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Curriculum Requirements. The core requirements for the master’s degree include at least six courses at the 7000 level or above, subject to approval of the graduate program advisor and in accordance with the following curricular framework. Read more

Curriculum Requirements

The core requirements for the master’s degree include at least six courses at the 7000 level or above, subject to approval of the graduate program advisor and in accordance with the following curricular framework. A maximum of 9 hours may be independent study.

A student who has been fully admitted to the Graduate School should meet with the graduate program advisor of the Cyber Security program to plan a program through to the completion of the degree requirements. This program is subject to change by mutual consent.

Cyber Security Core (6 hours)

Cyber Security Electives (15 hours)*

Chosen from the following courses with approval of advisor:

Electives (9 hours)

Courses selected to fulfill this requirement may include up to three credit hours of CS 7911-3 Master’s Report.

Electives may include up to 6 hours of non-computer science graduate courses subject to the approval of the graduate advisor.  

Total: 30 hours



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The International Master’s Programme in Software Engineering imparts general software engineering and management skills, as well as specialized skills in two major software application domains. Read more

The International Master’s Programme in Software Engineering imparts general software engineering and management skills, as well as specialized skills in two major software application domains: enterprise systems and embedded real-time systems. The program is delivered jointly by Estonia’s two largest universities: University of Tartu and Tallinn University of Technology. Students graduating from this program obtain degrees from both universities.

The Master’s program starts with a core module where you will acquire general software engineering skills, covering both technical aspects (systems modeling and programming) but also management skills. You will then choose one of two specialization modules: enterprise software (at University of Tartu) or embedded & real-time software (at Tallinn University of Technology). A range of elective and free-choice courses will allow you to further specialize or to broaden your horizons.

During the second year, you will put your skills into use, first via an internship or an entrepreneurial project, and secondly via a research or engineering project leading to the defense of a Master’s thesis.

Follow the links in the table below to see the description of individual modules and the web pages of individual courses. Some of these pages contain video recordings so that you can see us in action before joining us.

Semesters 3-4Master’s Seminar and ThesisSemesters 2-3Internship or Entrepreneurial ProjectSemesters 2-3Electives & Free-choice CoursesSemesters 1-2Specialty 1: Embedded & Real-Time SoftwareSpecialty 2: Enterprise SoftwareFirst SemesterCore Module



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For Details see below. The deadline for Applicants who graduated outside of Europe allready expired. This international oriented 2-year master’s degree programme is based on the following pillars. Read more

Application for EU graduates until 30 September 2016

For Details see below. The deadline for Applicants who graduated outside of Europe allready expired.

About the Program

This international oriented 2-year master’s degree programme is based on the following pillars:
▪ The study of a range of topics within the field of human-computer interaction: usability, user-centred design and user interface testing and research, and innovative interface technologies such as virtual reality, mobile systems, adaptive systems, mixed reality, ubiquitous computing and graphic interfaces.
▪ Acquisition of key skills and competences through a project-based study approach.

In the English-language Human-Computer Interaction M.Sc. programme, students focus on theoretical and practical issues in current computer science research in the fields of user-centered design, interactive system development and evaluation. In addition, this technically-oriented HCI master offers the opportunity to participate in interdisciplinary projects and attend courses from Architecture and Urbanism, Art and Design, Media Studies and Media Management.

In general, our programme aims at people with a bachelor’s degree or minor in computer science. The medium of instruction for all mandatory courses is English. The program has received accreditation by Acquin until 30.09.2020 in April 2015.

More Information under https://www.uni-weimar.de/en/media/studies/computer-science-and-media-hci/human-computer-interaction-msc/

Program Structure

The programme comprises 120 ECTS, distributed into the following components:
▪ Four compulsory modules (Advanced HCI, Information Processing and Presentation, Virtual/Augmented Reality and Mobile HCI), each comprising 9 ECTS.
▪ Elective module (24 ECTS in total).
▪ Two research projects (15 ECTS each).
▪ The Master’s thesis module (30 ECTS).

In accordance with the Weimar Bauhaus model, research-oriented projects contribute towards a large proportion of the master’s programme. The elective modules allows students to incorporate courses from other degree programmes such as Media Studies, Media Management, Architecture and Urbanism, and Art and Design alongside the general Computer Science and Media course catalogue. Graded language courses up to 6 ECTS may also be included, or an additional HCI related project. The fourth and final semester is dedicated to the master’s thesis.

Further information on the curriculum : https://www.uni-weimar.de/en/media/studies/computer-science-and-media-hci/curriculum-master-hci/

Career Perspectives

The HCI Master was developed based upon our experiences with the long-standing Computer Science & Media Master program. CS&M graduates have all readily found employment in industry and academia, in R&D departments at large companies (e.g. Volkswagen, BMW), research institutes (e.g. Fraunhofer), as well as at universities, with many continuing into a PhD.

Usability is becoming more and more important for computer systems as computers are embedded in many aspects of everyday life. The ability to design complex systems and interfaces with regard to usability and appropriateness for the usage context increases in importance. HCI graduates can work both in software development, in particular in conception and development of novel interface technologies, and in the area of usability and user research, which both grow in demand on the job market. Our unique project-based study approach provides graduates with a skill set that qualifies them both for research and industry careers.

Studying in Weimar

The Bauhaus, the most influential design school in the 20th century, was founded in 1919 in our main building. A tie to this history was established in the renaming as Bauhaus-Universität Weimar in 1996. We are an international university in the unique, cultural city of Weimar. We are a vibrant institution, not a museum. Experimentation and excellence prevail throughout the 4 faculties where transdisciplinary projects and co-operations in research and education are conducted.

Weimar is a medium-sized city with UNESCO World Cultural Heritage sites. It is known for its connection to literature, the arts and music and also has a music university. The affordable living costs in this area of Germany and the rich cultural program of Weimar make it a very attractive location for students.

Application Process

Applicants who graduated outside of Europe apply online at: http://www.uni-assist.de.
Applicants who graduated in Europe and do not require a visa apply online at: Online-Application.

For details see http://www.uni-weimar.de/en/media/studies/computer-science-and-media-hci/application-master-hci/

Many typical questions about the program, application process and requirements are answered in our FAQ http://www.uni-weimar.de/en/media/studies/computer-science-and-media-hci/faq-application-hci/

Requirements

Higher Education Entrance Qualification:

Students need a school leaving certificate for studies completed at secondary education level. The formal entrance qualifications for international students are checked by uni-assist (see application process).

Academic Background in Computer Science (CS):

You need some academic background in CS, such as a bachelor's degree in CS, business informatics, HCI or related areas with a focus on CS and HCI. Students with a minor in computer science (at least 60 European Credit Points) may apply, here, decisions are on a case-by-case-base.

Only diplomas of international accredited universities will be accepted. Non-academic, practical experience in computer science alone does not suffice to qualify you.

Sufficient Marks from previous studies:

If the converted credit-weighted average grade of your Bachelor's degree is between 1.0 and 2.0 in the German system, your chances of acceptance are very good. Uni-assist does the conversion into the German system.

Language Requirements:

See http://www.uni-weimar.de/en/media/studies/computer-science-and-media-hci/application-master-hci/

The medium of instruction is English, some electives can be taken in German. B2 level (CEFR) of English proficiency is needed. We require a standardised language certificate (unless your bachelor degree was done in a native-English speaking country). We accept three types of language proficiency certificates:

TOEFL (80 internet-based, 550 paper-based at minimum)
IELTS (6.0 minimum)
ESOL Cambridge First Certificate in English

To be admitted, international students have to provide proof of German proficiency at level A1 (CEFR). This is required for registration to the program. You can apply before having the A1 certificate, but might need to show you are registered for the exam for your visum.


Motivational Letter and CV:

We highly recommend a detailed CV and motivation letter. Please do not send lengthy standard letters. Make clear you know our curriculum and point out why you chose our programme, and describe your specific interest in HCI i and why you want to specialize in this area.

Further information

Please check our FAQ
http://www.uni-weimar.de/en/media/studies/computer-science-and-media-hci/faq-application-hci/


link to Video by an international Master student (from the sibling program) talking about her experiences: https://vimeo.com/77485926

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This is a high quality course aimed at imparting advanced knowledge across a broad range of Computer Science and offering training in advanced skills. Read more

This is a high quality course aimed at imparting advanced knowledge across a broad range of Computer Science and offering training in advanced skills. It is suitable for those who wish to enhance their computing skills in order to improve their contribution to IT-related industry or to pursue R&D in academia or industry.

A student following the Advanced Computer Science course chooses two from about a dozen themes, each of which combines two related course units that build on top of each other. Certain combinations are integrated into specialised 'pathways' . A student who opts to follow the pathways will have the pathway specialism included in their degree certificate.

Teaching and learning

Computational thinking is becoming increasingly pervasive and is informing our understanding of phenomena across a range of areas; from engineering and physical sciences, to business and society. This is reflected in the way the Manchester course is taught, with students able to choose from an extremely broad range of units that not only cover core computer science topics, but that draw on our interdisciplinary research strengths in areas such as Medical and Health Sciences, Life Sciences and Humanities.

Coursework and assessment

Lectures and seminars are supported by practical exercises that impart skills as well as knowledge. These skills are augmented through an MSc project that enables students to put into practice the techniques they have been taught throughout the course.

Course unit details

A student following the Advanced Computer Science course chooses two from about a dozen themes, each of which combines around four related course units that build on top of each other. Certain combinations are integrated into specialised pathways

Facilities

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 

Career opportunities

The MSc in Advanced Computer Science has an excellent record of employment for its graduates. Opportunities exist in fields as diverse as finance, films and games, pharmaceuticals, healthcare, consumer products, and public services - virtually all areas of business and society. Our courses are considered among the best in the country and our graduates are actively targeted for the very top jobs in industry and academia. The MSc is also a route to further study at research level, or to careers in industrial or academic research.

We maintain close relationships with potential employers and run various activities throughout the year, including career fairs, guest lectures, and projects run jointly with partners from industry. This is managed by our Employability Tutor; see the School of Computer Science's employability pages for more information.

Accrediting organisations

This programme is CEng accredited and fulfils the educational requirements for registration as a Chartered Engineer when presented with CEng accredited Bachelors programme.



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The aim of this course is to provide students with a state-of-the-art collection of knowledge, understanding, and skills in the area of Advanced Computer Science. Read more

The aim of this course is to provide students with a state-of-the-art collection of knowledge, understanding, and skills in the area of Advanced Computer Science. This collection aims to be of particular depth so as to provide the student with the relevant knowledge, understanding, and skills to prepare them for a career in Computer Science research. It is designed for students with a good first degree in Computer Science or related areas who wish to deepen their understanding, knowledge, and skills, and aim at a research career in either Industry or Academia.

A student following this course chooses two themes, each consisting of a conceptually coherent set of two course units of 15 credits each, and they take three course units out of these. In addition, they follow three Research Seminars COMP80122, COMP80131, COMP80142 of 5 credits each. This will provide students with the necessary knowledge and skills in Research methodology, ethics and professional issues, as well as communication and presentation skills. As part of COMP80122, students actively participate in the school's annual research symposium, held in reading week between Period 1 and 2.

Teaching and learning

We use a variety of teaching forms, from face-to-face lectures via supervised and unsupervised labs, to self-study elements and supervised projects. Where appropriate, we use blended learning and enquiry based learning.

All our taught course units use coursework as a part of fomative assessment, to deepen and assess both knowledge and understanding and to teach and assess relevant skills.

Coursework and assessment

Course units are assessed through coursework (50%) and end-of-semester examination (50%). However, flexibility is allowed in the delivery and assessment, allowing methods appropriate for each subject. If a course unit's specific features require it for assessments through 66% coursework and 34% exam, or other distributions.

Further information is available at http://intranet.cs.man.ac.uk/intranet_subweb/postgrad

Course unit details

A student following this programme chooses two themes, each consisting of a conceptually coherent set of two course units of 15 credits each, and they take three course units out of these. In addition, they follow three Research Seminars COMP80122, COMP80131, COMP80142 of 5 credits each. This will provide students with the necessary knowledge and skills in Research methodology, ethics and professional issues, as well as communication and presentation skills. As part of COMP80122, students actively participate in the school's annual research symposium, held in reading week between Period 1 and 2.

This makes up the 60 credits taught part of the course.

The MRes research project is worth 120 credits and consists of the following parts: a taster project (10 credits) plus the research project (110 credits), which can but do not have to be related to the same subject and supervised by the same supervisor. The taster project is assessed via a short report. The research project is assessed in two parts, through the Project Progress Report (30 credits) and the Dissertation (80 credits).

A student who chooses two themes that belong to a given pathway, and whose project is in an area suitable for this pathway (which is determined by the examiners) can choose to graduate with an MRes in Advanced Computer Science with a specialisation in an available themes in their course options.

Facilities

  • Newly refurbished computing labs furnished with modern desktop computers
  • Access to world leading academic staff
  • Collaborative working labs complete with specialist computing and audio visual equipment to support group working.
  • Over 300 Computers in the School dedicated exclusively for the use of our students.
  • An Advanced Interfaces Laboratory to explore real time collaborative working;
  • Nanotechnology Centre for the fabrication of new generation electronic devices;
  • An e-Science Centre and Access Grid facility for world wide collaboration over the internet.
  • Access to a range of Integrated Development Environments (IDEs)
  • Specialist electronic system design and computer engineering tools.

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 

Career opportunities

Our Advanced Computer Science courses have an excellent record of employment for its graduates. Opportunities exist in fields as diverse as finance, films and games, pharmaceuticals, healthcare, consumer products, and public services - virtually all areas of business and society. Manchester Advanced Computer Science courses are considered among the best in the country and our graduates are actively targeted for the very top jobs in industry and academia.

The MRes in Advanced Computer Science particularly focuses students to explore further study at research level, or to careers in industrial or academic research and development.

We maintain close relationships with potential employers and run various activities throughout the year, including career fairs, guest lectures, and projects run jointly with partners from industry. This is managed by our Employability Tutor; see the School of Computer Science's employability pages for more information.



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Our Software Systems Engineering (SSE) MSc provides an ideal foundation for PhD study. The UCL SSE group is regularly ranked in the top three groups in the world (Microsoft Academic Search), you will be taught by those who are setting the international agenda, and our research has been repeatedly rated as world-class. Read more

Our Software Systems Engineering (SSE) MSc provides an ideal foundation for PhD study. The UCL SSE group is regularly ranked in the top three groups in the world (Microsoft Academic Search), you will be taught by those who are setting the international agenda, and our research has been repeatedly rated as world-class. Fully-funded PhD scholarships are available for high-performing students.

About this degree

Students are trained in the principles and techniques of engineering large, complex software systems and gain the opportunity to apply these techniques in a realistic group project setting. The programme analyses current practice in software systems engineering, looking at the most significant trends, problems and results in complex software systems.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of five core modules (75 credits), and either a group project (60 credits) or three research modules (90 credits) including a project. Students will be able to select between one and three modules (15 to 45 credits) from electives.

Core modules

  • Professional Practice (15 credits)
  • Requirements Engineering and Software Architecture (15 credits)
  • Software Abstractions and Systems Integration (15 credits)
  • Tools and Environments (15 credits)
  • Validation and Verification (15 credits)

Optional modules

Students must take either the Group Project in Software Systems Engineering (60 credits) with 45 credits from electives, or Research Methods, Project and Seminar in Software Engineering (90 credits) with 15 credits from electives.

  • Research Methods in Software Engineering (15 credits)
  • Research Project in Software Engineering (60 credits)
  • Research Seminar in Software Engineering (15 credits)
  • OR
  • Group Project in Software Systems Engineering (60 credits)

Please note: the availability and delivery of optional modules may vary, depending on your selection.

A list of acceptable elective modules is available on the UCL Computer Science webpage.

Dissertation/report

Most students participate in a group industrial project, generally in close collaboration with one of our industrial partners. 

Other students undertake either an individual or small-group research project, under the supervision of academics in UCL's Software Systems Engineering group.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, written and laboratory exercises, and group project supervision. Student performance is assessed through written exercises with modelling notations, laboratory exercises with tools and environments, unseen examination papers, and a significant, comprehensive group project.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Software Systems Engineering MSc

Funding

The department typically does not hire postgraduate students on research or teaching assistantships because the students need to work full-time on their studies for the programme.

Four MSc Scholarships, worth £4000 each, are made available by UCL Computer Science to UK/EU offer holders with a record of excellent academic achievement. The closing date is 30 June 2018. For more information, please see the department pages.

For a comprehensive list of the funding opportunities available at UCL, including funding relevant to your nationality, please visit the Scholarships and Funding website.

Careers

This professionally oriented programme provides an ideal foundation for graduates who wish to pursue a career as a software architect or leader of software development organisations. It also provides an excellent introduction for those who want to pursue research in software systems engineering.

Graduates from UCL are keenly sought after by the world's leading organisations, and many progress in their careers to secure senior and influential positions. UCL Computer Science (UCL-CS) graduates are particularly valued as a result of the department's strong international reputation, strong links with industry, and ideal location close to the City of London.

Graduates have found positions at global companies such as Barclays and RBS.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Software Developer, BNP Paribas
  • Technology Analyst, Morgan Stanley
  • IT Consultant, OnTrack
  • Software Analyst and Designer, Nok Technology
  • Security Science, UCL

Employability

There is, throughout the world, a strong demand for software engineers with solid foundations covering not only the programming aspects of software development, but also aspects related to requirements engineering, software architectures, system integration, and testing.

Following graduation, our students are generally hired as software engineers or software architects, sometimes by companies they have engaged with in the context of their MSc project.

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL Computer Science is recognised as a world-leader in teaching and research.

UCL received the highest percentage (96%) for quality of research in Computer Science and Informatics in the UK's most recent Research Excellence Framework (REF2014).

Our Master's programmes have some of the highest employment rates and starting salaries, with graduates entering a wide variety of industries from entertainment to finance.

We take an experimental approach to our subject and place a high value on our extensive range of industrial collaborations. In the recent past, students have worked on projects and coursework in collaboration with Microsoft, IBM, JP Morgan, Citigroup and BNP Paribas.

Accreditation:

CITPFL - Accredited by BCS. CEng (partial fulfilment) - Accreditation by the BCS.



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In the past twenty years, the Web has transformed society and changed the way we work, trade, learn, do science, organise our lives, and play. Read more

In the past twenty years, the Web has transformed society and changed the way we work, trade, learn, do science, organise our lives, and play. The Web is, on the one hand, a network of interlinked computers, protocols, and software and, on the other hand, a socio-cultural phenomenon that influences law, the media, business, science, etc. To shape and work with the current and future forms of the Web, we need to understand its underlying design principles and concepts, relevant issues and techniques, and how these interact and influence each other. The fast changing nature of the Web means that such a deep understanding is essential to understand the latest developments and their potential.

The Advanced Web Technologies pathway is centred around a core theme of the same name, Advanced Web Technologies, and combines it with a choice of closely related yet complimentary themes, including Software Engineering 1 & 2, Making Sense of Complex Data, and Learning from Data. Students following this theme will gain an understanding and insight into the technologies that deliver the Web as we see it today. The topics covered include underlying languages and standards used to represent information on the web; techniques for understanding and managing data and information in a web context; and techniques and technology used to design and deliver web infrastructure.

Teaching and learning

Computational thinking is becoming increasingly pervasive and is informing our understanding of phenomena across a range of areas; from engineering and physical sciences, to business and society. This is reflected in the way the Manchester course is taught, with students able to choose from an extremely broad range of units that not only cover core computer science topics, but that draw on our interdisciplinary research strengths in areas such as Medical and Health Sciences, Life Sciences and Humanities.

Coursework and assessment

Lectures and seminars are supported by practical exercises that impart skills as well as knowledge. These skills are augmented through an MSc project that enables students to put into practice the techniques they have been taught throughout the course.

Facilities

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 

Career opportunities

Students following the Advanced Web Technologies pathway have all the career choices and options as described for general Advanced Computer Science.

In addition, students of this pathway are ideally placed to work in positions requiring an understanding of modern Wed infrastructure, ranging from the obvious Web developers and system providers to basically all companies employing or developing Web technologies.

We maintain close relationships with potential employers and run various activities throughout the year, including career fairs, guest lectures, and projects run jointly with partners from industry. This is managed by our Employability Tutor; see the School of Computer Science's employability pages for more information.

Accrediting organisations

This programme is CEng accredited and fulfils the educational requirements for registration as a Chartered Engineer when presented with CEng accredited Bachelors programme.



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Artificial Intelligence is a well-established, exciting branch of computer science concerned with methods to make computers, or machines in general, intelligent… Read more

Artificial Intelligence is a well-established, exciting branch of computer science concerned with methods to make computers, or machines in general, intelligent - so that they are able to learn from experience, to derive implicit knowledge from the one given explicitly, to understand natural languages such as English, Arabic, or Urdu, to determine the content of images, to work collaboratively together, etc. The techniques used in AI are as diverse as the problems tackled: they range from classical logic to statistical approaches to simulate brains.

This pathway reflects the diversity of AI in that it freely combines a number of themes related to AI techniques, namely Making Sense of Complex Data, Learning from Data, Reasoning and Optimisation, and Advanced Web Technologies.

Teaching and learning

Computational thinking is becoming increasingly pervasive and is informing our understanding of phenomena across a range of areas; from engineering and physical sciences, to business and society. This is reflected in the way the Manchester course is taught, with students able to choose from an extremely broad range of units that not only cover core computer science topics, but that draw on our interdisciplinary research strengths in areas such as Medical and Health Sciences, Life Sciences and Humanities.

Coursework and assessment

Lectures and seminars are supported by practical exercises that impart skills as well as knowledge. These skills are augmented through an MSc project that enables students to put into practice the techniques they have been taught throughout the course.

Facilities

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 

Career opportunities

Students following the Artificial Intelligence pathway have all the career choices and options as described for general Advanced Computer Science.

In addition, students of this pathway are ideally placed to work in positions requiring an understanding of modern AI formalism and technologies such as Natural Language Processing, Machine Learning, and Semantic Technologies. This includes the obvious positions in the games industry, but also positions in finance, commerce, and scientific research, and many more.

We maintain close relationships with potential employers and run various activities throughout the year, including career fairs, guest lectures, and projects run jointly with partners from industry. This is managed by our Employability Tutor; see the School of Computer Science's employability pages for more information.

Accrediting organisations

This programme is CEng accredited and fulfils the educational requirements for registration as a Chartered Engineer when presented with CEng accredited Bachelors programme.



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Individuals, governments and organizations now routinely connect their computers to the Internet to communicate, provide services, and access massive stores of shared information. Read more

Individuals, governments and organizations now routinely connect their computers to the Internet to communicate, provide services, and access massive stores of shared information. These on-line activities, many conducted beyond national boundaries, have opened up enormous opportunities for security attacks such as identity thefts, computer hackings, privacy breaches, technical sabotages, etc. Addressing security threats and attacks in this vast and complex distributed environment is an immensely challenging task.

The Computer Security pathway is centred round a core Security theme that introduces students to fundamental security topics that arise in the design, analysis, and implementation of networked and distributed systems. Subsidiary themes allow students to investigate broader areas in which they may apply their newly acquired skills. The pathway is designed for students who wish to specialize in the security aspect of the Information Technology field.

Teaching and learning

Computational thinking is becoming increasingly pervasive and is informing our understanding of phenomena across a range of areas; from engineering and physical sciences, to business and society. This is reflected in the way the Manchester course is taught, with students able to choose from an extremely broad range of units that not only cover core computer science topics, but that draw on our interdisciplinary research strengths in areas such as Medical and Health Sciences, Life Sciences and Humanities.

Coursework and assessment

Lectures and seminars are supported by practical exercises that impart skills as well as knowledge. These skills are augmented through an MSc project that enables students to put into practice the techniques they have been taught throughout the course.

Facilities

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 

Career opportunities

The MSc in Advanced Computer Science has an excellent record of employment for its graduates. Opportunities exist in fields as diverse as finance, films and games, pharmaceuticals, healthcare, consumer products, and public services - virtually all areas of business and society. Manchester Computer Science MSc courses are considered among the best in the country and our graduates are actively targeted for the very top jobs in industry and academia.

Security plays a role in almost all areas where computers are being used, including, for example, finance, healthcare, consumer products, and public services. Thus students who have followed the Computer Security pathway will be ideally placed in any of these areas, especially in positions where they need to be aware of security issues and solutions.

We maintain close relationships with potential employers and run various activities throughout the year, including career fairs, guest lectures, and projects run jointly with partners from industry. This is managed by our Employability Tutor; see the School of Computer Science's employability pages for more information.

Accrediting organisations

This programme is CEng accredited and fulfills the educational requirements for registration as a Chartered Engineer when presented with CEng accredited Bachelors programme.



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Computer Systems Engineering is a well-established branch of Computer Science, closely related to Electrical Engineering, and concerned with software-hardware integration and the development of high-performance and energy-efficient embedded systems, for example as used in mobile computing. Read more

Computer Systems Engineering is a well-established branch of Computer Science, closely related to Electrical Engineering, and concerned with software-hardware integration and the development of high-performance and energy-efficient embedded systems, for example as used in mobile computing. Aspects covered include questions such as how software can be designed to make use of new, ever more powerful (and often multicore) hardware, or how hardware can be designed to support certain software paradigms. The School of Computer Science is home to internationally renowned research groups working on these challenging tasks, and students following the Computer Systems Engineering pathway will have the opportunity to profit from their understanding of current technology and visions of how to exploit, for example, the formidable complexity of the billion transistor microchips that semiconductor technology will make commonplace over the next decade.

This pathway combines two themes, namely the Parallel Computing in the Mulit-core Era theme and the Mobile Computing theme. The former provides the student with techniques and tools to successfully develop concurrent multicore systems, while alleviating problems of correctness, reliability, performance and system management. The latter provides the student with an understanding of the current state of the art in computing to support mobility for telecommunications.

Teaching and learning

Computational thinking is becoming increasingly pervasive and is informing our understanding of phenomena across a range of areas; from engineering and physical sciences, to business and society. This is reflected in the way the Manchester course is taught, with students able to choose from an extremely broad range of units that not only cover core computer science topics, but that draw on our interdisciplinary research strengths in areas such as Medical and Health Sciences, Life Sciences and Humanities.

Coursework and assessment

Lectures and seminars are supported by practical exercises that impart skills as well as knowledge. These skills are augmented through an MSc project that enables students to put into practice the techniques they have been taught throughout the course.

Facilities

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 

Career opportunities

The MSc in Advanced Computer Science has an excellent record of employment for its graduates. Opportunities exist in fields as diverse as finance, films and games, pharmaceuticals, healthcare, consumer products, and public services - virtually all areas of business and society. Manchester Computer Science MSc courses are considered among the best in the country and our graduates are actively targeted for the very top jobs in industry and academia.

We maintain close relationships with potential employers and run various activities throughout the year, including career fairs, guest lectures, and projects run jointly with partners from industry. This is managed by our Employability Tutor; see the School of Computer Science's employability pages for more information.

Accrediting organisations

This programme is CEng accredited and fulfils the educational requirements for registration as a Chartered Engineer when presented with CEng accredited Bachelors programme.



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Efficient management of data and knowledge are key factors not only to the success of almost any enterprise, but also to the successful handling of today's vast amounts of science related data. Read more

Efficient management of data and knowledge are key factors not only to the success of almost any enterprise, but also to the successful handling of today's vast amounts of science related data: with the transition to the information age and the knowledge economy, data has become both increasingly central and critical to all activities. For example, imagine the huge amounts of genomic or patient data available electronically, and how the quality of their management can affect society.

The Data and Knowledge Management pathway allows students to take specialist themes concerned with methods and technologies for the adequate management of data and knowledge. The Managing Data theme focuses on the design, maintenance, and query processing of both structured and unstructured databases. The Learning from Data theme covers principles, algorithms, and technologies underlying machine learning, probabilistic modelling, and optimisation, while exposing students to relevant applications. The Advanced Web Technologies theme provides students with a deep understanding of the technologies that are being used to support the continuing evolution of the Web, including Semantic Web technologies.

Teaching and learning

Computational thinking is becoming increasingly pervasive and is informing our understanding of phenomena across a range of areas; from engineering and physical sciences, to business and society. This is reflected in the way the Manchester course is taught, with students able to choose from an extremely broad range of units that not only cover core computer science topics, but that draw on our interdisciplinary research strengths in areas such as Medical and Health Sciences, Life Sciences and Humanities.

Coursework and assessment

Lectures and seminars are supported by practical exercises that impart skills as well as knowledge. These skills are augmented through an MSc project that enables students to put into practice the techniques they have been taught throughout the course.

Facilities

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 

Career opportunities

Students following the Data and Knowlege Management pathway have all the career choices and options as described for general Advanced Computer Science.

In addition, students of this pathway are ideally placed to work in positions requiring an understanding of modern data and knowledge management tools and technologies. This includes data and knowledge engineering positions in all areas where data is stored and managed electronically, i.e., in all areas, including the finance, retail, and healthcare sector.

We maintain close relationships with potential employers and run various activities throughout the year, including career fairs, guest lectures, and projects run jointly with partners from industry. This is managed by our Employability Tutor; see the School of Computer Science's employability pages for more information.

Accrediting organisations

This programme is CEng accredited and fulfils the educational requirements for registration as a Chartered Engineer when presented with CEng accredited Bachelors programme.



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These are exciting times in biology and medicine. The genomics revolution is opening up whole new areas of research - from new insights into how organisms function, to new understandings of disease and disease processes. Read more

These are exciting times in biology and medicine. The genomics revolution is opening up whole new areas of research - from new insights into how organisms function, to new understandings of disease and disease processes. Medicine is currently involved in the largest and most ambitious IT project in the world - the capture and interpretation of electronic patient records. This information will make health care much more effective and can help spot new diseases early - whilst they can still be contained and controlled. At the heart of all these developments are data and knowledge - and a real need and demand for the skills and techniques that computer scientists can bring these problem areas. Biology and healthcare now provide some of the fastest growing and most challenging areas for computer scientists to apply their skills.

The Digital Biology pathway is centered around a central theme of Biohealth Informatics. The theme is specifically designed for computer scientists without any previous experience of medicine or biology and will help you to develop the core skills needed to work or research (as a computer scientist) in these rapidly evolving fields. This core theme is complemented by a range of other themes that allow students to develop additional skills which have important applications in healthcare and biology.

Teaching and learning

Computational thinking is becoming increasingly pervasive and is informing our understanding of phenomena across a range of areas; from engineering and physical sciences, to business and society. This is reflected in the way the Manchester course is taught, with students able to choose from an extremely broad range of units that not only cover core computer science topics, but that draw on our interdisciplinary research strengths in areas such as Medical and Health Sciences, Life Sciences and Humanities.

Coursework and assessment

Lectures and seminars are supported by practical exercises that impart skills as well as knowledge. These skills are augmented through an MSc project that enables students to put into practice the techniques they have been taught throughout the course.

Facilities

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 

Career opportunities

Students following the Digital Biology pathway have all the career options as described for general Advanced Computer Science.

In addition, students following this pathway are well placed for careers with healthcare providers, the pharmaceutical industry, and bio-health research institutes.

We maintain close relationships with potential employers and run various activities throughout the year, including career fairs, guest lectures, and projects run jointly with partners from industry. This is managed by our Employability Tutor; see the School of Computer Science's employability pages for more information.

Accrediting organisations

This programme is CEng accredited and fulfills the educational requirements for registration as a Chartered Engineer when presented with CEng accredited Bachelors programme.



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Semantic Technologies is a relatively new term that describes all areas concerned with using and developing software and methodologies for meaning-centred manipulation of information. Read more

Semantic Technologies is a relatively new term that describes all areas concerned with using and developing software and methodologies for meaning-centred manipulation of information. The aim is to provide software and methodologies so that web resources, data in databases and raw data associated with programs can be processed and manipulated in a more intelligent way. This requires storing, understanding, manipulating and reasoning about the meaning of the data. Semantic technologies are increasingly being used in such varied applications as the semantic web, health care and biomedical domains, the life sciences, software/hardware industries and the automotive industry.

The Semantic Technologies pathway combines themes such as 'Data on the Web' with 'Ontology Engineering and Automated Reasoning'. These core offerings can be combined with any other theme. Good complementary themes are Data Engineering, Managing Data, Learning from Data, Security and Software Engineering.

Teaching and learning

Computational thinking is becoming increasingly pervasive and is informing our understanding of phenomena across a range of areas; from engineering and physical sciences, to business and society. This is reflected in the way the Manchester course is taught, with students able to choose from an extremely broad range of units that not only cover core computer science topics, but that draw on our interdisciplinary research strengths in areas such as Medical and Health Sciences, Life Sciences and Humanities.

Coursework and assessment

Lectures and seminars are supported by practical exercises that impart skills as well as knowledge. These skills are augmented through an MSc project that enables students to put into practice the techniques they have been taught throughout the course.

Facilities

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 

Career opportunities

Students following the Semantic Technologies pathway have all the career choices and options as described for general Advanced Computer Science.

In addition, students of this pathway are ideally placed to work in software companies or for healthcare providers who are using or developing Semantic Technologies.

We maintain close relationships with potential employers and run various activities throughout the year, including career fairs, guest lectures, and projects run jointly with partners from industry. This is managed by our Employability Tutor; see the School of Computer Science's employability pages for more information.

Accrediting organisations

This programme is CEng accredited and fulfils the educational requirements for registration as a Chartered Engineer when presented with a CEng accredited Bachelors programme.



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Microprocessor manufacturers have recently presented the software industry with its most serious challenge ever, by switching from serial execution architectures clocked at ever-increasing clock rates to ever-more parallel multi-core architectures clocked at a constant (or even decreasing) clock rate. Read more

Microprocessor manufacturers have recently presented the software industry with its most serious challenge ever, by switching from serial execution architectures clocked at ever-increasing clock rates to ever-more parallel multi-core architectures clocked at a constant (or even decreasing) clock rate. The consequences will be profound because parallel computational activities will need to be handled as the norm, rather than the exception; programmers of the future will need skills that are currently possessed by very few, due to the inherent complexities of parallel systems.

This pathway is centred round a core theme, Parallel Computing in the Multi-core Era , that introduces students to the aforementioned complexities, and provides techniques and tools that can alleviate the ensuing problems of correctness, reliability, performance and system management. Subsidiary themes allow students to investigate broader areas in which they might apply their newly learned skills.

Teaching and learning

Computational thinking is becoming increasingly pervasive and is informing our understanding of phenomena across a range of areas; from engineering and physical sciences, to business and society. This is reflected in the way the Manchester course is taught, with students able to choose from an extremely broad range of units that not only cover core computer science topics, but that draw on our interdisciplinary research strengths in areas such as Medical and Health Sciences, Life Sciences and Humanities.

Coursework and assessment

Lectures and seminars are supported by practical exercises that impart skills as well as knowledge. These skills are augmented through an MSc project that enables students to put into practice the techniques they have been taught throughout the course.

Facilities

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 

Career opportunities

Students following the Multi-Core Computing pathway have all the career options as described for general Advanced Computer Science.

In addition, students following this pathway are well placed for careers in the software industry since they will acquire the necessary skills to design and develop software that makes the most out of state-of-the-art multi-core architectures. This includes the games industry, the financial sector, and all other areas in which high performance computing is key.

We maintain close relationships with potential employers and run various activities throughout the year, including career fairs, guest lectures, and projects run jointly with partners from industry. This is managed by our Employability Tutor; see the School of Computer Science's employability pages for more information.

Accrediting organisations

This programme is CEng accredited and fulfils the educational requirements for registration as a Chartered Engineer when presented with a CEng accredited Bachelors programme.



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Software Engineering is a well-established, central part of Computer Science, and concerned with the design and use of techniques to support humans to build… Read more

Software Engineering is a well-established, central part of Computer Science, and concerned with the design and use of techniques to support humans to build software systems that are reliable, adaptable, usable, maintainable, etc, despite the fact that they are usually developed by large groups of people with different ideas, conceptualisations, or working styles, and against a tight schedule and possibly conflicting or unclear requirements. The understanding and mastering of these techniques is essential both for people who are part of this group and for those managing such a group or project.

The Software Engineering pathway combines two themes of the same name, Software Engineering 1 & 2. These themes covers both an overview of existing approaches to Software Engineering, and two particular approaches at the forefront of Software Engineering research and practice; Pattern-based and Component-based Software Development.

Teaching and learning

Computational thinking is becoming increasingly pervasive and is informing our understanding of phenomena across a range of areas; from engineering and physical sciences, to business and society. This is reflected in the way the Manchester course is taught, with students able to choose from an extremely broad range of units that not only cover core computer science topics, but that draw on our interdisciplinary research strengths in areas such as Medical and Health Sciences, Life Sciences and Humanities.

Coursework and assessment

Lectures and seminars are supported by practical exercises that impart skills as well as knowledge. These skills are augmented through an MSc project that enables students to put into practice the techniques they have been taught throughout the course.

Facilities

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 

Career opportunities

Students following the Software Engineering pathway have all the career choices and options as described for general Advanced Computer Science.

In addition, students of this pathway are ideally placed to work in positions requiring an understanding of modern Software Engineering techniques and tools. This includes the obvious positions in the games industry, but also positions in finance, commerce, software project management, etc.

We maintain close relationships with potential employers and run various activities throughout the year, including career fairs, guest lectures, and projects run jointly with partners from industry. This is managed by our Employability Tutor; see the School of Computer Science's employability pages for more information.

Accrediting organisations

This programme is CEng accredited and fulfils the educational requirements for registration as a Chartered Engineer when presented with a CEng accredited Bachelors programme.



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