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Masters Degrees (Cultural Development)

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The MSc in Human Resource Development (International Development) enables you to critically understand the role of human resource development (HRD) in enhancing performance within your own institutions and societies. Read more
The MSc in Human Resource Development (International Development) enables you to critically understand the role of human resource development (HRD) in enhancing performance within your own institutions and societies. Emphasis is placed on how HRD can support economic and social advancement by improving public services, and in building capabilities within individuals, organisations and communities to effectively cope with social change. The programme aims to develop students' critical appreciation of globalisation processes, policy initiatives and development management plans to support skills development, competitiveness and human capabilities, including development issues associated with eradicating gender inequalities, fostering human well being and maintaining sustainable livelihoods.

The course aims to develop your professional understanding of HRD strategies and development tools to support skill and knowledge acquisition, and build organization and community capabilities. A focus on developing human knowledge and skills enables you to appreciate how education supports skills development. Students also acquire knowledge of the role of International Organizations (through governments and MNCs) such as the World Bank and the UN in supporting education and development initiatives. There is a strong emphasis on acquiring cross cultural leadership knowledge, relevant for many social change and development projects in the public sector, or in the private sector, MNCs, NGOs or international organizations like the World Bank The objectives are that, by the end of the programme, participants will have:
-Knowledge and understanding of the linkage between international development, education and HRD practices and policies

-Knowledge of how approaches to national human resource development affect organisation and societal performance in developing and transitional economies

-Knowledge and understanding of comparative education policy and governance frameworks, for capacity building, the political economy of skills formation and how national HRD training systems affect organization, industrial and societal development, including gender national planning

-Knowledge of globalisation and cross-cultural factors affecting the application of HRD theories and methods in developing, transitional and newly industrialised countries

-An understanding of HRD and development policies in diverse geographic regions and how they enhance human capabilities and support poverty reduction, empowerment, help eradicate gender inequality and advance human well being especially within transitional and developing country contexts

-A critical understanding of cutting edge international HRD policies including talent management, knowledge management, private sector management and entrepreneurship, corporate social responsibility (CSR), social justice and ethics, social capital, and strategies for managing inequality including gender and other differences

-Knowledge of leadership for development (lead4dev) and different HRD strategies for the building of leadership skills in the workplace/society, especially those from disadvantaged/marginalized groups including the poor and women

-An understanding of how to analyse and design HRD strategies at societal and organisational level, including gender national planning and empowerment

The programme is designed for individuals of any professional background in international organisations, public administration, transnational organisations and private sector companies who are involved in the HRD, leadership and capacity planning aspects of organisations in developing and transitional countries. These may include managers/leaders of HRD/training/learning, HRD and education in government administration; direct trainers, staff of training centres, staff involved in human development planning in governments; HRD and Leadership consultants involved in change projects, change consultants involved in community development; NGO managers and line managers concerned with the development of their staff.

Aims

You will gain:
-Knowledge and understanding of the linkage between international development and HRD practices and policies
-Knowledge of globalisation and cross-cultural actors affecting the application of HRD and education theories and methods in developing, transitional and newly industrialised countries
-Knowledge of education and HRD interventions and their role in building leadership skills and capacity
-Knowledge of how approaches to national human resource development (NHRD) affect organisation and societal performance in developing and transitional economies
-Knowledge of how new approaches to HRD strategies including private sector management and development, social capital, knowledge management, gender planning affect the context for competence and performance enhancement in organisations and societies
-Understanding of how to analyse and design HRD strategies at societal and organisational level
-Understanding of your own learning and leadership skills and how they may be improved

Special features

The course usually includes a field visit to a UK or overseas destination, enabling you to visit public sector organisations, companies and agencies to learn about HRD systems and practices. The cost of the visit is included in the course fee.

Career opportunities

Graduates acquire a range of skills and knowledge valuable in the global economy and relevant for a variety of professional careers in international development. Recent graduates have gained positions including: HRD consultants/managers/directors in Ministries of HRD or Ministries of Education and as NGO Leaders (Middle East, Thailand, Indonesia, Latin America); Knowledge Management Consultants (Middle East, Canada); university HRD and training directors (Middle East, Africa); leadership and capacity development advisors in the public sector (Africa, Asia), education and HRD leadership consultants (Pakistan, Middle East). Some go on to work for the UN or World Bank, for example, gender and HRD specialist, or capacity building advisers (Kazakhstan, India, USA, China) and development project leaders (Nigeria). Some students progress to PhD study and a career in academia.

The course is unique as it demonstrates understanding of institutional HRD practices within the context of globalisation, social change and economic development so graduates acquire relevant development, HRD, leadership and education knowledge for directing culture and social change.

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The MA Cultural Geography (Research) is celebrating its 20th birthday in 2015-2016. The course was founded in 1995 as one of the first masters programmes in the world to offer students focused engagement with the then emerging sub-discipline of Cultural Geography. Read more
The MA Cultural Geography (Research) is celebrating its 20th birthday in 2015-2016. The course was founded in 1995 as one of the first masters programmes in the world to offer students focused engagement with the then emerging sub-discipline of Cultural Geography.

Twenty years later and Cultural Geography is one of the most dynamic sub-disciplines in contemporary geography. Our course reflects this dynamism. We combine core concepts with research methods training and interdisciplinary scholarship and practice. We develop this alongside innovative placements and research engagements with some of world’s top cultural institution, located on our doorstep in London.

Thematically cultural geography focuses on the interconnections between place,landscape, environment, mobilities and identity, and thus has profound relevance for the contemporary world. Our graduates go onto work in a range of sectors, including the arts and cultural sector, publishing, planning and urban policy, private and public sector research work as well as many carrying on to further doctoral study.

As profiles of our recent students (https://landscapesurgery.wordpress.com/2014/11/13/maculturalgeography/) show, the course attracts a diverse range of students from a range of backgrounds, not just those with geography degrees.

To see more about the activities around the MA Cultural Geography at Royal Holloway, please look at our research group blog Landscape Surgery - https://landscapesurgery.wordpress.com/ .

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/geography/coursefinder/maculturalgeography.aspx

Why choose this course?

- This well established course aims to provide research training and practice at Master’s level in Human Geography, with a particular emphasis on Cultural Geography; to prepare you for independent research at doctoral level in Human Geography; and to develop specialised knowledge and understanding of research, particularly involving cultural analysis, interpretation and practice.

- The course has a strong track record in gaining Research Council Funding for students. This includes ESRC 1+3 funding as well as funding from AHRC TECHNE. Please see the funding opportunities page for further details.

- The MA in Cultural Geography (Research) combines the vibrant research of the outstanding Social and Cultural Geography group with cutting edge teaching. The quality of our course was recognised by our external examiner as offering a gold-standard for the sector. Our teaching was nationally recognised by the student nominated award for “Best Teaching Team” (Arts and Humanities) at the National Prospects Post-Graduate Awards (2013).

- The programme includes cutting-edge conceptual teaching in themes such as theories of place and space, postcolonial geographies, geographies of knowledge, mapping and exploration, landscape, memory and heritage, geographies of consumption, material geographies, geographies of embodiment, practice and performance, critical urbanisms and creative geographies.

- At RHUL we are known for our commitment to collaborative research, offering you the chance to develop your seminar and tutorial-based learning alongside world leading cultural institutions. These include the Science Museum, V&A Museum, Museum of London, British Library, Natural History Museum, Royal Botanic Gardens Kew, Institute for International Visual Arts, and the Royal Geographical Society.

- You will be well prepared to continue to a PhD, building on the research you have completed on this course.

Department research and industry highlights

Social and Cultural Geography at Royal Holloway emphasises the cultural politics of place, space and landscape. The Group's research stresses theoretically informed and informative work, values equally contemporary and historical scholarship, and engages with diverse geographical locations within and beyond the UK.

SCG is home to a large and intellectually vibrant postgraduate community. There are around 40-50 postgraduates in the Group at any time. Many of the past graduates of the MA and SCG PhDs are now established academics in their own right.

SCG is well-known for its collaboration with a range of cultural institutions beyond the academy; recent partners include the the Science Museum, Victoria and Albert Museum, National Maritime Museum, British Library, British Museum, Museum of London and the Royal Geographical Society. The Group also has a tradition of including creative practitioners within its activities, as artists in residence, as research fellows and through participation in major research projects.

Many leading journals are edited by group staff, including Cultural Geographies, the Journal of Historical Geography, Geoforum, History Workshop Journal and GeoHumanities. Please see the Landscape Surgery blog for further information on Social and Cultural Geography activities at RHUL.

Course content and structure

The programme consists of four elements, all assessed by coursework.

- Element 1: Contemporary Cultural Geographies
This is a programme of seminars on current ideas, theory and practice in Cultural and Human Geography. It includes the following themes: theories of place; colonial and postcolonial geographies; biographies of material culture; embodiment, practice and place; geographies of consumption; culture, nature and landscape; space, politics and democracy; cultures of politics.

- Element 2: Methods and Techniques in Cultural Geography
This consists of a programme of workshops devoted to research methodologies and techniques in Cultural Geography. It includes research strategies and project design; reflexivity and ethics; ethnographic research; social survey; qualitative data analysis and computing; visual methodologies; interpreting texts; interpreting things; interpreting movement; negotiating the archives; the arts of cultural geography.

- Element 3: Research Training
You will be introduced to the culture of research in Human Geography and provided with a broad training for independent research within contemporary cultural geography. This element supplements the more specialised research training in research techniques in Element 2, and culminates in a 5,000 word research proposal for the Dissertation.

- Element 4: Dissertation
You will produce a substantial (15-18,000 word) research dissertation, under supervision.

On completion of the course graduates will have:
- advanced knowledge and expertise in the field of Cultural Geography and its current research questions
- advanced knowledge in the ideas, approaches and substantive themes of contemporary Cultural Geographies
- advanced knowledge of the research methods and techniques of Cultural Geography
- knowledge of the culture of research.

Assessment

Assessment is by coursework only. Formative feedback and detailed ongoing discussion of work before final submission is a central part of the teaching ethos of the course. Students also have significant autonomy in the selection of topics for coursework and dissertation allowing them to develop particular interests and specialisms.

Contemporary Cultural Geographies (Element 1)
Assessed by two course essays of up to 5,000 words (25% of final mark).

Methods and Techniques in Cultural Geography (Element 2)
Assessed by two workshop reports of up to 5,000 words (25% of final mark).

Research Training (Element 3)
Assessed by a 5,000-word dissertation proposal and satisfactory completion of modules taken in the element (Pass required).

Dissertation (Element 4)
Assessed by submission of a completed dissertation of 15-18,000 words. (50% of final mark).

Employability & career opportunities

Throughout the MA we spend time exploring possible career trajectories with our students.

This includes working on PhD applications – over 50% of our students go onto do PhDs and many go into academic position thereafter.

We also run a series of placement days with key cultural institutions in and around London including, British Library, Royal Geographical Society and Kew that help students develop skills, experience and contacts.

In recent years our graduates have entered a range of sectors, including the creative industries (advertising and marketing), the museum and research sectors (British Library, National Archive, and research assistantships in various academic projects).

We offer a series of course and activities to support career development:

1) Transferable Skills sessions

During the course staff on the MA not only teach key ideas and research methods, but also help students hone a series of transferable skills. As well as writing and presentation skills, activities on Element three enable the development of team-working and delegation skills. We also hold a series of dedicated skills sessions during the course including social media skills and networking skills run both by staff and by specialists from the careers office.

2) Career Development sessions and workshops

Both staff on the MA and the specialist staff at RHUL career centre offer tailored career development sessions. These might involve talking about developing an academic career, exploring careers in the cultural sector, as well as generic skills such as preparing your CV and developing a Linkedin profile.

3) Cultural Engagements and Placements

Staff on the MA course make the most of their research links with arts and cultural organisations to help students develop placement based work during their course.

Element three activities are designed to help students build up their CVs but also their contacts, and we are happy to help arrange shorter placements during element 1 and 2 pieces or longer-term placements for dissertation work. Past placements have seen students working with a range of key cultural institutions in and around London including the Royal Geographical Society, Kew Gardens, Furtherfield Digital Media and The British Museum.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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This Programme offered in partnership with. Read more
This Programme offered in partnership with

UNESCO

aims to impart the necessary competencies and skills in the conservation and promotion of World Heritage Sites and in the conceptualization of sustainable projects designed around a wide spectrum of cultural activities in the fields of natural and cultural heritage, creative industries, museums and tourism. It explores the economic, social, institutional and legal considerations that govern the categories of UNESCO World Heritage Sites.
It also emphasis strategic management competencies for the preservation and promotion of these sites as well as monitoring the efficacy and adequacy of site management plans and associated cultural projects.

The Master has a strong international faculty including Professor Walter Santagata from University of Turin, Professor David Throsby from Macquarie University, Professor Allen Scott from UCLA, Professor Andy Pratt from Kings College, Professor
Françoise Benhamou from University Paris III, Professor Xavier Greffe from University Paris I-Sorbonne, and Professor Helmut Anheier from Heidelberg University. Officials from UNESCO, the World Bank and the ILO also teach on the Master.

CURRICULUM OF THE MASTER

The Master is divided into three major learning cycles. The first cycle consists of distance learning modules supported by a tutoring service. The second cycle is a face-to-face learning period that will be held in Turin, Italy, at the International Training Centre of the ILO. The third cycle is a research and study period during which the students may attend internships and are expected to finalize their final projects.

MODULE 1- Distance learning.

The introductory distance learning phase of the course lasts 10 weeks and is tutor-assisted. It includes two foundation modules on Cultural Heritage and Economic Development and the World Heritage System and Heritage Management.

MODULE 2- Culture and Economic Development

This module will introduce the participants to the following topics:
• The value chain of cultural and natural sites;
• Cultural capital and the theory of sustainable development;
• The role of culture in local development;
• Cultural and natural districts, property rights and sustainable economic development;
• Governance and cultural policies in cultural/creative industries;
• Micro enterprises, local entrepreneurship and micro fi nance;
• Gender-related economics; International organizations and cultural projects;
• Culture and natural resources as a strategic engines for local development.

MODULE 3 - Project Management in the Cultural Field

This module is intended to upgrade participants’ competences in the disciplines of project cycle design and management. . Ample opportunity will be given to the participants to practice the development of the project logical framework and project appraisal techniques. The role of international development agencies in promoting cultural initiatives will be explored, including their respective procurement guidelines and project supervision procedures.

MODULE 4 - Cultural Sectors and Creative Industries

This module investigates the main cultural sectors that come into play in cultural policies, namely:
• Management of museums;
• monuments and archaeological sites;
• Performing arts;
• Creative and Cultural industries;
• Economics of cultural tourism;
• National Parks and Protected areas.
Particular attention will be devoted to the role of International Agencies that deal with cultural programmes including the presentation of the relevant UNESCO Conventions

MODULE 5 - Tools for Strategic Planning and Evaluation

This module explores the tools needed for planning, management and evaluation of cultural resources, focusing on:
• Management Tools.
• Strategic Assessment and Monitoring.

MODULE 6 – Home research and study

This module will allow the students to further elaborate on their projects’ plans and prepare their final dissertation

Deadline for Application: 18 August 2015



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Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study International Security and Development at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study International Security and Development at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

The MA in International Security and Development introduces students to issues and debates within International Security. This includes coverage of both ‘traditional’ security issues such as war and conflict and ‘non-traditional’ issues such as economic security, environmental security, health, identity and migration.

Key Features of MA in International Security and Development

Issues of security, violence and conflict have become central to international politics and to development policy and discourse. In order to comprehend the modern world, a full appreciation of the realities of conflict and violence, has become essential.

Drawing on the Department’s expertise in the field of security, International Security and Development students are also provided with an advanced introduction to key approaches in the study of security including realism, securitization theory, feminist approaches, critical theory and poststructuralism.

Students enrolled on the MA in International Security and Development benefit from the College of Arts and Humanities' Graduate Centre. The Graduate Centre fosters and supports individual and collaborative research activity of international excellence and offers a vibrant and supportive environment for students pursuing postgraduate research and taught masters study including those in International Security and Development. The Centre provides postgraduate training to enhance academic and professional development and facilitates participation in seminar programmes, workshops and international conferences.

The full-time International Security and Development course structure is split across the year with three modules taken in each academic semester (a total of six modules) and then a dissertation over the summer. Students study four compulsory modules, the research module and one optional module. The dissertation is written on a specialist research topic of the student's choosing.

Part-time study in MA in International Security and Development is available.

The Extended MA (EMA) in International Security and Development is a 240-credit postgraduate qualification that is equivalent to 120 ECTS (European Credit Transfer System) and is thus a recognised Masters qualification throughout the European Union. The EMA is a standard UK MA plus an additional 60 credits (30 ECTS) and this additional coursework is undertaken in one semester at a partner institution overseas. The EMA in International Security and Development is therefore not only an EU recognised postgraduate qualification it also adds a study abroad experience thus enhancing the qualification’s employability credentials.

The partner institution for EMA International Security and Development is the Department of International and Area Studies at The University of Oklahoma. The Department of International and Area Studies is an exciting and rapidly growing academic unit within the University of Oklahoma. It has approximately twenty faculty members and, critically for this EMA in International Security and Development, their expertise lie within the fields of security and development. The University of Oklahoma Norman Campus is located approximately 20 minutes south of Oklahoma City on a breathtaking campus. Created in 1890 The University of Oklahoma enrols more than 30,000 students, it has achieved the Carnegie Foundation’s highest tier of research activity classification, and is ranked in the top 400 universities in the world according to the Times Higher rankings.

MA in International Security and Development Programme Aims

- To develop advanced knowledge and understanding of International Security and Development.
- To develop critical, theoretical and analytical skills, improve written and oral communication skills.
- To acquire research skills in International Security and Development.

Modules

Modules on the MA in International Security and Development typically include:

• Violence, Conflict and Development
• Critical Security
• International Security in the Asia Pacific
• Civil Society and International Development
• Approaches to International Relations
• War, Identity and Society
• Governance: From State Formation to Global Governance
• War in Space
• State of Africa
• Human Rights and Humanitarian Intervention
• Rights Based Approaches to Development

Who should Apply?

Students interested in International Security and Development, from a politics, international relations, development studies, law, humanities, social science, international business or related background. Students interested in preparation for postgraduate research, MPhil or PhD, or who wish to develop skills and knowledge related to International Security and Development.

Careers

Career expectations are excellent for International Security and Development graduates. MA in International Security and Development degree holders may move on to doctoral study or enter employment sectors such as the diplomatic corps, the armed forces, intelligence and risk analysis, relief and humanitarian organisations, law and finance, government and politics and international business.

Research Interests

The following research groups at Swansea provide a distinct international and multi-disciplinary forum for the advancement of the
study of international security and development including:

• International Relations & Security
• Development Studies
• Cultural Political Economy
• Policy and Governance
• International Communication

Regular research seminars and lectures are run through these groups and also through the Research Institute for Arts and Humanities (RIAH) which students are encouraged to attend.

Student Quote

“I am now in my fourth year at Swansea University and can honestly say that I have enjoyed every moment. My undergraduate years were so good that I choose to stay on for another year to complete my Masters in International Security and Development and this is a decision I certainly do not regret. I feel like my degree has provided me with the tools needed to thrive in the world of employment, and the MA in International Security and Development I am now studying towards will only improve my chances of getting a high end job.”

Chris Harber, International Security and Development, MA

Read less
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study International Security and Development at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study International Security and Development at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

The MA in International Security and Development introduces students to issues and debates within International Security. This includes coverage of both ‘traditional’ security issues such as war and conflict and ‘non-traditional’ issues such as economic security, environmental security, health, identity and migration.

Key Features of MA in International Security and Development

Issues of security, violence and conflict have become central to international politics and to development policy and discourse. In order to comprehend the modern world, a full appreciation of the realities of conflict and violence, has become essential.

Drawing on the Department’s expertise in the field of security, International Security and Development students are also provided with an advanced introduction to key approaches in the study of security including realism, securitization theory, feminist approaches, critical theory and poststructuralism.

Students enrolled on the MA in International Security and Development benefit from the College of Arts and Humanities' Graduate Centre. The Graduate Centre fosters and supports individual and collaborative research activity of international excellence and offers a vibrant and supportive environment for students pursuing postgraduate research and taught masters study including those in International Security and Development. The Centre provides postgraduate training to enhance academic and professional development and facilitates participation in seminar programmes, workshops and international conferences.

The full-time International Security and Development course structure is split across the year with three modules taken in each academic semester (a total of six modules) and then a dissertation over the summer. Students study four compulsory modules, the research module and one optional module. The dissertation is written on a specialist research topic of the student's choosing.

Part-time study in MA in International Security and Development is available.

MA in International Security and Development Programme Aims

- To develop advanced knowledge and understanding of International Security and Development.
- To develop critical, theoretical and analytical skills, improve written and oral communication skills.
- To acquire research skills in International Security and Development.

Modules

Modules on the MA in International Security and Development typically include:

• Violence, Conflict and Development
• Critical Security
• International Security in the Asia Pacific
• Civil Society and International Development
• Approaches to International Relations
• War, Identity and Society
• Governance: From State Formation to Global Governance
• War in Space
• State of Africa
• Human Rights and Humanitarian Intervention
• Rights Based Approaches to Development

Who should Apply?

Students interested in International Security and Development, from a politics, international relations, development studies, law, humanities, social science, international business or related background. Students interested in preparation for postgraduate research, MPhil or PhD, or who wish to develop skills and knowledge related to International Security and Development.

Careers

Career expectations are excellent for International Security and Development graduates. MA in International Security and Development degree holders may move on to doctoral study or enter employment sectors such as the diplomatic corps, the armed forces, intelligence and risk analysis, relief and humanitarian organisations, law and finance, government and politics and international business.

Research Interests

The following research groups at Swansea provide a distinct international and multi-disciplinary forum for the advancement of the
study of international security and development including:

• International Relations & Security
• Development Studies
• Cultural Political Economy
• Policy and Governance
• International Communication

Regular research seminars and lectures are run through these groups and also through the Research Institute for Arts and Humanities (RIAH) which students are encouraged to attend.

Student Quote

“I am now in my fourth year at Swansea University and can honestly say that I have enjoyed every moment. My undergraduate years were so good that I choose to stay on for another year to complete my Masters in International Security and Development and this is a decision I certainly do not regret. I feel like my degree has provided me with the tools needed to thrive in the world of employment, and the MA in International Security and Development I am now studying towards will only improve my chances of getting a high end job.”

Chris Harber, International Security and Development, MA

Read less
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Development and Human Rights at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Development and Human Rights at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

The MA in Development and Human Rights examines the comparatively new interface between Human Rights and International Development.

Key Features of MA in Development and Human Rights

This MA in Development and Human Rights is a multi-disciplinary programme combining insights from the fields of development studies, politics, political theory and international law. The Development and Human Rights programme examines some of the key issues confronting twenty-first century global societies through a dynamic programme that combines theoretical and applied perspectives and is taught by a team of leading academics in their fields of development and human rights.

Students on the MA in Development and Human Rights will be encouraged to apply legal theory, social and political theory and research tools in analysing and understanding development and human rights, as well as being taught key historical and policy dimensions and concepts.

The full-time Development and Human Rights course structure is split across the year with three modules offered in each academic semester (a total of six modules in (part one) and then a dissertation over the summer (part two).

Development and Human Rights students study four compulsory modules, the research process module and one optional module. The dissertation component is written on a specialist research topic of their choosing.

Modules

Modules on the MA in Development and Human Rights typically include:

• Human Rights and Humanitarian Intervention
• Rights Based Approaches to Development
• International Human Rights Law
• Approaches to Political Theory
• International Security in the Asia Pacific
• Postcolonialism, Orientalism and Eurocentrism
• Critical Security
• War, Identity and Society
• Civil Society and International Development
• European Union Governance and Policy Making
• War in Space

Development and Human Rights MA Aims

- To develop critical, theoretical and analytical skills and improve written and oral communication skills.
- To acquire research skills and research methodologies.
- To appreciate the role of development and human rights within wider social, economic and political contexts and the implications for policy formation.

Who should Apply?

Students interested in Development and Human Rights, from a development studies, law, politics, international relations, humanities, social science, international business or related backgrounds. Students interested in preparation for postgraduate research, MPhil or PhD, or who wish to develop skills and knowledge related to Development Studies.

Research Interests

The following research groups at Swansea provide a distinct international and multi-disciplinary forum for the advancement of study,
including:

• Development Studies
• International Communication
• Cultural Political Economy
• Software Studies
• Digital Theory
• Policy and Governance
• International Relations & Security

Regular research seminars and lectures are run through these groups and also through the Research Institute for Arts and Humanities (RIAH) which students are encouraged to attend.

Work-based Placements

Development and Human Rights students are offered opportunities (awarded on a competitive basis) for work-based placement learning either through the Study in Gambia programme or placements arranged with government organisations in Wales.

Careers

Career expectations are excellent for Development and Human Rights graduates. MA degree holders may move on to doctoral study or enter employment sectors such as the diplomatic corps, the armed forces, intelligence and risk analysis, relief and humanitarian organisations, law and finance, government and politics and international business.

Read less
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Development and Human Rights (Extended) at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Development and Human Rights (Extended) at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

The Extended MA in Development and Human Rights examines the comparatively new interface between Human Rights and International Development.

Key Features of Extended MA in Development and Human Rights

This MA in Development and Human Rights is a multi-disciplinary programme combining insights from the fields of development studies, politics, political theory and international law. The Development and Human Rights programme examines some of the key issues confronting twenty-first century global societies through a dynamic programme that combines theoretical and applied perspectives and is taught by a team of leading academics in their fields of development and human rights.

Students on the MA in Development and Human Rights will be encouraged to apply legal theory, social and political theory and research tools in analysing and understanding development and human rights, as well as being taught key historical and policy dimensions and concepts.

The Extended MA (EMA) in Development and Human Rights is a 240-credit postgraduate qualification that is equivalent to 120 ECTS (European Credit Transfer System) and is thus a recognised Masters qualification throughout the European Union. The EMA is a standard UK MA plus an additional 60 credits (30 ECTS) and this additional coursework is undertaken in one semester at a partner institution overseas. The EMA is therefore not only an EU recognised postgraduate qualification it also adds a study abroad experience thus enhancing the qualification’s employability credentials.

The partner institution for EMA Development and Human Rights is the Department of Political Science and the Institute of Human Rights in the College of Law at the University of the Philippines, Diliman (UPD). The Department of Political Science was established in 1915 and is the only Commission on Higher Education (CHEd) Center of Excellence in Political Science in the Philippines. The College of Law admitted its first students in 1911 and a century after it was founded, the College of Law can point to its alumni in the highest positions of the government: Four became President of the Philippines and thirteen served as Chief Justice of the Supreme Court. The University of the Philippines is the country’s national university, with UPD its biggest campus and the physical seat of its Administration. UPD occupies 493 hectares of prime land in Quezon City, it has in excess of 25,000 students and the library resources are the largest in the country.

Modules

Modules on the MA in Development and Human Rights typically include:

• Human Rights and Humanitarian Intervention
• Rights Based Approaches to Development
• International Human Rights Law
• Approaches to Political Theory
• International Security in the Asia Pacific
• Postcolonialism, Orientalism and Eurocentrism
• Critical Security
• War, Identity and Society
• Civil Society and International Development
• European Union Governance and Policy Making
• War in Space

Development and Human Rights MA Aims

- To develop critical, theoretical and analytical skills and improve written and oral communication skills.
- To acquire research skills and research methodologies.
- To appreciate the role of development and human rights within wider social, economic and political contexts and the implications for policy formation.

Who should Apply?

Students interested in Development and Human Rights, from a development studies, law, politics, international relations, humanities, social science, international business or related backgrounds. Students interested in preparation for postgraduate research, MPhil or PhD, or who wish to develop skills and knowledge related to Development Studies.

Research Interests

The following research groups at Swansea provide a distinct international and multi-disciplinary forum for the advancement of study,
including:

• Development Studies
• International Communication
• Cultural Political Economy
• Software Studies
• Digital Theory
• Policy and Governance
• International Relations & Security

Regular research seminars and lectures are run through these groups and also through the Research Institute for Arts and Humanities (RIAH) which students are encouraged to attend.

Work-based Placements

Development and Human Rights students are offered opportunities (awarded on a competitive basis) for work-based placement learning either through the Study in Gambia programme or placements arranged with government organisations in Wales.

Careers

Career expectations are excellent for Development and Human Rights graduates. MA degree holders may move on to doctoral study or enter employment sectors such as the diplomatic corps, the armed forces, intelligence and risk analysis, relief and humanitarian organisations, law and finance, government and politics and international business.

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Delivered from one of the world’s cultural capitals, this MA is designed to meet the complex needs of today’s arts and cultural manager. Read more

About the Arts & Cultural Management MA:

Delivered from one of the world’s cultural capitals, this MA is designed to meet the complex needs of today’s arts and cultural manager. With its distinctive mix of theoretical, practical, and arts-based knowledge and skills development, you will learn how to apply creative leadership in managing artistic excellence, cultural heritage, audience diversity and financial sustainability at local and global levels.

Key benefits

- Head start your career through focused teaching and internship.
- Insights into management, planning and leadership.
- Gain knowledge of arts and culture across national and international contexts.
- Strong links with London’s cultural organisations.
- Lectures and workshops from leading arts and cultural industry professionals.
- Emphasis on creativity and arts-based learning.

Visit the website: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/arts-and-cultural-management-ma.aspx

Course detail

- Description -

This innovative new Masters programme, delivered from within the heart of one of the world’s cultural capitals, is specifically designed to meet the needs of the arts and cultural manager.

You will learn the vital importance of creativity, given the increasingly global nature of competition, as well as the opportunities and threats posed by new technologies.

Hosted by the Department of Culture, Media and Creative Industries and working in collaboration with the Cultural Institute at King's, the MA Arts & Cultural Management programme offers an unparalleled exposure to cultural management in practice, with core modules providing critical engagement with experienced cultural managers and leading London-based arts organisations. There is also the opportunity to undertake an internship, where you will undertake work experience in the arts or creative industries, and write a self-assessment looking at the skills, knowledge and motivation needed to build a career in these industries.

- Course purpose -

The MA in Arts & Cultural Management is suitable for those new to the field as well as individuals with existing arts and cultural work experience. It provides a critical understanding of arts and cultural management for graduates seeking a career in arts management or for professionals wishing to enhance their existing knowledge and career prospects.

- Course format and assessment -

Essays; learning journal; dissertation; arts-based research project.

Career prospects

Graduates of this new MA are expected to move on to arts and cultural management roles in a wide variety of contexts and international locations. Graduates from the host department (Culture, Media and Creative Industries) currently go on to take up a wide range of roles in the cultural and creative industries, for example, in performing arts management, museum and gallery management, arts funding, cultural industries development, film distribution, freelance research, creative business development, arts administration, publishing, art marketing and local governance. A number of our students go on to do further academic research.

About Postgraduate Study at King’s College London:

To study for a postgraduate degree at King’s College London is to study at the city’s most central university and at one of the top 21 universities worldwide (2016/17 QS World University Rankings). Graduates will benefit from close connections with the UK’s professional, political, legal, commercial, scientific and cultural life, while the excellent reputation of our MA and MRes programmes ensures our postgraduate alumni are highly sought after by some of the world’s most prestigious employers. We provide graduates with skills that are highly valued in business, government, academia and the professions.

Scholarships & Funding:

All current PGT offer-holders and new PGT applicants are welcome to apply for the scholarships. For more information and to learn how to apply visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/pg/funding/sources

Free language tuition with the Modern Language Centre

If you are studying for any postgraduate taught degree at King’s you can take a module from a choice of over 25 languages without any additional cost. Visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/mlc

How to apply: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/taught-courses.aspx

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The Master of Cultural Economy is a program built on the recognition that contemporary culture is a growing economy. Music, film, new media, computer games, publishing, music, the visual and performing arts, tourism, crafts, design and fashion all offer dynamic careers now and in the future. Read more
The Master of Cultural Economy is a program built on the recognition that contemporary culture is a growing economy. Music, film, new media, computer games, publishing, music, the visual and performing arts, tourism, crafts, design and fashion all offer dynamic careers now and in the future. Policymakers at city, national and international levels understand that the benefits of the cultural economy go beyond monetary value and are essential for social well-being. Cultural pursuits are the markers of contemporary civilised societies. 'Cultural economy' helps you understand how the cultural and the economic fit together – for without the culture, there would be no economy.

The Master of Cultural Economy offers an individual roadmap to dynamic careers in the independent arts and creative/cultural industries; working in cultural policy, governance and community development; and/or seeking to place cultural economies in an historical context, and its implications for contemporary practice.

The course offers a research or internship project component, which provides the opportunity to work in interdisciplinary contexts to combine theory and practice in responding to local and global issues at individual, community, corporate and government levels. For instance, you may participate in the unit Shanghai City Lab, a unique program aimed at immersing students in the cultural economy of Asia's new global metropolis.

As a student in the Master of Cultural Economy, you will be taught by academic staff who are widely regarded as leading experts in their respective fields. Further, you will attend regular presentations from a range of policymakers, industry practitioners, cultural activists, urban planners and community groups. These include Renew Newcastle and Renew Australia; Melbourne cultural policy representatives; live music campaigners; cultural consultants working with indigenous groups; and creative industry practitioners and advisors.

Visit the website http://www.study.monash/courses/find-a-course/2016/cultural-economy-a6004?domestic=true

Course Structure

The course is structured in three parts. Part A. Foundations for advanced cultural economy studies, Part B. Core Master's study and Part C. Advanced expertise. All students complete Part B. Depending upon prior qualifications, you may receive credit for Part A or Part C or a combination of the two.

[Note that if you are eligible for credit for prior studies you may elect not to receive the credit.]

PART A. Foundations for advanced cultural economy studies
These studies will introduce you to cultural economy studies at advanced undergraduate or graduate level. They are intended for students whose previous qualification is not in a cognate field.

PART B. Core Master's study
These studies draw on best practices within the broad realm of cultural economy studies practice and research to further your understanding of the complex ecosystem in which cultural and economic goals and dynamics combine in ways that transgress traditional disciplinary and policy boundaries.

PART C. Advanced expertise
The focus of these studies is professional or scholarly work that can contribute to a portfolio of professional development. You have two options.

The first option is a program of coursework study where you select the units to suit your own interests. This option includes the opportunity to undertake an internship in the field.

The second option is a 24 point research thesis. Students wishing to use this Masters course as a pathway to a higher degree by research should take this second option.

Students admitted to the course, who have a recognised honours degree in a cognate discipline including humanities or social sciences, will receive credit for Part C, however, should they wish to complete a 24 point research project as part of the course they should consult with the course coordinator.

For more information visit the faculty website - http://www.study.monash/media/links/faculty-websites/arts

Find out how to apply here - http://www.study.monash/courses/find-a-course/2016/cultural-economy-a6004?domestic=true#making-the-application

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The MA Program in Cultural Diplomacy and International Sport is offered by the University of the West of Scotland in partnership with the Academy for Cultural Diplomacy. Read more
The MA Program in Cultural Diplomacy and International Sport is offered by the University of the West of Scotland in partnership with the Academy for Cultural Diplomacy.
.

Credits - 90 ECTS Credits

Length - 2 Trimesters (plus Dissertation)

Location - Paisley, Scotland and Berlin, Germany

Tuition - €9,000

Sport has come to occupy a central role in the economic, physical, psychological and socio-cultural fabric of nation states. Historical and cultural identity cannot be reflected, understood or critiqued without recourse to the place and influence of sport. Importantly, and despite the rhetoric of politicians and governing bodies, sport is a powerful political vehicle. As a driver of economic wealth, tourist attraction, business development and urban regeneration sport is a major plinth in the policy process. Moreover, in a techno-cultural age of digital and social immediacy, sport has become a key media and experiential spectacular, constantly deployed across the geo-political stage. Modern sport is now a global power player intrinsic to the perpetuation of the spectacle of consumer capitalism, which solidifies its status as a primary vehicle of cultural diplomacy.
Sport, sport events and the media are, more than ever, intrinsically linked. The trajectory of such a union is traced through the rise of the hallmark, major and mega events (e.g. Olympics and World Cup), which see the mediatisation of experience subtly mixed with the pride and prestige with identity politics and ideological power (Getz, 2014). Whether the propaganda of Nazi Germany, race relations of Mexico Olympics, terrorism of Munich Olympics, 1980s Cold War boycotts, favela clearances of 2016 Rio World Cup to human rights and FIFA allegations of 2022 Qatar World Cup sport is embedded in the arena of political contestation. The role of sport as a vehicle for peace and development are increasingly promoted by governing bodies of sport and ambassadors for developing nations. Again cultural diplomacy comes to the forefront with sport as we see governing bodies of sporting events, policy institutions and transnational corporations assert counter-discourses that see sport claimed as a supranational values vehicle for peace, human rights and equality. Whether in the bidding phase, lead up, mediatised event or post-event legacy and leverage claims sporting events bring geopolitical differences to the fore. This MA blends expertise in sport with that of cultural diplomacy to ensure the sporting leaders or diplomats of the future are prepared to deal with the global sporting arena and its potential political, social and cultural outcomes.
The program provides students with expertise in the field of International Sport and Cultural Diplomacy, a new and attractive field of studies, which is currently offered as an academic field only through the Center for Cultural Diplomacy Studies of the Institute for Cultural Diplomacy. This particular emphasis on Cultural Diplomacy and its historical and contemporary application in the public sector, private sector and civil society, provides students with expertise in three distinct academic fields, thus with an academic and practical advantage in the European and Global Arena.

The program addresses contemporary international issues, with classroom seminars and lectures, as well as online resources including vodcasts, recorded lecturers and presentations. Additionally, educational & cultural events, conferences, professional trainings, tours, visits and meetings with foreign officials, are further incorporated into the curriculum. Students will meet with leading experts working in international organizations, embassies, and academic institutions, and will engage with specialists in the areas of International Events, Sport, Sport Media, Sport Policy, Culture, Communication, Politics, Human Rights, Culture, Peace Building, Multilateral Diplomacy, Conflict Resolution, and Development.

The program provides students with practical experience for both academic and professional development, preparing students for careers in diverse fields, such as international sport events, sports policy, sport governing bodies, international relations, conferences and events, the humanities, politics, and culture, foreign policy and international policy. On a practical level, the international environment of the Center for Cultural Diplomacy Studies offers students a unique opportunity to interact with leading experts and academics at a wide variety of international organizations and research centers. This exceptional learning environment leads to original research and independent study opportunities. It allows students to create a solid professional network and form a concrete base for future academic and professional career choices, preparing students for engagement in the international arena, civil society, politics, governmental organizations and international economic organizations, as well as the private sector.

Program Structure
The program consists of 90 ECTS credits in total and has duration of two trimesters, and a Thesis to be submitted towards the completion of the program. The first trimester of the program is hosted by the University of the West of Scotland in Paisley and the second trimester is hosted by the Institute for Cultural Diplomacy in Berlin.

The program follows the conventional university structure of a one year academic program divided into two trimesters, where Students are offered elective courses to accompany mandatory courses, a professional development experience and the final thesis.

Enrolments to the Program are possible towards the Fall, Winter and Spring semesters’ start each year.

For start Winter 2017 (February 8th, 2017)

Deadline for late admissions: December 31st, 2016

Next start:

Spring Semester 2017- April 11th, 2017 , Deadline for admissions: January 15th, 2017

For more information please visit: http://www.ccds-berlin.de and .http://www.ccds-berlin.de/index.php?en_uws_macd-is

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A ground-breaking MA in Games Design and Development, combining existing NFTS expertise in character creation, storytelling, design, animation, sound, and more, with input from games industry experts in games design, games art, games production and games audio. Read more
A ground-breaking MA in Games Design and Development, combining existing NFTS expertise in character creation, storytelling, design, animation, sound, and more, with input from games industry experts in games design, games art, games production and games audio.

Quick Facts:

2 Year Course
Full-time
Course runs Jan-Dec each year
Next intake: January 2017
NFTS Scholarships available for UK Students

Visit the website https://nfts.co.uk/our-courses/masters/games-design-development

APPLICATION DEADLINE: 07 JUL 2016

COURSE OVERVIEW

- Study games design and development working alongside the film and television industry’s best and brightest future prospects.
- Build up an in depth fluency in all games design and development disciplines.Develop industry contacts through conferences, event attendance, trade association involvement and visits from industry practitioners and luminaries.
- Gain a practical knowledge of games software development, and the ability to experiment with new pipelines and evolving technologies and techniques.
- Work on high profile solo and group projects, with plenty of opportunities to experiment, innovate and excel.
- Unlike other schools, production costs are met by the School.

Taught by leading games practitioners and experts in the field, our MA in Games Design and Development is a world-leading postgraduate games programme with the reputation, accreditation and alumni credits to back this up. Learning and working alongside film, television and animation practitioners, the course provides a unique opportunity for future games innovators to hone their creative and technical skills, developing fluency in all the core videogames development disciplines such as games design, code, art, animation, production, audio, interface and more. The NFTS provides MA Games students with an unrivalled creative context, as well as the inestimable collaborative opportunities presented by the course’s setting at the heart of the NFTS media development and production studios.

WHY STUDY GAMES DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT?

Videogames are a relatively young medium, in a continual state of innovation and evolution, which means creatively there is still everything to play for. New platforms and technologies have broadened out the field, with fantastic opportunities for technical invention and artistic innovation. The NFTS Games course provides the practical skills and creative knowhow to design, devise and make games from inception to delivery, and the vision and temperament to provide creative leadership in an industry which continually strives to increase its cultural reach, broaden its audiences and create new and engaging experiences for an innovation-hungry marketplace. Games students develop projects in collaboration with students from other NFTS disciplines including sound design, composing, screenwriting, cinematography, producing, production design, digital effects, editing and production management.

*There are a number of different scholarships that support this course, including the Wellcome Trust Science Media Studentship. For more information see Scholarships and the Wellcome Trust - http://www.wellcome.ac.uk/Funding/Public-engagement/Funding-schemes/Broadcast-games-and-film-awards/Science-Media-Studentships/index.htm

CURRICULUM

In the first year students undertake a series of set projects – both group and solo – during which they also learn core games development disciplines of design, art, animation, coding and production. The modules and workshops cover 3D modelling/animation, game programming (C#/Unity), game design, character creation, producing and project management. Students also take classes in Life Drawing and theory lectures in cultural and critical studies to support their practical work. In the second year students focus on their Final Major Project, working in multi-disciplinary teams with students from other disciplines. Numerous fruitful partnerships have been formed with sound designers, composers, screenwriters, producers, production designers, cinematographers, digital effects artists and others, but the exact composition of development teams varies according to the nature of the projects. External practitioners can also be brought in on projects where needed. Early in the second year students also undertake a detailed module on commercial aspects of game development and present professional business cases for their projects to a panel of experts as a practical output.

PORTFOLIO DEVELOPMENT AND PROJECT OUTPUT

Students develop a cumulative portfolio of work throughout the course. First year output will include the following projects at minimum: ‘Hello World’ (an extensive playable 3D environment made a as a group project); ‘App Factory’ (a mobile/tablet game); ‘Synthespian’ (a player controlled interactive character performing to a set text); ‘Moments of Consequence’ (a short interactive drama). Students work in teams with other school specialisms depending on the specifics of the project. Second year output is exhibited at major shows and expos in various stages during the year, as well as at the Games Graduation Expo which takes place alongside the NFTS Graduation Film, Television and Animation screenings in February.

Students also participate in competitions, game jams and external projects throughout the course, and work is shown and shared on NFTS Games department blog (http://www.nfts-games.com) as well as on students’ own individually maintained portfolio websites. The department also actively promotes student output and activity on our well-followed social media presences.

Final Projects are as varied and diverse as our student group. We’ve proudly presented cutting edge virtual reality experiences, a playable political thriller, episodic interactive dramas, comedic ghost stories, a Dostoevsky-inspired interactive story environment, a motion-controlled playable monster, an interactive romantic comedy, to name a handful. Many more on the way.

CREATIVE COMMUNITY

Since 2012, the NFTS Games course has fed into a creative community of alumni, course contacts, indie developers, games journalists and development studio people who visit the course and follow our work. Students entering the course rapidly become part of this community through networking events, meetup groups, conference attendance and involvement with industry associations such as UKIE, Bafta Games, Creative Skillset and others. Not only does this provide a healthy exchange of ideas and knowledge, but it also provides a network of contacts for future employment, partnership opportunities and funding sources.

A significant proportion of NFTS Games grads have secured funding or distribution for projects developed on the course and have formed their own studio start-ups to make them, while others go on to work at games studios such as Sony Computer Entertainment or Reloaded. Students have also been successful in securing grant funding for projects through our partnership with the Wellcome Trust. Our alumni have also had their fair share of awards and prizes.

INDUSTRY INPUT

As well as an advisory group including members drawn from Sony, Electronic Arts, Microsoft, Media Molecule, Bossa Studios, Natural Motion, NDreams and others, we have regular workshops delivered by experienced industry practitioners. Recent visiting tutors include Siobhan Reddy (Media Molecule), Imre Jele (Bossa Studios), Tara Saunders (Sony), Andrew Oliver (Radiant Worlds), Richard Lemarchant (ex Naughy Dog), Phil Harrison (ex Microsoft), Barry Mead (Fireproof games), Mike Bithell, Jess Curry (The Chinese Room). As well as giving overview talks, where time permits guest tutors have one-to-one sessions with students and give specific input of current project work.

The course is a member of the Sony Playstation®First programme which give students access to Sony PS4 devkits and professional software development kits. We are also a Creative Skillset accredited MA course.

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

Games design and development students at the NFTS come from a wide range of backgrounds and prior experiences, and have demonstrated an excitement, aptitude, creativity and willingness to learn new skills. We actively seek a diverse and interesting group of people who have something new to bring into the games development fold. Successful applicants have come to us with previous qualifications from across the arts, sciences and humanities; and from all walks of life as far as profession and practice is concerned. Games development experience is welcome, but by no means essential.

The NFTS games course provides a truly unique opportunity to enter one of the most exciting creative industries of the modern age.

APPLY WITH

- A critical analysis of a computer game of your choice. No more than two sides A4, typed.
- A brief outline of the kind of game project you wish to undertake
- A digital portfolio containing samples of your work.

Feel free to contact the NFTS games department via for any further information. You can also keep up to date with all our latest developments on the course blog at
http://www.nfts-games.com , our facebook page http://www.facebook.com/NFTS.Games or twitter feed @NFTS_Games.

HOW TO APPLY

You can apply directly to us at the NFTS by clicking on the link below:

APPLY FOR GAMES DESIGN & DEVELOPMENT COURSE - https://nfts.co.uk/sign-me-up/apply-now/?nid=28

You can apply online, or download a word document of the application form to submit via email
When selecting your course, please ensure that you have read the entry requirements and details of the supporting materials that should accompany your application.

TIMING YOUR APPLICATION

We are happy to receive applications 24/7 and 365 days a year up until the deadline. That said, there is no particular advantage to submitting your application very early. The important thing is that your application shows us your latest work and tell us about your most recent filmmaking experiences.

Visit the Games Blog site - http://www.nfts-games.com/

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The only graduate program in Cultural Studies in Western Canada, the University of Winnipeg's multidisciplinary Master of Arts in Cultural Studies is an innovative, 12-month, course-based program that offers specializations in Texts and Cultures or Curatorial Practices. Read more
The only graduate program in Cultural Studies in Western Canada, the University of Winnipeg's multidisciplinary Master of Arts in Cultural Studies is an innovative, 12-month, course-based program that offers specializations in Texts and Cultures or Curatorial Practices. Bringing together instructors from across the university and from the city's vibrant arts and culture community, the MA in Cultural Studies provides students with strong methodological and theoretical training in order to pursue further postgraduate studies or careers in a range of fields, including education, publishing, arts management, art curation, and journalism.

What is Cultural Studies?

Cultural Studies is an interdisciplinary field, drawing on theories and practices from a range of humanities and social sciences disciplines, that seeks to investigate the ways in which cultures produce and are produced. At the centre of Cultural Studies sits a host of questions, such as what constitutes a text, how some texts, visual images, and cultural artifacts come to be valued over others, and how questions of value relate to the distribution of power and authority.

Rather than concentrating exclusively on the group of elite texts that make up so-called "high culture," Cultural Studies takes as its focus the whole complex of changing beliefs, ideas, feelings, values, and symbols that define a community’s organization and sense of itself. Culture in this sense is often understood to be a primary vehicle of globalization in the contemporary world and deeply enmeshed in particular social, economical and political environments. As such, when we study culture, we are studying the world we live in and how we function in it.

Cultural Studies MA at the University of Winnipeg

Small seminars, individual attention from dedicated instructors, and strong academic development are just some of the benefits of being a student in the MA in Cultural Studies. Students specialize in one of two areas: 1) Texts and Cultures, which emphasizes theoretically-grounded cultural analysis and 2) Curatorial Practices, which focuses on museum studies.

Students in the MA in Cultural Studies take a total of 24 credit hours (the equivalent of 4 full-year courses) in a range of topic areas, including Cultural Theory; Visual Cultures; Curatorial Practices; Cultures of Childhood; Gender, Sexualities and Culture; Local, National and Global Cultures; and Manuscript, Print and Digital Cultures.

What is a multidisciplinary degree?

A multidisciplinary degree is one that allows you to study courses in a variety of subject areas. The Cultural Studies MA degree incorporates theories and methods from a variety of disciplines, including Literary Studies, History, Art History, Women’s and Gender Studies, Politics, and Rhetoric and Communications. In the Cultural Studies MA program at the University of Winnipeg, instructors from these disciplines regularly teach courses in the program and are available for Special Studies courses in which they direct the research projects of individual students.

How to prepare for an MA in Cultural Studies?

Cultural Studies is an academic field that uses critical and cultural theories to study cultural phenomena. Therefore, it is recommended that a student choose classes that use feminist theory, social theory, political theory, literary theory, and/or media theory while pursuing their undergraduate degree in order to prepare for an MA in Cultural Studies.

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This Anthropology MA provides an understanding of the ways in which anthropological approaches and debates inform the study of meanings and concepts in development, its priorities, policies and practice. Read more
This Anthropology MA provides an understanding of the ways in which anthropological approaches and debates inform the study of meanings and concepts in development, its priorities, policies and practice. It attracts students with diverse backgrounds and study/work experiences which makes for a lively and challenging atmosphere.

The degree is designed to provide students with a fairly detailed knowledge of anthropology, development issues, research methods and either an ethnographic region (and/or language) and/or thematic interest in health/gender/food/ media. Advice will be given to match the choice of optional components to the requirements, interests, and qualifications of individual students whose background may be in general social science, regional, language or other studies. While the focus of the degree is on development issues and practice, its disciplinary orientation remains anthropological.

Students explore the contribution of anthropology to contemporary development debates, for example, on donors/aid agencies and NGOs, poverty, migration and development, dominating discourses, human rights, violence and complex emergencies, refugees, gender, social capital and community action, health, climate change, the ‘market’ (as a core metaphor of globalised development), whether there are alternatives to the market, the role of business in development (corporate social responsibility and markets for the poor) and the importance of ethical, professional conduct by anthropologists. Anthropological studies provide the basis for understanding issues of state and governance in development, as well as the meaning of community development, and of popular ‘participation’ and ‘empowerment’. Throughout the programme, the role of, and opportunities for anthropologists as professionals in development is discussed, in part through a dedicated series of seminars in term 2.

Note: (1) Students registered in other departments who wish to take this course MUST write to the Director of Study for this course for permission to take it.

The programme consists of four elements: three assessed course units and a dissertation of 10,000 words.

The degree’s core course – ‘Anthropology of Development’ – provides an up-to-date and in-depth understanding of anthropological perspectives on policy and practice in contemporary international development, and gives a theoretical overview of the relationship between development and anthropology. The course examines the politics of aid, shifting aid frameworks, and concrete intervention programmes, bridging the disparate worlds of planners and beneficiaries. This involves close reading of anthropological monographs/studies which examine the nature of policy-making, bureaucracy and programmes in a variety of sectors – health, agriculture, water and others – while always paying close attention to the specific cultural contexts of intervention. Students should note that the course is continuously assessed which each term students are expected to write 1 book review, 1 essay and sit a 50 minute examination. This form of assessment has been found to be much fairer to overseas students whose first language is not English. While continuous assessment requires students to organize their studies efficiently from the very beginning of the year, we have found that a much higher proportion of our students graduate having achieved a distinction.

Commonwealth Shared Scholarship Scheme

The Commonwealth Shared Scholarship scheme (http://www.soas.ac.uk/registry/scholarships/soas-hakluyt-scholarship.html) has been extended to cover the MA Social Anthropology of Development.

Note (2). Students registered in other departments at SOAS, notably in Development Studies, must apply in writing/email to the Director of Studies for permission to take this course as part of their degree.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/masocanthdev/

Structure

Overview
The programme consists of four units in total: three units of examined taught courses and a one unit dissertation of 10,000 words.

Core Courses:
- Anthropology of Development - 15PANC090 (1.0 unit).

- Dissertation in Anthropology and Sociology - 15PANC999 (1.0 unit). This is a 10,000 word dissertation on a topic agreed with the Programme Convenor of the MA Social Anthropology of Development and the candidate’s supervisor.

- Additionally all MA Anthropology students 'audit' the course Ethnographic Research Methods during term 1 - this will not count towards your 4 units.

Foundation Course:
- Theoretical Approaches to Social Anthropology - 15PANC008 (1.0 unit). This is compulsory only for students without a previous anthropology degree.

Option Courses:
- The remaining unit(s) of your programme can be selected from the Option Courses list below.

- A total of either 1 unit of option courses (if taking Theoretical Approaches to Social Anthropology) or 2 units (if exempted from Theoretical Approaches to Social Anthropology), may be selected.

- Your 1 or 2 total units may be made up of any combination of 0.5 or 1 unit option courses.

- However, courses without a "15PANxxxx" course code are taught outside of the Anthropology Department. No more than 1 unit in total of these courses may be selected.

- Alternatively, one language course may be taken from the Faculty of Languages and Cultures.

Programme Specification

Programme Specification 2012/2013 (pdf; 134kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/masocanthdev/file39771.pdf

Employment

A postgraduate degree in the Social Anthropology of Development at SOAS develops students’ understanding of the world, other peoples’ ways of life and how society is organised with a particular focus on how anthropological approaches and debates inform the study of meanings and concepts in development, its priorities, policies and practice. Over the years the SOAS department has trained numerous leading anthropologists who have gone on to occupy lectureships and professorships throughout the world. Equally, students gain skills during their degree that transfer well to areas such as information and technology, government service, the media and tourism.

Postgraduate students leave SOAS with a portfolio of widely transferable skills which employers seek, including analytical and critical skills; ability to gather, assess and interpret data; high level of cultural awareness; and problem-solving. A postgraduate degree is a valuable experience that provides students with a body of work and a diverse range of skills that they can use to market themselves with when they graduate.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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This programme is designed for those who want to understand global processes and development, and for those who want to work on, or analyse, development related tasks and issues. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

This programme is designed for those who want to understand global processes and development, and for those who want to work on, or analyse, development related tasks and issues. It is also highly relevant to anyone working, or intending to work, in development advocacy, policy making, and global development policy analysis, in the NGO sector, government agencies, and international development organisations.

We welcome students with a strong background in the social sciences in their first degree, but we also welcome students who have worked in the area of development, or in a related field.

This exciting programme offers a critical examination of the contemporary process of globalisation and how it influences the developing world, both before and after the ongoing global crisis. The MSc Globalisation and Development blends, in equal measure, critical analysis of mainstream thinking, alternative theories and practices, and case studies of political, social and cultural aspects of globalisation and development.

This degree draws its strength from the unrivalled expertise at SOAS in development problems and processes. The programme is of interest for development practitioners, activists, and students with a scholarly interest in how globalisation influences the developing world, and how the poor majority responds to these challenges.

Highlights include:

- Critical and historical approaches to globalisation and their relationship to neoliberalism, imperialism and US global hegemony.

- Contemporary globalising processes – capital flows, state-market relations, transnational corporations, global commodity chains, inequality and poverty on a global scale.

- Transformation of work in the age of globalisation – new types of work, informalisation and precarisation, labour migration, agrarian change and gender relations.

- Globalisation and imperialism – post-Cold War imperial and civil wars, global and regional challengers to US hegemony: China and Russia.

- Globalisation, democracy and culture – human rights, democratisation, cosmopolitanism, standardisation, homogenisation.

- Alternatives to neoliberal globalisation – global labour movement, transnational social movements and NGOs, environmental issues.

Students can draw on SOAS's unique expertise to specialise further in particular regions or topics. Please see 'Structure' for details on core and optional modules.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/development/programmes/mscglobdev/

Structure

- Overview
There are four main components to this degree: three taught modules and a 10,000 word dissertation. All students take a core module, Globalisation and Development. They then select one of two further modules: Political Economy of Development or Theory, Policy and Practice of Development. Through these modules students build their analytical skills and knowledge of the main issues and debates in Development Studies.

- Specialisation
Students also take optional modules (one full module or two half modules), allowing them to specialise in particular areas of development and possibly use them to develop a dissertation in a related theme. By tying optional modules to their individual dissertation topic, students design their degree to suit their own interests and career development goals.

Students should be aware that not all optional modules may run in a given year. Modules at other institutions are not part of the approved programme structure.

Programme Specification

Programme Specification 2015/16 (pdf; 76kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/development/programmes/mscglobdev/file101725.pdf

Materials

SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources.

Teaching & Learning

Modules are taught by a combination of methods, principally lectures, tutorial classes, seminars and supervised individual study projects.

The MSc programme consists of three taught modules (corresponding to three examination papers) and a dissertation.

- Lectures

Most modules involve a two hour lecture as a key component with linked tutorial classes.

- Seminars

At Masters level there is particular emphasis on seminar work. Students make full-scale presentations for each unit that they take, and are expected to write papers that often require significant independent work.

- Dissertation

A quarter of the work for the degree is given over to the writing of an adequately researched 10,000-word dissertation. Students are encouraged to take up topics which relate the study of a particular region to a body of theory.

Employment

A postgraduate degree in Globalisation and Development from SOAS provides graduates with a portfolio of widely transferable skills sought by employers, including analytical skills, the ability to think laterally and employ critical reasoning, and knowing how to present materials and ideas effectively both orally and in writing. Equally graduates are able to continue in the field of research, continuing their studies either at SOAS or other institutions. An MSc in Globalisation and Development is a valuable experience that provides students with a body of work and a diverse range of skills that they can use to market themselves with when they graduate.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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This programme challenges the assumptions behind the media and development industries and development studies, and offers new ways of thinking about the issues. Read more
This programme challenges the assumptions behind the media and development industries and development studies, and offers new ways of thinking about the issues. The approach balances critical theoretical analysis of the hegemony implied by the ideas and practices of development with the practical issues surrounding the use of contemporary media, including notably digital technologies.

It draws on media theory, practical knowledge and experience, alongside critical debates within and about development, to challenge assumptions about the role of media and development industries. Students combine critical theoretical analysis of the role of media in development with a focus on practical issues surrounding the use of media, including digital technologies.

The programme differs from other degrees in the field by placing the onus on the role of media to further the Development agenda, especially post the Second World War. Students benefit from the unique position of the Centre for Media Studies as a specialist institution for the study of media in the global south.

It is designed for those with an interest in global media and development, including media and development professionals seeking alternative ways of thinking about their roles. It provides an excellent foundation for MPhil/PhD research.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/media-studies/ma-media-and-development/

Teaching & Learning

- Learning Outcomes

Knowledge:

1. How to assess data and evidence critically from texts, manuscripts, audio and video sources, both analog and digital, solve problems of conflicting sources and conflicting interpretations, develop skills in critical judgements of complex source materials, locate materials in print and on line, use research resources (particularly research library catalogues and websites) and other relevant traditional and electronic sources.

2. Knowledge and understanding of the dynamics and debates about the role of media and Information Communication Technologies in the development process: to be able to critically examine the discourses of development, the roles of national and international organizations, NGOs, citizens in defining and producing development and the emergence of critical and alternative paradigms for sustainable societies; to be aware of the key theoretical issues surrounding the role of media and Information Communication Technologies in development processes; to be able to analytically disaggregate economic, political, social and cultural strands of development and the nature of mediated practices within each; develop awareness of emergent models of sustainable development in which contemporary media practices play a key role; analyze the role of the media in hegemonic representations of social change and development.

Intellectual (thinking) skills:

1. To be critical and precise in their assessment of evidence, and to understand through practice what documents and electronic sources can and cannot tell us. Such skills should improve and be refined throughout the programme.

2. Question theories and interpretations, however authoritative, and critically reassess evidence for themselves. Students will learn how to question and challenge the accepted tenets both of development and media as the means of transmission of messages. These skills should improve and be refined throughout the programme.

3. Critically interrogate situated empirical examples of specific media and Information Communication Technologies practices in development contexts in Asia, Africa, Middle East

Subject-based practical skills:

1. Communicate effectively in writing

2. Retrieve, sift and select information from a variety of conventional and electronic sources

3. Communicate orally to a group. Listen and discuss ideas introduced during seminars and classes.

4. Practise research techniques in a variety of specialized research libraries and institutes.

5. Have developed some new competencies in digital media production and dissemination

Transferable skills:

1. Write good essays and dissertations

2. Structure and communicate ideas effectively both orally and in writing

3. Understand unconventional ideas

4. Study a variety of written and digital materials, in libraries, on line and research libraries of a kind they will not have used as undergraduates.

5. Present material orally to a group.

6. Have developed a range of on-line competencies

Employment

As well as academic expertise, MA Media in Development graduates from SOAS gain a portfolio of widely transferable skills which employers seek. These include; written and oral communication skills, attention to detail, analytical and problem-solving skills and the ability to research, amass and order information from a variety of sources. This postgraduate degree provides students with a body of work and a diverse range of skills that they can use to market themselves with when they graduate.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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