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Masters Degrees (Criminal Law)

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How are international and transnational crimes prevented, investigated and prosecuted? Is criminal law an effective tool in the present context of globalized criminality?. Read more
How are international and transnational crimes prevented, investigated and prosecuted? Is criminal law an effective tool in the present context of globalized criminality?

These questions will constitute some of criminal law's biggest challenges for the years to come and are the focus of the Global Criminal Law LLM track, which explores the application of criminal law - both substantive and procedural - in the context of global criminality, such as organized, transnational and international criminality.

This track offers you the two-fold opportunity to study substantive and procedural criminal law from a comparative and international perspective but also to specialise in the study of specific criminal behaviour: organised and financial crimes, cybercrimes and international crimes.

Why in Groningen?

This programme has a strong focus on the application of criminal law in a globalised and internationalised context. It thus draws from comparative criminal law and international criminal law as well as from rules regulating international cooperation in criminal matters to explore particular types of global criminality: organised and financial crimes, cybercrimes and international crimes.

Job perspectives

The programme is specifically tailored to train students into becoming well-equipped legal professionals with both academic skills and practical knowledge of criminal law. Graduates can apply their specialized understanding of substantive and procedural criminal law in domestic, regional and international contexts. In particular, the programme meets the requirements of a career within int. organizations and judicial institutions as well as within inter-governmental and nat. government agencies.

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With over 30 years of expertise, LSBU Law has shaped the professional futures of thousands of law students. Read more
With over 30 years of expertise, LSBU Law has shaped the professional futures of thousands of law students.

This LLM course covers the concepts and enforcement of international criminal law, It focuses on international crimes that fall under the jurisdiction of international criminal courts and tribunals (genocide, crimes against humanity, war crimes and aggression). The core principles, law, and institutions of international criminal law are contextualised against international law and human rights, and international humanitarian law.

You'll study the following subset categories of International Law:International Criminal Law, International Human Rights Law and Humanitarian Law by exploring the contours of the duty to prosecute those who commit international crimes. And, focus on the application of domestic and international law to the question of jurisdiction over international criminal activities, including universal jurisdiction of national courts.

The course explores the procedural aspects of international cooperation in criminal matters, with particular attention to extradition and problems associated with obtaining evidence from abroad.

Modules

International criminal law
International criminal procedure and practice
International law and human rights
Research methods
Dissertation

Plus two options from:

International humanitarian law
International human rights and development
Terrorism
Case management
Advocacy
Migration and development

Assessment

Content, knowledge and understanding is assessed through coursework, or coursework, presentations and on-line assessments.

Assessment methods reflect the development of legal skills within particular modules, for example the advocacy presentation within the Advocacy Module and the Case study within the Case Management Module. Oral assessments assess your ability to effectively and critically research, evaluate, write and present a coherent legal analysis of a particular issue drawing upon relevant law reform proposals, assessing conflicting interpretations of the International Criminal Law and proposing new hypotheses relevant to the topic being assessed.

Coursework

Coursework can take many forms (based on the practical or theoretical content of the module) including essays and reports. Typically coursework pieces will be 6,000 words in length. Students will explore a topic covered in depth, providing a critical, practical, insight into the topic analysed.

Professional links

A number of Visiting Professors and Lecturers will teach on the course. All are leading practitioners with a national reputation in the fields of international criminal law and human rights.

Recent guest lecturers:

• Ko Aung, Burma Human Rights Campaigner;
• Joel Bennathan, QC, Barrister;
• Sir Geoffrey Bindman, Solicitor;
• Imran Khan, Solicitor;
• Roger Smith, Director of Justice.

Employability

New international criminal law:

This programme is particularly relevant if you're looking for careers in the new international criminal law institutions such as the International Criminal Court or in agencies with rapidly increasing criminal justice competencies such as the UN or the EU.

You'll acquire in-depth knowledge of international criminal law and procedure, international human rights law and international humanitarian law. You'll have the necessary knowledge and skills to practice international criminal law before international tribunals or national courts.

This LLM will appeal to you if you're interested in the increasing trend in international human rights law to criminalize and prosecute mass human rights atrocities, both in domestic courts and international tribunals, like the International Criminal Court.

Non-governmental organisations:

Other graduates may embark on careers in non-governmental organisations, such as Amnesty International or Human Rights Watch, or in the area of international legal practice. The LLM is also highly relevant for law graduates and criminal law practitioners both from the UK and abroad. Moreover it is particularly relevant for graduates from Commonwealth Common Law jurisdictions, wishing to study international criminal law and practice while developing their legal and professional knowledge and skills in the field of international litigation.

The LLM aims to produce reflective practitioners, capable of using their professional experience in combination with theoretical insights to contribute to public debate on international criminal justice policy and practice.

LSBU Employability Services

LSBU is committed to supporting you develop your employability and succeed in getting a job after you have graduated. Your qualification will certainly help, but in a competitive market you also need to work on your employability, and on your career search. Our Employability Service will support you in developing your skills, finding a job, interview techniques, work experience or an internship, and will help you assess what you need to do to get the job you want at the end of your course. LSBU offers a comprehensive Employability Service, with a range of initiatives to complement your studies, including:

direct engagement from employers who come in to interview and talk to students
Job Shop and on-campus recruitment agencies to help your job search
mentoring and work shadowing schemes.

• Direct engagement from employers who come in to interview and talk to students
• Job Shop and on-campus recruitment agencies to help your job search
• Mentoring and work shadowing schemes.

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The opportunity to study Criminal Justice and Criminal Law at an advanced level is a particular strength of the LLM at the University of Leeds. Read more

The opportunity to study Criminal Justice and Criminal Law at an advanced level is a particular strength of the LLM at the University of Leeds.

This programme will enable you to develop a sophisticated knowledge of current issues in criminal justice, criminology and criminal law in the UK, Europe and across the globe. It combines cutting-edge compulsory modules with a wide range of optional modules allowing you to tailor your degree to your own particular interests.

Throughout the course we’ll encourage you to:

  • examine critical issues in criminal law
  • explore the complex and dynamic nature of the criminal justice process
  • understand the mechanics of the research process
  • consider the rights of individuals within criminal justice processes.

This programme is offered within the dynamic Centre for Criminal Justice Studies (CCJS), an internationally-recognised research centre that provides an active and multi-disciplinary environment, whose members are committed to high-quality teaching in criminal justice, criminology and criminal law. The CCJS also excels in the production of research that is empirically rich, conceptually sophisticated and policy relevant. Research is interdisciplinary and often international in its reach. The University of Leeds recognises CCJS as one of its key 'peaks of research excellence'.

CCJS academics have conducted research for a range of external funding bodies including the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC), the Nuffield Foundation, the Home Office, the Youth Justice Board, the Leverhulme Trust, the European Commission, the National Probation Service and others. Since 2001, CCJS members have been awarded research grants totalling over £10 million. Such projects sustain the established profile of the Centre as a pre-eminent research unit and ensure that our teaching is at the cutting edge of contemporary academic and policy debates.

The CCJS has an Advisory Board with more than twenty members who hold senior positions within local criminal justice and partner organisations, including the police, the judiciary, the probation service, prisons and the courts. Our strong links with the local criminal justice community bring valuable benefits for our students.

Course content

Compulsory modules studied throughout the year will introduce you to fundamental principles, theories, concepts and approaches in the fields of criminal law and criminal justice. You’ll also explore and examine the intricate and complex relationships and dynamics between criminological theory, research and practice, and the impact of criminal justice processes on individuals and social groups, often in the wider context of social and political change.

These modules will also enable you to hone your critical and analytical abilities and your legal research and writing skills, which you’ll be able to demonstrate in your dissertation – an independent piece of research on your chosen topic.

If you study with us, you’ll also benefit from our academic skills programme. This 10-week programme runs alongside your taught academic programme, and is specifically designed to meet the needs of home and international students in the School of Law. It allows you to refine and develop the academic and transferable skills to excel during your taught postgraduate programmes, as well as prepare for professional roles after graduation.

Our optional modules will give you the opportunity to gain specialist knowledge in topics that interest you. An indicative list of optional modules is provided below.

If you are a part-time student, you’ll take four compulsory modules in your first year. You’ll then take the compulsory dissertation module and your chosen one or two optional modules in your second year.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • Criminal Justice Processes 30 credits
  • Contemporary Criminological Theory and Approaches 30 credits
  • Dissertation Criminal Law/Criminal Justice 60 credits
  • Central Issues in Criminal Law 15 credits
  • Postgraduate Legal Research Skills 15 credits

Optional modules

  • Policing 1: The Nature of Contemporary Policing 15 credits
  • Policing 2: Accountability of Policing 15 credits
  • Security and Justice 30 credits
  • European Human Rights 15 credits
  • Cyberlaw: Regulation of Cyberspace 15 credits
  • Globalisation and Crime 15 credits
  • International Human Rights 30 credits
  • Global Justice 30 credits
  • Advanced Racism and Ethnicity Studies 30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Criminal Justice and Criminal Law LLM Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Criminal Justice and Criminal Law LLM Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

Our compulsory and optional modules are taught through a range of weekly seminars, lectures and workshops.

You’ll need to prepare for your seminars and lectures, undertaking any exercises that might be prescribed in advance. Independent study is integral to this programme – not just to prepare for classes but to develop research abilities and other critical skills.

The LLM Degrees Director will be your personal supervisor and will support you throughout the programme.

Assessment

You’ll be assessed using a variety of methods but for most modules you’ll be required to write an essay of up to 4,500 words at the end of each module. You’ll also be expected to write a final dissertation.

Career opportunities

This programme is particularly suited to those who wish to pursue a career in public service, the private sector, the voluntary sector, or any other arena where success is built upon higher-level skills and advanced knowledge of criminal justice, criminology and criminal law issues.

Recent graduates have gone on to do a PhD and work in academia and in research outside academia both in the UK and overseas. Other alumni hold senior positions in criminal justice organisations including police and probation services, the prison service, and youth justice services, as well as in the private and voluntary sector, both in the UK and abroad. Some graduates have been awarded promotions following successful completion of the programme.



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Security is a major contemporary preoccupation; criminal law and criminal justice are key responses. This postgraduate degree in criminal law and criminal justice offers an exciting, challenging and distinctive opportunity to undertake advanced study in these areas. Read more
Security is a major contemporary preoccupation; criminal law and criminal justice are key responses. This postgraduate degree in criminal law and criminal justice offers an exciting, challenging and distinctive opportunity to undertake advanced study in these areas.

The central focus of the programme is the interface between criminal law and criminal justice. It offers a theoretically informed and multidisciplinary course of study. In addition to studying the now established critical and theoretical perspectives relevant to criminal law and criminal justice, the programme also has a humanities focus, which offers an opportunity to explore and engage with cutting-edge scholarship in criminal law and criminal justice studies.

The programme is delivered by staff from the School of Law, the Institute of Criminal Policy Research at Birkbeck, and a range of visiting international scholars and practitioners.

Why study this course at Birkbeck?

Designed for students who are passionate about criminal law and criminal justice, who want to face new challenges, and who are interested in exploring and developing new critical perspectives on major contemporary national and international debates.
Flexible learning, studying in the evening, makes it particularly attractive to legal and criminal justice professionals and practitioners.
The School of Law is an internationally recognised centre for critical and interdisciplinary legal research. It provides an exciting and innovative environment for a wide range of research with a strong theoretical and policy focus. The School is the home of Birkbeck Law Press and publishes Law and Critique: The International Journal of Critical Legal Thought.
The School of Law is also the home of the Institute for Criminal Policy Research. Mike Hough and Paul Turnbull, its co-directors, lead a team of outstanding researchers. They bring a wealth of knowledge to the Master's programme, participating in core and specialist modules and providing dissertation supervision.
We use technology, such as electronic learning environments, to enhance teaching and learning. Birkbeck Library has an extensive teaching collection of books, journals and electronic resources in law and related disciplines, such as economics, politics and sociology. For example, it provides access to over 17,000 electronic journals, which are available online 24 hours a day. Find out more about our teaching and learning resources.
You can also take advantage of the rich research collections nearby, including those of the Institute of Advanced Legal Studies, Senate House Library, the British Library of Political and Economic Science (LSE Library) and the British Library.

Our research

Birkbeck is one of the world’s leading research-intensive institutions. Our cutting-edge scholarship informs public policy, achieves scientific advances, supports the economy, promotes culture and the arts, and makes a positive difference to society.

Birkbeck’s research excellence was confirmed in the 2014 Research Excellence Framework, which placed Birkbeck 30th in the UK for research, with 73% of our research rated world-leading or internationally excellent.

We are among the top 10 law schools in the UK and in the top 3 in London in the Times Higher Education 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF) rankings, while our research environment was judged conducive to producing research of the highest quality.

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This pathway draws upon Birmingham Law School’s (BLS) long standing research strengths in the areas of criminal law and criminal justice. Read more

This pathway draws upon Birmingham Law School’s (BLS) long standing research strengths in the areas of criminal law and criminal justice. Criminal Law is concerned with the most potentially invasive assertion of authority by the state: if you fail to comply with the law you will be punished. This pathway provides a holistic analysis of the criminal process through an analysis of the law, its philosophical underpinnings and its operation in practice.

Students can study to attain a broad overview of criminal justice processes or specialise in particular aspects as diverse as underpinning theories, policing, health aspects of criminal justice or indeed international aspects of law enforcement co-operation. Many modules have been created and are taught by leading scholars of the particular field and students benefit from close contact with researchers.

For those wishing to gain in-depth understanding of criminal law and criminal justice, this pathway offers the opportunity for broader or deeply specialised study within an innovative research-led teaching environment which benefits from BLS’s longstanding stature in this field and our staff’s dedication to ensuring it lives on; also in our LLM graduates.

Course details

At Birmingham Law School we research into topics as diverse as the ever widening net of criminalisation and (at least quasi-) criminal justice processes, to money saving tactics and their effect on the very philosophy which underpins our criminal law and justice system, the justice which emerges from it and effects.

These specialisations flow into the modules on this LLM which will allow you to study the five separate objectives used in enforcement of Criminal Law; retribution, deterrence, incapacitation, rehabilitation and restitution taught. All of these are subjects of great debate and controversy across all jurisdictions and students benefit from debating these informed by and in exchange with our broad range of experts.

Learning and teaching

Birmingham's LLM pathways have been designed to provide in-depth analysis of important legal topics. Modules are all 20 credits in value, comprising 10 two-hour seminars to enable students to develop significant expertise in each area of law.

Birmingham offers small-group teaching on the LLM, and students opting for popular modules with large groups of students will receive (where possible) additional teaching time: classes will be split into two separate seminar groups so as to provide an equal opportunity for class interaction compared to those in smaller modules. 

The LLM course last 12 months, running from September to September. All LLM pathways follow the same basic structure:

  • In part I of the course, you take six 20 credit modules: the range available depends on the pathway you decide to follow. Assessment in those modules, by essay or formal examination, is in May and June.
  • In part II of the course, you research and write a 15,000-word dissertation on a selected topic of law under the supervision of a member of staff. 

The LLM pathways enable you to develop expertise in a range of subjects. You will acquire a systematic understanding of these along with a critical appreciation of the problems that arise in these fields. You will be encouraged to demonstrate originality in the application of knowledge together with a practical understanding of how established research techniques are used to create and interpret knowledge.

Law School induction

At the start of the course there is a comprehensive welcome and induction programme designed to help you settle in and gain an understanding of the Birmingham LLM. You will familiarise yourself with the various ways in which we can support you throughout the year to ensure that your LLM course is an exciting and rewarding experience.

Students can register for modules before arrival as well as at the start of the academic year. As part of the induction process you will get the opportunity to learn more about the various modules available and make choices that correspond to your interests. 

Studying part-time

All the LLM pathways may be taken part-time and completed over a period of two years. This mode of study is particularly suitable for barristers and solicitors who wish to combine professional practice with university-level study, gaining CPD points in the process.

Classes for part-time students on the LLM will be scheduled between 9am-6pm and students will typically have between 2-4 hours of teaching each week. Fees are the same as for full-time study but are split over two years. 

International students

For students from outside the UK, there will be an opportunity during induction to familiarise themselves with the English legal system, as it forms the basis for the modules on offer. The English for International Students Unit provides a range of support in reading and writing academic English.



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This masters of law programme is designed to help students become experts in the areas of International Law that directly concern the human person - International Criminal Law & International Human Rights Law - whilst mastering the discipline of International Law of which they are part. Read more

This masters of law programme is designed to help students become experts in the areas of International Law that directly concern the human person - International Criminal Law & International Human Rights Law - whilst mastering the discipline of International Law of which they are part. In addition to the foundational courses in Legal Research Methods and Public International Law, students will be required to study International Criminal Law, International Human Rights Law and write a dissertation on a topic within the International Criminal Law or International Human Rights Law. The remaining courses can be chosen from a range of relevant options.

Through carefully designed course work and varied teaching approaches, students will acquire the intellectual open-ness, technical expertise and critical thinking abilities that are necessary for effectiveness in a globalising world. The programme will equip students to respond effectively to the wide range of intellectual and professional challenges facing those working on legal issues concerning the human person in International Law. The LLM in International Law (specialising in International Criminal Law & International Human Rights Law) will equip them to deal with both case work and policy making.



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The LLM (Criminal Law) is one of the named routes through our LLM programme and allows you to specialise and develop expertise in criminal law. Read more

The LLM (Criminal Law) is one of the named routes through our LLM programme and allows you to specialise and develop expertise in criminal law. The programme has been designed by a team of highly motivated academic staff at Teesside University who have particular research interests that have informed its content.

Course details

The programme gives you flexibility and autonomy to allow you to develop your own areas of interest within the area of criminal law. At the same time it distinguishes you in the eyes of employers in ways that show that you have specialised in a substantive and applied area of contemporary legal study relevant to criminal policy and practice.

What you study

Course structure

Core modules

  • Contemporary Legal Issues
  • Criminal Law
  • Dissertation
  • Legal Theory in Context

and one optional module

  • European Responses to Crime
  • International Law
  • Medical Law

Modules offered may vary.

Teaching

How you learn

The link between legal theory and practice is the central theme of the programme and is incorporated into the teaching through a blend of directed and student-centred learning to develop an understanding of methodology, practice and presentation. This is achieved through a combination of lectures, seminars, group work, debates, audio-visual presentations, guided reading and research exercises.

We want you to become an effective autonomous learner. The research and academic writing skills you develop in taught sessions enable you to prepare and contribute to seminars and group discussions, and to produce the required assessed work appropriate to postgraduate study. You are also encouraged to attend and participate in relevant research seminars offered by the research institutes of the University, particularly the Social Futures Institute (SoFI) in the School of Social Sciences & Law.

How you are assessed

Our assessments help you develop essential skills to work successfully at postgraduate level, as well as for continuing professional roles and lifelong learning. Your work is assessed in a variety of ways, including: 

  • individual presentations
  • peer review and assessment
  • research proposal 
  • reflective practice
  • written assignments
  • dissertation

Employability

By completing the course you will develop and have recognised knowledge and understanding of the theory and application of criminal law. You will also develop cognitive, intellectual, practical, professional and generic key skills and qualities, which have a directly beneficial effect on future employability, whether in the legal profession or in subject-related disciplines, including academia. You will be equipped to contribute to and inform policy-making decisions in your chosen sphere. 

A number of our previous students have published work in academic journals.



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This programme offers the ideal opportunity to study contemporary debates in both criminal law and criminal justice at an advanced level. Read more

This programme offers the ideal opportunity to study contemporary debates in both criminal law and criminal justice at an advanced level.

Our wide portfolio of courses will help you understand the key concepts and theories underpinning criminal law and criminal justice and how they operate in practice.

It is suitable for students who have studied law at undergraduate level and wish to develop their understanding of criminal justice in particular. It prepares you for further work in this area, whether professional or academic.

Programme structure

You must complete 180 credits of study – 60 credits are taken in the compulsory dissertation and the remaining 120 credits are taken in taught courses.

On these courses your studies will be led by members of the Law School academic community. You are expected to prepare in advance by reading the required materials and by reflecting on the issues to be discussed, and your participation in classes will be assessed.

For the dissertation you will have a supervisor from whom you can expect guidance and support, but the purpose of the dissertation is to allow you to independently design and conduct a piece of research and analysis. Courses are assessed primarily by way of essay and other written work, but oral presentations may also be required.

Please note that due to unforeseen circumstances or lack of demand for particular courses, we may not be able to run all courses as advertised come the start of the academic year.

Learning outcomes

Having completed the programme, students will emerge with an understanding of contemporary debates in criminal law theory and doctrine, the ability critically to analyse existing practice and new developments in this and related subjects, and advanced-level skills in legal research and analysis.



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This course is one of the few LLM courses with a specific focus on criminal law and procedure. Read more
This course is one of the few LLM courses with a specific focus on criminal law and procedure.

Course overview

Are you looking for a thorough knowledge of criminal law and procedure in order to support your career plans? Our specialist postgraduate legal training is particularly relevant for those who are looking for higher-level roles within the legal profession, police, probation service, prison service and HM Revenue and Customs. Our Master of Laws will add to your credentials in an area in which you already practise or are proposing to work. The Law Department at Sunderland is well-respected and was ranked 'internationally excellent' in the Latest Research Excellence Framework (REF).

You will undertake two core modules: ‘Criminal Law: Theory and Doctrine’ and ‘Law, Society and the State’. You will also choose a further two options that match your particular career ambitions and intellectual interests.

Your Masters dissertation is an opportunity to develop rigorous research skills and to explore a topic that you negotiate with your tutors. We provide expert supervision, drawing on our own research and the latest academic approaches and evidence base.

Our teaching methods include weekly three-hour workshops. You will be expected to prepare thoroughly, respond to new ideas and contribute to vibrant and thought-provoking sessions.

Course content

The course mixes taught elements with self-directed research. You can negotiate the topic of the dissertation to reflect your personal interests and career aspirations.

Modules on this course include:
-Advanced Legal Skills (30 Credits)
-International Perspective in Law (30 Credits)
-International Human Rights Law (30 Credits)
-Legal Research Project (30 Credits)
-Dissertation (60 Credits)

Teaching and assessment

We use a wide variety of teaching and learning methods which include weekly three-hour workshops. These are interactive and require a high level of preparation. The research project and dissertation are supervised by your tutor.

Compared to an undergraduate course, you will find that this Masters course requires a higher level of independent working.

Facilities & location

The University of Sunderland has excellent facilities for law students including a purpose-built mock courtroom and specialist collections of books and resources.

Course location
This course is based on the banks of the River Wear at the Sir Tom Cowie Campus at St Peter’s. It looks out over the River Wear and is less than a mile from the seaside.

Mock courtroom
We are one of the few universities in the UK to have a mock court that allows you to develop advocacy skills and apply legal knowledge in a realistic environment. The mock court is also used for mooting competitions. It’s one of the features that ranked Sunderland second in the UK for Course Satisfaction and Student Satisfaction with Teaching (source: The Guardian University Guide 2014).

Law Library
The Law Library, which is located within the St Peter’s Library, offers an excellent selection of books. There is also a range of electronic sources of information such as Lexis and West Law.

University Library Services
The University boasts a collection of more than 430,000 books with many more titles available through the inter-library loan service. There are nearly 9,000 journal titles, mostly in electronic format. Each year the University invests around £1 million in new resources.

IT provision
When it comes to IT provision you can take your pick from hundreds of PCs as well as Apple Macs in the David Goldman Informatics Centre and St Peter’s Library. There are also free WiFi zones throughout the campus. If you have any problems, just ask the friendly helpdesk team.

Learning environment
Sunderland offers a vibrant learning environment with an international dimension thanks to the presence of students from around the world. At the same time, the University is fully plugged into relevant professional organisations, with strong links and an exchange of ideas and people.

Employment & careers

This LLM course equips you with advanced skills and knowledge in a specialised area of law. As a result, you will have an important edge when applying for roles in the Crown Prosecution Service, police, and prison or probation services. Salaries of law graduates are among the highest of all graduates.

You will also be better equipped for applying for training contracts or pupillages if this is appropriate to your career stage. In addition, a Masters degree will enhance opportunities in academic roles or further study towards a PhD.

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Your programme of study. The General Law programme at Aberdeen is one of the best programmes in terms of scope and areas of interest you can choose to study at advanced level. Read more

Your programme of study

The General Law programme at Aberdeen is one of the best programmes in terms of scope and areas of interest you can choose to study at advanced level. If your first degree was in a specific area of law there is nothing preventing you from choosing another area of law completely or a complementary area. You could study environmental law areas such as oil and gas law, energy and environmental law, low carbon energy transition with further environmental regulation. If you are more interested in criminal law you could look at Criminology, the politics of human rights, humanitarian law.  If you are more interested in business you might choose international law, intellectual property law, world trade organisation or for business with a creative aspect you might think about specialist in cultural property issues or law for business and arts and museums law.  There are many possible mixes of these general areas of law you might want to explore. Employment possibilities are huge from this range of areas of law and include all notable areas to practise law and careers within the legal profession to welfare sectors such as employment, business, HR and finance.

Law careers

You may become a Barrister if you wish to represent people at High Court and Magistrates court to put legal argument forward for decision. You could start off as a legal executive to later qualify as a solicitor with further training or after a number of years experience you may wish to become a judge. If you want some work experience you could become a court usher. Other careers include a Paralegal. This role undertakes much of a lawyers role in drafting documents, meetings and contracts.  If you decide your law degree is useful for other areas you may look at Civil Service careers, become a politician, work in the police, city, or teach.

This programme is ideal if you want to be a generalist to an advanced level rather than a specialist in a specific area of law. You develop your analysis and research skills and you have the option of wide ranging courses to choose from which stretches your intellectual thinking capabilities in a top 10 School of Law (Complete University Guide 2018)

Courses listed for the programme

Semester 1

Compulsory

  • Critical Legal Thinking and Scholarship

Optional (4 courses 2 in Semester 1 and 2)

  • International Energy and Environmental Law
  • Oil and Minerals for Good
  • Low Carbon Energy Transition: Renewable Energy Law
  • International Law: A Time of Challenges
  • The Politics of Human Rights
  • Oil and Gas Law
  • International Commercial Arbitration
  • International Commercial Arbitration In the Asia Pacific
  • Private International Law: Concepts and Institutions
  • Issues in Criminal Justice
  • World Trade Organisation: Gatt
  • Comparative Contract Law for International Transactions
  • International Intellectual Property: Frameworks and Challenges
  • International Criminal Law
  • Copyright and Patents
  • Private International Law - Jurisdiction, Recognition and Enforcement

Semester 2

Optional

  • Cultural Property Issues: Law, Art and Museums
  • Principles of Environmental Regulation
  • Choice of Law for Business
  • International Humanitarian Law
  • Low Carbon Energy Transition: Nuclear Energy and Carbon Capture and Storage
  • Criminal Evidence and Proof
  • Criminal Law
  • The use of Force in International Law
  • Trade Marks and Brand Development
  • International Trade and Finance Law
  • Private International Law of Family Law
  • International Human Rights Law
  • Carriage of Goods By Sea
  • Oil and Gas Law: Taxation of Upstream
  • Downstream Energy Law
  • Commercialising Innovation and Law
  • Commercial Tax Law and Policy
  • International Investment Law and Arbitration in the Energy Sector

Semester 3

  • Dissertation

Find out more detail by visiting the programme web page

Why study at Aberdeen?

  • You are taught by a School of Law ranked 10th in the UK (The Complete University Guide 2018). The University has been teaching and researching law since the Middle Ages.
  • You develop skills which are vital to the legal profession in a highly personalised environment with high contact from your lecturers.
  • You get a great range of options which you can tailor to your own requirements and build upon your undergraduate degree and experience to widen your career options, and you can take your qualifications further with programmes such as International Arbitration and Dispute Resolution

Where you study

  • University of Aberdeen
  • 12 Months or 24 Months
  • Full Time or Part Time
  • January or September

Scholarships

View all funding options on our funding database via the programme page and the latest postgraduate opportunities

Living in Aberdeen

Find out more about:

Your Accommodation

Campus Facilities

Find out more about living in Aberdeen and living costs

You may be interested in:



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Criminal law and criminology lie at the heart of questions and debates on how we as a society should respond to crime. On this course you’ll study an exciting range of topics, covering theory, policy and practice. Read more
Criminal law and criminology lie at the heart of questions and debates on how we as a society should respond to crime. On this course you’ll study an exciting range of topics, covering theory, policy and practice.

Our research expertise informs our teaching on the LLM. You’ll be taught by lecturers who specialise in critical work in areas including:
-Criminal law theory
-Comparative criminal justice
-International crimes
-Financial crimes
-Human rights and criminal justice
-Youth justice
-Policing and restorative justice

Our course also draws on expertise from the Department of Sociology, which will enable you to develop an interdisciplinary perspective.

How will I study?

Our core modules give you the necessary theoretical, methodological and empirical foundations. They cover:
-Criminal law
-Criminal justice
-Criminology
-Research methods

Our options – from both law and criminology – are taught by specialist academics based on their areas of expertise.

Teaching methods include lectures, workshops and seminars. Assessment modes include essays and briefing papers as well as a 10,000-word dissertation.

Scholarships

Our aim is to ensure that every student who wants to study with us is able to despite financial barriers, so that we continue to attract talented and unique individuals.

Chancellor's International Scholarship (2017)
-25 scholarships of a 50% tuition fee waiver
-Application deadline: 1 May 2017

HESPAL Scholarship (Higher Education Scholarships Scheme for the Palestinian Territories) (2017)
-Two full fee waivers in conjuction with maintenance support from the British Council
-Application deadline: 1 January 2017

USA Friends Scholarships (2017)
-A scholarship of an amount equivalent to $10,000 for nationals or residents of the USA on a one year taught Masters degree course.
-Application deadline: 3 April 2017

Careers

You’ll gain practical abilities as well as critical and problem-solving skills valued in contemporary job markets.

You will be able to apply your analytical skills to a range of careers in legal practice and criminal justice administration as well as careers in the private and voluntary sectors.

The LLM can also provide a strong foundation for further academic study or a career in research.

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International criminal law is a dynamic, controversial and fast-moving field that increasingly touches on, and affects matters of, key international significance. Read more
International criminal law is a dynamic, controversial and fast-moving field that increasingly touches on, and affects matters of, key international significance.

At the core of the subject are legal institutions such as the International Criminal Court that have been established to realise the ideal of holding to account those responsible for offences such as war crimes and genocide.

Our LLM combines a study of the legal doctrine underpinning the investigation and prosecution of international crimes with a critical analysis of the political context in which such prosecutions are undertaken.

How will I study?

You’ll study two core modules in the autumn term and choose two options in the spring term. In the summer, you undertake supervised work on the LLM dissertation. You will be assessed through coursework, an unseen examination, essays and a dissertation.

Scholarships

Our aim is to ensure that every student who wants to study with us is able to despite financial barriers, so that we continue to attract talented and unique individuals.

Chancellor's International Scholarship (2017)
-25 scholarships of a 50% tuition fee waiver
-Application deadline: 1 May 2017

HESPAL Scholarship (Higher Education Scholarships Scheme for the Palestinian Territories) (2017)
-Two full fee waivers in conjuction with maintenance support from the British Council
-Application deadline: 1 January 2017

USA Friends Scholarships (2017)
-A scholarship of an amount equivalent to $10,000 for nationals or residents of the USA on a one year taught Masters degree course.
-Application deadline: 3 April 2017

Faculty

Law at Sussex has active research groups in its primary research fields, exploring legal conceptualisations of responsibility and issues of citizenship and governance.

These groups meet regularly for the presentation of work in progress, as reading groups, to host external speakers and to plan the organisation of research seminars, workshops and conferences.

Careers

This LLM is ideal if you want to work in any area of criminal law – from practising as a lawyer to policy review and reform – but particularly if you wish to pursue a career with an international angle.

Our graduates have progressed to work and research with human rights NGOs, in education, as legal professionals, with several working and interning at the international criminal tribunals in The Hague.

Several have also chosen to continue with doctoral-level study in the fields of human rights and international criminal law.

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This programme will provide you with an opportunity to explore and analyse global relationships between criminal laws and national security (ICLAS). Read more

This programme will provide you with an opportunity to explore and analyse global relationships between criminal laws and national security (ICLAS). With the rise in the threat to national and global security at unprecedented levels, the time to further study this area is now. You will study many aspects of international criminal law, for example, the balance that is struck between human rights and the threat of terrorism in the UK and internationally and the way in which differing jurisdictions tackle international organised crime.

If you are looking to work for international bodies such as the United Nations or the International Criminal Court, or you are looking to continue your studies within this fascinating field, then this course will be the ideal next move to help further develop your career.

Course content

This course will develop analytical, evaluative and research skills and provide students with a comprehensive understanding of the tensions between security and human rights that exist in the contemporary UK, European and international legal frameworks. In particular you will consider how effectively human rights standards are protected both from an EU and global perspective and the response to the threat of terror and international crime in different jurisdictions.

You will also have the opportunity to probe in detail an area of particular interest when you produce your dissertation. You will be supported by experienced lecturers who use a range of innovative teaching methods, which will enhance your overall studies.

To be eligible for the award of LLM International Criminal Law and Security, you must successfully gain 180 credits from the below compulsory modules. If you must successfully gain 120 credits from the below but not including the Dissertation you would be awarded a Postgraduate Diploma, if you gain 60 credits not include the Dissertation you would be awarded the Postgraduate Certificate.

Course modules (17/18)

-European Crime and Security

-International Organised Crime

-European and International Human Rights

-National Security, Terrorism and the Rule of Law

-Dissertation

-Diversity, Migration and the Law

Module information is quoted for 17/18 entry. Please note that modules run subject to student numbers and staff availability, any changes will be communicated to applicants accordingly.

Methods of Learning

The LLM is offered for full time study over 12 months. The course is also available part time and via distance learning.

You will typically study three or four modules in each semester. This is followed by the dissertation period of 18 weeks.

This course is also available through distance learning, as well as taught at the University of Northampton. The distance learning element of the course delivery will vary module-by-module but typically includes podcasts of lectures combined with weekly or fortnightly online reading, exercises and discussions using a range of platforms, including blogs and discussion boards.

Where appropriate, PowerPoint slides will be available online at the same time as the lecture podcast. The readings will be in the form of links to online documents, case reports, book extracts or similar and will be available through online systems. Formative assessment is carried out regularly so that you can ensure on a regular basis that you are at the right place in the course. You will be allocated a personal tutor and will be able to arrange live one-to-one tutorial sessions using Skype or Google Hangouts as necessary.

Assessments

Formal course assessment is centred on module essays and submission of a dissertation, although the precise method of assessment may vary across modules. In addition, students may be informally assessed in a number of different ways, including individual presentations.

Facilities and Special Features

-Strong staff expertise, with substantial teaching experience on both undergraduate and postgraduate courses.

-An enthusiastic teaching team providing a supportive atmosphere for research.

Careers

You will be provided with the skills and knowledge to work in, or continue your studies in modern warfare, security and terrorism. You could also expand your academic knowledge through PhD studies in your chosen field.



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LLB Law. Senior Status degree is ideal for non-law graduates outside the UK to gain a qualifying law degree in two years. . As a LLB Law (Senior Status Degree) student you will. Read more

LLB Law: Senior Status degree is ideal for non-law graduates outside the UK to gain a qualifying law degree in two years. 

As a LLB Law (Senior Status Degree) student you will:

  • Gain a sound grounding in the Law of England and Wales
  • Learn how to apply legal concepts in a practical environment
  • Gain transferable skills, including team working, communication, presentation, problem-solving, research and analytical skills

Key Features of the LLB Law (Senior Status Degree) 

  • Graduates achieve an LLB accredited Law degree
  • This course covers all the compulsory foundation modules required for a qualifying law degree

Choosing law will enable you to expand your intellectual skills in the context of a discipline which touches upon every aspect of human endeavour. As the degree progresses you will notice a marked improvement in your ability to manage large amounts of materials, to express yourself in an organised and convincing manner both in writing and orally, and to evaluate the strength of arguments you encounter. Not only will this give you a sense of personal satisfaction, but you will also have acquired skills which are highly relevant to a range of career options attracting competitive salaries.

Modules on the LLB Law (Senior Status Degree) Programme

Modules on the LLB Law (Senior Status Degree) may include:

Year 1

  • Contract Law 1
  • European Law 1
  • Public Law 1
  • Tort 1
  • Contract 2
  • European Law 2
  • Public Law 2
  • Tort Law 2
  • Family Law: Adult Relationships
  • Commercial Sales
  • Environmental Law 1 - Regulatory Law Approaches
  • Employment Law: Rights and Obligations
  • Medical Law
  • Human Rights Law
  • Human Rights & Social Justice
  • Planning Law
  • Family Law: Parents & Children
  • World Trade Law
  • Nature Conservation Law
  • Employment Law: Enforcing Rights
  • International Dispute Settlement
  • Foundations in Legal Practice
  • Media Law

Year 2

  • Criminal Law 1
  • Land Law 1
  • Equity and Trusts 1
  • Criminal Law 2
  • Equity and Trusts 2
  • Land Law 2
  • Family Law: Adult Relationships
  • Commercial Sales
  • Legal History of Wales
  • Environmental Law 1 - Regulatory Law Approaches
  • Planning Law
  • Employment Law: Rights and Obligations
  • Competition Law: Regulation of Agreements
  • Terrorism: The Legal Response
  • Criminal Evidence
  • Human Rights Law
  • Cybercrime
  • Human Rights & Social Justice
  • Medical Law
  • International Law - Principles and Procedures
  • Jurisprudence
  • Company Law: Incorporation, Constitution and Control
  • Sports Law and Liability
  • Legislation
  • Miscarriage of Justice Project
  • Clinical Legal Education
  • Family Law: Parents & Children
  • World Trade Law
  • Criminal Procedure and Sentencing
  • Nature Conservation Law
  • Employment Law: Enforcing Rights
  • Competition Law: Regulation of Dominance
  • Human rights-based research with children
  • Criminal Evidence Law and Psychology
  • Foundations in Legal Practice
  • Media Law
  • International Dispute Settlement
  • Company Law: Governance, Rights and Liquidation
  • Legal Issues in Sport
  • Multi-level Governance
  • Cymraeg y Gyfraith
  • Comparative Constitutional Law
  • Miscarriage of Justice Project
  • Clinical Legal Education
  • Street Law
  • Medical Law: Reproduction

Graduate Employability and Careers

The College of Law and Criminology takes a proactive approach to enhancing graduate employability. The College offers a range of local, national and international work placements, professional courses and the advice and support to help you develop the skills to achieve your ambitions.

Our Law graduates find careers in:

  • Advice Worker
  • Barrister
  • Barrister's Clerk
  • Chartered Accountant
  • Chartered Legal Executive
  • Civil Service
  • Company Secretary
  • Lecturer
  • Licensed Conveyancer
  • Patent Attorney
  • Police
  • Researcher
  • Solicitor
  • Stockbroker
  • Trading Standards Officer


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What does this master’s programme entail?. In this advanced master’s programme, you will gain a thorough understanding of the legislation that governs international relations in an increasingly complex global society. Read more

What does this master’s programme entail?

In this advanced master’s programme, you will gain a thorough understanding of the legislation that governs international relations in an increasingly complex global society. You will learn in-depth about a wide range of aspects that affect our world, in addition to getting the opportunity to specialise your area of study. Through focused seminars and workshops, you will be challenged to develop your own views on the role and functioning of public international law.

For this programme, you will choose one of the following specialisations:

To view the full programme outline, please choose the link to one of the specialisations.

Professional skills

During the programme, you will develop the skills to:

  • thoroughly analyse and interpret legal sources, literature and cases
  • research and formulate an independent opinion on international legal questions
  • clearly present your findings both orally and in writing to legal specialists as well as non-lawyers
  • actively participate in academic debate
  • apply this advanced academic knowledge of public international law in a professional context

Is Public International Law the right programme for you?

The Public International Law programme is a good fit for you if you have a sincere interest in the field and:

  • you are a qualified lawyer who would like to enhance your career prospects
  • you are an excellent student who has completed your legal studies in your home country with sufficient knowledge of Public International Law or
  • you have professional experience in the field

The programme caters to those who are working in or would like to pursue a career in international organisations, governmental institutions, international non-governmental organisations or in academia. You can follow the programme full-time for one year or part-time for two years.

Courses

Core courses

Specialisation courses: International Criminal Law 

Specialisation courses: Peace, Justice and Development 

Please select one of the specialisations to view the full prospectus and a more detailed programme description.

Specialisations



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