• Coventry University Featured Masters Courses
  • Cardiff University Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Glasgow Featured Masters Courses
  • Goldsmiths, University of London Featured Masters Courses
  • St Mary’s University, Twickenham Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Derby Online Learning Featured Masters Courses
  • Xi’an Jiaotong-Liverpool University Featured Masters Courses
  • New College of the Humanities Featured Masters Courses
De Montfort University Featured Masters Courses
Queen’s University Belfast Featured Masters Courses
University of Reading Featured Masters Courses
Institute for Advanced Architecture of Catalonia Featured Masters Courses
Northumbria University Featured Masters Courses
"criminal" AND "law"×
0 miles

Masters Degrees (Criminal Law)

  • "criminal" AND "law" ×
  • clear all
Showing 1 to 15 of 449
Order by 
How are international and transnational crimes prevented, investigated and prosecuted? Is criminal law an effective tool in the present context of globalized criminality?. Read more
How are international and transnational crimes prevented, investigated and prosecuted? Is criminal law an effective tool in the present context of globalized criminality?

These questions will constitute some of criminal law's biggest challenges for the years to come and are the focus of the Global Criminal Law LLM track, which explores the application of criminal law - both substantive and procedural - in the context of global criminality, such as organized, transnational and international criminality.

This track offers you the two-fold opportunity to study substantive and procedural criminal law from a comparative and international perspective but also to specialise in the study of specific criminal behaviour: organised and financial crimes, cybercrimes and international crimes.

Why in Groningen?

This programme has a strong focus on the application of criminal law in a globalised and internationalised context. It thus draws from comparative criminal law and international criminal law as well as from rules regulating international cooperation in criminal matters to explore particular types of global criminality: organised and financial crimes, cybercrimes and international crimes.

Job perspectives

The programme is specifically tailored to train students into becoming well-equipped legal professionals with both academic skills and practical knowledge of criminal law. Graduates can apply their specialized understanding of substantive and procedural criminal law in domestic, regional and international contexts. In particular, the programme meets the requirements of a career within int. organizations and judicial institutions as well as within inter-governmental and nat. government agencies.

Read less
With over 30 years of expertise, LSBU Law has shaped the professional futures of thousands of law students. Read more
With over 30 years of expertise, LSBU Law has shaped the professional futures of thousands of law students.

This LLM course covers the concepts and enforcement of international criminal law, It focuses on international crimes that fall under the jurisdiction of international criminal courts and tribunals (genocide, crimes against humanity, war crimes and aggression). The core principles, law, and institutions of international criminal law are contextualised against international law and human rights, and international humanitarian law.

You'll study the following subset categories of International Law:International Criminal Law, International Human Rights Law and Humanitarian Law by exploring the contours of the duty to prosecute those who commit international crimes. And, focus on the application of domestic and international law to the question of jurisdiction over international criminal activities, including universal jurisdiction of national courts.

The course explores the procedural aspects of international cooperation in criminal matters, with particular attention to extradition and problems associated with obtaining evidence from abroad.

Modules

International criminal law
International criminal procedure and practice
International law and human rights
Research methods
Dissertation

Plus two options from:

International humanitarian law
International human rights and development
Terrorism
Case management
Advocacy
Migration and development

Assessment

Content, knowledge and understanding is assessed through coursework, or coursework, presentations and on-line assessments.

Assessment methods reflect the development of legal skills within particular modules, for example the advocacy presentation within the Advocacy Module and the Case study within the Case Management Module. Oral assessments assess your ability to effectively and critically research, evaluate, write and present a coherent legal analysis of a particular issue drawing upon relevant law reform proposals, assessing conflicting interpretations of the International Criminal Law and proposing new hypotheses relevant to the topic being assessed.

Coursework

Coursework can take many forms (based on the practical or theoretical content of the module) including essays and reports. Typically coursework pieces will be 6,000 words in length. Students will explore a topic covered in depth, providing a critical, practical, insight into the topic analysed.

Professional links

A number of Visiting Professors and Lecturers will teach on the course. All are leading practitioners with a national reputation in the fields of international criminal law and human rights.

Recent guest lecturers:

• Ko Aung, Burma Human Rights Campaigner;
• Joel Bennathan, QC, Barrister;
• Sir Geoffrey Bindman, Solicitor;
• Imran Khan, Solicitor;
• Roger Smith, Director of Justice.

Employability

New international criminal law:

This programme is particularly relevant if you're looking for careers in the new international criminal law institutions such as the International Criminal Court or in agencies with rapidly increasing criminal justice competencies such as the UN or the EU.

You'll acquire in-depth knowledge of international criminal law and procedure, international human rights law and international humanitarian law. You'll have the necessary knowledge and skills to practice international criminal law before international tribunals or national courts.

This LLM will appeal to you if you're interested in the increasing trend in international human rights law to criminalize and prosecute mass human rights atrocities, both in domestic courts and international tribunals, like the International Criminal Court.

Non-governmental organisations:

Other graduates may embark on careers in non-governmental organisations, such as Amnesty International or Human Rights Watch, or in the area of international legal practice. The LLM is also highly relevant for law graduates and criminal law practitioners both from the UK and abroad. Moreover it is particularly relevant for graduates from Commonwealth Common Law jurisdictions, wishing to study international criminal law and practice while developing their legal and professional knowledge and skills in the field of international litigation.

The LLM aims to produce reflective practitioners, capable of using their professional experience in combination with theoretical insights to contribute to public debate on international criminal justice policy and practice.

LSBU Employability Services

LSBU is committed to supporting you develop your employability and succeed in getting a job after you have graduated. Your qualification will certainly help, but in a competitive market you also need to work on your employability, and on your career search. Our Employability Service will support you in developing your skills, finding a job, interview techniques, work experience or an internship, and will help you assess what you need to do to get the job you want at the end of your course. LSBU offers a comprehensive Employability Service, with a range of initiatives to complement your studies, including:

direct engagement from employers who come in to interview and talk to students
Job Shop and on-campus recruitment agencies to help your job search
mentoring and work shadowing schemes.

• Direct engagement from employers who come in to interview and talk to students
• Job Shop and on-campus recruitment agencies to help your job search
• Mentoring and work shadowing schemes.

Read less
Security is a major contemporary preoccupation; criminal law and criminal justice are key responses. This postgraduate degree in criminal law and criminal justice offers an exciting, challenging and distinctive opportunity to undertake advanced study in these areas. Read more
Security is a major contemporary preoccupation; criminal law and criminal justice are key responses. This postgraduate degree in criminal law and criminal justice offers an exciting, challenging and distinctive opportunity to undertake advanced study in these areas.

The central focus of the programme is the interface between criminal law and criminal justice. It offers a theoretically informed and multidisciplinary course of study. In addition to studying the now established critical and theoretical perspectives relevant to criminal law and criminal justice, the programme also has a humanities focus, which offers an opportunity to explore and engage with cutting-edge scholarship in criminal law and criminal justice studies.

The programme is delivered by staff from the School of Law, the Institute of Criminal Policy Research at Birkbeck, and a range of visiting international scholars and practitioners.

Why study this course at Birkbeck?

Designed for students who are passionate about criminal law and criminal justice, who want to face new challenges, and who are interested in exploring and developing new critical perspectives on major contemporary national and international debates.
Flexible learning, studying in the evening, makes it particularly attractive to legal and criminal justice professionals and practitioners.
The School of Law is an internationally recognised centre for critical and interdisciplinary legal research. It provides an exciting and innovative environment for a wide range of research with a strong theoretical and policy focus. The School is the home of Birkbeck Law Press and publishes Law and Critique: The International Journal of Critical Legal Thought.
The School of Law is also the home of the Institute for Criminal Policy Research. Mike Hough and Paul Turnbull, its co-directors, lead a team of outstanding researchers. They bring a wealth of knowledge to the Master's programme, participating in core and specialist modules and providing dissertation supervision.
We use technology, such as electronic learning environments, to enhance teaching and learning. Birkbeck Library has an extensive teaching collection of books, journals and electronic resources in law and related disciplines, such as economics, politics and sociology. For example, it provides access to over 17,000 electronic journals, which are available online 24 hours a day. Find out more about our teaching and learning resources.
You can also take advantage of the rich research collections nearby, including those of the Institute of Advanced Legal Studies, Senate House Library, the British Library of Political and Economic Science (LSE Library) and the British Library.

Our research

Birkbeck is one of the world’s leading research-intensive institutions. Our cutting-edge scholarship informs public policy, achieves scientific advances, supports the economy, promotes culture and the arts, and makes a positive difference to society.

Birkbeck’s research excellence was confirmed in the 2014 Research Excellence Framework, which placed Birkbeck 30th in the UK for research, with 73% of our research rated world-leading or internationally excellent.

We are among the top 10 law schools in the UK and in the top 3 in London in the Times Higher Education 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF) rankings, while our research environment was judged conducive to producing research of the highest quality.

Read less
This programme is designed to help students become experts in the areas of International Law that directly concern the human person - International Criminal Law & International Human Rights Law - whilst mastering the discipline of International Law of which they are part. Read more
This programme is designed to help students become experts in the areas of International Law that directly concern the human person - International Criminal Law & International Human Rights Law - whilst mastering the discipline of International Law of which they are part. In addition to the foundational courses in Legal Research Methods and Public International Law, students will be required to study International Criminal Law, International Human Rights Law and write a dissertation on a topic within the International Criminal Law or International Human Rights Law. The remaining courses can be chosen from a range of relevant options.

Through carefully designed course work and varied teaching approaches, students will acquire the intellectual open-ness, technical expertise and critical thinking abilities that are necessary for effectiveness in a globalising world. The programme will equip students to respond effectively to the wide range of intellectual and professional challenges facing those working on legal issues concerning the human person in International Law. The LLM in International Law (specialising in International Criminal Law & International Human Rights Law) will equip them to deal with both case work and policy making.

Employment Opportunities
Employment opportunities for graduates of the programme will include work with international law firms, international organisations such as the United Nations, World Bank, World Trade Organisation and European Union, international courts and tribunals, ‘think tanks’ and research centres, non-governmental organisations and government (eg. Ministries of Justice and Foreign Affairs). Having taken one of our programmes, there will, of course, also be possibilities for academically inclined students to pursue careers in teaching and research.

Compulsory Modules:

Legal Research Methods
Public International Law
International Criminal Law
International Human Rights Law
Dissertation on a topic within International Criminal Law or International Human Rights Law
Optional Modules (choose 2):

European Human Rights Law
Children’s Rights in Domestic and International Law
International Law of Armed Conflict
Dealing with the Legacies of the Past
Structure
January intake: Taught modules are undertaken in the period of January to June and September to January and will involve the study of 120 credits. The dissertation (or equivalent) is valued at 60 credits and is undertaken during the period of June to September.

September intake: Taught modules are undertaken in the period of September to June and will involve the study of 120 credits. The dissertation (or equivalent) is valued at 60 credits and is undertaken during the period of June to September.

Teaching will mostly be seminar-based which will promote group and individual interaction, which also ensures that every individual student is encouraged to contribute to discussions. Seminar-based teaching enables lecturers and students to discuss issues and investigate topics in greater depth, and develops critical thinking and solution-based learning skills in students; whilst also allowing the course teachers to monitor closely each individual’s progress. Emphasis will be placed on the use of virtual learning through the mechanism of the Blackboard computer-assisted learning system and databases such as Westlaw and LexisNexis. Throughout all modules, comparative elements with other legal systems will be emphasised.

Read less
Programme description. This programme will provide students with an advanced understanding of contemporary debates in criminal law and criminal justice. Read more

Programme description

This programme will provide students with an advanced understanding of contemporary debates in criminal law and criminal justice.

It is suitable for students who have studied law at undergraduate level and wish to develop their understanding of criminal justice in particular.

It prepares students for further work in this area, whether professional or academic.

Programme structure

This programme offers a range of courses across the fields of criminal law and criminal justice from an international perspective, allowing you to tailor a programme to suit your interests.

For 2017/18 the programme consists of 180 credits, comprising taught courses worth 120 credits (60 credits per semester) and a 10,000 word dissertation worth 60 credits.

The 120 credits of taught courses are made up of the following mandatory, core and option courses.

Mandatory courses (40 credits)

General Principles of Criminal Law (20 credits, Semester 1)

Current Issues in Criminal Law (20 credits, Semester 2)

Core courses in Criminal Law and Criminal Justice (40 - 80 credits)

20 credit courses in semester 1

Criminal Justice and Penal Process

EU Criminal and Immigration Law - New for 2017!

20 credit courses in semester 2

Sexual Offending and the Law

Gender, Crime and Criminal Justice

Mental Health and Crime

Cybercrime

Police and Policing

Responding to Global Crime and Insecurity

Option Courses (0 - 40 credits)

You may also select up to a maximum of 40 credits from any course offered by the Law School, depending on availability and with the express permission of the Programme Director.

We cannot guarantee that all courses will run each year, and will provide adequate notice of any changes to the programme structure and courses.

Learning outcomes

Having completed the programme, students will emerge with an understanding of contemporary debates in criminal law theory and doctrine, the ability critically to analyse existing practice and new developments in this and related subjects, and advanced-level skills in legal research and analysis.



Read less
This programme draws upon Birmingham Law School’s long standing research strengths in the areas of criminal law and criminal justice. Read more
This programme draws upon Birmingham Law School’s long standing research strengths in the areas of criminal law and criminal justice. Criminal Law is concerned with the most potentially invasive assertion of authority by the state: if you fail to comply with the law you will be punished. This programme provides a holistic analysis of the criminal process through an analysis of the law, its philosophical underpinnings and its operation in practice.

Students can study to attain a broad overview of criminal justice processes or specialise in particular aspects as diverse as underpinning theories, policing, health aspects of criminal justice or indeed international aspects of law enforcement co-operation. Many modules have been created and are taught by leading scholars of the particular field and students benefit from close contact with researchers.

For those wishing to gain in-depth understanding of criminal law and criminal justice, this course offers the opportunity for broader or deeply specialised study within an innovative research-led teaching environment which benefits from BLS’s longstanding stature in this field and our staff’s dedication to ensuring it lives on; also in our LLM graduates.

At Birmingham Law School we research into topics as diverse as the ever widening net of criminalisation and (at least quasi-) criminal justice processes, to money saving tactics and their effect on the very philosophy which underpins our criminal law and justice system, the justice which emerges from it and effects.

These specialisations flow into the modules on this LLM which will allow you to study the five separate objectives used in enforcement of Criminal Law; retribution, deterrence, incapacitation, rehabilitation and restitution taught. All of these are subjects of great debate and controversy across all jurisdictions and students benefit from debating these informed by and in exchange with our broad range of experts.

About the Birmingham Law School

Birmingham Law School has a long tradition of producing cutting-edge research that has real-world impact and informs the challenging and exciting learning environment our students experience. As a community of world-leading scholars, teachers and students, Birmingham Law School continues to make an important contribution to our understanding, teaching, and practice of law. In 2016 it was named as one of the world’s Top 100 law schools in the QS World Rankings.
We provide an expansive range of programmes, for both undergraduate and postgraduate studies and employ a range of approaches in our teaching and our research, from the theoretical and doctrinal to the empirical and applied. Our research is recognised on a global stage, and our academics are frequent participants in legal debates and contribute to the policy-making process.
We provide students with more than just a degree, and enable them to develop the skills required to enhance their employability. Our Centre for Professional Legal Education and Research (CEPLER) presents our students with opportunities to increase their knowledge of law in action through Pro Bono and Mooting as well as the 50+ legal specific career events CEPLER organises annually. CEPLERs work is one of the many things that have led to Birmingham being recognised as the University of the Year for Graduate Employability in the Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2016.

Funding and Scholarships

There are many ways to finance your postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. To see what funding and scholarships are available, please visit: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/funding

Open Days

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open days.
Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/visit

Virtual Open Days

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk


Read less
The LLM (Criminal Law) is one of the named routes through our LLM programme and allows you to specialise and develop expertise in criminal law. Read more
The LLM (Criminal Law) is one of the named routes through our LLM programme and allows you to specialise and develop expertise in criminal law. The programme has been designed by a team of highly motivated academic staff at Teesside University who have particular research interests that have informed its content.

Course details

The programme gives you flexibility and autonomy to allow you to develop your own areas of interest within the area of criminal law. At the same time it distinguishes you in the eyes of employers in ways that show that you have specialised in a substantive and applied area of contemporary legal study relevant to criminal policy and practice.

What you study

Core modules
-Contemporary Legal Issues
-Criminal Law
-Dissertation
-Legal Theory in Context
And one optional module
-Comparative Law and Criminal Justice
-European Responses to Crime
-International Law
-Medical Law

Modules offered may vary.

Teaching

The link between legal theory and practice is the central theme of the programme and is incorporated into the teaching through a blend of directed and student-centred learning to develop an understanding of methodology, practice and presentation. This is achieved through a combination of lectures, seminars, group work, debates, audio-visual presentations, guided reading and research exercises.

We want you to become an effective autonomous learner. The research and academic writing skills you develop in taught sessions enable you to prepare and contribute to seminars and group discussions, and to produce the required assessed work appropriate to postgraduate study. You are also encouraged to attend and participate in relevant research seminars offered by the research institutes of the University, particularly the Social Futures Institute (SoFI) in the School of Social Sciences & Law.

Our assessments help you develop essential skills to work successfully at postgraduate level, as well as for continuing professional roles and lifelong learning. Your work is assessed in a variety of ways, including:
-Individual presentations
-Peer review and assessment
-Research proposal
-Reflective practice
-Written assignments
-Dissertation

Employability

By completing the course you will develop and have recognised knowledge and understanding of the theory and application of criminal law. You will also develop cognitive, intellectual, practical, professional and generic key skills and qualities, which have a directly beneficial effect on future employability, whether in the legal profession or in subject-related disciplines, including academia. You will be equipped to contribute to and inform policy-making decisions in your chosen sphere.

A number of our previous students have published work in academic journals.

Read less
Interested in criminal law? Want to focus your legal skills towards working at an international level? Then LLM International Criminal Law is perfect for you! We cover the key concepts in enforcing international criminal law, looking particularly at crimes falling under the jurisdiction of international criminal courts and tribunals. Read more
Interested in criminal law? Want to focus your legal skills towards working at an international level? Then LLM International Criminal Law is perfect for you! We cover the key concepts in enforcing international criminal law, looking particularly at crimes falling under the jurisdiction of international criminal courts and tribunals. This includes genocide, crimes against humanity, war crimes and aggression. You'll learn valuable practical skills to become a specialist international lawyer, including conducting mediation and negotiation in an international law setting and acting as an advocate presenting legal arguments before an international forum.

As well as focusing on a specialist area, we will also help you develop an awareness and critical understanding of commercialism in the legal sector, understanding the law in practice and legal ethics. You'll gain everything you need to work in international law, opening your career options and enhancing your skills for future employment. Take your love of law to the next level by gaining expertise in international criminal law.

Course outline

All students will begin by engaging in a critical appraisal of relevant research methods to achieve competence in project planning and academic writing, an awareness and critical understanding of commercialism in the legal sector, understanding the law in practice and legal ethics. Students will be trained on how to prepare written advice to clients, how to draft court pleadings, conduct mediation and negotiation in an international law setting, and act as an advocate and present legal argument before an international forum.

There are no exams to worry about - assessments are made through essays, presentations, advocacy exercises and professional portfolios. The research project is a significant piece of research which students will undertake with support from supervisors. The focus of this project must be on an area of their specialisation and must be completed within 15,000 words.

Graduate destinations

The LLM qualification can help career development in the legal sector (including for those practicing law in commercial and business fields) as well as the Business and Management industry, helping promotion to middle and senior management. To meet the constant evolution of global business law development, we offer the opportunity to gain the qualification in one year.

Other admission requirements

For non UK degree programmes, the University will utilise the NARIC database to determine its equivalence to a UK honours degree. Applicants presenting non-standard qualifications with substantial legal practice and law related experience may be invited for an interview to present their experiential learning. If an applicant's first language is not English, he or she must be able to demonstrate oral and written fluency in English. Working or studying in an English-speaking environment will usually be sufficient to demonstrate an acceptable competence. Otherwise applications for admission must be accompanied by a certificate of competency in the English language from a recognised institution or programme. English language requirements for non-English-speaking students are a minimum IELTS score of 6.5 or a minimum TOEFL score of 600, or equivalent.

Read less
This course is one of the few LLM courses with a specific focus on criminal law and procedure. Read more
This course is one of the few LLM courses with a specific focus on criminal law and procedure.

Course overview

Are you looking for a thorough knowledge of criminal law and procedure in order to support your career plans? Our specialist postgraduate legal training is particularly relevant for those who are looking for higher-level roles within the legal profession, police, probation service, prison service and HM Revenue and Customs. Our Master of Laws will add to your credentials in an area in which you already practise or are proposing to work. The Law Department at Sunderland is well-respected and was ranked 'internationally excellent' in the Latest Research Excellence Framework (REF).

You will undertake two core modules: ‘Criminal Law: Theory and Doctrine’ and ‘Law, Society and the State’. You will also choose a further two options that match your particular career ambitions and intellectual interests.

Your Masters dissertation is an opportunity to develop rigorous research skills and to explore a topic that you negotiate with your tutors. We provide expert supervision, drawing on our own research and the latest academic approaches and evidence base.

Our teaching methods include weekly three-hour workshops. You will be expected to prepare thoroughly, respond to new ideas and contribute to vibrant and thought-provoking sessions.

Course content

The course mixes taught elements with self-directed research. You can negotiate the topic of the dissertation to reflect your personal interests and career aspirations.

Modules on this course include:
-Advanced Legal Skills (30 Credits)
-International Perspective in Law (30 Credits)
-International Human Rights Law (30 Credits)
-Legal Research Project (30 Credits)
-Dissertation (60 Credits)

Teaching and assessment

We use a wide variety of teaching and learning methods which include weekly three-hour workshops. These are interactive and require a high level of preparation. The research project and dissertation are supervised by your tutor.

Compared to an undergraduate course, you will find that this Masters course requires a higher level of independent working.

Facilities & location

The University of Sunderland has excellent facilities for law students including a purpose-built mock courtroom and specialist collections of books and resources.

Course location
This course is based on the banks of the River Wear at the Sir Tom Cowie Campus at St Peter’s. It looks out over the River Wear and is less than a mile from the seaside.

Mock courtroom
We are one of the few universities in the UK to have a mock court that allows you to develop advocacy skills and apply legal knowledge in a realistic environment. The mock court is also used for mooting competitions. It’s one of the features that ranked Sunderland second in the UK for Course Satisfaction and Student Satisfaction with Teaching (source: The Guardian University Guide 2014).

Law Library
The Law Library, which is located within the St Peter’s Library, offers an excellent selection of books. There is also a range of electronic sources of information such as Lexis and West Law.

University Library Services
The University boasts a collection of more than 430,000 books with many more titles available through the inter-library loan service. There are nearly 9,000 journal titles, mostly in electronic format. Each year the University invests around £1 million in new resources.

IT provision
When it comes to IT provision you can take your pick from hundreds of PCs as well as Apple Macs in the David Goldman Informatics Centre and St Peter’s Library. There are also free WiFi zones throughout the campus. If you have any problems, just ask the friendly helpdesk team.

Learning environment
Sunderland offers a vibrant learning environment with an international dimension thanks to the presence of students from around the world. At the same time, the University is fully plugged into relevant professional organisations, with strong links and an exchange of ideas and people.

Employment & careers

This LLM course equips you with advanced skills and knowledge in a specialised area of law. As a result, you will have an important edge when applying for roles in the Crown Prosecution Service, police, and prison or probation services. Salaries of law graduates are among the highest of all graduates.

You will also be better equipped for applying for training contracts or pupillages if this is appropriate to your career stage. In addition, a Masters degree will enhance opportunities in academic roles or further study towards a PhD.

Read less
The opportunity to study Criminal Justice and Criminal Law at an advanced level is a particular strength of the LLM at the University of Leeds. Read more
The opportunity to study Criminal Justice and Criminal Law at an advanced level is a particular strength of the LLM at the University of Leeds.

This programme will enable you to develop a sophisticated knowledge of current issues in criminal justice, criminology and criminal law in the UK, Europe and across the globe. It combines cutting-edge compulsory modules with a wide range of optional modules allowing you to tailor your degree to your own particular interests.

Throughout the course we’ll encourage you to:

examine critical issues in criminal law
explore the complex and dynamic nature of the criminal justice process
understand the mechanics of the research process
consider the rights of individuals within criminal justice processes.

Read less
International criminal law is a dynamic, controversial and fast-moving field that increasingly touches on, and affects matters of, key international significance. Read more
International criminal law is a dynamic, controversial and fast-moving field that increasingly touches on, and affects matters of, key international significance.

At the core of the subject are legal institutions such as the International Criminal Court that have been established to realise the ideal of holding to account those responsible for offences such as war crimes and genocide.

Our LLM combines a study of the legal doctrine underpinning the investigation and prosecution of international crimes with a critical analysis of the political context in which such prosecutions are undertaken.

How will I study?

You’ll study two core modules in the autumn term and choose two options in the spring term. In the summer, you undertake supervised work on the LLM dissertation. You will be assessed through coursework, an unseen examination, essays and a dissertation.

Scholarships

Our aim is to ensure that every student who wants to study with us is able to despite financial barriers, so that we continue to attract talented and unique individuals.

Chancellor's International Scholarship (2017)
-25 scholarships of a 50% tuition fee waiver
-Application deadline: 1 May 2017

HESPAL Scholarship (Higher Education Scholarships Scheme for the Palestinian Territories) (2017)
-Two full fee waivers in conjuction with maintenance support from the British Council
-Application deadline: 1 January 2017

USA Friends Scholarships (2017)
-A scholarship of an amount equivalent to $10,000 for nationals or residents of the USA on a one year taught Masters degree course.
-Application deadline: 3 April 2017

Faculty

Law at Sussex has active research groups in its primary research fields, exploring legal conceptualisations of responsibility and issues of citizenship and governance.

These groups meet regularly for the presentation of work in progress, as reading groups, to host external speakers and to plan the organisation of research seminars, workshops and conferences.

Careers

This LLM is ideal if you want to work in any area of criminal law – from practising as a lawyer to policy review and reform – but particularly if you wish to pursue a career with an international angle.

Our graduates have progressed to work and research with human rights NGOs, in education, as legal professionals, with several working and interning at the international criminal tribunals in The Hague.

Several have also chosen to continue with doctoral-level study in the fields of human rights and international criminal law.

Read less
Criminal law and criminology lie at the heart of questions and debates on how we as a society should respond to crime. On this course you’ll study an exciting range of topics, covering theory, policy and practice. Read more
Criminal law and criminology lie at the heart of questions and debates on how we as a society should respond to crime. On this course you’ll study an exciting range of topics, covering theory, policy and practice.

Our research expertise informs our teaching on the LLM. You’ll be taught by lecturers who specialise in critical work in areas including:
-Criminal law theory
-Comparative criminal justice
-International crimes
-Financial crimes
-Human rights and criminal justice
-Youth justice
-Policing and restorative justice

Our course also draws on expertise from the Department of Sociology, which will enable you to develop an interdisciplinary perspective.

How will I study?

Our core modules give you the necessary theoretical, methodological and empirical foundations. They cover:
-Criminal law
-Criminal justice
-Criminology
-Research methods

Our options – from both law and criminology – are taught by specialist academics based on their areas of expertise.

Teaching methods include lectures, workshops and seminars. Assessment modes include essays and briefing papers as well as a 10,000-word dissertation.

Scholarships

Our aim is to ensure that every student who wants to study with us is able to despite financial barriers, so that we continue to attract talented and unique individuals.

Chancellor's International Scholarship (2017)
-25 scholarships of a 50% tuition fee waiver
-Application deadline: 1 May 2017

HESPAL Scholarship (Higher Education Scholarships Scheme for the Palestinian Territories) (2017)
-Two full fee waivers in conjuction with maintenance support from the British Council
-Application deadline: 1 January 2017

USA Friends Scholarships (2017)
-A scholarship of an amount equivalent to $10,000 for nationals or residents of the USA on a one year taught Masters degree course.
-Application deadline: 3 April 2017

Careers

You’ll gain practical abilities as well as critical and problem-solving skills valued in contemporary job markets.

You will be able to apply your analytical skills to a range of careers in legal practice and criminal justice administration as well as careers in the private and voluntary sectors.

The LLM can also provide a strong foundation for further academic study or a career in research.

Read less
This programme will provide you with an opportunity to explore and analyse global relationships between criminal laws and national security (ICLAS). Read more
This programme will provide you with an opportunity to explore and analyse global relationships between criminal laws and national security (ICLAS). With the rise in the threat to national and global security at unprecedented levels, the time to further study this area is now. You will study many aspects of international criminal law, for example, the balance that is struck between human rights and the threat of terrorism in the UK and internationally and the way in which differing jurisdictions tackle international organised crime.

If you are looking to work for international bodies such as the United Nations or the International Criminal Court, or you are looking to continue your studies within this fascinating field, then this course will be the ideal next move to help further develop your career.

Course content

This course will develop analytical, evaluative and research skills and provide students with a comprehensive understanding of the tensions between security and human rights that exist in the contemporary UK, European and international legal frameworks. In particular you will consider how effectively human rights standards are protected both from an EU and global perspective and the response to the threat of terror and international crime in different jurisdictions.

You will also have the opportunity to probe in detail an area of particular interest when you produce your dissertation. You will be supported by experienced lecturers who use a range of innovative teaching methods, which will enhance your overall studies.

To be eligible for the award of LLM International Criminal Law and Security, you must successfully gain 180 credits from the below compulsory modules. If you must successfully gain 120 credits from the below but not including the Dissertation you would be awarded a Postgraduate Diploma, if you gain 60 credits not include the Dissertation you would be awarded the Postgraduate Certificate.

Course modules (16/17)

-European Crime and Security
-International Organised Crime
-European and International Human Rights
-National Security, Terrorism and the Rule of Law
-Research Methods
-Dissertation
-Diversity, Migration and the Law
-Research Methods

Methods of Learning

The LLM is offered for full time study over 12 months. The course is also available part time and via distance learning.

You will typically study three or four modules in each semester. This is followed by the dissertation period of 18 weeks.

This course is also available through distance learning, as well as taught at the University of Northampton. The distance learning element of the course delivery will vary module-by-module but typically includes podcasts of lectures combined with weekly or fortnightly online reading, exercises and discussions using a range of platforms, including blogs and discussion boards.

Where appropriate, PowerPoint slides will be available online at the same time as the lecture podcast. The readings will be in the form of links to online documents, case reports, book extracts or similar and will be available through online systems. Formative assessment is carried out regularly so that you can ensure on a regular basis that you are at the right place in the course. You will be allocated a personal tutor and will be able to arrange live one-to-one tutorial sessions using Skype or Google Hangouts as necessary.

Assessments

Formal course assessment is centred on module essays and submission of a dissertation, although the precise method of assessment may vary across modules. In addition, students may be informally assessed in a number of different ways, including individual presentations.

Facilities and Special Features

-Strong staff expertise, with substantial teaching experience on both undergraduate and postgraduate courses.
-An enthusiastic teaching team providing a supportive atmosphere for research.

Careers

You will be provided with the skills and knowledge to work in, or continue your studies in modern warfare, security and terrorism. You could also expand your academic knowledge through PhD studies in your chosen field.

Read less
The Kent LLM (and associated Diploma programme) allows you to broaden and deepen your knowledge and understanding of law by specialising in one or more different areas. Read more
The Kent LLM (and associated Diploma programme) allows you to broaden and deepen your knowledge and understanding of law by specialising in one or more different areas.

This specialisation stimulates a critical awareness of the operation of international environmental law and policy, and features a particular focus on topics that are perceived to be controversial or in a state of evolution. You develop a sound knowledge and systematic understanding of the institutional structures, key principles of law and policy, and the contexts within which international law operates.

You study the theoretical, social, political and scientific perspectives that underlie the substantive areas of law, as well as the practical situations in which international environmental law operates. Graduates of the LLM take with them the knowledge and expertise required to pursue a professional or academic career in this contemporary and developing discipline.

Studying for a Master's in Law (LLM) at Kent means having the certainty of gaining an LLM in a specialist area of Law. The Kent LLM gives you the freedom to leave your choice of specialism open until after you arrive, your specialism being determined by the modules you choose.

About Kent Law School

Kent Law School (KLS) is the UK's leading critical law school. A cosmopolitan centre of world-class critical legal research, it offers a supportive and intellectually stimulating place to study postgraduate taught and research degrees.

In addition to learning the detail of the law, students at Kent are taught to think about the law with regard to its history, development and relationship with wider society. This approach allows students to fully understand the law. Our critical approach not only makes the study of law more interesting, it helps to develop crucial skills and abilities required for a career in legal practice.

The Law School offers its flagship Kent LLM at the University’s Canterbury campus (and three defined LLM programmes at the University’s Brussels centre). Our programmes are open to non-law graduates with an appropriate academic or professional background who wish to develop an advanced understanding of law in their field. You study within a close-knit, supportive and intellectually stimulating environment, working closely with academic staff. KLS uses critical research-led teaching throughout our programmes to ensure that you benefit from the Law School’s world-class research.

Our programmes are open to non-law graduates with an appropriate academic or professional background who wish to develop an advanced understanding of law in their field. You study within a close-knit, supportive and intellectually stimulating environment, working closely with academic staff. KLS uses critical research-led teaching throughout our programmes to ensure that you benefit from the Law School’s world-class research.

National ratings

In the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014, research by Kent Law School was ranked 8th in the UK for research intensity. We were also ranked 7th for research power and in the top 20 for research output, research quality and research impact.

An impressive 99% of our research was judged to be of international quality and the School’s environment was judged to be conducive to supporting the development of world-leading research.

Course structure

You can tailor your studies to your particular needs and interests to obtain an LLM or Diploma in a single specialisation, in two specialisations jointly, or by choosing a broad range of modules in different areas of law to obtain a general LLM or Diploma in Law.

Your choice of specialisation will be shaped by the modules you take and your dissertation topic. To be awarded an LLM in a single specialisation, at least three of your six modules must be chosen from those associated with that specialisation and your dissertation focusing on that area of law. The other three modules can be chosen from any offered in the Law School. All students are required to take the Legal Research and Writing Skills module. To be awarded a major/minor specialisation you choose three modules associated with one specialisation, and three from another specialisation, with the dissertation determining your 'major' specialisation.

For example, a student who completes at least three modules in International Commercial Law and completes a dissertation in this area would graduate with an LLM in International Commercial Law; a student who completes three Criminal Justice modules and three Environmental Law modules and then undertakes a dissertation which engages with Criminal Justice would graduate with an LLM in Criminal Justice and Environmental Law.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of this specialisation stream. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation and student demand. Most specialisation streams will require you to study a combination of subject specialisation modules and modules from other specialisation streams so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

LW852 European Union Environmental Law and Policy

LW906 International Environmental Law – Legal Foundations

LW884 International Environmental Law – Substantive Legal Aspects

LW888 Climate Change and Renewable Energy Law

Assessment
The postgraduate programmes offered within the Law School are usually taught in seminar format. Students on the Diploma and LLM programmes study three modules in each of the autumn and spring terms. The modules normally are assessed by a 4-5,000-word essay. Students undertaking an LLM degree must write a dissertation of 15-20,000 words.

Programme aims

This programme aims to provide:

1. LLM: The opportunity to develop (a) expert knowledge and a sophisticated understanding of particular areas of law; (b) advanced research, writing and oral communication skills of general value to postgraduate employment.
PGDip: The opportunity to develop (a) expert knowledge and a sophisticated understanding of particular areas of law; (b) written and oral communication skills of general value to postgraduate employment.

2. LLM: A sound knowledge and systematic understanding of the institutional structures, key principles of law and policy and influential ideas, theories, assumptions and paradigms of particular areas of law.
PGDip: A sound knowledge and systematic understanding of the institutional structures, key principles of law and policy and influential ideas, theories, assumptions and paradigms of the subjects studied.

3. LLM & PGDip: A degree of specialisation in areas of law and policy chosen from the LLM option streams available and an opportunity for students to engage with academic work at the frontiers of scholarship.

4. LLM & PGDip: A critical awareness of the operation of law and policy, particularly in contexts that are perceived to be controversial or in a state of evolution.

5. LLM: The skills to undertake supervised research on an agreed topic in their specialisation and to encourage the production of original, evaluative analysis that meets high standards of scholarship.

6. LLM & PGDip: Critical, analytical and problem-solving skills that can be applied to a wide range of contexts.

7. LLM & PGDip: The skills of academic legal research and writing.

8. LLM: A sophisticated grounding in research methods.

Careers

Employability is a key focus throughout the University and at Kent Law School you have the support of a dedicated Employability and Career Development Officer together with a broad choice of work placement opportunities, employability events and careers talks. Details of graduate internship schemes with NGOs, charities and other professional organisations are made available to postgraduate students via the School’s Employability Blog.

Law graduates have gone on to careers in finance, international commerce, government and law or have joined, or started, an NGO or charity.

Kent has an excellent record for postgraduate employment: over 94% of our postgraduate students who graduated in 2013 found a job or further study opportunity within six months.

Information about the internship programme for LLM students can be found on the Kent Law School Employability blog - http://blogs.kent.ac.uk/klsemployability/postgraduates/llm-internships/

Learn more about Kent

Visit Us - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/visit/openday/pgevents.html

International Students - https://www.kent.ac.uk/internationalstudent/

Why study at Kent? - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/why/

Read less
The Kent LLM (and associated Diploma programme) allows you to broaden and deepen your knowledge and understanding of law by specialising in one or more different areas. Read more
The Kent LLM (and associated Diploma programme) allows you to broaden and deepen your knowledge and understanding of law by specialising in one or more different areas.

Law and the Humanities is a distinct field of interdisciplinary study of growing significance. As the only programme of its kind in the UK, this LLM specialisation, taught at the University’s Canterbury and Paris centres, offers a unique perspective on the study and practice of law.

It draws upon the theoretical and methodological richness of the humanities, including history, political and social theory, literature, theatre and visual culture studies, to equip students with the conceptual tools and skills for a more thorough understanding of the traditions and workings of the law. It develops and strengthens students’ analytical, critical, and imaginative capabilities, and cultivates specific skills such as textual analysis, critical reading, and effective argument.

Studying for a Master's in Law (LLM) at Kent means having the certainty of gaining an LLM in a specialist area of Law. The Kent LLM gives you the freedom to leave your choice of specialism open until after you arrive - your specialism being determined by the modules you choose.

About Kent Law School

Kent Law School (KLS) is the UK's leading critical law school. A cosmopolitan centre of world-class critical legal research, it offers a supportive and intellectually stimulating place to study postgraduate taught and research degrees.

In addition to learning the detail of the law, students at Kent are taught to think about the law with regard to its history, development and relationship with wider society. This approach allows students to fully understand the law. Our critical approach not only makes the study of law more interesting, it helps to develop crucial skills and abilities required for a career in legal practice.

The Law School offers its flagship Kent LLM at the University’s Canterbury campus (and two defined LLM programmes at the University’s Brussels campus). The KLS programmes enable you to gain expertise in a wide range of international and domestic subjects and to develop advanced, transferable research, writing and oral communication skills. All of our LLM and Diploma programmes allow you to broaden and deepen your understanding and knowledge of law.

Our programmes attract excellent law graduates from around the world and are also open to non-law graduates with an appropriate academic or professional background who wish to develop an advanced understanding of law in their field. You study within a close-knit, supportive and intellectually stimulating environment, working closely with academic staff. KLS uses critical research-led teaching throughout our programmes to ensure that you benefit from the Law School’s world-class research.

National ratings

In the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014, research by Kent Law School was ranked 8th in the UK for research intensity. We were also ranked 7th for research power and in the top 20 for research output, research quality and research impact.

An impressive 99% of our research was judged to be of international quality and the School’s environment was judged to be conducive to supporting the development of world-leading research.

Course structure

You can tailor your studies to your particular needs and interests to obtain an LLM or Diploma in a single specialisation, in two specialisations jointly, or by choosing a broad range of modules in different areas of law to obtain a general LLM or Diploma in Law.

As a student on the LLM at Canterbury, your choice of specialisation will be shaped by the modules you take and your dissertation topic. To be awarded an LLM in a single specialisation, at least three of your six modules must be chosen from those associated with that specialisation with your dissertation also focusing on that area of law. The other three modules can be chosen from any offered in the Law School. All students are also required to take the Legal Research and Writing Skills module. To be awarded a major/minor specialisation you will need to choose three modules associated with one specialisation, and three from another specialisation, with the dissertation determining which is your 'major' specialisation.

For example, a student who completes at least three modules in International Commercial Law and completes a dissertation in this area would graduate with an LLM in International Commercial Law; a student who completes three Criminal Justice modules and three Environmental Law modules and then undertakes a dissertation which engages with Criminal Justice would graduate with an LLM in Criminal Justice and Environmental Law.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of this specialisation stream. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation and student demand. Most specialisation streams will require you to study a combination of subject specialisation modules and modules from other specialisation streams so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

Several modules from the MA on Resistance offered by the School of Politics are also available.

LW 927 - Law and the Humanities I: Ethos and Scholarship - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/modules/module/LW927
LW 928 - Law and the Humanities 2: Current Issues - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/modules/module/LW928
LW 925 - Cultural Heritage Law - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/modules/module/LW925
LW 843 - International Human Rights Law - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/modules/module/LW843
LW 813 - Contemporary Topics in Intellectual Property - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/modules/module/LW813

Assessment

The postgraduate programmes offered within the Law School are usually taught in seminar format. Students on the Diploma and LLM programmes study three modules in each of the autumn and spring terms. The modules normally are assessed by a 4-5,000-word essay. Students undertaking an LLM degree must write a dissertation of 15-20,000 words.

Programme aims

This programme aims to provide:

- LLM: The opportunity to develop (a) expert knowledge and a sophisticated understanding of particular areas of law; (b) advanced research, writing and oral communication skills of general value to postgraduate employment.
PDip: The opportunity to develop (a) expert knowledge and a sophisticated understanding of particular areas of law; (b) written and oral communication skills of general value to postgraduate employment.

- LLM: A sound knowledge and systematic understanding of the institutional structures, key principles of law and policy and influential ideas, theories, assumptions and paradigms of particular areas of law.
PDip: A sound knowledge and systematic understanding of the institutional structures, key principles of law and policy and influential ideas, theories, assumptions and paradigms of the subjects studied.

- LLM & PDip: A degree of specialisation in areas of law and policy chosen from the LLM option streams available and an opportunity for students to engage with academic work at the frontiers of scholarship.

- LLM & PDip: A critical awareness of the operation of law and policy, particularly in contexts that are perceived to be controversial or in a state of evolution.

- LLM: The skills to undertake supervised research on an agreed topic in their specialisation and to encourage the production of original, evaluative analysis that meets high standards of scholarship.

- LLM & PDip: Critical, analytical and problem-solving skills that can be applied to a wide range of contexts.

- LLM & PDip: The skills of academic legal research and writing.

- LLM: A sophisticated grounding in research methods.

Careers

Employability is a key focus throughout the University and at Kent Law School you have the support of a dedicated Employability and Career Development Officer together with a broad choice of work placement opportunities, employability events and careers talks. Details of graduate internship schemes with NGOs, charities and other professional organisations are made available to postgraduate students via the School’s Employability Blog.

Law graduates have gone on to careers in finance, international commerce, government and law or have joined, or started, an NGO or charity.

Kent has an excellent record for postgraduate employment: over 96% of our postgraduate students who graduated in 2014 found a job or further study opportunity within six months.

Information about the internship programme for LLM students can be found on the Kent Law School Employability blog - http://blogs.kent.ac.uk/klsemployability/postgraduates/llm-internships/

Learn more about Kent

Visit us - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/visit/openday/pgevents.html

International Students - https://www.kent.ac.uk/internationalstudent/

Why study at Kent? - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/why/

Read less

Show 10 15 30 per page



Cookie Policy    X