archiving and public history and heritage projects, while the technical and transferrable skills they develop can also lead them to the Industry and the IT sector.

How To Apply

Online application only http://www.pac.ie/maynoothuniversity

PAC Code
MH50F/MH51F

The following documents should be forwarded to PAC, 1 Courthouse Square, Galway or uploaded to your online application form:

Certified copies of all official transcripts of results for all non-Maynooth University qualifications listed MUST accompany the application. Failure to do so will delay your application being processed. Non-Maynooth University students are asked to provide two academic references and a copy of birth certificate or valid passport.

Find information on Scholarships here https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/study-maynooth/postgraduate-studies/fees-funding-scholarships

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Spatial eHumanities is a truly interdisciplinary programme combining geocomputation, cultural heritage, design, and humanities/arts research. Read more

Overview

Spatial eHumanities is a truly interdisciplinary programme combining geocomputation, cultural heritage, design, and humanities/arts research. It takes an interdisciplinary approach to focus on spatio-temporal concepts, methods, and tools in the development of computational and visual frameworks from which to explore the past and better understand our present.

The MSc in Spatial eHumanities has been jointly designed by An Foras Feasa and the National Centre for Geocomputation to provide both a historical background and theoretical grounding to the field while providing students with solid skills in contemporary digital methods and technologies, including Geographic Information Systems and 3D computer graphics modelling. It is also excellent preparation for those wishing to pursue a computationally-enabled PhD in the arts, humanities, social science, or digital cultural heritage.

Students have opportunities to:

Learn how to use open source and proprietary geographical information systems (GIS) software such as QGIS and ArcGIS;
Become familiar with standards and methods common to digital humanities including XML, TEI, and Dublin Core;
Learn how to create virtual worlds and acquire an expertise in computer graphic design for cultural heritage;
Become actively involved in current Spatial eHumanities projects;
Learn how to encode literary and historical sources, as well as newer sources (such as social media) to identify and visualise spatial and temporal networks and patterns;
Gain practical project-based experience and project management skills by becoming an intern in a cultural heritage institution, a commercial organisation, or a digital spatial project;
Learn programming languages and apply these to spatial and temporal data in the various fields of the arts/humanities, archaeology, and geography.
The course is delivered in our state-of-the-art facilities in An Foras Feasa and National Centre for Geocomputation (Iontas Building, North Campus), which include the MakersLab for Computational Imaging and 3D Printing projects, the Digital Humanities Lab with high-end desktop computers for computer graphics and image processing, the Green Screen Studio for audio-visual recording, and the GIS Lab

Course Structure

90 ECTS are needed to complete the Masters. The course is comprised of the following elements:

Required Taught Modules: 40 ECTS*

Elective Taught Modules: 20 ECTS

Project and Dissertation: 30 ECTS

*Required modules include 1) Mapping and Modelling Space and Time; 2) Intro to Geographical Information Science; 3) Digital Heritage: Theories, Methods and Challenges; 4) Digital Humanities Practicum (10 ECTS each). All modules are integral to the building of practical and theoretical knowledge of the discipline, its development and its intersection with public projects. The Digital Humanities Practicum module guarantees students a work placement at a cultural heritage institution or on a Digital Humanities project.

Part-time students are advised to register for ‘Mapping and Modelling Space and Time’ in the first semester, while working for the ‘Digital Humanities Practicum’ in the second year of the course.

Applicants with little previous programming experience, are advised to register for ‘Structured Programming’, an intensive 3-week 90-hour pre-semester laboratory-based programming course.

Elective Modules in the second semester provide students with specialised skills either on geocomputation or 3D modelling. Students who don’t register for the pre-semester structured programming module can register for both geocomputation and 3D modelling-related modules therefore getting a much broader specialisation in the field of Spatial eHumanities.

The project and dissertation will be undertaken over the last semester of the course and will be individually supervised or co-supervised by an academic from one or both of the contributing departments.

For students who wish not to write a final thesis, this course is also offered as a postgraduate diploma in Spatial eHumanities.

Career Options

This course would be attractive to professionals in the cultural heritage and library sectors to update existing skills to work specifically with spatial data. It would also be attractive to computer scientists wishing to work with new datasets being created by the cultural heritage sector as well as organisations such as Google (e.g. Google Books, Google Cultural Institute, and Google Maps). This MSc would also be attractive to students wishing to go into fields such as GIS and spatial consultancy, government departments that work with spatial data (e.g. Office of Public Works). Potential graduates would also be skilled in areas of content and data analysis and recommender systems in organisations such as TripAdvisor and Amazon.

How To Apply

Online application only http://www.pac.ie/maynoothuniversity

PAC Code
MH56F/MH57F

The following documents should be forwarded to PAC, 1 Courthouse Square, Galway or uploaded to your online application form:

Certified copies of all official transcripts of results for all non-Maynooth University qualifications listed MUST accompany the application. Failure to do so will delay your application being processed. Non-Maynooth University students are asked to provide two academic references and a copy of birth certificate or valid passport.

Find information on Scholarships here https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/study-maynooth/postgraduate-studies/fees-funding-scholarships

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