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Never has there been a more important time for a new approach to economics. There is an urgent need for a radical rethink of our economic system. Read more
Never has there been a more important time for a new approach to economics.

There is an urgent need for a radical rethink of our economic system. We need new thinking and new models that recognise the challenges we face now, rather than blindly following the path that has led us into the converging crises we now face.

These models will enable us to both mitigate the impacts and adapt to these inter-locking crises – including climate change, biodiversity loss, the peaking in fossil fuel energy supplies, financial instability, food security, poverty and so on.

They will be built on an understanding of the complementarity of ecological protection and human flourishing.

For 20 years, pioneering thinkers and practitioners have been developing alternative economic ideas, models and experiments that were once considered radical and marginal.

As we turn to face a new economic dawn, these theories and practices are now moving centre stage.

"I teach at Schumacher College because of its strong link with ecological sustainability and an approach which is based on collaborative co-creation. People are not told what to do, together they co-create their ideas. It’s a fundamentally different model of education that we can learn from and apply to the economy as well as other areas of our life."
Professor Eve Mitleton-Kelly, London School of Economics

"In making the transition to a world in which we can all thrive within planetary boundaries, it is paradigm shift or bust, and nobody does paradigm shift better than Schumacher College. Its learning environment and the content of its courses make visions of a better world tangible. And, the Economics for Transition MA shows how right now we can take the first steps to get there."
Andrew Simms, Fellow of New Economics Foundation

"Schumacher College is one of the few places I know where economic questions are being asked as openly as they need to be. When I run seminars there, I learn as much as I teach."
Kate Raworth, Visiting Research Associate at Oxford University’s Environmental Change Institute

Why Schumacher College?

Since 1991, Schumacher College has been pioneering radical new thinking in economics, attracting leading teachers, practitioners and activists from across the globe. We have inspired and supported thousands of organisations and individuals from many different countries in their quest to achieve a more sustainable and equitable world.

In 2011, in response to the deepening economic and related crises, we launched our first postgraduate programme in Economics for Transition in association with the New Economics Foundation, the Transition Network and the Business School at Plymouth University.

Now in its fourth year, this partnership offers you an unparalleled opportunity to learn about the cream of radical economic thinking, activism and entrepreneurship globally.

Hosted by highly respected radical economists, completed by an unrivalled visiting faculty of teachers and practitioners from across the world, you have a unique chance to join those at the forefront of new economic thinking.

Our teachers include:

Jonathan Dawson – Schumacher College
Tim Crabtree – Schumacher College
Stephan Harding – Schumacher College
Julie Richardson – Schumacher College
Anna Coote and Tony Greenham (link is external) – New Economics Foundation
Rob Hopkins, Jay Tompt & Sophy Banks (link is external) – Transition Network
David Bollier – co-founder of the Commons Strategies Group
Gustavo Esteva – founder of the Universidad de la Tierra
Fiona Ward – REconomy Project
Pat Conaty – NEF Fellow
Tim ‘Mac’ Macartney – Founder and CEO of Embercombe
Robin Murray – Industrial and environmental economist.
Kate Raworth – Senior Visiting Research Associate at Oxford University’s Environmental Change Institute
Dr. Martin Shaw – Author, mythologist, storyteller and award winning wilderness Rites-of-Passage guide

Who is this course for?

We are delighted to receive your application whether you are coming directly from an undergraduate degree, taking time-out to study mid-career or wanting an opportunity to retrain in a subject area that is of huge importance to our global economic future and wellbeing.

We are looking for enthusiastic agents of change who are ready to co-create a new economy in practice. We are looking for those prepared to take a risk and stand on the cutting-edge of new thinking in this area.

Schumacher College welcomes students from all over the world in its diverse mix of cultural experience and age group that allows for rich peer to peer learning.

What you will learn?

The key sustainability issues facing the world today
How ecological, economic and social crises are systemically linked to the malfunctioning of today’s globalised economy
A critique of the dominant neoclassical, industrial growth model from different perspectives
A theoretical and experiential understanding of an ecological world-view
How to apply ecology and complexity science to the economy and social systems
The co-creation of a new approach to economics drawn from alternative schools of thought
The co-creation of future scenarios and pathways towards low-carbon, high wellbeing and resilient economies
Participation in current debates on the economics of transition
New economics tools, methods and policies and their application to real-world case studies
Self-evaluation to improve professional practice

You will also carry out an independent research project related to the economics of transition

Where you will go?

Are you ready to join a new generation of business leaders, entrepreneurs, policy-makers, researchers, consultants and activists?

Graduates from this programme will have the skills and knowledge to work for sustainable change in the public and private sectors as well as in civil society, or to set up their own projects or organisations that will contribute to the transition to a new economy.

Hear from some of our past and present students and find out how this programme has changed their lives and careers by reading our the Economics for Transition student profiles.

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Security ranks high on both the societal as well as political agenda. The threat of terrorism, transnational organized crime, civil war, urban riots or natural disasters is making headlines almost every day and is a guarantee for political turmoil. Read more
Security ranks high on both the societal as well as political agenda. The threat of terrorism, transnational organized crime, civil war, urban riots or natural disasters is making headlines almost every day and is a guarantee for political turmoil. Although from a factual perspective the risk of high-end security incidents is in most Western countries low, the risk perception is far more higher. When it comes to security and crisis, risk perception seems to be as important as actual risk assessments.

Visit the website: http://en.mastersinleiden.nl/programmes/crisis-and-security-management/en/introduction

Course detail

During the one year multi-disciplinary master program students will become familiar with the political and social dimensions of the governance of (in)security and crises. By analyzing security discourses, security actors, security practices and security outcomes students will become acquainted with the ‘wicked problem’ of security and crises topics in a complex and globalizing world.
As security is no longer a public good solely provided by state actors or public actors but the combined outcome of public actors, private security actors, civil society and citizens as well, the master program will focus on the multiplicity of actors engaged in defining and practicing security.

Further, as a result of the globalized and interwoven world of today in which incidents, images and messages travel within seconds from one part of the world to another part of the world, students will study current security and crisis challenges from a ‘glocal’ perspective: both global and local levels and especially the nexus of those levels.

Format

In the master’s program students will be confronted with the insights of various academic disciplines and a combination of theory and practice and skills relevant for a professional career in public or private security and crisis organizations. Students will become familiar with the causes of different forms of crises and threats to security, with patterns of responses and governance of these phenomena, and policies and strategies to prevent threats, incidents or crises. The Master thesis project provides students the opportunity to specifically focus on one particular type of crisis or security issue and how certain actors deal with it.

Careers

The combination of academic and professional skills taught in the master’s programme makes Leiden graduates excellent candidates for positions in national and international Public Administration as well as for managerial positions in the private sector. Many of them also find their way to consultancy organisations and other private companies in the field of crisis and security management.

This specialisation prepares students for a career in the rapidly expanding domain of local, national and international security and safety management. In recent years, there has been a rising demand for professionals with a background in crisis and safety management, both in the public and private sector. Students with this specialisation can apply for jobs in policymaking departments, local and provincial government, international organizations and NGOs, consultancy agents, and private industry.

How to apply: http://en.mastersinleiden.nl/arrange/admission

Funding

For information regarding funding, please visit the website: http://prospectivestudents.leiden.edu/scholarships

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This course is also offered at the Bangor Business School - London Centre. Banking and financial services represents a highly competitive and rapidly changing sector in every modern economy. Read more
This course is also offered at the Bangor Business School - London Centre.

Banking and financial services represents a highly competitive and rapidly changing sector in every modern economy. Changes in customer requirements, technology, competitive conditions and regulation create the need for managers, traders and analysts to make rapid and often far-reaching decisions about their short term operations and long term strategies. The MSc and MA in Banking and Finance degree courses at Bangor offer you a unique opportunity to study advanced theory and practice relating to financial services, and to develop an appreciation of the causes and significance of current developments in this vitally important and dynamic sector of the economy.

Issues you will tackle as part of your MA/MSc Banking and Finance degree programme include:

Why are the banking systems in different countries (such as the UK, Germany, Japan and the US) so diverse?
What determines the structure, performance and efficiency of banking and financial markets?
Why do banks and financial intermediaries exist?
What are the main theories of the banking firm?
How relevant are financial intermediaries in a world of increasing securitization and with the evolution of virtual banking?
How do banks optimally allocate capital?
Does bank regulation increase or decrease risks?
How do we measure the risks undertaken by banks?
Can regulators reduce the likelihood of systemic (system-wide) risk?
What are the relationships between risk and return governing investment in company shares and other derivative instruments?
Can market risk be priced accurately? Can credit risk be priced accurately?
How should institutional investors go about constructing a portfolio of assets to maximise returns on behalf of investors?
How can we assess the investment performance of pension funds, insurance companies and unit trusts?
How do banks use futures, options, derivatives and swaps to manage their balance sheet and off-balance sheet risks?
What are the key principles of international portfolio management in a world of fast and unpredictable movements in exchange rates?
How do banks manage their business so as to maintain customer relationships, improve operational efficiency and add shareholder value?

With these needs in mind, the MSc and MA Banking and Finance programmes at Bangor are designed to develop participants' existing skills through a scheme of specialist advanced study. An important objective is to provide participants with relevant analytical training, so that they are familiar with the latest theoretical and practical developments relating to banking, finance and capital markets. These programmes provide a coherent theoretical framework for the various subject areas, but the emphasis throughout is on advanced practical application of financial techniques in a real-world setting.

The availability of parallel MSc and MA degrees in Banking and Finance allows you to choose between registering for a more technical MSc degree (including a compulsory element in Financial Econometrics), and a less technical MA degree (for which Financial Econometrics is optional). The MSc degree may be more suitable for applicants with some previous background in mathematics, statistics or econometrics, while the MA degree is more suitable for applicants who prefer to adopt a predominantly non-quantitative approach to their studies. However, both degrees include a compulsory module in Research Methods, which includes coverage of both quantitative and non-quantitative research techniques.

ESRC Recognition

The MA Banking and Finance is recognised by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) as the first year of a 1+3 PhD training programme.

Course Structure

January intake: Taught modules are undertaken in the period of January to June and September to January and will involve the study of 120 credits. The dissertation (or equivalent) is valued at 60 credits and is undertaken during the period of June to September.

September intake: Taught modules are undertaken in the period of September to June and will involve the study of 120 credits. The dissertation (or equivalent) is valued at 60 credits and is undertaken during the period of June to September.

Compulsory modules

Research Methods: This module develops knowledge of intermediate and advanced research methods, and provides a basis in research methodology for those who may eventually wish to pursue research degrees.

Bank Financial Management: This module provides a grounding in the nature, strategic context and managerial functions of financial management in banks, and other financial services firms.

International Financial Markets: This module provides an overview of financial instruments in a multi-currency world, taking account of insights from portfolio theory concerning the relationship between risk and return, the diversification of risk, and the pricing of assets.

International Banking: This module examines the origins of international banking, the activities of international banks, the markets in which they participate, and the sources of risk.

Financial Crises and Bank Regulation: This module examines why banks and financial markets are inherently vulnerable to crises, and analyses the role of policy makers and institutions. The roles of monetary policy, bank supervision and regulation, corporate governance and ratings agencies in mitigating or exacerbating crises are considered.

International Financial Management: In this module the financial management of multinational companies and the influence of macroeconomic, fiscal, currency and political environments on business and financial decision-making are examined in an international and global context.

Optional modules

Islamic Finance: This course provides an insight into topical issues relating to Islamic financial instruments and related risk management issues.

Corporate Risk Management: This module provides an analysis of pure risk and its management.

Financial Institutions Strategic Management: This module examines the main theoretical and practical issues concerning banking business. You will develop a critical awareness of the theory of the banking firm, the motives for international banking, and regulatory and structural issues impacting on bank behaviour.

Financial Analysis: This module analyses the techniques that are used to evaluate a company’s financial position and performance.

Investment Strategy and Portfolio Management: This module evaluates the development of investment strategies for bonds, equities and derivatives that are designed to achieve optimal risk-return outcomes, and examines the measurement and evaluation of the performance of a portfolio of investments.

Islamic Banking: This module provides an insight into the key features of Islamic banking business.

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In today’s global competitive marketplace, the successful corporate executive needs to understand how the legal system and legal regulation can impact on their own area of expertise. Read more
In today’s global competitive marketplace, the successful corporate executive needs to understand how the legal system and legal regulation can impact on their own area of expertise. Accordingly, the BangorBusinessSchool and the Bangor School of Law have combined to offer an innovative suite of interdisciplinary MBA and MA programmes.

The MA in Banking and Law is an interdisciplinary programme that will enable the student to study key legal and regulatory developments affecting the financial sector. This includes the regulation of financial services, security instruments, corporate finance, arbitration and other issues affecting modern banks at UK, EU and international level. As well as the general principles of International Banking Law, you will also choose from a wide range of law and business. The programme will equip candidates with higher level knowledge in both the Banking and Law areas, as global Banking practice today is heavily influenced by the Law. In particular the financial and regulatory lessons to be drawn from the so-called ‘credit crunch’ in the USA and the UK will be examined. The MA degree is suitable for those who wish to adopt a predominantly non-quantitative approach to their studies.
Course Structure

January intake: Taught modules are undertaken in the period of January to June and September to January and will involve the study of 120 credits. The dissertation (or equivalent) is valued at 60 credits and is undertaken during the period of June to September.

September intake: Taught modules are undertaken in the period of September to June and will involve the study of 120 credits. The dissertation (or equivalent) is valued at 60 credits and is undertaken during the period of June to September.

Compulsory modules:

Research Methods: This module develops knowledge of intermediate and advanced research methods, and provides a basis in research methodology for those who may eventually wish to pursue research degrees.

Bank Financial Management: This module provides a grounding in the nature, strategic context and managerial functions of financial management in banks, and other financial services firms.

International Banking: This module examines the origins of international banking, the activities of international banks, the markets in which they participate, and the sources of risk.

Financial Institutions Strategic Management: This module examines the main theoretical and practical issues concerning banking business. You will develop a critical awareness of the theory of the banking firm, the motives for international banking, and regulatory and structural issues impacting on bank behaviour.

Financial Crises and Bank Regulation: This module examines why banks and financial markets are inherently vulnerable to crises, and analyses the role of policy makers and institutions. The roles of monetary policy, bank supervision and regulation, corporate governance and ratings agencies in mitigating or exacerbating crises are considered.

International Banking and Capital Markets Law: This module will provide a sound understanding of the law and practice of modern international banking, including the regulation and prudential supervision of banks in the UK and EU in the areas of capital adequacy and risk management.

Optional Law modules (choose 2):

Comparative Corporate Governance: Major corporate scandals in the US, Europe and the UK in recent years have raised questions about the organisation and governance of companies, in particular large multinational organisations. The growth of private equity buy-outs has also raised issues of transparency and accountability.

Credit and Security Law: The supply of credit is the lifeblood of industry but of course a lender will require security. This module will examine in detail the provisions relating to the regulation of the supply of credit to consumers and business.

International Corporate Finance Law and Merger Regulation Law: This module focuses on the study of leading case law and selected legislation, relating to international mergers and their financing from several common law countries such as the USA, Britain, Ireland, Canada, Australia and New Zealand, as well as China, India and the EU.

International Commercial Arbitration: This module considers the theoretical and institutional structure of arbitration and alternative dispute resolution, examines the legal framework within which disputes are resolved and reviews the practice of international commercial arbitration.

Consumer Law: This module focuses on the main areas of legal liability and the pitfalls that can arise if an organisation does not comply with the relevant consumer protection rules both in the UK and Europe.

Intellectual Property Law: This module addresses the fundamentals of intellectual property law, the definition and scope of copyright; the authorship, ownership, duration and qualification for copyright protection.

Competition Law: This module focuses on the theory and law of competition, focusing on UK competition law, and EU competition law relating to the control of restrictive practices, vertical and horizontal restraints and abuse of a dominant position. Comparative regimes, in particular that of the US, are examined.

Industrial Property Law: This module examines the history and development of industrial property law in the UK, EU and internationally. It covers the law relating to trade secrets, patents, copyrights, design rights and trademarks.

World Trade Law: This module studies aspects of the regulation of international trade through the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) and the World Trade Organisation.

International Insurance Law: Insurance plays an important role in commerce and risk management. Insurance contracts are governed by the rules of general law of contract. The module explores the nature and scope of the contract of insurance, considers the general principles of insurance, and examines the relationships between parties to a contract.

International Taxation Law: This module studies the basic principles of income taxation of international transactions involving taxpayers of several European countries (including the UK, the Netherlands, France, Germany, Ireland), the US, Australia, Canada and Japan.

Employment Law: Modern employment law is complex, and imposes major compliance costs on employers. This module covers contract of employment, minimum wage legislation, discrimination against employees, and unfair dismissal actions before Employment Tribunals.

International Environmental Law: This module focuses on internationally recognised principles and values concerning environmental protection, and how they are translated into legally enforceable tools. Methods of environmental regulation are analysed and compared.

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This course is also offered at the Bangor Business School – London Centre. Over the past two or three decades or so, Islamic banking and finance has emerged as another viable way of financial intermediation. Read more
This course is also offered at the Bangor Business School – London Centre.

Over the past two or three decades or so, Islamic banking and finance has emerged as another viable way of financial intermediation. It has gained credibility and has spread worldwide and is the preferred way of banking for one fifth of the world’s population. This taught MA offers an opportunity to study the structure of the Islamic banking and finance industry, including its theoretical foundations, products, performance, Islamic financial instruments and risk management issues. These and other topics will be studied within the wider context of the banking and finance industry worldwide. There is also an MSc version of this MA programme, and whilst the MSc is more suitable for candidates with some previous background in mathematics, statistics or econometrics, this MA is more suitable for candidates who prefer a less quantitative approach to their studies.
Course structure

January intake: Taught modules are undertaken in the period of January to June and September to January and will involve the study of 120 credits. The dissertation (or equivalent) is valued at 60 credits and is undertaken during the period of June to September.

September intake: Taught modules are undertaken in the period of September to June and will involve the study of 120 credits. The dissertation (or equivalent) is valued at 60 credits and is undertaken during the period of June to September.

Compulsory modules:

Research Methods: This module develops knowledge of intermediate and advanced research methods, and provides a basis in research methodology for those who may eventually wish to pursue research degrees.

International Financial Markets: This module provides an overview of financial instruments in a multi-currency world, taking account of insights from portfolio theory concerning the relationship between risk and return, the diversification of risk, and the pricing of assets.

Islamic Finance: This module provides an insight into topical issues relating to Islamic financial instruments and related risk management issues. The first part of the module examines issues relating to financial contracting, instruments and various intermediation issues. The second part focuses on the role of the capital market in providing Islamic financing, and highlights financial engineering and risk management features of this type of business.

Islamic Banking: This module provides an insight into the key features of Islamic banking business. The first part of the course outlines the theoretical foundations and development of Islamic banking practices. In particular, the main characteristics of various types of Islamic banking products are discussed. The second part of the course examines the operational features of Islamic banks, focusing on their performance and how they compete with conventional interest-based banks. The final part of the course outlines contemporary challenges to Islamic banking business.

International Banking: This module examines the origins of international banking, the activities of international banks, the markets in which they participate, and the sources of risk. You will investigate the determinants of the efficiency of international banks, and evaluate the implications for banks’ strategic decision-making.

Financial Crises and Bank Regulation: This module examines why banks and financial markets are inherently vulnerable to crises, and analyses the role of policy makers and institutions. The roles of monetary policy, bank supervision and regulation, corporate governance and ratings agencies in mitigating or exacerbating crises are considered.

Optional modules (choose 2):

Islamic Accounting and Financial Reporting: This module develops a critical awareness of theoretical and practical approaches to Islamic accounting and financial reporting. Islamic accounting standards are compared with IFRS, and the content and impact of academic research in this area is examined.

Corporate Risk Management: This module provides an analysis of pure risk and its management.

Bank Financial Management: This module provides a grounding in the nature, strategic context and managerial functions of financial management in banks and other financial services firms. Three key themes are: identification and management of the trade-off between risk and return; improvement of a bank’s value using market models; and external market-based tests of bank performance.

Financial Institutions Strategic Management: This module examines the main theoretical and practical issues concerning banking business. You will develop a critical awareness of the theory of the banking firm, the motives for international banking, and regulatory and structural issues impacting on bank behaviour.

Investment Strategy and Portfolio Management: This module evaluates the development of investment strategies for bonds, equities and derivatives that are designed to achieve optimal risk-return outcomes, and examines the measurement and evaluation of the performance of a portfolio of investments.

Islamic Insurance: This module analyses the nature and principles of Islamic insurance, and examines the operational modes and practice of Islamic insurance. The structure of Islamic insurance markets is described, and constraints and opportunities are highlighted.

Read less
In today’s global competitive marketplace, the successful corporate executive needs to understand how the legal system and legal regulation can impact on their own area of expertise. Read more
In today’s global competitive marketplace, the successful corporate executive needs to understand how the legal system and legal regulation can impact on their own area of expertise. Accordingly, the BangorBusinessSchool and the Bangor School of Law have combined to offer an innovative suite of interdisciplinary MBA and MA programmes.

The MA in Banking and Law is an interdisciplinary programme that will enable the student to study key legal and regulatory developments affecting the financial sector. This includes the regulation of financial services, security instruments, corporate finance, arbitration and other issues affecting modern banks at UK, EU and international level. As well as the general principles of International Banking Law, you will also choose from a wide range of law and business. The programme will equip candidates with higher level knowledge in both the Banking and Law areas, as global Banking practice today is heavily influenced by the Law. In particular the financial and regulatory lessons to be drawn from the so-called ‘credit crunch’ in the USA and the UK will be examined. The MA degree is suitable for those who wish to adopt a predominantly non-quantitative approach to their studies.

Course Structure
January intake: Taught modules are undertaken in the period of January to June and September to January and will involve the study of 120 credits. The dissertation (or equivalent) is valued at 60 credits and is undertaken during the period of June to September.

September intake: Taught modules are undertaken in the period of September to June and will involve the study of 120 credits. The dissertation (or equivalent) is valued at 60 credits and is undertaken during the period of June to September.

Compulsory modules:

Research Methods: This module develops knowledge of intermediate and advanced research methods, and provides a basis in research methodology for those who may eventually wish to pursue research degrees.

Bank Financial Management: This module provides a grounding in the nature, strategic context and managerial functions of financial management in banks, and other financial services firms.

International Banking: This module examines the origins of international banking, the activities of international banks, the markets in which they participate, and the sources of risk.

Financial Institutions Strategic Management: This module examines the main theoretical and practical issues concerning banking business. You will develop a critical awareness of the theory of the banking firm, the motives for international banking, and regulatory and structural issues impacting on bank behaviour.

Financial Crises and Bank Regulation: This module examines why banks and financial markets are inherently vulnerable to crises, and analyses the role of policy makers and institutions. The roles of monetary policy, bank supervision and regulation, corporate governance and ratings agencies in mitigating or exacerbating crises are considered.

International Banking and Capital Markets Law: This module will provide a sound understanding of the law and practice of modern international banking, including the regulation and prudential supervision of banks in the UK and EU in the areas of capital adequacy and risk management.

Optional Law modules (choose 2):

Comparative Corporate Governance: Major corporate scandals in the US, Europe and the UK in recent years have raised questions about the organisation and governance of companies, in particular large multinational organisations. The growth of private equity buy-outs has also raised issues of transparency and accountability.

Credit and Security Law: The supply of credit is the lifeblood of industry but of course a lender will require security. This module will examine in detail the provisions relating to the regulation of the supply of credit to consumers and business.

International Corporate Finance Law and Merger Regulation Law: This module focuses on the study of leading case law and selected legislation, relating to international mergers and their financing from several common law countries such as the USA, Britain, Ireland, Canada, Australia and New Zealand, as well as China, India and the EU.

International Commercial Arbitration: This module considers the theoretical and institutional structure of arbitration and alternative dispute resolution, examines the legal framework within which disputes are resolved and reviews the practice of international commercial arbitration.

Consumer Law: This module focuses on the main areas of legal liability and the pitfalls that can arise if an organisation does not comply with the relevant consumer protection rules both in the UK and Europe.

Intellectual Property Law: This module addresses the fundamentals of intellectual property law, the definition and scope of copyright; the authorship, ownership, duration and qualification for copyright protection.

Competition Law: This module focuses on the theory and law of competition, focusing on UK competition law, and EU competition law relating to the control of restrictive practices, vertical and horizontal restraints and abuse of a dominant position. Comparative regimes, in particular that of the US, are examined.

Industrial Property Law: This module examines the history and development of industrial property law in the UK, EU and internationally. It covers the law relating to trade secrets, patents, copyrights, design rights and trademarks.

World Trade Law: This module studies aspects of the regulation of international trade through the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) and the World Trade Organisation.

International Insurance Law: Insurance plays an important role in commerce and risk management. Insurance contracts are governed by the rules of general law of contract. The module explores the nature and scope of the contract of insurance, considers the general principles of insurance, and examines the relationships between parties to a contract.

International Taxation Law: This module studies the basic principles of income taxation of international transactions involving taxpayers of several European countries (including the UK, the Netherlands, France, Germany, Ireland), the US, Australia, Canada and Japan.

Employment Law: Modern employment law is complex, and imposes major compliance costs on employers. This module covers contract of employment, minimum wage legislation, discrimination against employees, and unfair dismissal actions before Employment Tribunals.

International Environmental Law: This module focuses on internationally recognised principles and values concerning environmental protection, and how they are translated into legally enforceable tools. Methods of environmental regulation are analysed and compared.

Read less
This multidisciplinary degree course focuses on response to crises originating from both conflict-zones and natural disasters. Read more
This multidisciplinary degree course focuses on response to crises originating from both conflict-zones and natural disasters. Bringing together the study of medicine and humanities, the course provides an inclusive approach that mirrors the reality of aid operations and informs the reflexive processes of both analytical and applied disciplines. Students will be able to draw synergies from an exceptionally wide breadth of disciplinary traditions and research expertise.

Aims

1. Provide critical insights into competing perspectives on how Humanitarianism and Conflict Responses can be understood, analysed and explained - from both an historiographic and contemporary viewpoint.
2. Develop analytical skills in critically evaluating the idea of humanitarianism and the ways that responses to conflict are organised, justified and implemented. This includes competency in developing a reasoned argument, critically considering data sources and depending different approaches.
3. Develop skills in gathering, organising and using evidence and information from a wide variety of sources. This will be complemented by guidance on how best to manage workloads and obtain research materials.
4. Enable students to apply research skills to a relevant research area.

Students should be able to show a critical understanding of :
1. Key issues and debates in Humanitarianism and Conflict Response, familiarity with different theoretical approaches, practical problems and an appreciation of the diversity of policies at international and national levels.
2. Both the range of social science topics associated with Humanitarianism and Conflict Response and the normative and historiographic assumptions which underpin these issues.
3. The analytical and policy literature concerning the related issues of the causes of conflict, reconstruction, ethics and international governance structures and institutions, the role and perspectives of the state, multilateral and bilateral agencies, international and domestic NGOs and other civil institutions.
4. A detailed and extensive understanding of a specific conceptual and/or policy-related area of Humanitarianism and Conflict Response, of the implications and limitations of research findings on this subject; and of how to produce an original piece of academic research, all through their dissertation.

Special features

HCRI at The University of Manchester is inspired by the need to conduct rigorous research and to support postgraduate training on the impact and outcomes of contemporary and historical crises. Directed by Dr Rony Brauman (former President of MSF France, Associate Professor at L'Institut d'Études Politiques, Paris, and Director of Research at the MSF Foundation, Paris), HCRI is widely recognised as being a leading international research institute focusing on the study of humanitarianism, conflict response and peacebuilding.

Our work is driven by a desire to inform and support policy and decision makers, to optimise joint working between partner organisations, and to foster increased understanding and debate within the field. Bringing together the disciplines of medicine and the humanities (including international relations and political science) to achieve these goals, HCRI aims to facilitate improvements in crisis response on a global scale whilst providing a centre of excellence for all concerned with emergencies, conflicts and peace. In offering a range of postgraduate courses we embrace this opportunity to develop a scholarly and professional agenda for humanitarians and peacebuilders around the world.

Course unit details

Course units may include:
-Humanitarianism and conflict response: inquiries
-Emergency humanitarian assistance
-Fundamentals of epidemiology
-Humanitarian responses to crises: case studies
-The history of humanitarian aid
-Research & evaluation methods
-Global health
-The Arab revolts and post-revolutionary state formation
-Anthropology of violence
-Performance in theory and practice
-The ethics of killing
-Ethics in world politics
-Conflict analysis
-Democracy: theory & practice
-Reconstruction and development
-Global governance

Career opportunities

As a hard-working, ambitious Manchester postgraduate, a wide range of exciting careers are within your reach. Students at the Humanitarian and Conflict Response Institute come from a broad range of backgrounds, with varying levels of experience. Many who already have work experience will be able to harness the knowledge gained from their course to progress within their field of expertise, reaching senior roles in government and non-governmental organisations. Others will be able to use the course as a starting point to progress onto careers within NGOs, HR consultancies, financial institutions, academic institutions and more. Whatever your level of experience, you can access support from your tutors, the University Careers Service and an extensive alumni network to boost your career prospects further than ever before whilst at Manchester.

Associated organisations

A close link has been formed with the humanitarian organisation Médecins Sans Frontières. Recipient of the 1999 Nobel Prize, it delivers emergency aid in over 60 countries to people affected by armed conflict, epidemics, natural or man-made disasters or exclusion from healthcare through its staff of 25,000 health professionals, logistics experts and administrators. The HCRI is also building a network of associate fellows based in relevant organisations and academic institutions around the world.

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The Finance MBA is designed for candidates with degrees or relevant business backgrounds, who wish to develop their expertise and further their professional careers. Read more
The Finance MBA is designed for candidates with degrees or relevant business backgrounds, who wish to develop their expertise and further their professional careers.

The course will be of particular interest to:

Graduates who have professional experience in the financial sector;
Managers and accountants in public and private organisations who wish to develop their financial management skills;
Managers employed in the financial services industry;
Graduates contemplating a career in the banking and financial services industry;
Graduates who have relevant practical experience and wish to enhance their skills in the areas of banking and finance;
Finance professionals (like corporate treasurers and accountants) who deal with the financial services industry.

Course Structure

January intake: Taught modules are undertaken in the period of January to June and September to January and will involve the study of 120 credits. The dissertation (or equivalent) is valued at 60 credits and is undertaken during the period of June to September.

September intake: Taught modules are undertaken in the period of September to June and will involve the study of 120 credits. The dissertation (or equivalent) is valued at 60 credits and is undertaken during the period of June to September.

Compulsory modules:

Organisations and People: This module examines key issues arising from contemporary research in organisational behaviour (OB) and human resource management (HRM). It provides an integrated analysis of management, organisations and people, developing the conceptual, strategic and practical skills necessary for managers in complex, global organisational contexts.

Management Research: This module analyses the philosophical basis for research in the management sciences, and examines a number of key methodological issues and approaches. Research designs for both quantitative and qualitative research methodologies are developed, including interviews, case studies, focus groups, surveys and experiments.

Global Financial Markets: This module provides an overview of financial markets and instruments in a global context, taking account of insights from portfolio theory concerning the relationship between risk and return, the diversification of risk, and the pricing of assets.

Portfolio Management: This module evaluates the development of investment strategies for bonds and equities, which are designed to achieve optimal risk-return outcomes. The module builds on the foundations provided in ‘Global Financial Markets’. Emphasis is placed on strategic and tactical asset allocation, and on the measurement and evaluation of the performance of a portfolio of investments.

International Financial Management: In this module the financial management of multinational companies and the influence of macroeconomic, fiscal, currency and political environments on business and financial decision making are examined in an international and global context.

Optional modules (choose 3):

International Strategic Management+: This module analyses strategic decision-making within business. You will develop a critical understanding of the strategic processes of business management, the interconnections with the functional domains of marketing, human resource management and corporate finance, and the management of knowledge systems.

Marketing Financial Services+ : This module surveys the tools of modern financial services marketing, focussing on the key methods of financial services marketing in the acquisition of customers and sale and distribution of financial services. The module progresses considering consumer behaviour, the changing customer demands, consumer heuristics and biases and ways in which financial services marketing has succeeded and failed.

Islamic Finance: This module provides an insight into topical issues relating to Islamic financial instruments and related risk management issues. The first part of the module examines issues relating to financial contracting, instruments and various intermediation issues. The second part focuses on the role of the capital market in providing Islamic financing, and highlights financial engineering and risk management features of this type of business.

Financial Modelling: This module develops a combined theoretical and practical approach to mathematical modelling for specialists in finance. The module emphasises numerical methods and other analytic approaches to financial modelling.

Financial Institutions Strategic Management: This module examines the main theoretical and practical issues concerning banking business. You will develop a critical awareness of the theory of the banking firm, the motives for international banking, and regulatory and structural issues impacting on bank behaviour.

Financial Crises and Bank Regulation: This module examines why banks and financial markets are inherently vulnerable to crises, and analyses the role of policy makers and institutions. The roles of monetary policy, bank supervision and regulation, corporate governance and ratings agencies in mitigating or exacerbating crises are considered.

Contemporary Issues in Management: This module develops several theories and concepts in contemporary management theory and practice. It provides a detailed and critical analysis of management, further developing the conceptual, strategic and practical skills necessary for managers in complex, global organisational contexts.

Islamic Banking*: This module provides an insight into the key features of Islamic banking business. The first part of the course outlines the theoretical foundations and development of Islamic banking practices. In particular, the main characteristics of various types of Islamic banking products are discussed. The second part of the course examines the operational features of Islamic banks, focusing on their performance and how they compete with conventional interest-based banks. The final part of the course outlines contemporary challenges to Islamic banking business.

Read less
The number, intensity, and impact of crises, emergencies, conflicts and disasters are increasing. During the past ten years alone, an estimated 1.5 billion people have been affected by some form of disaster or conflict-related event. Read more
The number, intensity, and impact of crises, emergencies, conflicts and disasters are increasing. During the past ten years alone, an estimated 1.5 billion people have been affected by some form of disaster or conflict-related event.

This exciting and timely multidisciplinary postgraduate taught programme examines the role of global law, policy and practice across the spectrum of possible crises, conflicts, and disasters. You will consider the complete disaster cycle of prevention, mitigation, preparedness, response and recovery, and explore all types of crisis and conflict (civil, international, post-conflict peace-building, and terrorism) as well as disasters, both man-made (pollution and contamination) and natural (earthquakes, cyclones, tsunamis, health pandemics).

The programme reflects on current and changing global priorities such as the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-30; progressing the outputs of the UN Climate Change Conference 2015; UN Sustainable Development Goals 2015; and the World Humanitarian Summit 2016.

The aim of this programme is to equip you with many of the substantive, professional, practical, and personal transferable skills and knowledge necessary to operate effectively in inherently multidisciplinary crisis, conflict and/or disaster environments.

A number of schools will collaborate on the delivery of this programme: Law; Agriculture, Policy and Development; Politics, Economics and International Relations; Archaeology, Geography, and Environmental Science. There will also be input from other disciplinary perspectives too, together with practitioners drawn from across the conflict, humanitarian and disasters sectors.

As well as Law graduates, this programme will appeal to early to mid-career professionals working in roles dealing with different types of crises, conflicts and/or disasters, particularly governmental, intergovernmental, private/corporate, civil society/non-governmental who wish to broaden and deepen their existing areas of expertise. It will be also be suitable for recent graduates of any subject, those on career breaks, and career changers.

It is possible to take either an LLM or MSc pathway. Both are framed around the global architecture of crisis, conflict and disaster management with embedded multidisciplinarity. The key distinction is that an LLM route takes more optional law modules, whereas optional modules for the MSc are more multidisciplinary in nature.

WHAT WILL YOU STUDY?

Planned Law modules include:
-Global Architecture of Crisis, Conflict and Disaster Management
-Human Rights Law, Policy, and Practice
-Disaster Management
-Hazard, Risk, Vulnerability and Resilience
-Public International Law
-International Refugee Law
-International Law and the Regulation of Armed Conflict
-International Criminal Justice and Post-Conflict Peace-building
-Climate Change Disasters
-Technologies and Weaponry
-Research project
-Professional placement

Non-law modules are expected to span such topics as:
-Development (including, foundational concepts, food security, gender)
-Political (including, contemporary diplomacy, conflict in the Middle East, terrorism)
-Economic (including, macro/micro-economics for developing countries, economics of public/social policy, climate change and economics) (MSc pathway only)
-Preparing for Floods

(MSc students will have economics modules and a broader selection of politics modules to choose from).

Please note that all modules are subject to change.

A series of non-assessed, employability orientated, practical training events, inside and outside the classroom, will take place throughout the programme aimed at consolidating and applying substantive knowledge learnt as well as developing transferable professional and personal skills. This will include the opportunity to undertake a fantastic and unique practical ‘fragile/hostile environment training’ package delivered by external professional trainers*.

*Subject to payment of an additional fee, and a minimum number of students wishing to take this element.

EMPLOYABILITY

The skills gained by undertaking a postgraduate Law programme are in great demand from both legal and non-legal employers. As with any postgraduate taught Law programme, completion of the various entry points will be an asset for students seeking employment in international courts and tribunals, United Nations agencies, legal practice and advocacy in the international law field, international NGOs, the public service (in the areas of foreign relations, international development, etc), law reform agencies, the media (journalism and broadcasting), and academia (with further postgraduate study).

Graduates of this programme will be uniquely positioned and clearly distinguishable to prospective employers. In addition to acquiring knowledge of the key principles and topics associated with a traditional Public International Law and Human Rights related LLM programmes or a master's degree in crisis, conflict and/or disaster management issues, graduates of this programme will also develop a unique understanding of cutting edge law and policy, become more multidisciplinary conversant and therefore better equipped to work in inherently multidisciplinary environments.

The flexible nature of this programme allows students to select the degree qualification which best suits their background or area of expertise.

Read less
Our social world is changing all the time and there is a growing demand by employers for expert social researchers. This course is designed to give you the extra edge needed in a competitive job market. Read more
Our social world is changing all the time and there is a growing demand by employers for expert social researchers. This course is designed to give you the extra edge needed in a competitive job market.

UEL offers you a unique chance to study sociology at a university based at the heart of an area experiencing the quickest rate of social change in Europe. You will benefit from being taught by academic staff at the cutting edge of research who have excellent links to the communities developing around the campus.

We will introduce you to a variety of research methods and topics of study and give you advanced training in key sociological theories to enhance your understanding of the changes and crises associated with the modern era.

The course uniquely encourages students to consider contemporary debates through an attention to the local area and includes opportunities to carry out research in collaboration with organisations and research partners.

WHAT YOU WILL STUDY

During this one-year course (or two years part-time) you will receive advanced training in social research and sociological theory as well as furthering your understanding of key substantive areas of research such as urban change, class, gender, race, terrorism, nationalism and social policy.

You will also have the opportunity to carry out an original piece of research under the close supervision of one of our faculty members.

The course is designed to give you the opportunity to:
• Acquire postgraduate training in sociology and allied social sciences, particularly in relation to social research methods and theory development;
• Gain an understanding of how debates in sociology relate to local and global social contexts, as well as historical and contemporary events;
• Acquire the skills and training necessary for a wide range of employment opportunities in social research and analysis;
• Gain the knowledge and credentials necessary to conduct doctoral study in sociology and other social science disciplines.
You will complete one optional module and core modules on Theorising Modernity, Understanding Crises, Framing Questions, Locating Research and Themes and Issues in Sociology as well as writing a master’s dissertation.

YOUR FUTURE CAREER

Graduates with social science master’s degrees are in high demand. According to recent data, social science graduates are more likely to be in paid employment than arts or science graduates, and more likely to be in managerial roles.

This new course provides graduates with the research skills and expertise needed to respond to a wide range of employment opportunities in diverse sectors.

This includes helping local and national governments seeking to understand the impact of policy decisions, working with NGOs who are looking to inform the public about neglected aspects of society or advising corporations on how to market their products effectively.

Our academic team are involved in groundbreaking research in key areas of sociology, including culture, nationalism, race, ethnicity, gender, class and social change.

They have excellent contacts, too, which will enable you to learn practical skills in the heart of east London. We have embedded our learning and research practice in the rapid changes and complex relations of this urban laboratory.

This is a unique opportunity to develop and refine your skills of research, analysis and collaboration in an environment that reflects some of the most pressing social questions of our time. You will be well prepared for your new role and future career.

MODULES

Theorising Modernity, Understanding Crises (core)
Framing Questions, Locating Research (core)
Themes and Issues in Sociology (core)
Critical Theories of International Relations (optional)
Global Environmental Politics (optional)
Introduction to Forced Migration (optional)
Current Issues in Forced Migration (optional)
Landscapes of power and rights (optional)
Masters Dissertation (core)

Read less
The number, intensity, and impact of crises, emergencies, conflicts and disasters are increasing. During the past ten years alone, an estimated 1.5 billion people have been affected by some form of disaster or conflict-related event. Read more
The number, intensity, and impact of crises, emergencies, conflicts and disasters are increasing. During the past ten years alone, an estimated 1.5 billion people have been affected by some form of disaster or conflict-related event.

This new and innovative multidisciplinary postgraduate taught programme examines the role of global law, policy and practice across the spectrum of possible crises, conflicts, and disasters. You will consider the complete disaster cycle of prevention, mitigation, preparedness, response and recovery, and explore all types of crisis and conflict (civil, international, post-conflict peace-building, and terrorism) as well as disasters, both man-made (pollution and contamination) and natural (earthquakes, cyclones, tsunamis, health pandemics).

The programme reflects on current and changing global priorities such as the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-30; progressing the outputs of the UN Climate Change Conference 2015; UN Sustainable Development Goals 2015; and the World Humanitarian Summit 2016.

The aim of this programme is to equip you with many of the substantive, professional, practical, and personal transferable skills and knowledge necessary to operate effectively in inherently multidisciplinary crisis, conflict and/or disaster environments.

A number of schools will collaborate on the delivery of this programme: Law; Agriculture, Policy and Development; Politics, Economics and International Relations; Archaeology, Geography, and Environmental Science. There will also be input from other disciplinary perspectives too, together with practitioners drawn from across the conflict, humanitarian and disasters sectors.

As well as Law graduates, this programme will appeal to early to mid-career professionals working in roles dealing with different types of crises, conflicts and/or disasters, particularly governmental, intergovernmental, private/corporate, civil society/non-governmental who wish to broaden and deepen their existing areas of expertise. It will be also be suitable for recent graduates of any subject, those on career breaks, and career changers.

It is possible to take either an LLM or MSc pathway on the PGDip. Both are framed around the global architecture of crisis, conflict and disaster management with embedded multidisciplinarity. The key distinction is that an LLM route takes more optional law modules, whereas optional modules for the MSc are more multidisciplinary in nature.

WHAT WILL YOU STUDY?

Planned Law modules include:
-Global Architecture of Crisis, Conflict and Disaster Management
-Human Rights Law, Policy, and Practice
-Disaster Management
-Hazard, Risk, Vulnerability and Resilience
-Public International Law
-International Refugee Law
-International Law and the Regulation of Armed Conflict
-International Criminal Justice and Post-Conflict Peace-building
-Climate Change Disasters
-Technologies and Weaponry

Non-law modules are expected to span such topics as:
-Development (eg foundational concepts, food security, gender)
-Political (eg contemporary diplomacy, conflict in the Middle East, terrorism)
-Economic (eg macro/micro-economics for developing countries, economics of public/social policy, climate change and economics) (MSc pathway only)
-Preparing for Floods

(MSc students will have economics modules and a broader selection of politics modules to choose from).

Please note that all modules are subject to change.

A series of non-assessed, employability orientated, practical training events, inside and outside the classroom, will take place throughout the programme aimed at consolidating and applying substantive knowledge learnt as well as developing transferable professional and personal skills. This will include the opportunity to undertake a fantastic and unique practical ‘fragile/hostile environment training’ package delivered by external professional trainers*.

*Subject to payment of an additional fee, and a minimum number of students wishing to take this element.

EMPLOYABILITY

The skills gained by undertaking a postgraduate Law programme are in great demand from both legal and non-legal employers. As with any postgraduate taught Law programme, completion of the various entry points will be an asset for students seeking employment in international courts and tribunals, United Nations agencies, legal practice and advocacy in the international law field, international NGOs, the public service (in the areas of foreign relations, international development, etc), law reform agencies, the media (journalism and broadcasting), and academia (with further postgraduate study).

Graduates of this programme will be uniquely positioned and clearly distinguishable to prospective employers. In addition to acquiring knowledge of the key principles and topics associated with a traditional Public International Law and Human Rights related LLM programmes or a master's degree in crisis, conflict and/or disaster management issues, graduates of this programme will also develop a unique understanding of cutting edge law and policy, become more multidisciplinary conversant and therefore better equipped to work in inherently multidisciplinary environments.

The flexible nature of this programme allows students to select the degree qualification which best suits their background or area of expertise.

Read less
The number, intensity, and impact of crises, emergencies, conflicts and disasters are increasing. During the past ten years alone, an estimated 1.5 billion people have been affected by some form of disaster or conflict-related event. Read more
The number, intensity, and impact of crises, emergencies, conflicts and disasters are increasing. During the past ten years alone, an estimated 1.5 billion people have been affected by some form of disaster or conflict-related event.

This new and innovative multidisciplinary postgraduate taught programme examines the role of global law, policy and practice across the spectrum of possible crises, conflicts, and disasters. You will consider the complete disaster cycle of prevention, mitigation, preparedness, response and recovery, and explore all types of crisis and conflict (civil, international, post-conflict peace-building, and terrorism) as well as disasters, both man-made (pollution and contamination) and natural (earthquakes, cyclones, tsunamis, health pandemics).

The programme reflects on current and changing global priorities such as the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-30; progressing the outputs of the UN Climate Change Conference 2015; UN Sustainable Development Goals 2015; and the World Humanitarian Summit 2016.

The aim of this programme is to equip you with many of the substantive, professional, practical, and personal transferable skills and knowledge necessary to operate effectively in inherently multidisciplinary crisis, conflict and/or disaster environments.

A number of schools will collaborate on the delivery of this programme: Law; Agriculture, Policy and Development; Politics, Economics and International Relations; Archaeology, Geography, and Environmental Science. There will also be input from other disciplinary perspectives too, together with practitioners drawn from across the conflict, humanitarian and disasters sectors.

As well as Law graduates, this programme will appeal to early to mid-career professionals working in roles dealing with different types of crises, conflicts and/or disasters, particularly governmental, intergovernmental, private/corporate, civil society/non-governmental who wish to broaden and deepen their existing areas of expertise. It will be also be suitable for recent graduates of any subject, those on career breaks, and career changers.

It is possible to take either an LLM or MSc pathway on the PGCert. Both are framed around the global architecture of crisis, conflict and disaster management with embedded multidisciplinarity. The key distinction is that an LLM route takes more optional law modules, whereas optional modules for the MSc are more multidisciplinary in nature.

WHAT WILL YOU STUDY?

Planned Law modules include:
-Global Architecture of Crisis, Conflict and Disaster Management
-Human Rights Law, Policy, and Practice
-Disaster Management
-Hazard, Risk, Vulnerability and Resilience
-Public International Law
-International Refugee Law
-International Law and the Regulation of Armed Conflict
-International Criminal Justice and Post-Conflict Peace-building
-Climate Change Disasters
-Technologies and Weaponry

Please note that all modules are subject to change.

A series of non-assessed, employability orientated, practical training events, inside and outside the classroom, will take place throughout the programme aimed at consolidating and applying substantive knowledge learnt as well as developing transferable professional and personal skills. This will include the opportunity to undertake a fantastic and unique practical ‘fragile/hostile environment training’ package delivered by external professional trainers*.

*Subject to payment of an additional fee, and a minimum number of students wishing to take this element.

EMPLOYABILITY

The skills gained by undertaking a postgraduate Law programme are in great demand from both legal and non-legal employers. As with any postgraduate taught Law programme, completion of the various entry points will be an asset for students seeking employment in international courts and tribunals, United Nations agencies, legal practice and advocacy in the international law field, international NGOs, the public service (in the areas of foreign relations, international development, etc), law reform agencies, the media (journalism and broadcasting), and academia (with further postgraduate study).

Graduates of this programme will be uniquely positioned and clearly distinguishable to prospective employers. In addition to acquiring knowledge of the key principles and topics associated with a traditional Public International Law and Human Rights related LLM programmes or a master's degree in crisis, conflict and/or disaster management issues, graduates of this programme will also develop a unique understanding of cutting edge law and policy, become more multidisciplinary conversant and therefore better equipped to work in inherently multidisciplinary environments.

The flexible nature of this programme allows students to select the degree qualification which best suits their background or area of expertise.

Read less
The number, intensity, and impact of crises, emergencies, conflicts and disasters are increasing. During the past ten years alone, an estimated 1.5 billion people have been affected by some form of disaster or conflict-related event. Read more
The number, intensity, and impact of crises, emergencies, conflicts and disasters are increasing. During the past ten years alone, an estimated 1.5 billion people have been affected by some form of disaster or conflict-related event.

This new and innovative multidisciplinary postgraduate taught programme examines the role of global law, policy and practice across the spectrum of possible crises, conflicts, and disasters. You will consider the complete disaster cycle of prevention, mitigation, preparedness, response and recovery, and explore all types of crisis and conflict (civil, international, post-conflict peace-building, and terrorism) as well as disasters, both man-made (pollution and contamination) and natural (earthquakes, cyclones, tsunamis, health pandemics).

The programme reflects on current and changing global priorities such as the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-30; progressing the outputs of the UN Climate Change Conference 2015; UN Sustainable Development Goals 2015; and the World Humanitarian Summit 2016.

The aim of this programme is to equip you with many of the substantive, professional, practical, and personal transferable skills and knowledge necessary to operate effectively in inherently multidisciplinary crisis, conflict and/or disaster environments.

A number of schools will collaborate on the delivery of this programme: Law; Agriculture, Policy and Development; Politics, Economics and International Relations; Archaeology, Geography, and Environmental Science. There will also be input from other disciplinary perspectives too, together with practitioners drawn from across the conflict, humanitarian and disasters sectors.

As well as Law graduates, this programme will appeal to early to mid-career professionals working in roles dealing with different types of crises, conflicts and/or disasters, particularly governmental, intergovernmental, private/corporate, civil society/non-governmental who wish to broaden and deepen their existing areas of expertise. It will be also be suitable for recent graduates of any subject, those on career breaks, and career changers.

Please note that the Certificate of Credit option is only suitable for students who do not require a visa to study in the UK, and who live close enough to the University to attend each seminar in person. We regret, but no distance learning option is available.

WHAT WILL YOU STUDY?

Planned Law modules include:
-Foundational Concepts, Principles, and Actors
-Human Rights Law, Policy, and Practice
-Public International Law
-International Refugee Law
-International Law and the Regulation of Armed Conflict
-Disaster Management
-Morality and Governance
-Conflict and Disaster Case Studies
-International Criminal Justice and Post-Conflict Peacebuilding
-Climate Change Disasters
-Technologies and Weaponry

Please note that all modules are subject to change.

EMPLOYABILITY

The skills gained by undertaking a postgraduate Law programme are in great demand from both legal and non-legal employers. As with any postgraduate taught Law programme, completion of the various entry points will be an asset for students seeking employment in international courts and tribunals, United Nations agencies, legal practice and advocacy in the international law field, international NGOs, the public service (in the areas of foreign relations, international development, etc), law reform agencies, the media (journalism and broadcasting), and academia (with further postgraduate study).

Graduates of this programme will be uniquely positioned and clearly distinguishable to prospective employers. In addition to acquiring knowledge of the key principles and topics associated with a traditional Public International Law and Human Rights related LLM programmes or a master's degree in crisis, conflict and/or disaster management issues, graduates of this programme will also develop a unique understanding of cutting edge law and policy, become more multidisciplinary conversant and therefore better equipped to work in inherently multidisciplinary environments.

Read less
-Graduates from this programme may seek careers in emergency planning, disaster response, and crisis communication amongst other pathways. Read more
-Graduates from this programme may seek careers in emergency planning, disaster response, and crisis communication amongst other pathways.
-You will have the opportunity to undertake an optional study visit to Sri Lanka. Costs relating to this can be found in the Fees tab.
-You can apply for a two week optional placement, see the Features tab for more details

Introduction

The MSc Crisis and Disaster Management programme aims to develop a better understanding of approaches to crisis, risk and disaster and the impact that such events may have on businesses, communities and nations. In particular, the programme addresses the issues of interruption to business and the need for preparedness, response and recovery strategies to minimise both economic and human losses arising from crises and disasters of both natural and human origins.

There is an increasing global demand for businesses, communities and nations to increase their resilience to potential crises and disasters, particularly through using the principles of crisis and disaster management, disaster preparedness, response and recovery planning. The use of simulations and engagement with practitioners gives you the opportunity to develop practical knowledge and insight about the processes and procedures associated with crisis and disaster management.

You will learn to differentiate between the various phases of crisis and disaster management and be encouraged to critically reflect and appraise alternative approaches to managing crises and disasters. The programme also aims to develop your knowledge and skills in risks appraisal, operations management, and crisis communication. You will have the opportunity to learn how to identify and address conflict and vulnerability within organisations and disaster zones and how to address these effectively.

How You Study

The Crisis and Disaster Management MSc covers both topics from both a theoretical and professional perspective. The programme consists of modules in (1) business and management, (2) project and operations management, and (3) crisis and disaster management. Approaches to crisis and disaster management are taught through case studies from a broad range of sectors.

The taught element of the programme consists of seven core modules and one optional module.

The core modules are:
-Disaster management
-Crisis communication
-Humanitarian logistics
-Project planning and management
-Decision analysis for managers
-Finance and accounting
-Teams and leadership

The following is an illustrative list of options. Optional modules will run as far as at least 10 students select them. Timetabling arrangements may limit the availability of modules to some students. As the options reflect staff's research interests, they may alter over time due to staff availability.
-Global supply strategies
-Social entrepreneurship
-Trade and development
-Analysing fiction

Students can choose one of the following independent study elements:
-Dissertation
-Consultancy project
-Start-up venture

Each module typically consists of two or three weekly teaching hours over a teaching term of 12 weeks. You will normally study four modules per semester and therefore 8-12 hours per week.

Postgraduate level study involves a significant proportion of independent study exploring the material covered in lectures and seminars. As a general guide, for every hour in class students are expected to spend two - three hours in independent study.

If you are planning to study the degree on a part time basis, you will be studying two modules per term with 4-6 hours of contact time on a weekly basis.

How You Are Assessed

A variety of assessment methods are utilised during this course, including essays, examinations, oral presentations and simulation games. These assessments are designed to develop skills that will be useful for your career.

Essays involve written assignments where you structure and develop arguments based on research and critical analysis of alternative perspectives and courses of action.

Examinations test and develop your ability to think on your feet and provide logical and well-formed arguments under time pressure.
Oral presentations help you to demonstrate and develop communication and influencing skills that are highly valued in business and management roles.

Finally, simulation games provide you with the opportunity to see the results of decisions you make relating to allocating financial, human and other resources.

The University of Lincoln's policy on assessment feedback aims to ensure that academics will return in-course assessments to you promptly – usually within 15 working days after the submission date.

Modules

-Comparative Human Resource Management (Option)
-Crisis Communications
-Decision Analysis for Managers
-Disaster Management
-Finance and accounting
-Humanitarian Logistics
-Project Planning and Management
-Research Design and Methods
-Teams and Leadership

Special Features

The Lincoln International Business School has an experienced team of staff, which is made up of academically and professionally qualified lecturers with relevant industrial experience and finance experts with wide research interests.

The School hosts a series of visiting speakers each year. As part of the School, you will have the opportunity to learn from industry experts. Previous speakers have included representatives from organisations such as Deloitte, Santander, HSBC, Innocent, The Institute of Internal Auditors and Sir David Tweedie (ex-Chairman of the IASB).

You will also have the chance to build your skills and knowledge further with extra-curricular activities such as joining a society, volunteering or becoming a Student Ambassador.

Placements

Students can apply for a two week optional placement that takes place between the first and second semester or during the Summer. The placement is an opportunity to gain work experience from a UK-based employer and build a CV towards a career in your area of interest.

Placements will be sourced by the School and will be based within the local area of Lincoln. Students who undertake an optional two week placement will be required to cover their own travel costs.

Facilities

The Lincoln International Business School is based in the David Chiddick building alongside Lincoln Law School. The building provides students with teaching and learning space including lecture theatres, workshop rooms, an IT/language lab and a mooting chamber, along with places to meet and eat with friends and staff.

The building provides high quality spaces for teaching and group learning and is the perfect setting for successful Business School students to learn and develop.

Sage 50 and SPSS software is available within the Business School for student use.

Career and Personal Development

The programme aims to prepares students for careers in humanitarian organisations, emergency planning, risk management and insurance.

The University Careers and Employability Team offer qualified advisors who can work with you to provide tailored, individual support and careers advice during your time at the University. As a member of our alumni we also offer one-to-one support in the first year after completing your course, including access to events, vacancy information and website resources; with access to online vacancies and virtual and website resources for the following two years.

This service can include one-to-one coaching, CV advice and interview preparation to help you maximise your future opportunities.
The service works closely with local, national and international employers, acting as a gateway to the business world.

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This advanced specialist degree provides a cutting-edge perspective of economic and financial dynamics, state strategies, and questions of global order and change. Read more
This advanced specialist degree provides a cutting-edge perspective of economic and financial dynamics, state strategies, and questions of global order and change.

Who is it for?

The MA in Global Political Economy caters specifically to students who wish to broaden their understanding of the complex contemporary global economic system and the socio-political relationships contained therein. Often students begin this course with no formal economics education and from a wide range of subject fields, including politics, law, business studies, media studies and the humanities, among others.

Objectives

The MA in Global Political Economy (GPE) at City, University of London enables students to critically evaluate complex relationships between markets, governments, transnational actors and networks in the context of a globalising world economy. The course is tailored to students who wish to acquire a range of analytical skills and specialist knowledge of the global economic system in the 21st century.

This advanced specialist MA gives you the tools to analyse the complex and changing roles of private markets, states, institutions and transnational forces and actors in the global capitalist system. It enables students to gain an advanced understanding of the means and processes through which actors, institutions and structures of the global political economy participate in economic and political life.

By the end of the course, you will have developed an in-depth understanding of the ways the global economy works and will have learned to address and analyse critical issues facing global business leaders as well as national and international policymakers.

Teaching and learning

The MA in Global Political Economy is taught by internationally renowned and world leading scholars in the field. This includes Ronan Palan, Anastasia Nesvetailova, Stefano Pagliari, Amin Samman, Sandy Brian Hager and Nick Srnicek amongst others.

Academic staff

The staff within our Department of International Politics are research active, enthusiastic and passionate about their work. Often this research and influence leads to policy change and many media appearances.

Student activities

In many modules students are encouraged to give presentations. We use group discussions, brain-storming, role-play and mini-roundtables on thematic issues in addition to conventional teaching techniques.

As MA student you are also invited to attend PhD workshops organised by doctoral students in the Department. The dissertation in MA in Global Political Economy is grounded in a specialised stream of the Research Design module (IPM111), where GPE students receive specialised training in research methodology tailored for their dissertation in the field of global political economy.

Assessment

All modules are assessed through a written essay of 4,500 words. In addition to coursework, you must complete a final MA dissertation of 15,000 words based on your independent research. The dissertation is worth one-third of the overall MA mark.

Modules

City's MA in Global Political Economy provides you with analytical skills and conceptual knowledge of key debates around the role of states and societies, companies and markets, global finance and international organisations in shaping globalisation in the 21st century.

The Global Political Economy Masters course focuses on contemporary issues and processes in global political economy in the context of the broader changes associated with 'globalisation,' change, crises and global governance. You will consider and become part of the conceptual and policy debates around issues such as:
-Economic growth and financial crises.
-International competition and economic diplomacy.
-Development, growth and inequality.
-States, international institutions and governance.
-The rise of new economic powers.
-Migration and cultural identity.

Core modules
-Global political economy: contemporary approaches (30 credits)
-Global capitalism: past, present, future (30 credits)
-GPE dissertation (60 credits)

Elective modules - choose 60 credits
Typical modules offered by the Department of International Politics:
-Understanding Security in the Twenty-First Century (15 credits)
-Development and World Politics (15 credits)
-Political Economy of Global Finance (15 credits)
-The Politics of Forced Migration (15 credits)
-Global Governance (15 credits)
-International Politics and the Middle East (15 credits)
-Global Financial Governance (15 credits)
-Strategy, Diplomacy and Decision-Making (30 credits)
-Economic Diplomacy (15 credits)
-Foreign Policy Analysis (15 credits)
-Religion in Global Politics (15 credits)

Typical modules offered by The City Law School:
-International Law and the Global Economy (30 credits)
-International Tax Law (30 credits)
-International Trade Law(30 credits)
-Money Laundering Law (30 credits)
-International Investment Law (30 credits)
-International Banking Law (30 credits)

In Term 3 you will complete your dissertation project.

Career prospects

This is a specialised degree enabling graduates who are often non-economists to engage competently and confidently with economic and financial developments and pursue professional careers in the public and the private sectors, including finance and banking, transnational corporations, civil service and international diplomacy, the media and development agencies.

In addition, graduates of this MA may continue their education into doctoral programmes.

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