• Swansea University Featured Masters Courses
  • Anglia Ruskin University Featured Masters Courses
  • Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Edinburgh Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Edinburgh Featured Masters Courses
  • Jacobs University Bremen gGmbH Featured Masters Courses
  • Goldsmiths, University of London Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Southampton Featured Masters Courses
King’s College London Featured Masters Courses
Vlerick Business School Featured Masters Courses
FindA University Ltd Featured Masters Courses
FindA University Ltd Featured Masters Courses
University of Pennsylvania Featured Masters Courses
"crystallisation"×
0 miles

Masters Degrees (Crystallisation)

We have 6 Masters Degrees (Crystallisation)

  • "crystallisation" ×
  • clear all
Showing 1 to 6 of 6
Order by 
This programme will provide you with advanced chemical engineering and process technology skills for exciting and challenging careers in the chemical and process industries. Read more

This programme will provide you with advanced chemical engineering and process technology skills for exciting and challenging careers in the chemical and process industries. This programme also prepares graduates for a PhD study.

If you’ve studied chemical engineering before, you’ll develop your knowledge in key areas such as reaction engineering, process modelling and simulation, pharmaceutical formulation, and fuel processing. If your degree is in chemistry or another related science or engineering discipline, you’ll build your knowledge and skills to convert to a specialisation in chemical engineering.

The course has been designed to provide a greater depth of knowledge in aspects of advanced chemical engineering and a range of up-to-date process technologies. These will enable you to design, operate and manage processes and associated manufacturing plants and to provide leadership in innovation, research and development, and technology transfer.

Specialist facilities

Your Research Project module gives you the chance to study in cutting-edge facilities where our researchers are pushing the boundaries of chemical engineering.

We have world-class facilities for carrying out research in manufacturing (including crystallisation), processing and characterising particulate systems for a wide range of technological materials, as well as facilities for nanotechnology and colloid science/technology.

We also have high performance computing facilities and state-of-the-art computer software, including computational fluid dynamics (CFD), for modelling and simulation of a wide range of processes. This will provide a strong background knowledge in industrial process and equipment design and optimisation.

Accreditation

This course is accredited by the Institution of Chemical Engineers (IChemE) under licence from the UK regulator, the Engineering Council. This adheres to the requirements of further learning for Chartered Engineer (CEng) status.

Course content

The path you take through this programme will depend on your background. If your degree is in Chemical Engineering, you’ll take a suite of compulsory modules on advanced topics such as recent advances in chemical engineering, reaction engineering, multi-scale modelling (including CFD), pharmaceutical formulation and fuel processing. If your degree is not in Chemical Engineering, you’ll build the knowledge you need to succeed in this area with modules such as Separation Processes, Reaction Engineering and Chemical Process Technology and Design.

You’ll then complement this with a choice of optional modules, allowing you to gain specialist knowledge in a topic that suits your career plans or personal interests. Different modules will be available to you depending on your background – for example, if your degree is in Chemical Engineering you could study Process Optimisation and Control, while if your degree is in another subject you might want to gain an understanding of energy management.

Every student undertakes a research project that runs throughout the year. You’ll focus on a topic of your choice that fits within one of the School’s research areas and produce an independent study, reflecting the knowledge and skills you’ve acquired. This will enable you to gain experience of planning, executing and reporting a research work of the type you will undertake in an industrial/academic environment.

Want to find out more about your modules?

Take a look at the Chemical Engineering module descriptions for more detail on what you will study.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • Research Project (MSc) 60 credits

Optional modules

  • Team Design Project 15 credits
  • Chemical Products Design and Development 15 credits
  • Separation Processes 30 credits
  • Chemical Process Technology 15 credits
  • Chemical Reaction Processes 15 credits
  • Batch Process Engineering 15 credits
  • Chemical Engineering Principles 15 credits
  • Multi-Scale Modelling and Simulation 30 credits
  • Pharmaceutical Formulation 15 credits
  • Advanced Reaction Engineering 15 credits
  • Nuclear Operations 15 credits
  • Advances in Chemical Engineering 15 credits
  • Fuel Processing 15 credits
  • Materials Structures and Characterisation 15 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Chemical Engineering MSc in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

We use a variety of teaching and learning methods including lectures, practicals, tutorials and seminars. Independent study is also an important element of the programme, as you develop your problem-solving and research skills as well as your subject knowledge.

Assessment

You’ll be assessed using a range of techniques including problem sheets, technical reports, presentations, in-class tests, assignments and exams. Optional modules may also use alternative assessments.

Projects

The research project is one of the most satisfying elements of this course. It allows you to apply what you’ve learned to a piece of research focusing on a real-world problem, and it can be used to explore and develop your specific interests.

Recent projects by students in MSc Chemical Engineering have included:

  • Control of heat release and temperature levels in jacketed stirred tank vessels
  • Pool boiling heat transfer of nanofluids
  • Effect of surface wettability and spreading on Nanofluid boiling heat transfer
  • Aspen Plus simulation of CO2 removal by amine absorption from power plant
  • Modelling of CO2 absorption using solvents in spray and packed towers
  • Historical data analysis using artificial neural network modelling
  • Computational modelling of particulate flow
  • Characterisation of sedimentation process in two-phase flow based on continuity theory using impedance tomography
  • Finding a new technique for on-line monitoring of crystallisation process using an electrode probe.

A proportion of projects are formally linked to industry, and may include spending time at the collaborator’s site over the summer

Career opportunities

Career prospects are excellent. There is a wide range of career opportunities in the chemical and allied industries in process engineering, process design and research and development as well as in finance and management.

Graduates have gone on to work in a variety of roles at companies like National Environmental Standards and Regulations Enforcement, the National Centre of Science and Technology Evaluation, Invensys Operations Management, Worley Parsons, Hollister-Stier Laboratories, BOC, ASM Technologies and more. 



Read less
International Human Rights Law LLM is a unique programme designed to enable students to progress to become human rights practitioners and specialists in this dynamic area of law. Read more

About the course

International Human Rights Law LLM is a unique programme designed to enable students to progress to become human rights practitioners and specialists in this dynamic area of law.

Students will critically engage with many of the human rights issues that feature strongly in public debate today, gaining comprehensive understanding of international human rights law and its interconnection with international criminal and comparative criminal law.

This course places particular emphasis on the radical transformations that international human rights law has experienced since the beginning of the 21st century, with the genesis of the International Criminal Court, the on-going process of the United Nations reform and the post 9/11 shift to a more securitarian approach to criminal process values, especially regarding the war against terror.

The course offers:

A detailed analysis of the theory, history and development of human rights, and an examination of the main regional mechanisms of human rights protection.

An overview of a variety of contemporary human rights topics, including the examination of major developments and recent tendencies in the field of international human rights protection.

Analysis of contemporary topics and challenges of international human rights protection including:
the emergence of the right to development and the so-called third- generation rights;
human rights advocacy and global governance though NGOs and non-State actors;
the crystallisation of group rights, minorities and indigenous peoples’ rights;
the challenges posed to international human rights law by international migration and the enhanced need of protection of migrants, asylum seekers and refugees;
women’s rights and the rights of the child, including protection against victims of human trafficking;
the crystallisation of general equality and the development of human rights advocacy for sexual and gay rights.

Brunel Law School has an excellent reputation in this field. The International Human Rights Law Review - a peer-reviewed international journal - is edited at Brunel Law School. The School is able to attract a number of leading guest speakers to support further debate and learning’s around the complexity of human rights, and provides students with a wider variety of perspectives particularly in the international context.

The programme is available full-time:
September (12 months)
January (15 months due to dissertation submission requirements)

And also part-time:
September (24 months)
January (27 months due to dissertation submission requirements)

The course is aimed at graduates from all over the world who are keen to develop an expertise in the evolving discipline and develop a career in international human rights law.

Aims

You will develop an expertise in the corpus and complexities of international human rights law.

You will acquire critical and analytical skills in the complex field of international human rights law.

You will be able to demonstrate through original research the application of knowledge, practical understanding and critical appreciation that can contribute to the discourse on international human rights law.

You will gain professional skills required to develop a career in international human rights law.

You will gain detailed knowledge of the European system of human rights protection in particular, both at a theoretical and practical level, including the ability to handle cases before the European Court of Human Rights.

Course Content

The LLM consists of both compulsory and optional modules, a typical selection can be found below. Modules can vary from year to year, but these offer a good idea of what we teach.

Compulsory modules:

Term I

European System of Human Rights Protection (15 credits) 1 or 2
Foundations of International Human Rights Law (15 credits) 1 or 2

Term II

Theory and Practice of International Human Rights (15 credits) 1
Regional Systems of Human Rights Protection: America, Africa, Asia (15 credits) 1

Optional modules:

Term I

International Human Rights and Islamic Law (15 credits) 2
Public International Law (15 credits) 1 or 2
International Humanitarian Law 2
Multiculturalism and Human Rights (15 credits) 2
International Criminal Law (15 credits) 2

Term II

International Environmental Law (15 credits) 2
Corporate Governance and Corporate Social Responsibility (15 credits) 2
World Trade Organisation (WTO) abd Human Rights Law (15 credits) 2
Human Rights of Women (15 credits) 2
Counter-terrorism and Human Rights (15 credits) 2

** The superscript 1 or 2 indicates which year of study each module will normally take place in for part-time students.

Assessment

The faculty places great emphasis on the creation of a unique learning experience. In addition to attending seminars and preparing coursework and exams, students will also learn by participating in research centre activities and research trips, contributing to newsletters, making oral presentations, attending law film screenings as well as participating in debating events and reading group sessions.

Assessment methods in this programme range from coursework, seen examinations and a dissertation (15,000 words) to oral presentations and assessment by contribution in seminars.

Special Features

Research Centres
The Law School benefits from active research centres which regularly host research seminars and workshops. Many of these have been on the topic of international human rights. In the most recent Research Excellence Framework (REF2014) we were ranked 14th in the UK for REF Intensity in Law.

Extra-curricular Activities
The Law School offers students numerous opportunities to participate in extra-curricular activities, including a Reading Group, a Law Film society, mooting and debating societies and research workshops organized by the research centres based at the school. LLM students are expected to play a leading role organising and participating in these activities.

Research Skills
The Law School offers an elaborate scheme of research and writing skills sessions designed to facilitate students’ learning and to equip them with appropriate transferable skills.
Some of the modules in this programme also integrate skills training, for example on how to answer essay questions, make use of electronic legal databases and cite legal authorities.

Career Support
Students benefit from the university's award winning 'Professional Development Centre' which offers specialist workshops, interview skills, and one-to-one advice sessions to help prepare graduates for their chosen career.

Teaching Expertise
Brunel Law School has an excellent reputation in this field. The International Human Rights Law Review - a peer-reviewed international journal - is edited at Brunel Law School. The school is able to attract a number of leading guest speakers to support further debate and learnings around the complexity of human rights, and provides students with a wider variety of perspectives particularly in the international context.
This is a challenging programme that is at the forefront of thinking in International Human Rights Law. It is taught by leading academics with a wide range of expertise in human rights practice, policy, activism and governmental, international and non-governmental organisations. As a result, the programme is research-led, and some of the reading required for the programme is based on books published by our academics.

Read less
This course gives you specialised knowledge of the analytical techniques used to detect, identify and quantitatively determine drugs and related substances. Read more

Why this course?

This course gives you specialised knowledge of the analytical techniques used to detect, identify and quantitatively determine drugs and related substances.

You’re introduced to techniques for evaluating analytical data and validating analytical methods. You’ll also examine strategies for analytical research and development.

You’ll gain practical experience in a wide range of modern instrumentation and techniques.

See the website https://www.strath.ac.uk/courses/postgraduatetaught/pharmaceuticalanalysis/

You’ll study

The course consists of four theory and two practical modules running between October and April followed by examinations.
If you pass all exams and wish to proceed to MSc then you’ll undertake a 10-week research project. This will be in the University or at an external company or organisation. You’ll submit a thesis at the end of August.

Facilities

The Strathclyde Institute of Pharmacy & Biomedical Sciences (SIPBS) offers an excellent environment for research and teaching. It’s located in a new building with several laboratories. All are fitted with the latest equipment.
The course has access to the full range of analytical spectroscopic and chromatographic instrumentation including:
- Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR)
- Ultra-Violet (UV)
- Attenuated Total Reflectance Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (ATR_FTIR)
- Mass Spectrometry (MS)
- High-Pressure Liquid Chromatography (HPLC)
- Gas Chromatography (GC)
- Liquid Chromatograph/Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry (LC/GC-MS)

Teaching staff

- Dr David Watson, Course Leader
Dr Watson’s general research interests include:
- mass spectrometry-based metabolomics
- mass spectrometry imaging
- chromatographic retention mechanisms
- chemical profile and biological properties of propolis

- Dr Darren Edwards
Dr Edwards teaches at both undergraduate and postgraduate level in analytical chemistry, specifically:
- spectroscopy (UV/visible, AA, ICP, FP)
- chromatography (HPLC/TLC)
- bioanalysis and use of pharmacopeias

- Dr Iain D H Oswald
Dr Oswald is part of the team that teaches spectroscopic methods such as IR, spectrofluorimetry and circular dichroism. His research focuses on materials at high pressure and he has a general interest in the solid-state and polymorphism/co-crystallisation of materials.

- Dr Christine Dufes
Dr Dufes teaches Binding Assays on the MSc course. Her research interests are:
- Design and development of novel tumour-targeted anti-cancer therapeutic systems
- Design and development of novel therapeutic systems able to reach the brain after systemic administration, with the ultimate aim to facilitate drug delivery to brain tumours and neurodegenerative disorders.

- Dr RuAngelie Edrada-Ebel
Dr Edrada-Ebel teaches NMR spectroscopy and Mass Spectrometry in Pharmaceutical Analysis. Her research focuses on natural products chemistry of macro-organisms and micro-organisms from both the marine and the terrestrial habitat.

English language requirements

English language minimum IELTS 6.5.
We offer a range of English Language course for students who wish to improve their English. Module 3 is free of charge to all applicants and we strongly recommend all international students to take advantage of this free course.
We also offer comprehensive English language pre-sessional and foundation courses for students whose IELTS scores are below 6.5.
For students with IELTS of 6.0, an offer can be made conditional on completing Modules 2 and 3 of Pre-sessional English.
For students with IELTS of 5.5, an offer can be made conditional on completing Modules 1, 2 and 3 of Pre-sessional English.

Pre-Masters preparation course

The Pre-Masters Programme is a preparation course for international students (non EU/UK) who do not meet the entry requirements for a Masters degree at University of Strathclyde. The Pre-Masters programme provides progression to a number of degree options.

To find out more about the courses and opportunities on offer visit isc.strath.ac.uk or call today on +44 (0) 1273 339333 and discuss your education future. You can also complete the online application form. To ask a question please fill in the enquiry form and talk to one of our multi-lingual Student Enrolment Advisers today.

Learning & teaching

The course is taught by experts based in SIPBS. There’s also specialised lectures from visiting professors and world-renowned scientists who are working in the pharmaceutical and analytical industries and legislative bodies, including the European Pharmacopoeia.
Teaching of theory and applications is through lectures, tutorials and web-based learning. The material is further reinforced with practical sessions which provide you with hands-on experience with a wide range of modern instrumental techniques.

Assessment

Assessment is through written and practical examinations and submission of a thesis (MSc students only).

Careers

Many of our graduates obtain positions in the pharmaceutical & chemical industries and some have continued into PhD research.

Previous graduates of the course include:
- a number of world-renowned academics
- the current Head of the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime
- the previous Head of the European Pharmacopoeia Laboratory based in Strasbourg

Find information on Scholarships here http://www.strath.ac.uk/search/scholarships/index.jsp

Read less
This unique Masters course trains you in key aspects of modern manufacturing approaches suitable for pharmaceuticals and high-value chemicals. Read more

Why this course?

This unique Masters course trains you in key aspects of modern manufacturing approaches suitable for pharmaceuticals and high-value chemicals.

It's designed to produce highly-skilled graduates in continuous manufacturing science and technology to meet the growing demands for expertise in this area. You’ll be trained to take up jobs in the food, chemical and pharmaceutical industries.

The course is aligned with the EPSRC Doctoral Training Centre in Continuous Manufacturing & Crystallisation (CMAC). It’s supported by academic staff from across the University, six academic partners and CMAC's strategic partners (AstraZeneca, GlaxoSmithKline, Novartis).

See the website https://www.strath.ac.uk/courses/postgraduatetaught/advancedpharmaceuticalmanufacturing/

You’ll study

The course consists of taught classes along with practical classes from October to April.

If you successfully complete all assessments you’ll then undertake a 10-week research project. This can be at the University or with an external company or organisation. You’ll submit a thesis at the end of August.

Facilities

The Strathclyde Institute of Pharmacy & Biomedical Sciences (SIPBS) offers an excellent environment for research and teaching. It’s located in a new building with several laboratories. All are fitted with modern equipment.

The Institute is unique in the UK with centres such as the Cancer Research Formulation unit and CMAC both contributing to the course.

Teaching staff

The course is taught by experts within Strathclyde. There are also specialised lectures from visiting professors and world-renowned scientists from academia, industry, and organisations such as the NHS and the EU.

Pre-Masters preparation course

The Pre-Masters Programme is a preparation course for international students (non EU/UK) who do not meet the entry requirements for a Masters degree at University of Strathclyde. The Pre-Masters programme provides progression to a number of degree options.

To find out more about the courses and opportunities on offer visit isc.strath.ac.uk or call today on +44 (0) 1273 339333 and discuss your education future. You can also complete the online application form. To ask a question please fill in the enquiry form and talk to one of our multi-lingual Student Enrolment Advisers today.

Learning & teaching

Theory and applications are taught through lectures, tutorials, seminars and web-based learning. Class material is available through an online learning tool which you can access at any time.
You’ll also take part in practical sessions which provide you with experience of a wide range of modern instrumental and state-of-the-art techniques.

Assessment

Assessment is through both written and practical examinations and submission of a thesis (MSc students only).

Careers

The course prepares you for a career in:
- the chemical or pharmaceutical industry (research and development, production and regulatory affairs)
- academic and other research institutions
- government agencies such as drug licensing authorities

You’ll also be equipped to continue into PhD research at one of the University’s Doctoral Training Centres.

Find information on Scholarships here http://www.strath.ac.uk/search/scholarships/

Read less
In the Department of Chemistry we offer a range of programmes that can be taken full or part time. Research projects can be carried out in virtually any area of chemistry as long as a suitable project and supervisor can be allocated, meaning you can specialise in your own specific area of interest. Read more
In the Department of Chemistry we offer a range of programmes that can be taken full or part time. Research projects can be carried out in virtually any area of chemistry as long as a suitable project and supervisor can be allocated, meaning you can specialise in your own specific area of interest. You will work under the guidance of an academic supervisor who is expert in that particular field, and alongside other members of the research group including academics, post-doctoral researchers as well as fellow postgraduate students.

As a research student in the Department of Chemistry, you can expect:
-A dedicated supervisor to help direct your research and training
-A Thesis Advisory Panel (TAP) comprising two members of staff to monitor your progress and offer impartial advice
-TAP meetings every six months for which you are required to prepare a report on your research
-Progress meetings with your supervisor approximately every 2 months, and more informal interactions with your supervisor on a day-to-day basis
-Training programmes designed to provide you with research, teaching and transferable skills. This is delivered through our Innovative Doctoral Training in Chemistry Programme
-Seminar programmes from leading scientists, and opportunities to present your own research
-A student mentor to support your transition to postgraduate research and provide collaboration and networking opportunities

Facilities

The Department of Chemistry offers all research students the opportunity to access its state-of-the-art research facilities as required by their research. This includes a range of NMR Spectrometers, Mass Spectrometers, Laser Spectrometers, X-Ray Diffractometers, EPR Spectrometers, Electron Microscopes, and a dedicated Crystallisation Suite.

All Chemistry research students are provided with access to dedicated research space within the Department. This includes allocated writing space with others from your research group, which is usually adjacent to your supervisor’s office to facilitate regular discussions about progress. if your project is laboratory-based, you will also have access to a fume hood or bench space in a purpose-built research laboratory. All research students have access to a communal area for discussions with other researchers.

Careers

During your time at York, you will have the opportunity to develop a wide range of skills, which will support not only your studies, but also prepare you for the world of work beyond your research degree. The Researcher Development Team offer a wide range of training under the Research Development Framework, and the Careers Service provides a wealth of guidance and opportunities to develop the types of skills employers are looking for.

The Chemistry Department has a dedicated Employability and Diversity Officer who arranges a range of careers events for postgraduate chemists each year. She also offers one-to-one careers advice sessions for all graduate students to support you to develop your Curriculum Vitae, complete job applications and prepare for interviews. Your supervisor will also offer support and guidance for your career development.

Read less
In the Department of Chemistry we offer a range of programmes that can be taken full or part time. Research projects can be carried out in virtually any area of chemistry as long as a suitable project and supervisor can be allocated, meaning you can specialise in your own specific area of interest. Read more
In the Department of Chemistry we offer a range of programmes that can be taken full or part time. Research projects can be carried out in virtually any area of chemistry as long as a suitable project and supervisor can be allocated, meaning you can specialise in your own specific area of interest. You will work under the guidance of an academic supervisor who is expert in that particular field, and alongside other members of the research group including academics, post-doctoral researchers as well as fellow postgraduate students.

As a research student in the Department of Chemistry, you can expect:
-A dedicated supervisor to help direct your research and training
-A Thesis Advisory Panel (TAP) comprising two members of staff to monitor your progress and offer impartial advice
-TAP meetings every six months for which you are required to prepare a report on your research
-Progress meetings with your supervisor approximately every 2 months, and more informal interactions with your supervisor on a day-to-day basis
-Training programmes designed to provide you with research, teaching and transferable skills. This is delivered through our Innovative Doctoral Training in Chemistry Programme
-Seminar programmes from leading scientists, and opportunities to present your own research
-A student mentor to support your transition to postgraduate research and provide collaboration and networking opportunities

Facilities

The Department of Chemistry offers all research students the opportunity to access its state-of-the-art research facilities as required by their research. This includes a range of NMR Spectrometers, Mass Spectrometers, Laser Spectrometers, X-Ray Diffractometers, EPR Spectrometers, Electron Microscopes, and a dedicated Crystallisation Suite.

All Chemistry research students are provided with access to dedicated research space within the Department. This includes allocated writing space with others from your research group, which is usually adjacent to your supervisor’s office to facilitate regular discussions about progress. if your project is laboratory-based, you will also have access to a fume hood or bench space in a purpose-built research laboratory. All research students have access to a communal area for discussions with other researchers.

Careers

During your time at York, you will have the opportunity to develop a wide range of skills, which will support not only your studies, but also prepare you for the world of work beyond your research degree. The Researcher Development Team offer a wide range of training under the Research Development Framework, and the Careers Service provides a wealth of guidance and opportunities to develop the types of skills employers are looking for.

The Chemistry Department has a dedicated Employability and Diversity Officer who arranges a range of careers events for postgraduate chemists each year. She also offers one-to-one careers advice sessions for all graduate students to support you to develop your Curriculum Vitae, complete job applications and prepare for interviews. Your supervisor will also offer support and guidance for your career development.

Read less

  • 1
Show 10 15 30 per page



Cookie Policy    X