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Masters Degrees (Criminological)

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The one year MPhil programmes in Criminology and Criminological Research regularly recruit around 40 students each year. Read more
The one year MPhil programmes in Criminology and Criminological Research regularly recruit around 40 students each year. The programmes have a high national and international standing, and the MPhil in Criminological Research is a recognised Doctoral Training Centre pathway towards a PhD and so candidates can apply to the Institute of Criminology for Economic and Social Research Council 1+3 funding.

The MPhil programmes consist of core modules and seminars on topics in key areas. The core modules are compulsory and familiarise students with current criminological thinking and research. The other seminars cover a range of topics which include criminal justice, comparative criminology, mental health and crime, a sociology of punishment, developmental criminology, a sociology of prison life, policing, social contexts of crime and crime prevention (please note that not all optional courses are run each year).

The MPhil in Criminological Research includes compulsory participation in the Social Sciences Research Methods course (which provides additional research methods training).

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/lwcrmpcmr

Course detail

The basic aims of the MPhil programme are:

1. to offer an up-to-date and high-quality course, introducing students to some of the most important theory and research in criminology
2. to offer a sound foundation for more advanced work, such as that involved in research and teaching careers in criminology, and in particular for progression to the Institute’s PhD in Criminology
3. to provide those who wish to proceed to careers beyond academic or research contexts with a sound foundation of knowledge and methodological skills, which can be used effectively in relation to work in criminal justice agencies, the legal profession or other professional or voluntary organisations.

Learning Outcomes

Students should acquire:

- an understanding of core criminological and criminal justice theories; a critical awareness of current problems and debates within the field; originality in application of knowledge to current issues; and skills in critical evaluation of theoretical and empirical literature relevant to criminological and criminal justice research;

- a comprehensive understanding of qualitative and quantitative research methods used in criminology; the ability to use acquired knowledge to propose new hypotheses and address research problems; the ability to organise research; the ability to independently acquire and interpret additional knowledge needed for their own research; and an understanding of the quality of work required to satisfy peer review;

- the ability to use national data banks and develop competencies in devising and implementing surveys, active mastery of advanced statistics; the ability to use a range of qualitative methods such as interviews, observation and ethnography, and documentary and discourse analysis, and the ability to apply those research techniques to current research questions; students should also acquire the ability to use theoretical knowledge creatively and independently in order to be able to handle practical issues arising in empirical work; to understand the problems of knowledge transfer to non-specialist audiences, and develop skills in communicating criminological knowledge to specialist and non-specialist audiences.

Continuing

For progression from the MPhil to the PhD: the Institute strongly recommends that students who intend to register for the PhD apply for the MPhil in Criminological Research in the first instance. Progression to the PhD is dependent on a good performance on the MPhil programme.

Continuation to the PhD programme will involve a separate application process, undertaken during the MPhil year. Prospective PhD students are encouraged to discuss their plans with their MPhil supervisor as early as possible during the MPhil year. Please see our web pages at: http://www.crim.cam.ac.uk/courses/phd/prospective/#applications

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

The Institute of Criminology is pleased to be able to offer a number of Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) 1+3 or +3 studentships. Each of the studentships covers the cost of the University Composition Fee for four years, together with a maintenance stipend for each year. Where appropriate, the Institute can apply for an enhanced stipend for anyone wishing to pursue research which is likely to involve advanced quantitative research. The studentship enables each successful applicant to study for the M.Phil. in Criminological Research in the first year, followed by three years of doctoral research leading to the award of a Ph.D.

For further information on the ESRC studentships, and other possible sources of funding, please see our funding pages.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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A suite of MRes courses has been developed concurrently by six subject areas. - Applied Social Science; Education. - Film Media and Journalism. Read more

Introduction

A suite of MRes courses has been developed concurrently by six subject areas:
- Applied Social Science; Education
- Film Media and Journalism
- Management
- Nursing, Midwifery and Health
- Sports Studies

These courses have a shared core of four modules in generic research skills, plus specialist disciplinary modules and a range of options. They combine high quality with flexibility and choice for students. Employability is another important focus, with the opportunity for a research placement offered to all MRes students.

This course prepares students for undertaking social research and evaluation, leading to careers in research, research management and commissioning or using research. The MRes offers a combination of high quality, flexibility and choice. It is also focused on the employability of its graduates. Research work of the 100+ staff and postgraduate students at Stirling is supported by a state-of-the-art Information & Communication Technologies room, one of the best in the UK.

Key information

- Degree type: Postgraduate Diploma, MRes
- Study methods: Part-time, Full-time
- Start date: Full-time: September Part-time: September/January See
- Course Director: Richard Simmons

Course objectives

The MRes/Postgraduate Diploma Criminological Research provides training in the methods and approaches used in criminological research. The objectives are to:
- Provide you with the skills and knowledge base required to collect, analyse and report qualitative and quantitative data, taking account of ethics, reliability and validity
- Enable you to examine critically the theoretical foundations that underpin criminological and socio-legal research
- Enable you to examine issues concerning comparative criminological and socio-legal research
- Develop your understanding of the relationship between criminological research and policy, and the meanings of evaluation, its terminology, practice and use

English language requirements

If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills:
- IELTS: 6.5 with 6.0 minimum in each skill
- Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C
- Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade B
- Pearson Test of English (Academic): 60 with 56 in each component
- IBT TOEFL: 90 with no subtest less than 20

For more information go to English language requirements https://www.stir.ac.uk/study-in-the-uk/entry-requirements/english/

If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. View the range of pre-sessional courses http://www.intohigher.com/uk/en-gb/our-centres/into-university-of-stirling/studying/our-courses/course-list/pre-sessional-english.aspx .

Delivery and assessment

Teaching methods are designed for each module to facilitate your acquisition of skills and progressive development. You are expected to participate in lectures, seminars, tutorials, computer-based workshops and group work.
Full-time and part-time MRes/Diploma students experience a range of different forms of assessment across the compulsory taught modules. These include essays, critical review essays, book reviews, research proposals, a computer lab-based assessment for quantitative data analysis and the research dissertation. There are no examinations.

Why Stirling?

REF2014
In REF2014 Stirling was placed 6th in Scotland and 45th in the UK with almost three quarters of research activity rated either world-leading or internationally excellent.

- Rating
In the most recent Research Assessment Exercise (RAE), 95 percent of the research in Applied Social Science at Stirling was ‘Internationally Excellent’ with the top 10 percent of that judged to be ‘World-leading’.

Career opportunities

90.5% of Stirling graduates are in employment or further study six months after graduation.

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The MSc Crime and Justice provides an understanding of issues relating to crime and the criminal justice system, enhancing your career in this and related fields. Read more
The MSc Crime and Justice provides an understanding of issues relating to crime and the criminal justice system, enhancing your career in this and related fields. Tuition draws upon the expertise of research staff in the University’s well established Centre for Criminology.

You will examine a range of crimes and criminal behaviour, the context of crime and responses to it. In addition to core areas of study, you can choose modules and/or pathways to suit your career development. You will explore an area of interest to you, through a 20,000-word dissertation, and gain a thorough grounding in qualitative and quantitative research methods – invaluable skills for any profession that includes planning, analysis and evaluation.

On the Substance Misuse pathway, you will study a range of criminological modules and a module on drug interventions. This specialist module provides an insight into the nature and extent of substance misuse and responses to it, including prevention, treatment, harm reduction and enforcement. Your dissertation will be related to substance misuse.

On the Youth Justice and Offender Management pathway, you will study the contexts in which offenders come into contact with the criminal justice system. The work of relevant agencies and systems that engage with those at risk of offending are also considered. Your dissertation must be related to youth justice and offender management.

See the website http://courses.southwales.ac.uk/courses/230-msc-crime-and-justice

What you will study

- Criminological theory
Explore the philosophical foundations of criminological theory and the way in which it relates to general social theory. You’ll examine the social and political contexts within which the various criminological theories have developed.

- Criminal justice – theory and practice
Learn about the general theories, principles, and models of criminal justice within a national and international context. You’ll examine the key institutions and processes that deliver criminal justice, and evaluate the interplay between them.

- Approaches to criminological research
Gain an understanding of the ways in which criminological research is designed and conducted. You’ll be given a broad overview of both qualitative and quantitative approaches to research in criminology and criminal justice and will learn about the relationship between theories and methods.

- Criminological research in practice
Develop your understanding of the ways in which criminological research is designed and conducted, putting into practice both qualitative and quantitative approaches considered in ‘Approaches to Criminological Research’.

- Dissertation
A significant piece of research into an appropriate area of study.

Optional modules include:
- Violence and Homicide
- Policing in a Global Age
- Drug Interventions (specified for Substance Misuse pathway)
- Youth Justice and Offender Management (specified for Youth and Offender Management pathway)

Learning and teaching methods

You will learn through lectures, seminars and tutorials. Certificate (PgCert) and Diploma (PgDip) stages are taught in group sessions.

Teaching on the MSc Crime and Justice takes place in the evenings and at weekends specifically to enable you to continue to work alongside your studies.

Work Experience and Employment Prospects

This course provides the knowledge and skills to pursue careers in the criminal justice system, such as the police, courts, prison, probation services and youth offending services. You could also choose a career in government organisations such as the Home Office, Ministry of Justice, Welsh Government and local authorities. Graduates also go on to careers within voluntary agencies such as offender rehabilitation, victim support, community safety, and drug treatment services. It is also an excellent basis for further research at MPhil and PhD levels.

Assessment methods

Assessment methods include essays, critiques, written examinations, multiple choice tests, and oral and poster presentations. The MSc award requires a dissertation of around 20,000 words on an individual piece of research, which may be work-related.

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The Master of Criminology programme is designed to provide students with an advanced understanding of crime, public response to crime and, specifically, criminal justice in Europe and beyond. Read more

The Master of Criminology programme is designed to provide students with an advanced understanding of crime, public response to crime and, specifically, criminal justice in Europe and beyond.

What is the Master of Criminology all about?

The programme is characterised by a strong link between education and research, an explicitly international orientation, and a comparative approach, with special attention to the cross-border character of criminality. 

General subjects include criminological theories and models of law enforcement, psychology, law and criminal justice, youth criminology and juvenile justice, and research methods. The programme also offers cutting-edge courses on international police and judicial cooperation, political crimes and transitional justice, restorative justice, terrorism, and organised and corporate crime – research fields in which our Leuven Institute of Criminology (LINC) professors are internationally renowned experts.

LINC is the most recent institutional incarnation (2007) of the criminological tradition in Leuven, which began with the establishment of the School for Criminology in 1929. Excellence in criminology continues today, combining solid research with a deep commitment to society structured within ten research lines. LINC is composed of 11 professors and more than 70 assistants and fellows involved in criminological research and education. 

Is this the right programme for me?

 Prospective students should possess:

  • a critical-reflective attitude towards law (as a normative behavioural regulating framework), community and crime;
  • genuine interest in (inter)personal and social interactions;
  • theoretical knowledge of applied psychology, sociology and anthropology within the field of crime and the treatment of crime;
  • extensive knowledge of basic research methodology
  • familiarity with specific criminological sources as well as legal, psychological and sociological sources
  • the ability to formulate research questions from existing literature
  • basic knowledge concerning (quantitative and qualitative) data collection
  • the ability to independently carry out analysis and report results
  • basic skills of oral and written reporting, especially in a criminology context;
  • an ability to apply criminological theory in practice (for instance, in an internship, case study, etc.);
  • basic knowledge of English, that is, the ability to read and understand English texts and comprehend seminars and lectures taught in English

Objectives

Goals

  • the criminological program provides an appealing specialized, European and internationally oriented and research-based study of crime and the way of dealing with it as well as the study of the processes of (de)criminalization
  • to optimize methodological skills and attitudes in order to make autonomous constructive and high standing contributions to the field as well as further research possible
  • an international and comparative approach has been highlighted in the Master program, bearing in mind however the characteristic Belgian situation

Final terms

Knowledge: The graduates need 1) to obtain specialized and more in-depth theoretical insights into the criminology; 2) to know facts concerning the developments and (the possible solutions for) problems in policy and practice of institutions that are involved in dealing with criminality. 3) to have specialized knowledge of recent developments in the field of methodology that allows to examine the problems from a point of legal and empirical-criminological view.

Skills: The graduates must be able to make an autonomous contribution in the development in the search to solutions for complex social and individual questions on the field of crime and the treatment of crime. More specifically: to be able to formulate relevant challenges for further criminological research; to observe, detect and analyze the large variables and indicators; to collect information independently; to comment and report in a methodically founded statement; can possibly function in (multidisciplinary) surroundings with eye for its own input and the guarantee of its quality.

Attitude: the graduates need to develop a discerning mind and recognize the importance of theoretical, methodological and moral reflection, both to guarantee the quality of policymaking as the quality of the own vocational practice. From an ethical notion the students develop further sensitivity for the tensions which occur at the treatment of crime and (in)security, at the individual, institutional and social level on the one hand and between these levels on the other hand.

Career perspectives

The programme is intended to prepare students for research and professional employment in national and international policy and operational agencies in the fields of criminal justice and victim assistance.

Graduates find employment in the domains of:

  • safety, police, justice
  • youth care
  • execution of sentences and penal measures
  • forensic mental healthcare
  • private security and safety
  • the civil service
  • the non-profit sectors at the national, European and international level


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The MPhil programmes consist of core modules and seminars on topics in key areas. The core modules are compulsory and familiarise students with current criminological thinking and research. Read more
The MPhil programmes consist of core modules and seminars on topics in key areas. The core modules are compulsory and familiarise students with current criminological thinking and research. The other seminars cover a range of topics which include criminal justice, comparative criminology, mental health and crime, a sociology of punishment, developmental criminology, a sociology of prison life, policing, social contexts of crime and crime prevention (please note that not all optional courses are run each year).

The MPhil in Criminology runs from 1 October to 30 June.

Key benefits

- The programmes have a high national and international standing.

- We regularly recruit around 40 students each year from all around the world.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/lwcrmpmcr

Course detail

On completion, students should acquire:

- an understanding of criminological and criminal justice theories; a critical awareness of current problems and debates within the field; originality in application of knowledge to current issues; and skills in critical evaluation of theoretical and empirical literature relevant to criminological and criminal justice research;

- a comprehensive understanding of qualitative and quantitative research methods used in criminology; the ability to use acquired knowledge to propose new hypotheses and address research problems; the ability to organise research; the ability to independently acquire and interpret additional knowledge relating to research, and an understanding of the quality of work required to satisfy peer review.

- the ability to use theoretical knowledge creatively and independently; apply research competencies to practical issues, and develop skills in communicating criminological knowledge to specialist and non-specialist audiences.

Format

The basic aims of the MPhil programme are:

- to offer an up-to-date and high-quality course, introducing students to some of the most important theory and research in criminology

- to offer a sound foundation for more advanced work, such as that involved in research and teaching careers in criminology, and in particular for progression to the Institute’s PhD in Criminology

- to provide those who do wish to proceed to careers beyond academic or research contexts with a sound foundation of knowledge and methodological skills, which can be used effectively in relation to work in criminal justice agencies, the legal profession or other professional or voluntary organisations.

Assessment

A dissertation of not more than 18,000 words (including footnotes or endnotes, but excluding appendices and bibliographical references) on a criminological topic chosen by the student and approved by the Degree Committee for the Faculty of Law. Students are expected to demonstrate, via the dissertation, a critical understanding of research principles. Each student is required to make a presentation on the topic of the candidate’s dissertation. The dissertation accounts for 35% of the assessed coursework, and the dissertation presentation accounts for 5% of the assessed coursework.

Four essays, each of not more than 3,000 words, on topics chosen by the candidate from lists of topics announced by the Examiners, provided that one such essay shall be from among the topics relating to the core course in Criminological Theories; each essay accounts for 10% of the assessed coursework.

A methodological essay or exercise of not more than 3,000 words chosen by the candidate from a list announced by the Examiners relating to the core course in Criminological Research Methods (the exercise may comprise different elements); the methodological exercise accounts for 20% of the assessed coursework.

Continuing

For progression from the MPhil to the PhD: the Institute strongly recommends that students who intend to register for the PhD apply for the MPhil in Criminological Research in the first instance.

Continuation to the PhD programme will involve a separate application process, undertaken during the MPhil year. Prospective PhD students are encouraged to discuss their plans with their MPhil supervisor as early as possible during the MPhil year. Please see our web pages at http://www.crim.cam.ac.uk/courses/phd/prospective/#applications

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

The Institute offers funding from the Wakefield Scholarship Fund (for applicants born or educated in Canada, Australia or New Zealand) and the Manuel López-Rey Studentship Fund (open to all applicants). In addition, the University offers a range of funding. For further information on sources of funding, please see our funding pages

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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This MRes programme in Criminological Research, available full-time and part-time, will give you advanced theoretical and practical training in postgraduate-level research. Read more
This MRes programme in Criminological Research, available full-time and part-time, will give you advanced theoretical and practical training in postgraduate-level research.

You will conduct a substantial research project that will give you valuable experience, whether you're preparing for a career or seeking continuous professional development.

You can expect regular (at least fortnightly) supervision with this excellent research training opportunity, providing you with a respected Masters qualification upon completion.

Key Facts

REF 2014
22nd at 4* and 3* (world leading and internationally excellent) and 100% 4* and 3* impact (outstanding and very considerable) out of 62 submissions.

Why Sociology, Social Policy and Criminology?

Our work makes a tangible difference to society

Our research over the past five years has led to changes in criminal justice policy and procedure, changes in the way that public bodies are audited, and has led to the establishment of best practice in the evaluation of large-scale arts and cultural programmes.

An exciting study experience

Whether economic or cultural inequalities, the dangers of our online lifestyles, the definitions and consequences of crime or the social dimensions associated with problems such as health, we aim to give our students an exciting study experience in order to better understand what it means to be social, where society might be heading and what we can do to contribute to all our social futures.

Career prospects

The Social Research Methods MA is recognised nationally by the Economic and Social Research Council for providing quality methods training for those seeking a career in social science. The programme gives students the required skills to progress directly onto doctoral level social research, or to take up employment in a wide variety of careers within the government, charitable and/or private sectors. National and local government, as well as Regional Development Agencies have noted the rapid rise in demand for graduates qualified in the full spectrum of research design and analysis techniques.

The Social Research Methods MA is designed to meet the needs of both pre-employment training and within-post career development. Many students pursue an academic career or a university research career in the Social Sciences (Sociology, Social Policy and Criminology) or in a related discipline. Other research graduates have developed a career in commercial research or have developed their research skills in a practical context in either the public or the private sector.

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The MSc (by research) Forensic and Criminological Psychology is accredited by the British Psychological Society (BPS). Read more

Overview

The MSc (by research) Forensic and Criminological Psychology is accredited by the British Psychological Society (BPS). At successful completion, it fulfils Stage I of the BPS professional training in forensic psychology and therefore gives eligibility to enter Stage II of the BPS Diploma or at a later date, apply for the Top up Doctorate in Forensic Psychology at The University of Nottingham.

Course structure

The course provides comprehensive knowledge in theory and evidence based practice with victims and offenders. It consists of six theoretical modules and a research project/dissertation incorporating research methods training equivalent to two 10-credit taught modules. The course can be completed over one year full-time or two years part time.

The teaching is delivered through workshops led by experts and practicing clinicians Tuesday to Thursday each week during term time (36 weeks). The programme is assessed by means of continuous assessment related to each module.

Eligibility

Applicants must hold a BPS accredited 1st or 2nd class honours degree in a psychology programme (single or joint honours) or equivalent conferring eligibility for Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership (GBCM) of the BPS. Experience in a forensic setting is beneficial but not essential for MSc applications.

*It is expected that those who apply for the MSc programme only will graduate with the MSc qualification at the end of the year.

Modules

The course consists of six theoretical modules and a research project/dissertation incorporating research methods training equivalent to two 10-credit taught modules.

--Theories of Criminal Behaviour
--Forensic Child Psychology
--Forensic Mental Health
--Law and Criminal Justice
--Forensic Organisational Psychology
--Forensic Practice Interventions

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The MA Criminology allows you to develop specialist knowledge of the current trends and historical debates surrounding crime causation, crime control and regulation. Read more

The MA Criminology allows you to develop specialist knowledge of the current trends and historical debates surrounding crime causation, crime control and regulation.

This innovative, interdisciplinary course is taught by experts from sociological, legal and psychological backgrounds with real-world experience. You will benefit from research-led teaching as well as strong links to wider criminal justice professions and industry.

Whether you are a recent graduate, or a practitioner or professional already working in the criminal justice field, this course will enable you to gain a critical understanding of contemporary criminological and socio-legal issues and engage with a diverse range of methods used to research them.

Aims

Aims of the course:

  • Develop students' intellectual, critical and analytic skills in the academic areas of criminology and criminal justice.
  • Produce graduates who have a thorough understanding of the key theoretical and political positions and concepts within criminology and criminal justice and the ability to use this knowledge in sophisticated ways in the critical assessment and development of public policy and interventions.
  • Provide students with the opportunity to explore, through a range of optional courses, particular areas of study that are either professionally relevant or of academic interest.
  • Provide students quantitative and qualitative research method skills in a way that is consistent with the demands of the discipline and the professional market.
  • Develop in students an appreciation for interdisciplinary studies as the only way to confront the complexity of our object of study, an interest in the applied dimension of scientific knowledge and the awareness of the ethical implications of the scientific criminological project.
  • Enhance students' transferable skills including proficiency in oral and written communication; the capacity for independent learning; the ability to reflect about the ethical and ideological components of their work; and the capacity for working co-operatively with others to produce professional outputs in a timely fashion.
  • Develop criminological knowledge and research skills for the writing of a Masters-level dissertation.

Special features

On successful completion of the course, students will have:

  • demonstrated a critical awareness of the functioning and goals of the different institutions and agencies that comprise the criminal justice field in the English criminal justice system, the existing research on what works and the interrelationship between different forms of social control;
  • demonstrated a conceptual grasp of the different theoretical perspectives on crime, deviance and criminal justice, as well as specific areas of criminological research (e.g., interpersonal violence), and the capacity to critically evaluate theoretical developments in these areas;
  • developed an appreciation for the ethical and ideological dimensions of crime control and criminological research and the links between crime control and public policy;
  • recognised the methodological problems involved in the design and conduct of research and will have demonstrated knowledge of the main measurement strategies and data sources relevant to criminology and criminal justice studies;
  • understood the assumptions and practical implications built into criminal justice and criminological positions and how they affect policy formation and research methodologies;
  • demonstrated a critical awareness of research issues and methodologies related to the fields of criminology and/or criminal justice, combined with a knowledge of corresponding skills in undertaking a piece of research commensurate with Masters'-level study.

Teaching and learning

This course is taught by an interdisciplinary team using a variety of delivery methods: lectures, workshops, student-led presentations and debate, group work and individual research.

Coursework and assessment

Most course units are assessed by 3500 word essay or by essay and presentation.

Course unit details

You will be doing 180 credits in total, 120 of which will be taught modules and the remainder 60 credits in the form of a dissertation.

Course units are of the value of 15 or 30 credits. You will be required to select course units to a total of 120 credits, and so must choose a minimum of four course units or may be able to choose a maximum of eight course units to make up your course of study. The availability of individual optional course units is subject to change (due, among other factors, to staff availability to deliver the course units in any given year).

The course has a compulsory research component, in which you must write a 12,000 to 15,000 words dissertation (60 credits). The taught element of the degree programme will total 120 credits and the research element of the degree programme will total 60 credits i.e. you will study 180 credits for a master's programme. Your dissertation must be within the area of one of the units you have chosen. The research element of the course is supported by weekly research methodology lectures delivered throughout semesters one and two designed to improve your legal writing and research skills.

Dissertation

  • Supervised summer dissertation of 12-15,000 words. 
  • Part-time master's students undertake a dissertation in the summer months of year two. Please note that the part-time students can extend their registration for extra 3 months to submit their dissertations in December of their second year, instead of September (you will be advised of the exact date on the second year of the course).

Exit awards

Students who fail to fulfil the requirements to pass the 180 credits necessary to attain the final degree of MA can leave the course with the award of Postgraduate Diploma by passing 120 credits at the pass mark of 40%, or can qualify for the Postgraduate Certificate by passing 60 credits at the pass mark of 40%. Students who do not fulfil the criteria for passing the taught element of the course at the Masters' level of 50% will not be permitted to progress to the dissertation element of the course, and will leave the course with the highest award that the credits that have been passed will allow.



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This course combines the schools’ expertise in criminology and sociology and explores the sociological context of issues in criminology. Read more
This course combines the schools’ expertise in criminology and sociology and explores the sociological context of issues in criminology.

A broad range of criminology and sociology subjects are studied which develop knowledge and understanding of broad spectrum of topics within this field including; crime, organisations and administrations in the field of criminal justice, the social causes and consequences of crime, social change and social structures, culture and identity and related issues.

The broad yet specialised nature of this degree allows students to develop advanced and specialised knowledge and skills in criminological and sociological research.

On completion of the course, students will be able to:

Demonstrate advanced, specialised knowledge and skills across a range of criminology and sociology applications, including an understanding of community cohesion and social identities, of criminal behaviour, its causes and consequences, its prevention and the response by criminal justice agencies.
Conduct empirical research projects. Students will have developed specialist research skills and critical thinking across a range of criminological and sociological areas and an understanding of the complex contexts in which criminologists and sociologists work.
Demonstrate the ability to problem solve and reason scientifically, even in complex contexts using appropriate qualitative and quantitative skills, including identifying, formulating and solving social problems and problems related to crime. Students will have the ability to create, evaluate and assess a range of options, and apply ideas and knowledge to a range of situations.
Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of advanced level theories and empirical evidence concerning crime, its causes and consequences, including the definition of deviant behaviour, public opinion, the media and fear of crime, political reactions to crime, support for victims, offender management and related topics.
Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of advanced level sociological theories and sociological findings, related to topics like the functioning of public sector organisations, social stratification, political and social movements, social values, consensus and conflicts, culture, community and identity, the social function of law.
Careers
The course prepares for a wide range of employment including:

Law-enforcement agencies: the police, customs, the prison service
Public administration: including crime prevention units, offender management, general administration, international institutions
Political associations, work for members of parliaments, for lobby groups related to the criminal justice system and to issues of social justice broadly conceived
Research institutes, researching criminological and sociological issues
Academic institutions such as universities
Course Sturcture
A full MA is valued at 180 credits, a Diploma at 120 credits and Certificate at 60 credits.

The first 120 credits are achieved by following a programme of taught courses. The final 60 credits will be achieved through dissertation, after successful completion of the taught part of the course.

The course employs a wide range of teaching and learning strategies, both formal and informal. These include: lectures, individual study – some of it involving assigned readings - interactive discussion of case studies in class, small group work and essay writing. The MA Criminology and Sociology very much employs the concept of “active learning” by students.

The programme is offered on a full-time and part-time basis.

Full Time Study:

In full-time mode, the course normally lasts for a period of twelve months. Taught courses are undertaken September – May, and the dissertation completed from May to September.

Part Time Study:

In part-time mode, the course normally lasts for a period of two and a half years. Taught courses are undertaken from September to May over a period of two years, and on successful completion of the 120 credits of taught courses, the dissertation may be undertaken. Lectures are concentrated on one day per week for part-time students.

Taught Modules
Compulsory Modules:

The Research Process: This module introduces the main varieties of both quantitative and qualitative research in the social sciences and addresses the principles of research design and issues of data collection.

Key Issues in Crime and Justice: This module focuses on four main themes: comparative criminology, comparative criminal justice, comparative victimology, and criminological perspectives.

International Case Studies in Criminology: This module provides an internationally comparative perspective on key areas of criminological concern. These include questions of crime and deviance, criminological theory and the operation of systems of criminal justice.

Sociology Modules (choose 2):

Researching Community: This module examines the developments in the field of community research and related theoretical and policy debates surrounding the application of ideas of ‘community’ to current economic and social changes.

Case Study: Case Study introduces students to sociological analysis by selecting a topic of joint interest to students and lecturer.

Social Theories of Culture: Social Theories of Culture introduces students to the sociological study of culture by introducing and assessing theories.

MA students take part in the fortnightly lecture series of the School of Social Sciences. Visiting speakers and Bangor staff present topics related to social policy, criminology and sociology.

Dissertation
The dissertation is undertaken on completion of the taught modules. It is valued at 60 credits (one-third of the MA degree) and will be around 20,000 words in length.

Under guidance of a dissertation tutor, students will in their MA dissertation work independently on a topic of their choice. This may be a piece of empirical research including primary or secondary data analysis or a theoretical dissertation. Part-time students in employment may choose a topic related to their profession and an area in which they wish to develop further expertise and specialisation.

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This innovative course offers a unique insight into the global dimensions of crime and punishment in today's world. Read more
This innovative course offers a unique insight into the global dimensions of crime and punishment in today's world.

Exploring both cutting-edge criminological theory and current real-world phenomena related to crime and punishment, the programme provides a multidisciplinary platform for you to engage with the complexity of contemporary criminological challenges.

You will be introduced to the theoretical debates that underpin understanding of the relationship between global, national and local questions of crime and punishment. You will also learn about the range of research methods that are used to explore such questions.

In addition to the 3 modules that form the compulsory core of the programme - International Criminological Theory, Research Methods in Criminology and the Global Criminology Dissertation - you will choose a further 3 option modules from a wide range offered within the School of Law, including an internships option that will give you the opportunity to gain first-hand experience of the reality and importance of the idea of 'the global' for organisations engaged in criminal justice and related work.

By insisting on a genuinely international perspective that looks at, but also beyond, the experiences of affluent societies that have characteristically dominated criminological scholarship to date, the programme encourages you to think broadly and innovatively about this dynamic, burgeoning field of study.

The course will appeal to those seeking to develop a deeper appreciation and understanding of the key theoretical and practical issues that have shaped and currently play a major role in influencing matters of crime and punishment from a global perspective.

Why study this course at Birkbeck?

This programme offers a unique combination of cutting-edge theory, research methods training, an integral dissertation component, and an optional internship module.
Teaching on the programme is provided by experts in respective subjects, including by members of the renowned Institute for Criminal Policy Research, which has long contributed to policy-making, scholarship and public debate about crime and criminal justice.
Birkbeck's School of Law is also home to the Birkbeck Criminology Seminar Series, which provides a platform for leading and cutting-edge research and features guest speakers from around the world.
The Institute for Criminal Policy Research and, within it, the International Centre for Prison Studies, make the School of Law a dynamic and prestigious hub for criminological research and study, as well as an exciting arena for global criminological scholarship and teaching more particularly.
The School of Law is home to an exceptionally international range of empirical and theoretical scholarship conducted by its members, which is reflected in the teaching offered.
The School is also an internationally recognised centre for critical and interdisciplinary research in law, which provides a highly stimulating environment for research and teaching. It is the home of Birkbeck Law Press and publishes Law and Critique: The International Journal of Critical Legal Thought.
IT resources, such as electronic learning environments, are used at Birkbeck to enhance teaching and learning. Birkbeck Library has an extensive teaching collection of books, journals and electronic resources in law and related disciplines, such as economics, politics and sociology. It provides access to over 17,000 electronic journals, which are available online 24 hours a day. Find out more about our teaching and learning resources.
Students can also take advantage of the rich research collections nearby, including those of the Institute of Advanced Legal Studies, Senate House Library, the British Library of Political and Economic Science (LSE Library) and the British Library.
Birkbeck’s commitment to flexible learning and provision of evening teaching makes it an appealing choice for professionals and practitioners and is ideal if you want to combine studying with working during the day.

Our research

Birkbeck is one of the world’s leading research-intensive institutions. Our cutting-edge scholarship informs public policy, achieves scientific advances, supports the economy, promotes culture and the arts, and makes a positive difference to society.

Birkbeck’s research excellence was confirmed in the 2014 Research Excellence Framework, which placed Birkbeck 30th in the UK for research, with 73% of our research rated world-leading or internationally excellent.

We are among the top 10 law schools in the UK and in the top 3 in London in the Times Higher Education 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF) rankings, while our research environment was judged conducive to producing research of the highest quality.

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What are the key ethical considerations concerning criminological research? How does criminological research differ from other social science research? And how does it inform policy formation? The MSc Criminology and Social Research Methods tackles these key issues in the field of criminology research and offers excellent postgraduate training. Read more
What are the key ethical considerations concerning criminological research? How does criminological research differ from other social science research? And how does it inform policy formation? The MSc Criminology and Social Research Methods tackles these key issues in the field of criminology research and offers excellent postgraduate training.

This degree, which is eligible for ESRC 1+3 funding, guides you through the theory of criminological research and advances your skills in the collection, analysis and reporting of qualitative and quantitative data. Distinct in its integration of criminal justice and criminology modules, it gives you a much broader overview of current research in criminology and criminal justice, and of more specialised socio-legal research and debates.

You will be taught by lecturers who are nationally and internationally renowned researchers. Our Law School is home to the Centre for Crime, Law and Justice, the Centre for Law and Society, and the Centre for Child and Family Justice; these centres underpin our postgraduate teaching, which is research-led and research-informed.

Your core modules are: Research Projects in Practice; Qualitative Methods in the Social Sciences; Quantitative Research Methods; Crime and Criminal Justice in the 21st Century; Criminological Theory; and Criminological Research in Practice. A research-based Criminology dissertation completes your degree.

Your postgraduate degree prepares you for research jobs in the Home Office, Probation Service, Social Services, and other government departments of voluntary organisation. You will develop the skills to undertake and critically evaluate criminological research, which are highly prized by employers in the public and private sectors. The analytical and communications skills developed through your studies also enhance your employability.

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The MSc Criminal Justice & Social Research Methods offers excellent postgraduate training. You will engage with the ethical issues concerning criminology and criminal justice research and with the policies informing the design of research into crime, deviance and punishment. Read more

The MSc Criminal Justice & Social Research Methods offers excellent postgraduate training. You will engage with the ethical issues concerning criminology and criminal justice research and with the policies informing the design of research into crime, deviance and punishment. It opens doors to research careers in both the public and private sectors.

This degree, which is eligible for ESRC 1+3 funding, guides you through the theory of criminological and criminal justice research and develops your skills in the collection, analysis and reporting of qualitative and quantitative data. The integration of criminal justice and criminological modules gives you a broader overview of current research and allows you to engage in more specialised criminological and socio-legal studies.

Our Law School is home to the Centre for Crime, Law and Justice, the Centre for Law and Society, and the Centre for Child and Family Justice; these centres underpin our postgraduate teaching, which is research-led and research-informed. You will be taught by lecturers who are nationally and internationally renowned researchers.

Your core modules are Research Projects in Practice, Qualitative Methods in the Social Sciences, Quantitative Research Methods, Crime and Criminal Justice in the 21st Century, and Criminological Theory. You will choose one module from: Criminological Research in Practice; International Criminal Law; International Human Rights Law; International Terrorism and the Law; Gender, Sexualities and Human Rights; and Transitional Justice, Human Rights and Peace Building. A research-based Criminal Justice dissertation completes your degree.

Your postgraduate degree prepares you for research jobs in the Home Office, Probation Service, Social Services, and other government departments or voluntary organisations. You will develop the skills to undertake and critically evaluate criminological research, which are highly prized by employers. The analytical and communications skills developed through your studies also enhance your employability.



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Designed for those with a background in criminology/social science, socio-legal studies or policy studies, this course will develop the knowledge and practical skills necessary to enhance your employability in the field of criminal justice practice, policy formation and advocacy. Read more
Designed for those with a background in criminology/social science, socio-legal studies or policy studies, this course will develop the knowledge and practical skills necessary to enhance your employability in the field of criminal justice practice, policy formation and advocacy. The University is well placed for you to enhance your academic learning through field visits to the crown courts, central criminal court and the extensive network of non-government organisations (NGOs) and charities whose work connects to criminal justice/crime prevention and social justice. You will be taught by staff who have published in their specialised research areas and staff with hands-on professional experience. You will have a personal tutor with whom you will work to develop your academic potential and plan your future career strategies.

Key features
-This course provides in-depth knowledge of contemporary criminal justice policy, practice and politics in local, national and global contexts.
-The course will enable you to develop a critical appreciation of the dynamics between criminological theory and criminal justice policymaking. On completion you will be conversant with the current global trends in the exploration of criminological issues.
-Due to its location, Kingston University is well placed to allow numerous opportunities to see, at first hand, the criminal justice system in operation in the extensive London network of courts, custodial institutions and community-based crime-reduction programmes.

What will you study?

You will explore a wide range of crime control policies in local, national and globalised contexts. You will engage critically with the concepts of 'crime', 'offender' and, 'victim', and develop a critical awareness of their theoretical underpinnings, and the role of power in defining and enforcing crime. Criminologists draw upon a range of social science theoretical frameworks and social research techniques in order to question and explore criminological phenomenon and you will develop methodological knowledge and skills through this course in order to prepare for your own criminological enquiry. Criminology is multi-disciplinary and so by studying this course you can also venture into the fields of forensic psychology and politics and human rights.

Assessment

Essays, case study and research proposals, short exercise portfolios, examinations, oral presentations, briefing papers, extended projects and dissertation.

Course structure

Please note that this is an indicative list of modules and is not intended as a definitive list.
Core modules
-Crime, Harm and Justice
-Criminological Research in Practice
-Criminology Dissertation

Optional modules
-Global Terrorism and Transnational Crime
-Investigative and Legal Processes in Forensic Psychology
-Terrorism, Political Violence and Human Rights
-The Politics of Crime in the Black Atlantic

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The course was one of the first to take an internationally comparative perspective across a broad range of criminology and criminal justice issues. Read more
The course was one of the first to take an internationally comparative perspective across a broad range of criminology and criminal justice issues. It is designed to meet the needs of three groups of potential students: those requiring a thorough research training specialising in criminology and criminal justice; those who are interested in pursuing criminology and criminal justice to an advanced level; and practitioners in the criminal justice field who wish to expand their horizons from national to international levels. The programme components consist of a generic research module (The Research Process) for training in qualitative and quantitative research methods in the Social Sciences, specialised training in Applied Research Criminology and a module on international case studies in Criminology, which allows students to incorporate their particular research interests and areas of enquiry in comparative criminological and criminal justice research. The MA includes a 20,000 word dissertation.

Structure
The course aims to provide advanced training in research and analysis, linking theoretical awareness with empirical studies in criminology and criminal justice. The taught element of the course is studied by both MA and Diploma students and consists of core research training and theory modules, plus a module focussing on international and comparative criminological and criminal justice research. MA students who successfully complete the taught element proceed to the research dissertation.

Core modules:

The Research Process
Comparative Criminological Research
Key Issues in Crime and Justice
Empirical studies:

Applied Research in Criminology
MA students also take part in the fortnightly lecture series of the School of Social Sciences. Visiting speakers and Bangor staff present topics related to social policy, criminology and sociology.

Research Dissertation
The dissertation is a piece of independent research where you are expected to apply your research skills to a specific criminological or criminal justice topic. You will conduct this work with academic guidance provided by your supervisor who will be a member of the criminology and criminal justice team. Examples of successful MA dissertations in the past include:

Youth crime: high spirits or a criminal act
Sex offenders in the community
Human trafficking
An Englishman’s home is his castle
’Get out of jail free’ – malingered psychosis in prison populations
Research Interests of the Criminology and Criminal Justice Team
Youth homelessness and crime
Institutional child abuse
Critical approaches to law, crime and criminology
Sociology of law
Public opinion on crime and criminal justice
Penal policy
Rural criminology
Lay judges and jurors
Procedural justice
Popular legal culture, including film and TV
Victimology
Islamic extremism and terrorism
Trust in courts, police and the legal profession
Teaching and assessment methods
Teaching occurs via lectures, seminars and tutorials given by research experts in the School of Social Sciences. The team of lecturers employs the concept of ’active learning’ by students. Assessment methods include essays, assignments, presentations and a 20,000 word dissertation.

Careers
The course prepares for a wide range of employment including:

Law-enforcement agencies: the police, customs, the prison service
Public administration: including crime prevention units, offender management, general administration, international institutions
Political associations, work for members of parliaments, for lobby groups related to the criminal justice system and to issues of social justice broadly conceived
Research institutes, researching criminological and sociological issues
Academic institutions such as universities

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The course prepares students for undertaking social research and evaluation in criminal justice and criminology, leading to careers in research, research management, and commissioning or using research. Read more

Introduction

The course prepares students for undertaking social research and evaluation in criminal justice and criminology, leading to careers in research, research management, and commissioning or using research.

Accreditation

The course is recognised as research training by the ESRC for those who are studying or going on to study for a PhD (+3), and is also recognised by the ESRC for Master’s Course plus Research Studentship (1+3) purposes.

Key information

- Degree type: MSc, Postgraduate Diploma
- Study methods: Part-time, Full-time
- Start date: Full-time: September Part-time: September/January
- Course Director: Richard Simmons

Course objectives

This MSc has been designed to run concurrently with the MSc Applied Social Research, a long-standing course in Applied Social Science that is recognised by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) as meeting the standards of their Research Training Guidelines. The objectives are to:
- Provide you with the skills and knowledge base required to collect, analyse and report qualitative and quantitative data, taking account of ethics, reliability and validity
- Enable you to examine critically the theoretical foundations that underpin criminological and socio-legal research
- Enable you to examine issues concerning comparative criminological and socio-legal research
- Develop your understanding of the relationship between criminological research and policy, and the meanings of evaluation, its terminology, practice and use

English language requirements

If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills:
- IELTS: 6.5 with 6.0 minimum in each skill
- Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C
- Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade B
- Pearson Test of English (Academic): 60 with 56 in each component
- IBT TOEFL: 90 with no subtest less than 20

For more information go to English language requirements https://www.stir.ac.uk/study-in-the-uk/entry-requirements/english/

If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. View the range of pre-sessional courses http://www.intohigher.com/uk/en-gb/our-centres/into-university-of-stirling/studying/our-courses/course-list/pre-sessional-english.aspx .

Structure and content

The MSc/Diploma in Applied Social Research (Criminology) comprises six compulsory taught core modules and (for the MSc) a dissertation.
The modules are: Research Design and Process; Introduction to Information Technology and Library Services (not formally assessed); Quantitative Data Analysis; Qualitative Data Analysis; Research Methods in Criminology and Socio-legal Studies; Criminological Perspectives; and Criminalisation, Social Control and Human Rights.
In addition to the modules, you will complete the following:
- Research Dissertation: MSc students must undertake an original criminological or socio-legal research study and complete a research dissertation with academic supervision.

Examples of recent dissertation topics include:
- Explaining Crime through Narrative
- Nurses Perceptions of Workplace Violence and Aggression within an A&E Department
- Policing a Democracy
- The Effect of Anti-Terror Legislation on Liberty

Delivery and assessment

Teaching methods are designed for each module to facilitate your acquisition of skills and progressive development. You are expected to participate in lectures, seminars, tutorials, computer-based workshops and group work.
Full-time and part-time MSc/Diploma students experience a range of different forms of assessment across the compulsory taught modules. These include essays, critical review essays, book reviews, research proposals, a computer lab-based assessment for quantitative data analysis, and the research dissertation. There are no examinations.

Why Stirling?

REF2014
In REF2014 Stirling was placed 6th in Scotland and 45th in the UK with almost three quarters of research activity rated either world-leading or internationally excellent.

Rating

In the most recent Research Assessment Exercise (RAE), 95 percent of research in Applied Social Science at Stirling was 'Internationally Excellent' with the top 10 percent of that judged to be 'World-leading'.

Career opportunities

90.5% of Stirling students are in employment or further study six months after graduation.

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