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Masters Degrees (Critical Discourse Analysis)

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Advanced knowledge of phonetics and syntax coupled with practical application and exploration of English in context – e.g. speech therapy, English in education, discourse analysis – forms the core of our MA course. Read more
Advanced knowledge of phonetics and syntax coupled with practical application and exploration of English in context – e.g. speech therapy, English in education, discourse analysis – forms the core of our MA course.

The next start date for this course is October 2018.

Why Study English Language and Linguistics with us?

Taught at our Parkgate Road Campus in Chester, our cutting-edge MA course is delivered by a dynamic team of linguists, each with their own research specialisms. Our range of expertise includes corpus linguistics (computer-assisted discourse analysis), acoustic phonetics (useful for speech therapy), cognitive stylistics (how our minds process fictional and non-fictional texts) and critical discourse analysis (e.g. ideology in the media). Students can also explore conflicts and controversies in the discipline and contribute to our online blog.

Our dedicated English Language research space will allow you to undertake data-based projects using some of the latest specialist software (e.g. for acoustic phonetics and corpus linguistic analysis).

What will I learn?

Integral to the course is the advanced study of phonetics/phonology and morphology/syntax at the micro-level, combined with application of knowledge about structures of English in discourse (corpus linguistics, critical discourse analysis, cognitive stylistics) and research methods. These core areas of study are supplemented with options which may include the role of English in education (e.g. phonics and grammar in the classroom), language and identity, language change and speech disorders.

How will I be taught?

In most modules you will attend a lecture and discuss ideas in smaller seminars and workshops.
Full-time MA contact hours are approximately four hours per week with 20 hours per week of additional independent study, during term time. Further contact hours with lecturers are in the form of dissertation supervision and personal tutorials.

How will I be assessed?

Assessments are tailored for each module and include exercises in grammar and phonetics/phonology, discourse analysis essays, seminar papers (including presentations), discursive essays, extended data collection and analysis projects, lesson plan and commentary, portfolio, and an extended thesis (dissertation). A successful dissertation is also an essential requirement. There are no exams.

Postgraduate Visit Opportunities

If you are interested in this courses we have a number of opportunities to visit us and our campuses. To find out more about these options and to book a visit, please go to: https://www1.chester.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/postgraduate-visit-opportunities

Request a Prospectus

If you would like to know more about the University please request a prospectus at: http://prospectus.chester.ac.uk/form.php

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About the course. This course delivers advanced training in the theory and techniques of applied linguistics with an emphasis on second language acquisition. Read more

About the course

This course delivers advanced training in the theory and techniques of applied linguistics with an emphasis on second language acquisition.

We also have expertise in related disciplines including sociolinguistics, critical discourse analysis and corpus linguistics, and in the field of TESOL we offer particular expertise in Academic Writing, ESP, Materials Design and Testing.

Our course includes options to take part in work placements and gain additional professional qualifications.

Our graduates go on to advanced careers in TESOL all over the world. They also work in business, publishing, translation and interpreting.

Your career

Our graduates are working in teaching (primary, secondary, FE, HE and TESOL), publishing, marketing, libraries, fundraising, charities and the public sector. A masters from Sheffield is a sound basis for a PhD at any leading university.

How we teach

Our expertise covers all aspects of the subject, so whatever you’re interested in you’ll get the best possible advice and support. We provide training in research methods and you can choose to go on a work placement as part of your course.

You’ll be taught by academics whose work is published internationally. Their specialisms include language acquisition, historical language studies, applied linguistics, literary linguistics, discourse analysis and sociolinguistics.

We have a lively research culture. Through lectures and weekly seminars we’ll introduce you to the latest ideas. You’ll have the opportunity to explore these ideas in your own research.

With the School of Languages and Cultures, we established the new University Centre for Linguistic Research to gather and support postgraduate linguistics research across the University.

Our resources

We have specialist recording equipment for fieldwork and experimental work. Interactive computer-based workshops will introduce you to corpus-linguistic technology.

The University library subscribes to several electronic databases including JStor, Early English Texts online and Eighteenth-century Collections online. For more advanced reading, there’s a regular free minibus service to the British Library at Boston Spa.

Funding

There are a number of studentships and fee bursaries available, funded by either the University or the Arts and Humanities Research Council. Deadlines for funding applications are usually in winter/early spring. For details, see our website.

Core modules

  • Introduction to Language and Linguistics
  • English Grammar and Discourse
  • Language Teaching Methodology
  • Second Language Acquisition
  • Research Methods
  • Dissertation (MA only)

Examples of optional modules

  • Corpus Linguistics
  • Current Issues in Second Language Acquisition
  • Discourse and Genre Analysis
  • English for Specific Purposes
  • Intercultural Communication
  • Researching Writing in TESOL
  • Teaching Practice
  • Theory and Practice of Language Teaching
  • World Englishes

Teaching and assessment

You’ll be taught by a dedicated and enthusiastic team of teachers. Our internationally recognised research feeds straight into our teaching, with students sometimes taking a hands-on role in our research activities. The staff are leading figures in their fields, in many cases having written the books and papers you will be studying: Kook-hee Gil (Second Language Acquisition), Nigel Harwood (TESOL Materials), Gabriel Ozon (English Grammar), Jane Mulderrig (Critical Discourse Analysis), Valerie Hobbs (English for Specific Purposes) and Oksana Afitska (Language Teaching Materials).

You’ll spend about eight hours a week in lectures, seminars and workshops. And there are chances to take part in classroom-based research projects in the UK and overseas.

Assessment depends on the module, but includes essay assignments and classroom coursework tasks. You’ll write your dissertation (MA only) over the summer. If you don’t complete the dissertation you’ll be awarded a diploma.



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This programme looks at language from a sociocultural perspective. It's designed for anyone with an interest in the relationship between language, culture and society but also provides a solid understanding of English language and linguistics. Read more

This programme looks at language from a sociocultural perspective. It's designed for anyone with an interest in the relationship between language, culture and society but also provides a solid understanding of English language and linguistics.

The MA develops your understanding of historical and contemporary debates in (socio)linguistics and discourse analysis and enhances your analytic and linguistic skills by introducing different approaches to the analysis of written and spoken language use from a range of everyday and institutional contexts.

Topics covered include:

  • language and ideology
  • linguistic performances of identity (particularly language and gender, sexuality, ethnicity and social class)
  • language and the media
  • talk at work
  • English in a multilingual world
  • intercultural communication
  • multilingualism and code-switching
  • varieties of English

You're encouraged to engage with these topics by drawing on your own social, cultural and occupational backgrounds in class discussions and in your written work.

You're also encouraged to collect your own samples of written and spoken language use and learn to subject those to in-depth critical analysis.

This MA will draw on findings, theories and methodologies from: sociolinguistics, semantics, pragmatics, spoken and written discourse analysis, ethnography, semiotics, feminist stylistics; multimodal analysis; interactional sociolinguistics, conversational analysis, membership categorisation analysis, performativity and narrative analysis.

The programme’s distinct interdisciplinary ethos is also reflected in your opportunity to choose from a selection of relevant option modules in other departments in Goldsmiths.

Modules & structure

On this programme you will complete two core modules, two option modules and one dissertation.

Core modules

Option modules

You may choose two linguistic options or one linguistic option and one option from other MA programmes within the College, where specifically approved by the Programme Co-ordinator.

You may also choose one non-linguistics module, either from our own department (English and Comparative Literature) or from another department. Please note that availability of options across the College varies, but typically you can choose from the following selection.

Please note that your choice of option module from another department needs to be discussed with the Programme Co-ordinator of the MA Sociocultural Linguistics in advance. 

Dissertation

You also produce a dissertation. Dissertation topics in the past have included: 

  • A critical investigation of metaphor in accent coaching internationalisation & the role of language
  • Gun Ownership as Freedom and Safety: Framing in the Blogosphere
  • Tweeting Saudi Women’s Elections: A Critical Discourse Analysis
  • Framing and discourses of gender and national identity in sports commentary
  • Discursive identity construction in relation to global hip hop culture in young men’s talk
  • Representations of aging in women’s magazines
  • Discursive construction of religious identities in interviews with British Muslim converts
  • Code-switching practices in a Tunisian family
  • Discourse and identities in the SLA classroom
  • Language and gender in dream narratives
  • Pauses and silences on Talk Radio
  • Attitudes towards bilingual signs in Thailand
  • Representations of parenthood in UK parenting magazines
  • Political debates on Irish TV
  • Lifetime narratives of older Asian immigrants in the UK
  • The language of text messaging
  • Language and literacy practices on Facebook
  • Attitudes to non-standard language use
  • Discursive analysis of EFL textbooks
  • Gendered speech style in an all-female group of Iranian friends

The best (UG or MA) linguistics dissertation is rewarded every year with the Hayley Davis Prize. 

Approach to teaching

Our lecture/seminar sessions are designed to combine discussions of preparatory reading materials with tutor-led input and hands-on analyses of data/texts by students. We also tend to invite guest lectures as part of option modules and GoldLingS Seminar Series.

Our MA group is usually very tight-knit, students and student reps organise study/revision groups, online discussion forums, outings to lectures across London, and a number of social events.

Assessment

Coursework; essays; examinations; dissertation; presentation

Skills

Transferable skills, including enhanced communication and discussion skills in written and oral contexts; the ability to analyse and evaluate a wide variety of spoken and written texts from informal as well as institutional settings; an understanding of the concept of communicative competence; the ability to organise information, and to assimilate and evaluate competing arguments.

Careers

Publishing, journalism, british council roles, public relations, teaching, research, translation, advertising, the civil service, business, industry, the media.

Find out more about employability at Goldsmiths.



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How do ideologies form and sustain political identities and interests? What are the main ideologies and political discourses that frame and organise our lives today? How do theories of ideology and discourse inform contemporary political analysis? How can these theories help us to explain and evaluate key political processes?. Read more
How do ideologies form and sustain political identities and interests? What are the main ideologies and political discourses that frame and organise our lives today? How do theories of ideology and discourse inform contemporary political analysis? How can these theories help us to explain and evaluate key political processes?

Questions concerning the impact of ideological and symbolic processes on the formation of political discourses, identities and communities are of crucial importance. All of these are covered within our MA Ideology and Discourse Analysis.

You explore topics including:
-Poststructuralist, post-Marxist and psychoanalytic theories of ideology and discourse
-Research methods in critical political theory and analysis
-Key concepts for political analysis
-Mass media and democracy
-Philosophy of social science

Our Department of Government is one of the most prestigious in Europe, with an outstanding record of teaching, research and publication. We are rated top in the UK for research (REF 2014), and have consistently been the highest-rated politics department in the country since national assessments began. Ranked top 10 in the world for political science and international relations according to the Centre for World University Rankings (2017)

Our expert staff

Some of the biggest names in the field work at Essex, giving you unparalleled access to some of the best minds in politics. Our staff are advising the CIA on counter-terrorism, training politicians and civil servants in democratising countries, and commentating on political events in national and international media.

Our academic staff work on topics ranging from international conflict and violence to British elections, and from the obligations of the younger generation to why authoritarian leaders welcome natural disasters.

You join an active and prolific research team, with the opportunity to work alongside a member of staff on their research instead of completing a dissertation; some of these projects have even resulted in joint staff/student publications.

Specialist facilities

-Laboratories of networked computers featuring extensive software for political analysis
-The ESSEXLab provides opportunities for experimental lab research
-Student societies for politics, debating, and Model UN
-We organise the Essex Summer School in Social Science Data Analysis
-A programme of seminars and events run by the department

Your future

All Essex politics graduates have the distinction of a qualification from one of the world’s leading politics departments.

Our MA Ideology and Discourse Analysis will help you secure a solid grasp of key debates in social and political thought, give you a strong foundation in theoretical principles whose relevance and application goes well beyond politics, and instil a wide range of analytical, critical, and communication skills that will enable you to pursue the career of your choice, whether in the public, private, or third sector, whether with a domestic or international focus.

Recent graduates have gone on to work for the following high-profile organisations:
-The Civil Service
-Local government
-The World Bank
-The United Nations
-NATO
-YouGov and YouGov America

We also offer supervision for PhD and MPhil in the following fields: government; ideology and discourse analysis; international relations; political behaviour; and politics.

Our academic reputation is illustrated by the fact that many of our graduates now teach or research at universities, colleges of higher education and schools. For example, recent graduates are now research fellows and academic staff at: Mannheim, Germany; ETH Zurich, Switzerland; Duke University, USA; NATO/SHAPE, Belgium; and University of Amsterdam, Netherlands.

We also work with the university’s Employability and Careers Centre to help you find out about further work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

Example structure

-Ideology and Political Discourse
-MA Dissertation
-Research Seminar in Political Theory and Methods
-Advanced Research Methods (optional)
-Comparative European Politics (optional)
-Conflict Resolution (optional)
-Contemporary Theories of Justice (optional)
-International Security Studies (optional)
-Political Economy (optional)
-Political Explanation (optional)
-Political Parties in Britain and Europe (optional)
-Political Theory (optional)
-Public Opinion and Political Behaviour (optional)
-Research Design (optional)
-Theories of International Relations (optional)
-Theory and Explanation in Political Science (optional)
-Environmental Politics (optional)
-Survey Measurement and Question Design

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This MA is an innovative programme specifically designed to give you the competence to undertake empirical work in discourse studies by drawing on both linguistic and social theory. Read more

This MA is an innovative programme specifically designed to give you the competence to undertake empirical work in discourse studies by drawing on both linguistic and social theory. The MA enables you to explore discourse in areas such as politics, law, business, media and health, whilst developing skills in a range of analytical methods. Support for your studies is provided by the non-credit Postgraduate Academic Study Skills module which runs in terms 1, 2 and 3.

Course Structure

You will study a range of modules as part of your course, some examples of which are listed below.

Core

Optional

Information contained on the website with respect to modules is correct at the time of publication, but changes may be necessary, for example as a result of student feedback, Professional Statutory and Regulatory Bodies' (PSRB) requirements, staff changes, and new research.

Assessment

Coursework and dissertation



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This Master's degree in politics considers the increasingly pressing political issues of population and demography. World population is growing fast. Read more
This Master's degree in politics considers the increasingly pressing political issues of population and demography. World population is growing fast: having trebled in approximately a century, the UN projects an increase from today's 7 billion to around 11 billion by the end of the twenty-first century. This unique programme explores where this growth is occurring and considers the environmental, economic, political and global implications for both developing and developed countries. We will consider policy debates and responses to population growth and stabilisation, as well as the effects of ageing populations on economies, welfare systems and defence and security. Under the guidance of expert academics, you will examine how ethnic, religious and national identities intersect with questions of resources and population around the world.

You will be introduced to a spectrum of methodological approaches, including quantitative techniques for analysing and projecting demographic change, discourse analysis of policy documents, and historical case studies of political debates and movements. There will be an opportunity to read some of the classic works on population, such as Adam Smith, Malthus, J. S. Mill and Marx, as well as to study more recent ideas, including demographic transition theory and the environmental concept of the Anthropocene. You will be invited to examine unique case studies using methodologies that include data analysis, critical theory (Marxism, genealogy and critical discourse analysis) and policy analysis.

The core modules explore current demographic and environmental change in the context of politics, economics and international relations and also consider the relationship between immigration, ageing and conflict. You will be equipped with the conceptual ideas, theoretical approaches and analytical research skills needed to study politics at postgraduate level. You will then go on to undertake the researching and writing of a dissertation on the subject that interests you most.

Our Department of Politics is a lively and distinguished centre of interdisciplinary research, with a strong reputation for the quality of our teaching. Some of the world’s most famous libraries are on our doorstep in Bloomsbury, central London, and you can walk down to Whitehall, where Parliament and the UK’s most influential and important think-tanks and centres of political research and analysis are located.

Our departmental building was once a key location for members of the Bloomsbury Group, so you could be studying in rooms that have hosted distinguished visitors, including T. S. Eliot, George Bernard Shaw and Maynard Keynes.

Why study this course at Birkbeck?

This Master's degree is distinctive, combining theoretical and critical perspectives on population and ecology with empirical approaches and real-world case studies.
The programme allows you to follow your own interests, with a wide choice of option modules, while developing your research skills and undertaking a dissertation in an area that interests you.
Our location in central London puts us at the heart of the UK’s political life and at the centre of academic London. You can walk down to Parliament and Whitehall, while Bloomsbury contains some of the world’s most famous libraries and centres of research.
You can take advantage of the rich research collections nearby, including Senate House Library, which is right next door to Birkbeck, the British Library, which is 5 minutes’ walk away, and the British Library of Political and Economic Science at the London School of Economics, which is walkable from Birkbeck.
Our Department of Politics was ranked 12th in the UK in the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF) results and is a world-renowned centre of original, influential research.
The department organises a lively programme of seminars and conferences and is home to affiliated research centres, such as the Centre for the Study of British Politics and Public Life, which run seminars, conferences and other events where some of the world's best scholars present their latest research.
Our academic staff are international authorities in their respective fields, publishing and delivering stimulating teaching in a wide range of political topics including civil society and the state, public policy, development, gender, international security and terrorism, and social and political theory, among others.
Birkbeck Library has a large politics collection, including the major specialist journals, and provides you with access to an extensive range of online materials.

Our research

Birkbeck is one of the world’s leading research-intensive institutions. Our cutting-edge scholarship informs public policy, achieves scientific advances, supports the economy, promotes culture and the arts, and makes a positive difference to society.

Birkbeck’s research excellence was confirmed in the 2014 Research Excellence Framework, which placed Birkbeck 30th in the UK for research, with 73% of our research rated world-leading or internationally excellent.

In the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF), Politics at Birkbeck was ranked 17th in the UK.

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Why study at Roehampton. There is a strong emphasis on the application of linguistic knowledge in the classroom. A flexible choice of modules allows you to specialise in areas that interest you. Read more

Why study at Roehampton

  • There is a strong emphasis on the application of linguistic knowledge in the classroom.
  • A flexible choice of modules allows you to specialise in areas that interest you.
  • Roehampton is ranked best modern university in London (Complete University Guide 2018) and the most research-intensive modern university in the UK (Research Excellence Framework 2014).

Course summary

This course is designed to help you develop the skills and experience you need for a successful career in English teaching.

There is a demand throughout the world for graduates with qualifications and expertise in teaching English to speakers of other languages (TESOL). Our MA in TESOL is designed for students who are intending to have a career in English teaching. It will also be of interest to those who are already teachers of English and would like to increase their professional expertise by advancing their analytical knowledge of English and up-to-date teaching methods.

On the programme you will gain an in depth understanding of the structure of language at different levels of analysis and the relationship between language and use. You will explore how people learn languages, how English can be taught and gain an excellent understanding of the assessment and testing which those you will be teaching will be preparing for. 

You will research, discuss and evaluate a range of perspectives on the language teaching curriculum, and its delivery, with which to make informed decisions with regard to policy and practice. You will also have opportunity to study a range of optional modules and undertake a dissertation in an area that is of particular interest to you and suits your career plans.

As an Applied Linguistics and TESOL student you will become a member of Centre for Research in English Language and Linguistics (CRELL), a thriving forum for researchers with theoretical insight and varying interests such as politics and functionality of language.

Content

In your first semester, you will be introduced to the essential syntactic and morphological patterns of English. You will investigate the place of formal grammar in the description and teaching of language and study a range of theoretical frameworks for the study of syntax and morphology and apply these to learning challenges in future TESOL contexts.

In your second semester, you will explore the theories of learning a second language and look critically at the nature of discourse as the central feature of human interaction. You will also gain a solid foundation in approaches such as conversation analysis and pragmatics; narrative analysis; critical discourse analysis and genre analysis.

You will take the year-long module ‘Research Methods’, where you will be introduced to different methodological approaches employed in sociolinguistic and applied linguistic research and gain an excellent understanding of techniques such as participant-observation, eliciting, recording and storing natural speech data.

A range of optional modules are also currently available, such as ‘Principles and Practice in Language Teaching’, where you will explore the central concerns of the language learning curriculum. In ‘Language Testing’ you will gain an in depth understanding of, and be able to evaluate, the assessments which those learning English will be preparing for. You will also undertake a dissertation, where you will have the opportunity to explore the topic that suits your interests.

Modules

Some of the modules we currently offer include:

  • Theories of Second Language Learning
  • Syntax and Morphology for Language Teaching
  • Discourse Analysis and Language Teaching
  • Research Methods
  • Principles and Practice in Language Teaching
  • Language Testing
  • Dissertation

Career options

There are excellent opportunities around the world for teachers with an MA in TESOL. Related career possibilities include policy adviser, trainer of trainers, and designer of teaching materials. Applied linguistics is a very useful basis for a range of careers in publishing, editing and communication.

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This programme takes a philosophical, theoretical and historical approach to cultural studies, exploring the work of cultural criticism, reception and production through new critical perspectives, interdisciplinary insights and a vast spectrum of applications and opportunities. Read more

This programme takes a philosophical, theoretical and historical approach to cultural studies, exploring the work of cultural criticism, reception and production through new critical perspectives, interdisciplinary insights and a vast spectrum of applications and opportunities.

We study the major traditions of cultural theory, including semiology, deconstruction, feminism, psychoanalysis, and Frankfurt School theories of the aesthetic, the media and technology. This training enables you to shape your thinking critically and develop your interests in a rigorously analytical context.

These theoretical and historical perspectives allow us to tease out the critical charge embedded in the notion of culture itself, and the transformative potential of creative and critical work in the arts and humanities.

Close reading and textuality are at the heart of the course, encouraging you to think critically about issues of modernity and postmodernity, the postcolonial, subjectivity and sexuality.

Diverse and dynamic

Founded in 1987 (as MA Cultural Studies), and situated in the School of Fine Art, History of Art & Cultural Studies, this programme appeals to students from across the humanities who are interested in a broad range of objects and genres including literature, film and the visual arts, performance, music, and philosophy.

You’ll work alongside students in different creative and critical disciplines and benefit from the diverse research interests of our tutors. It’s a dynamic environment where you’ll gain valuable knowledge and skills in a city with a vibrant cultural life.

Leeds University Library is one of the major academic research libraries in the UK with extensive print, online and manuscript collections. The University Library offers a comprehensive training programme to help you make the most of them. The School houses Parallax, published by Taylor and Francis, an internationally distributed journal of cultural theory and analysis.

Course content

The two modules that sit at the heart of this course will develop your understanding of cultural theory over time.

A core module in Cultural Theory offers an introduction to key paradigms, focusing on theories of the commodity, language, discourse, subjectivity and sexuality.

The second core module, Cultural History, explores the genealogies of contemporary theory in relation to a longer tradition of cultural criticism that emerged, with modernity itself, in the 18th century. Emphasis is given to practices of close reading, the question of textuality and the case study.

You will develop an understanding of the ideas of ‘commodity’ and commodity fetish’ that are central to the study of consumer culture, as well as issues around language, sign and discourse and subjectivity. You will put this into the context of the development of cultural studies, focusing on thinkers from Rousseau to Kant and Homi Bhabha. You will use film and other texts to explore these ideas.

In each semester, you will also have the chance to specialise when you choose from a range of optional modules.

We provide an integrated course of training in advanced level research. The skills you will develop, combined with the specialist knowledge built through your optional modules, will ultimately be focused in your dissertation ― an independent and self-devised research project, which you will undertake with the guidance of your supervisor. In Semester 2, you will present some of your own research at the annual MA Symposium.

If you choose to study part-time, you will study over a longer period and take fewer modules in each year.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • Cultural Theory 30 credits
  • Advanced Research Skills 15 credits
  • Advanced Research Skills 25 credits
  • Cultural History 30 credits
  • Cultural Studies: Dissertation 50 credits

Optional modules

  • Derrida and Deconstruction 30 credits
  • Making Sense of Sound 30 credits
  • Capitalism-Criticism-Contemporary Art 30 credits
  • Unfinished Business: Trauma, Cultural Memory and the Holocaust 30 credits
  • Aesthetics and Politics 30 credits
  • Encountering Things: Art and Entanglement in Anglo-Saxon England 30 credits
  • The Origins of Postcolonial England 30 credits
  • Humanity, Animality and Globality 30 credits
  • Individual Directed Study 30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Critical and Cultural Theory MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Critical and Cultural Theory MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

To help you benefit from the expertise of our tutors, we use a range of teaching and learning methods. These include seminars, film screenings, lectures, online learning and tutorials. Independent study is also a crucial component, allowing you to form your own ideas and develop your research and critical skills.

Assessment

Assessment methods will vary depending on the modules you choose. However, among others they may include essays, in-course assessment, group and individual presentations, poster presentations and portfolio or e-portfolio work.

Career opportunities

This programme will develop your critical and cultural awareness and expand your subject knowledge in theories and histories of culture. In addition, it will equip you with sophisticated research, analytical, critical and communication skills that will put you in a good position to succeed in a variety of careers.

Many of our graduates have also continued with their research at PhD level and secured external funding to support them – including AHRC scholarships. A large proportion of our former research students are now developing academic careers in the UK, Europe, Asia, USA and Australia.

Some have taken up posts working as curators and education staff in museums and galleries, as well as in journalism, publishing, arts marketing, public relations, university administration and teaching.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



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This programme has been designed provide students with the opportunity to develop a critical understanding of the principles and application of research design and analytical methods relevant to the scientific study of the physiology of sport and exercise. Read more
This programme has been designed provide students with the opportunity to develop a critical understanding of the principles and application of research design and analytical methods relevant to the scientific study of the physiology of sport and exercise. The programme facilitates the integration of theory and professional practice, and throughout the programme the research process and emphasis on student autonomy of learning become increasingly important.

Programme Structure and Content
Research skills oriented modules form the bedrock of SHES’ MRes programmes. As a result taught modules are aligned with both discipline specific and the (higher) cognitive skills our MRes programmes aim to provide. Within a modular structure all students undertake compulsory modules in research skills totalling 40 credits:

Research Skills (20 credits)
and 20 credits from the following modules:

How to Conduct Statistics (20 credits);
Presentation of Statistics (10 credits);
Peer Reviewing (10 credits);
Latent Variable Modelling (10 credits);
plus 20 credits from optional modules and a final compulsory Research Project comprising 120 credits.

Research Skills
Research Skills is a double credit taught module. Students study the broad nature of the research process that will allow them to complete, initially, an appropriate Independent Study (in which a research proposal for the Research Project is completed) and subsequently, a full Research Project. The module covers material relevant to the design and analysis of both quantitative and qualitative research. It also provides a broad understanding of the benefits and limitations of various research methods, research designs, data collection instruments and data analysis tools. Students are given the opportunity to develop their ability to be critically evaluative.

Specific content includes: Statistical issues in quantitative research and design; Simple and multiple (forced entry, moderated and mediated) regression analyses; Single factor analysis of variance with and without repeated measures; Two factor analysis of variance with and without repeated measures; Single factor and two factor multivariate analysis of variance (with and without repeated measures); Repeated measures analysis of variance using the multivariate solution; Doubly repeated measures analysis of variance; Analysis of covariance; Follow-up procedures for all of the above; Assumptions underpinning all of the above and available options for dealing with violations to these assumptions; Experiments and causal inference; External and construct validity; Experimental and quasi-experimental designs; Correlational and epidemiological research; Reliability and validity in quantitative and qualitative research; Issues in qualitative research and design; Interviews; Single case design and analysis; Observation; Narrative; Ethnography; grounded theory and discourse analysis.

How to conduct Statistics and Presentation of Statistics modules
The purpose of these two taught modules is to provide students with an in-depth understanding and critical appreciation of statistical procedures. As independent study based modules, they will enable students to gain a comprehensive understanding of a statistical procedure of their choosing (following consultation with the staff member responsible for the module). Towards this end, students will likely cover (i) relevant background issues; (ii) when to use utilise particular statistical tests;(iii) how to conduct statistical testing via appropriate software; (iv) how to correctly interpret computational output; and (v) how to present the findings following analysis.

Students learn about these themes through a “learning by teaching” paradigm via the development of a statistics oriented verbal presentation and written assignment resembling a book chapter/resource. The verbal presentation will be conducted first in order to obtain developmental feedback for the written assignment.

Peer Reviewing Scientific Research
Students work closely with their supervisor to perform an initial review of a previously submitted (and subsequently published) research article. Students will then follow the paper along the peer review process, discussing their review with their supervisor, and then be required to adequately address concerns which have been raised. Collectively this will mean that the student will cover a contemporary research topic in a highly focused and in-depth manner gaining a comprehensive understanding of how to prepare their own manuscripts (eg research proposal, Research Project) and how to evaluate the research of others. Students will also attend the School’s Research Seminar series.

Latent Variable Modelling
This module introduces postgraduate students to the concepts of Structural Equation Modelling (SEM) and to give a basic grounding in their implementation. It also covers an introduction to SEM using LISREL and topics including: measurement models and structural models; exploratory factor analysis; confirmatory factor analysis (CFA); structural modelling with observed and latent variables; conceptual issues, common misunderstandings and limitations.

Research Project
Under the guidance of their supervising tutor(s), students will pro-actively determine the content of this unit. The initial stages of the Research Project will develop the work of the project proposal and taught phases of the MRes programmes. This will involve the surveying and reviewing of research evidence with the aim of formulating an appropriate research question, and will likely involve some refinement and pilot work. Once achieved, the student will implement a research design and method suited to their area of inquiry. Ethical approval of the study will be obtained before data may be collected, thereby introducing students to this integral part of the research process. Throughout this module students receive excellent research training from leaders in the field. It is expected that the resulting projects will be publishable in international, peer-reviewed journals.

Mono-disciplinary studies and interdisciplinary work, which might involve the student’s ongoing sport/exercise experience, will be encouraged. Each topic will normally involve data collection, analysis and interpretation and allow students to demonstrate their powers of imagination, initiative, independence and time management. Students will be expected to show a thorough knowledge of the relevant sources of information and the ability to use them with discrimination; to provide full references; to exercise sound and independent judgment; to structure work logically and to express themselves with clarity and precision.

Optional Modules:

In addition to the core/compulsory modules students choose a further 20 credits from the following optional modules:

The taught programme is delivered using a variety of teaching methods, including lectures, seminars, workshops, group activities, practical work, tutorials and role play. Each module comprises approximately 200 hours of student time (including formal contact).

Read less
This programme has been designed provide students with the opportunity to develop a critical understanding of the principles and application of research design and analytical methods relevant to the scientific study of the psychology of sport and exercise. Read more
This programme has been designed provide students with the opportunity to develop a critical understanding of the principles and application of research design and analytical methods relevant to the scientific study of the psychology of sport and exercise. The programme facilitates the integration of theory and professional practice, and throughout the programme the research process and emphasis on student autonomy of learning become increasingly important.

Programme Structure and Content
Research skills oriented modules form the bedrock of SHES’ MRes programmes. As a result taught modules are aligned with both discipline specific and the (higher) cognitive skills our MRes programmes aim to provide. Within a modular structure all students undertake compulsory modules in research skills totalling 40 credits:

Research Skills (20 credits)
and 20 credits from the following modules:

How to Conduct Statistics (20 credits);
Presentation of Statistics (10 credits);
Peer Reviewing (10 credits);
Latent Variable Modelling (10 credits);
plus 20 credits from optional modules and a final compulsory Research Project comprising 120 credits.

Research Skills
Research Skills is a double credit taught module. Students study the broad nature of the research process that will allow them to complete, initially, an appropriate Independent Study (in which a research proposal for the Research Project is completed) and subsequently, a full Research Project. The module covers material relevant to the design and analysis of both quantitative and qualitative research. It also provides a broad understanding of the benefits and limitations of various research methods, research designs, data collection instruments and data analysis tools. Students are given the opportunity to develop their ability to be critically evaluative.

Specific content includes: Statistical issues in quantitative research and design; Simple and multiple (forced entry, moderated and mediated) regression analyses; Single factor analysis of variance with and without repeated measures; Two factor analysis of variance with and without repeated measures; Single factor and two factor multivariate analysis of variance (with and without repeated measures); Repeated measures analysis of variance using the multivariate solution; Doubly repeated measures analysis of variance; Analysis of covariance; Follow-up procedures for all of the above; Assumptions underpinning all of the above and available options for dealing with violations to these assumptions; Experiments and causal inference; External and construct validity; Experimental and quasi-experimental designs; Correlational and epidemiological research; Reliability and validity in quantitative and qualitative research; Issues in qualitative research and design; Interviews; Single case design and analysis; Observation; Narrative; Ethnography; grounded theory and discourse analysis.

How to conduct Statistics and Presentation of Statistics modules
The purpose of these two taught modules is to provide students with an in-depth understanding and critical appreciation of statistical procedures. As independent study based modules, they will enable students to gain a comprehensive understanding of a statistical procedure of their choosing (following consultation with the staff member responsible for the module). Towards this end, students will likely cover (i) relevant background issues; (ii) when to use utilise particular statistical tests;(iii) how to conduct statistical testing via appropriate software; (iv) how to correctly interpret computational output; and (v) how to present the findings following analysis.

Students learn about these themes through a “learning by teaching” paradigm via the development of a statistics oriented verbal presentation and written assignment resembling a book chapter/resource. The verbal presentation will be conducted first in order to obtain developmental feedback for the written assignment.

Peer Reviewing Scientific Research
Students work closely with their supervisor to perform an initial review of a previously submitted (and subsequently published) research article. Students will then follow the paper along the peer review process, discussing their review with their supervisor, and then be required to adequately address concerns which have been raised. Collectively this will mean that the student will cover a contemporary research topic in a highly focused and in-depth manner gaining a comprehensive understanding of how to prepare their own manuscripts (eg research proposal, Research Project) and how to evaluate the research of others. Students will also attend the School’s Research Seminar series.

Latent Variable Modelling
This module introduces postgraduate students to the concepts of Structural Equation Modelling (SEM) and to give a basic grounding in their implementation. It also covers an introduction to SEM using LISREL and topics including: measurement models and structural models; exploratory factor analysis; confirmatory factor analysis (CFA); structural modelling with observed and latent variables; conceptual issues, common misunderstandings and limitations.

Research Project
Under the guidance of their supervising tutor(s), students will pro-actively determine the content of this unit. The initial stages of the Research Project will develop the work of the project proposal and taught phases of the MRes programmes. This will involve the surveying and reviewing of research evidence with the aim of formulating an appropriate research question, and will likely involve some refinement and pilot work. Once achieved, the student will implement a research design and method suited to their area of inquiry. Ethical approval of the study will be obtained before data may be collected, thereby introducing students to this integral part of the research process. Throughout this module students receive excellent research training from leaders in the field. It is expected that the resulting projects will be publishable in international, peer-reviewed journals.

Mono-disciplinary studies and interdisciplinary work, which might involve the student’s ongoing sport/exercise experience, will be encouraged. Each topic will normally involve data collection, analysis and interpretation and allow students to demonstrate their powers of imagination, initiative, independence and time management. Students will be expected to show a thorough knowledge of the relevant sources of information and the ability to use them with discrimination; to provide full references; to exercise sound and independent judgment; to structure work logically and to express themselves with clarity and precision.

Optional Modules:

In addition to the core/compulsory modules students choose a further 20 credits from the following optional modules:

Sport Psychology;
Effective Coaching;
Exercise Psychology;
Rehabilitation of the Injured Athlete.
The taught programme is delivered using a variety of teaching methods. Each module comprises approximately 200 hours of student time (including formal contact).

Read less
This programme has been designed to provide students with the opportunity to develop a critical understanding of the principles and application of research design and analytical methods relevant to the scientific study of sport and exercise sciences. Read more

This programme has been designed to provide students with the opportunity to develop a critical understanding of the principles and application of research design and analytical methods relevant to the scientific study of sport and exercise sciences. In contrast to our MRes programmes in Sport and Exercise Physiology and Psychology, this programme gives students the option to study elements of both physiology and psychology. The programme facilitates the integration of theory and professional practice, and throughout the programme the research process and emphasis on student autonomy of learning become increasingly important.

Programme Structure and Content

Research skills oriented modules form the bedrock of SHES’ MRes programmes. As a result taught modules are aligned with both discipline specific and the (higher) cognitive skills our MRes programmes aim to provide. Within a modular structure all students undertake compulsory modules in research skills totalling 40 credits:

Research Skills (20 credits)

and 20 credits from the following modules:

How to Conduct Statistics (20 credits);

Presentation of Statistics (10 credits);

Peer Reviewing (10 credits);

Latent Variable Modelling (10 credits);

plus 20 credits from optional modules and a final compulsory Research Project comprising 120 credits.

Research Skills

Research Skills is a double credit taught module. Students study the broad nature of the research process that will allow them to complete, initially, an appropriate Independent Study (in which a research proposal for the Research Project is completed) and subsequently, a full Research Project. The module covers material relevant to the design and analysis of both quantitative and qualitative research. It also provides a broad understanding of the benefits and limitations of various research methods, research designs, data collection instruments and data analysis tools. Students are given the opportunity to develop their ability to be critically evaluative.

Specific content includes: Statistical issues in quantitative research and design; Simple and multiple (forced entry, moderated and mediated) regression analyses; Single factor analysis of variance with and without repeated measures; Two factor analysis of variance with and without repeated measures; Single factor and two factor multivariate analysis of variance (with and without repeated measures); Repeated measures analysis of variance using the multivariate solution; Doubly repeated measures analysis of variance; Analysis of covariance; Follow-up procedures for all of the above; Assumptions underpinning all of the above and available options for dealing with violations to these assumptions; Experiments and causal inference; External and construct validity; Experimental and quasi-experimental designs; Correlational and epidemiological research; Reliability and validity in quantitative and qualitative research; Issues in qualitative research and design; Interviews; Single case design and analysis; Observation; Narrative; Ethnography; grounded theory and discourse analysis.

How to conduct Statistics and Presentation of Statistics modules

The purpose of these two taught modules is to provide students with an in-depth understanding and critical appreciation of statistical procedures. As independent study based modules, they will enable students to gain a comprehensive understanding of a statistical procedure of their choosing (following consultation with the staff member responsible for the module). Towards this end, students will likely cover (i) relevant background issues; (ii) when to use utilise particular statistical tests;(iii) how to conduct statistical testing via appropriate software; (iv) how to correctly interpret computational output; and (v) how to present the findings following analysis.

Peer Reviewing Scientific Research

Students work closely with their supervisor to perform an initial review of a previously submitted (and subsequently published) research article. Students will then follow the paper along the peer review process, discussing their review with their supervisor, and then be required to adequately address concerns which have been raised. Collectively this will mean that the student will cover a contemporary research topic in a highly focused and in-depth manner gaining a comprehensive understanding of how to prepare their own manuscripts (eg research proposal, Research Project) and how to evaluate the research of others. In order to place their highly specialised knowledge into a more holistic perspective, students will also attend the School’s Research Seminar series.

Latent Variable Modelling

This module introduces postgraduate students to the concepts of Structural Equation Modelling (SEM) and to give a basic grounding in their implementation. It also covers an introduction to SEM using LISREL and topics including: measurement models and structural models; exploratory factor analysis; confirmatory factor analysis (CFA); structural modelling with observed and latent variables; conceptual issues, common misunderstandings and limitations.

Research Project

Under the guidance of their supervising tutor(s), students will pro-actively determine the content of this unit. The initial stages of the Research Project will develop the work of the project proposal and taught phases of the MRes programmes. This will involve the surveying and reviewing of research evidence with the aim of formulating an appropriate research question, and will likely involve some refinement and pilot work. Once achieved, the student will implement a research design and method suited to their area of inquiry. Ethical approval of the study will be obtained before data may be collected, thereby introducing students to this integral part of the research process. Throughout this module students receive excellent research training from leaders in the field. It is expected that the resulting projects will be publishable in international, peer-reviewed journals.

Optional Modules

In addition to the core/compulsory modules students choose a further 20 credits from the following optional modules:

Clinical Exercise Physiology;

Sport Psychology;

Effective Coaching;

Exercise Psychology;

Performance Physiology;

Rehabilitation of the Injured Athlete.

The taught programme is delivered using a variety of teaching methods. Each module comprises approximately 200 hours of student time (including formal contact).



Read less
This course is designed to bring your basic knowledge of the description of English language to a high level of competence. It covers a range of topics reflecting staff expertise, including conversation analysis, stylistics, critical discourse analysis and pragmatics. Read more
This course is designed to bring your basic knowledge of the description of English language to a high level of competence.

It covers a range of topics reflecting staff expertise, including conversation analysis, stylistics, critical discourse analysis and pragmatics. You will be given the chance to engage with cutting-edge research in your area.

Any or all of the modules on this course can be taken via the distance learning option, which offers flexibility that will be of particular appeal to those who have special needs of various kinds.

There is an emphasis on the practical analysis of language in use, including spoken and written language, and literary or non-literary texts.

Your tutors are active in their own specialist areas and recognised by the Higher Education Academy.* You can be confident that your studies are led by experts with flair and enthusiasm, renowned nationally and internationally for their excellence in teaching and research. As leading researchers in their fields of expertise, your tutors are published authors, award-winners and acclaimed thinkers. Indeed, 75% of work submitted for the most recent Research Assessment Exercise was said to be 'internationally significant' and 'world leading'. (Research Excellence Framework 2014)

We have a vibrant research community of both national and international students. We run regular research seminars led by our staff, visiting guest speakers, and our own students. We also organise and host conferences which reflect the research interests of our academic staff.

Our department is home to the internationally-recognised Stylistics Research Centre and our academic staff hold official positions in the Poetics and Linguistics Association , the world's leading organisation for the study of linguistics.

Our department is also home to the internationally-recognised Centre for Intercultural Politeness Research, which hosts internationally-reputed experts and which operates with the support of the Linguistics Politeness Research Group.

permanent staff, after probation: some recently appointed colleagues will only obtain recognition in the months after their arrival in Huddersfield, once they have started teaching

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Our MRes Psychology research-focused course will give you in-depth theoretical understanding, knowledge and practical experience of key research paradigms, research designs and statistical techniques used in psychology and, more broadly, in the social sciences. Read more

Our MRes Psychology research-focused course will give you in-depth theoretical understanding, knowledge and practical experience of key research paradigms, research designs and statistical techniques used in psychology and, more broadly, in the social sciences.

You will receive extensive training in:

  • quantitative methods: path analysis, hierarchical regression analysis, multi-level modelling, signal detection analysis and non-linear regression models;
  • qualitative methods: focus groups, interviewing skills, IPA, thematic analysis, grounded theory, discourse analysis and conversation analysis. 

You will also receive training in meta-analytical techniques, experience sampling, physiological recording methods, eye-tracking and working with children.

Our MRes focuses on various forms of dissemination activity including:

  • writing academic papers;
  • preparing posters;
  • writing summaries;
  • data presentation;
  • collaborating and communicating with stakeholders (eg patients, health professionals, teachers, NHS managers);
  • writing and communicating with the public and professional psychologists.

You will also develop your critical thinking skills. We encourage you to question the evidence base of many assertions made in the media.

We will train you in the ability to take published articles in a number of domains of psychology and critically analyse components such as theoretical assumptions, methodologies used, data analysis (both qualitative and quantitative) and interpretation of the data. We will point you to wider domains of critical thinking in the realm of science.

This MRes provides one-year, master's-level postgraduate training that constitutes the first year of ESRC 1+3 postgraduate PhD studentships awarded through the ESRC Northwest Doctoral Training College for full-time, part-time and CASE students.

Teaching and learning

Course units are taught using a combination of lecture-seminars, workshops, problem-based learning exercises, worked examples, self-paced online training, student presentations and independent supervised study.

You are required to attend weekly research seminars given by visiting speakers throughout the year, as well as research and career management skills courses, a variety of which are provided by the University's careers service. This training will equip you with both academic and transferable skills, including oral and written communication, time management and information management skills.

You will also have the opportunity to attend a teaching assistant/demonstrators course and language courses provided by the University's Language Centre.

Key academic staff

Coursework and assessment

Assessment is by examination, continuous assessment in the form of essays, practical reports and exercises, and a dissertation.

Course unit details

Full-time MRes students take six taught course units. Full-time PGDip students take the same six course units, but no dissertation.

Typical taught compulsory course units include:

  • Research skills and a research dissertation
  • Advance Statistics Workshops (eg path analysis, meta-analysis)
  • Using Advanced Statistics in Psychology (eg linear and non-linear regression)
  • Qualitative Research Methods (eg Grounded theory, discourse analysis)
  • Practical Issues in Psychological Research (eg working with children, RCTs)
  • Advanced General Methods in Psychology (eg experience sampling, eye-tracking).

You will work collaboratively with your supervisor(s) to produce a high quality dissertation using qualitative, quantitative or mixed research methods. Dissertation work is supported by taught sessions including topics such as literature searching, designing a programme of research and critical thinking skills.

Career opportunities

Our course is designed primarily for students wishing to pursue research careers in psychology. It is also likely to be attractive if you wish to extend your training, with an emphasis on research methods, and if you work in social or health services, or in marketing and cognate disciplines.

Past careers and destinations of our MRes students have included:

  • PhD student
  • Graduate Market Researcher
  • Psychology Assistant
  • Independent Mental Health Advocate
  • Research Assistant
  • NHS Financial Management Graduate Scheme
  • Clinical Psychology Doctorate
  • Technical Analyst at NICE
  • Project Manager in Medical Electronics
  • Graduate Researcher.


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The MA in English Language and Literary Studies is ideal for you if you would like to combine your studies of English Language with the study of literature and literary theory. Read more

The MA in English Language and Literary Studies is ideal for you if you would like to combine your studies of English Language with the study of literature and literary theory. This MA is taught jointly by the Department of Linguistics and English Language and the Department of English and Creative Writing, allowing a great deal of flexibility to follow your own interests.

It consists of six credit-bearing modules, including at least two from each department, at least one research methods course and a dissertation. Support for your studies is provided by the non-credit Postgraduate Academic Study Skills module, which runs in terms 1, 2 and 3.

Course Structure

You will study a range of modules as part of your course, some examples of which are listed below.

Core

Optional

Information contained on the website with respect to modules is correct at the time of publication, but changes may be necessary, for example as a result of student feedback, Professional Statutory and Regulatory Bodies' (PSRB) requirements, staff changes, and new research.

Assessment

Coursework and dissertation



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The MA in English Speech and Language (one year full-time or two years part-time) provides students with advanced training in the study and analysis of language. Read more
The MA in English Speech and Language (one year full-time or two years part-time) provides students with advanced training in the study and analysis of language. It covers the core areas of linguistics (including phonetics, phonology, semantics, syntax) and reflects staff specialisms (including prosody, clinical and corpus linguistics, critical discourse analysis, stylistics). The course is suited to English Language and/or Linguistics graduates who wish to pursue advanced-level study either as an end in itself or as preparation for a PhD. Funding is available to the best students from various sources, including AHRC, DEL and the School of English at Queen’s.

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