• Xi’an Jiaotong-Liverpool University Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Glasgow Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Leeds Featured Masters Courses
  • University of York Featured Masters Courses
  • Leeds Beckett University Featured Masters Courses
  • Swansea University Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Edinburgh Featured Masters Courses
  • Regent’s University London Featured Masters Courses
De Montfort University Featured Masters Courses
University of Greenwich Featured Masters Courses
Southampton Solent University Featured Masters Courses
University of Leeds Featured Masters Courses
University of London International Programmes Featured Masters Courses
"criminal" AND "behaviour…×
0 miles

Masters Degrees (Criminal Behaviour)

  • "criminal" AND "behaviour" ×
  • clear all
Showing 1 to 15 of 78
Order by 
The MSc Forensic Psychology is the only BPS accredited programme in Wales, offering a unique opportunity for students to study Forensic Psychology in Wales. Read more

Course Overview

The MSc Forensic Psychology is the only BPS accredited programme in Wales, offering a unique opportunity for students to study Forensic Psychology in Wales. Working collaboratively with NOMS Cymru (National Offender Management Services, Wales), helps keep the programme up to date with strategy development and policy decisions. Regular contributions from practitioners within the Principality enable students to understand more about services within Wales and their impact on our society locally. We also have many national contributors who share their extensive knowledge and experience.​

Due to the popularity of this programme you should submit your application at the earliest opportunity, and at the very latest by 29th July. ​

See the website https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/health/courses/Pages/Forensic-Psychology---MSc-.aspx

​Course Content​​

Forensic Psychology is the practice and application of psychological research relevant to crime, policing, the courts, the criminal and civil justice system, offenders, prison, secure settings, offender management, health and academic settings as well as private practice.

It looks at the role of environmental, psychosocial, and socio-cultural factors that may contribute to crime or its prevention. The primary aim of Forensic Psychology as an academic discipline is to develop understanding of the processes underlying criminal behaviour and for this improved understanding to impact on the effective management and rehabilitation of different groups of offenders in all settings within the criminal justice system.

The first aim of the programme is to provide students with a thorough and critical academic grounding in the evidence relating to environmental, cultural, cognitive and biological factors that may contribute to a wide variety of forms of offending. The programme will encourage students to consider the role and limitations of causal explanations for offending in the development of offender treatments, services and policy.

The second aim of the programme is to introduce students to the basic professional competencies for working in the many settings where forensic psychology is practiced, including skills related to inter-disciplinary working, risk assessment, ethics, continuing professional development, report writing and differences in practice when working with offenders, victims, the courts and the police.

The programme aims to produce Masters degree graduates with the ability to understand the limitations of the conceptual underpinnings of interventions and assessments used in forensic psychology and who are able therefore to engage in critical evaluation of the evidence base upon which their own practice will eventually be based. The programme will specifically avoid providing any formal supervised practice. Its aim is to produce reflective scientist-practitioners who will be ready to engage with the next stage of training (i.e. BPS Stage 2 or HCPC route) towards registration as a Forensic Psychologist with the Health and Care Professions Council.

Students will complete the following taught modules and will also be required to conduct a novel, supervised research dissertation with participants preferably drawn from a forensic setting:

Research Methods and Design (30 credits)
The aim of this module is to extend students knowledge and experience of quantitative and qualitative research methods. Topics covered include: randomised control trials, ANOVA, ANCOVA, MANOVA, Power analysis, Regression, Non parametric methods, interviews, discourse analysis, grounded theory, reflective analysis and psychometric evaluation.

Forensic Mental Health (20 credits)
This module aims to provide students with a critical examination of the relationship between mental illness, personality disorder, learning disability and criminal behaviour. The module will encourage students to view the mental health needs of offenders in the broadest possible context and to appreciate the inter-disciplinary nature of services available to mentally disordered offenders, difficulties in accessing those services and problems for custodial adjustment presented by specific psychiatric diagnoses

Professional Practice and Offender Management (20 credits)
The focus of this module is the professional practice of forensic psychology. The module builds on the groundwork laid by earlier modules and covers professional skills and the types of interventions that a practicing forensic psychologist may engage in. The topics covered by this module include ethics, report writing, working with other agencies, and working with offenders and victims.

Psychological Assessments and Interventions (20 credits)
This module covers psychology as it may be applied to the reduction of re-offending by convicted criminals. The central focus of the module is the 'what works' literature. A range of topics will be covered demonstrating the broad application of psychology to offender rehabilitation in the Criminal Justice System, and within Wales particularly. These topics include: (1) Offender assessment: risk, need and protective factors (2) factors affecting response to treatment; (3) ethical issues of compulsory treatment; and (4) interventions for a range of offending behaviours.

Theories of Criminal Behaviour (10 credits)
The module aims to examine the contribution made by biological, psychodynamic, evolutionary, cognitive and socio-cultural perspectives to our understanding of the aetiology of criminal behaviour. It will explore psychological theories of a variety of offending behaviours such as: violence, aggression, domestic abuse, sex offending, vehicle crime, fire setting as well as gangs and gangs membership.

Legal Psychology (10 credits)
This module covers psychology as it may be applied to the law, and the central focus of the module is evidence. A range of topics will be covered, demonstrating the broad application of psychology within the legal system. These topics include the interviewing of suspects and witnesses, vulnerable victims, offender profiling and the detection of deception.

Addiction and Psychological Vulnerabilities (10 credits)
This module informs students about different factors that may contribute to psychological vulnerability in offenders and victims. A variety of topics will be covered, including issues around the concept of addictive behaviours, vulnerability and the protection of vulnerable adults, including factors which may increase vulnerability to offending and victimisation.

Learning & Teaching​

​Teaching on the MSc Forensic Psychology Programme is predominantly conducted in small groups and adopts an interactive approach. The Research Methods and Design module and the Dissertation workshops are the only part of the programme which is taught in a larger group of around 40 to 50 students as opposed to between 10 and 20 students on the core modules. As a result teaching involves a range of discussions, activities, evaluations of papers, case studies and role play exercises. The focus within the programme is on both content and key skills to develop specialists in the field of forensic psychology with flexible generic skills. These experiences also help to foster student development and confidence as independent life-long learners.

Student learning is promoted through a variety of learning and teaching methods. These include: lectures, workshops, online learning through the virtual learning environment, Moodle, as well as self directed learning. Each student will have an allocated personal tutor to support them through their period of study.

As this programme is accredited by the BPS, there is a requirement for students to attend at least 80% of the taught sessions for the programme.

Assessment

The MSc is assessed by a range of different coursework assignments – e.g. presentations, reports, essays, reflective reports, academic posters, research proposal. There are no examinations.

Employability & Careers​

An MSc in Forensic Psychology is the first step (stage one) in gaining Chartered Psychologist status with the British Psychological Society (BPS) and Registered Practitioner status with the Health and Care Professionals Council (HCPC). The MSc in Forensic Psychology will provide the knowledge base and applied research skills that will provide the foundation for stage two of the chartered process that requires a minimum of two years of full-time supervised practice with an appropriate client group.

Find information on Scholarships here https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/scholarships

Find out how to apply here https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/howtoapply

Read less
The MA Criminal Justice at Liverpool John Moores University is a stand alone qualification designed to enhance your career prospects in roles linked to criminal justice agencies, the probation service, social science departments, the police and community based correction/treatment agencies. Read more
The MA Criminal Justice at Liverpool John Moores University is a stand alone qualification designed to enhance your career prospects in roles linked to criminal justice agencies, the probation service, social science departments, the police and community based correction/treatment agencies.

•Course available full time (1 year) and part time (2 years)
•Teaching from research-active staff and local criminal justice professionals ensures that you will critically engage with the theory, policy, and practice of the institutions and agencies of criminal justice
•Extensive range of module options, including an MA International Criminal Justice pathway
•Our focus on research training will equip you with the key transferable skills required to undertake original, empirical research
•Opportunities for careers involving criminal justice agencies, probation services, the police, academic departments and community based correction and treatment agencies

The Masters in Criminal Justice offers the opportunity for students, practitioners, and criminal justice professionals to critically engage with a broad range of issues that impact upon the effectiveness and integrity of the workings of the criminal justice system.

Through exploring a series of theoretical and policy-orientated debates relevant to the delivery of contemporary crime control and management, and assessing their cultural, social and symbolic consequences, the course helps you to develop a comprehensive and critically aware understanding of the manufacture and delivery of criminal justice policy.


During the programme you will evaluate discriminatory practice in the criminal justice process and the causes of miscarriages of justice. Your evaluations will be informed by a critical understanding of sources of data and research methodologies and, through option modules, you will develop an in-depth knowledge of particular issues relating to criminal justice in England, Wales and elsewhere.

What you will study on this degree

Please see guidance below on core and option modules for further information on what you will study.

Contemporary Issues in Criminal Justice

The module aims to develop advanced knowledge and critical understanding of specific issues relating to the principles and practice of criminal justice in England and Wales

Research Dissertation

Provides you with an opportunity to demonstrate your knowledge of a specific criminal justice issue, by constructing a sustained and coherent assignment and showing a critical ability to apply appropriate research methods

Researching Crime and Criminal Justice

Prepares you for the compulsory dissertation by developing an advanced understanding of the politics and practice of crime and criminal justice research

The following option modules are typically offered:

Sex, Crime and Society

Develops your knowledge and understanding of the principles, policies and doctrines relating to the criminalisation and de-criminalisation of sexual, and sexually-related behaviour within society

Drugs, Alcohol and Criminal Justice

Provides a broad critical understanding of the different paradigms and perspectives on substance (mis)use and relevant policy in relation to crime and criminal justice

The Police, Policing, and Governance of Security

Explores the complex and dynamic relationship between policing services/agents and members of the diversity of publics these organisations serve

Crime, Power and Victimisation

Considers various definitions of crime and the relationship between these and the various sources of power within society
Delivering Rehabilitation

Encourages you to critically evaluate, at an adavnced level, the role and function of the prison and probation services in relation to the delivery of state punishment and rehabiliation

Youth Justice

Develops an analytical approach to understanding the treatment and experiences of young people within, and at the hands of, the criminal justice system

The United Nations, International Security and Global Justice

Enables you to understand and critically evaluate the effectivness of the United Nations as an actor capable of contributing to international security and global justice

Contemporary Issues in International Criminal Justice

Develop advanced knowledge and critical understanding of the theoretical concepts that underpin policy and practice with regard to International Criminal Jutsice and the issues in dealing with transnational crime

Further guidance on modules

The information listed in the section entitled 'What you will study' is an overview of the academic content of the programme that will take the form of either core or option modules. Modules are designated as core or option in accordance with professional body requirements and internal Academic Framework review, so may be subject to change. Students will be required to undertake modules that the University designates as core and will have a choice of designated option modules. Additionally, option modules may be offered subject to meeting minimum student numbers.

Academic Framework reviews are conducted by LJMU from time to time to ensure that academic standards continue to be maintained.

Please email if you require further guidance or clarification.

Read less
This flexible Forensic Mental Health course is designed for students with a clinical or academic interest in the complex relationship between mental disorders and criminal behaviour. Read more
This flexible Forensic Mental Health course is designed for students with a clinical or academic interest in the complex relationship between mental disorders and criminal behaviour. You will be taught by a multi-disciplinary team of clinical academics. The programme constitutes an ideal first step towards clinical psychology training or a PhD.

Come along to our Postgraduate Open Evening in Psychology, Mental Health and Neuroscience on Wed 1 Feb to discuss your study options with world-leaders in the field. Book your place now https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/postgraduate-taught-open-evening-health-subjects-tickets-29980971894

Key benefits

- Focus on the neuroscientific understanding of the development of prosocial and antisocial behaviours across the lifespan.
- Excellent links with clinical services.
- Strong emphasis on evidence-based practice and developing the critical skills to evaluate new research.

Visit the website: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/forensic-mental-health-msc-pg-dip.aspx

Course detail

- Description -

This course aims to equip you with the knowledge and advanced skills necessary for a career that will involve clinical work and/or research with mentally disordered offenders. There is an emphasis on the clinical relevance of research findings. You will develop the necessary skills to assess and manage risk of antisocial and criminal behaviour as well as establish, manage and evaluate programmes for reducing such behaviour.

You will be required to choose one of twopathways. This means that the combination of modules chosen will lead to a qualification which reflects your chosen focus of study. There are specific entry criteria for each pathway.

The two pathways are:

- Clinical Forensic Psychology (full-time only)
- Forensic Mental Health Research

Students on the Clinical Forensic Psychology pathway will undertake a 75-day clinical forensic placement working at the level of an assistant clinical psychologist and complete a module on Forensic Psychology Practice.

Students on the Forensic Mental Health Research pathway will complete additional research methods and statistics training and may benefit from a voluntary clinical placement.

- Course purpose -

This programme is designed to develop academic and clinical skills specific to the assessment and treatment of persons with mental disorders who engage in criminal behaviour. You will study alongside students from a wide range of professional and academic disciplines from all over the world.

- Course format and assessment -

You will be taught through a mix of lectures, seminars and tutorials. In order to get the most out of the course students, should expect to devote at least one day per week to their studies (part-time students) or 2-3days a week (full-time students)

Career prospects

- PhD programmes
- Forensic or clinical psychology training
- Research assistants or assistant psychologists.

How to apply: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/taught-courses.aspx

About Postgraduate Study at King’s College London:

To study for a postgraduate degree at King’s College London is to study at the city’s most central university and at one of the top 20 universities worldwide (2015/16 QS World Rankings). Graduates will benefit from close connections with the UK’s professional, political, legal, commercial, scientific and cultural life, while the excellent reputation of our MA and MRes programmes ensures our postgraduate alumni are highly sought after by some of the world’s most prestigious employers. We provide graduates with skills that are highly valued in business, government, academia and the professions.

Scholarships & Funding:

All current PGT offer-holders and new PGT applicants are welcome to apply for the scholarships. For more information and to learn how to apply visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/ioppn/study/prospective-students/Masters-Scholarships.aspx

Free language tuition with the Modern Language Centre:

If you are studying for any postgraduate taught degree at King’s you can take a module from a choice of over 25 languages without any additional cost. Visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/mlc

Read less
The Forensic Psychology and Crime MSc provides part-time students with a unique opportunity to study forensic psychology at a distance, whilst also being able to continue in employment. Read more
The Forensic Psychology and Crime MSc provides part-time students with a unique opportunity to study forensic psychology at a distance, whilst also being able to continue in employment.

The course is underpinned throughout by reflection and critical evaluation of theoretical concepts, research evidence and best practice to ensure the development of a sound, effective and reasoned approach in professional forensic psychological practice. The programme is accredited by the British Psychological Society (BPS) as fulfilling the Stage 1 requirements towards becoming a Chartered Psychologist and obtaining Full Membership of the Division of Forensic Psychology with the British Psychological Society. Graduates of the programme who go on to successfully complete Stage 2 of the Qualification in Forensic Psychology will be eligible to apply for registration with the UK Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) as a Forensic Psychologist.

WHY CHOOSE THIS COURSE?

-A unique opportunity to study the BPS accredited Forensic Psychology and Crime MSc through blended learning
-Interactive and participative teaching supported through the use of Coventry University’s extensive online learning resources
-A range of assessment methods, including essays, practical reports, literature reviews, practice-based reports, oral presentations and examinations
-Development of important transferable skills for forensic practice, for example in considering ethical dilemmas, reflective practice and writing papers in formats suitable for publication in peer-reviewed journals

WHAT WILL I LEARN?

You will complete the nine modules listed below. In your first year, you will complete sixty credits studying a range of topics such as theoretical explanations of criminal behaviour, violent crime, and responses to crime, as well as research methods.

The second year includes topics providing an overview of key aspects of forensic practice, risk assessment and risk management. Two modules explore the legal process and the use of psychology in forensic/legal decision making, one of which is taught by Coventry Law School. In the third year, you will complete your dissertation.

HOW WILL THIS COURSE BE TAUGHT?

The course is delivered by blended learning methods – a mix of online and classroom-based learning – and as such you will only pay for the modules you take each year. Blended learning incorporates the use of a well-established online learning system, an interactive, informed and participative teaching approach and residential schools.

Indicative course content
-Psychological Explanations of Criminal Behaviour (M71PY)
-Research Methods in Psychology (M72PY)
-Violent Crime (M73PY)
-Criminal and Civil Justice Responses to Crime (M74PY)
-Psychology in Forensic Decision Making (M75PY)
-Practice and Contemporary Developments in Forensic Psychology (M76PY)
-Risk Assessment and Offender Programmes (M77PY)
-Introduction to the English Legal System (M49CLS)
-Dissertation in Forensic Psychology (M114PY)

Read less
Forensic psychology is an expanding field. It interfaces with other disciplines such as clinical, social and cognitive psychology, as well as criminology and law in order to address issues of major concern to the justice system, organisations, individuals and society. Read more

Why take this course?

Forensic psychology is an expanding field. It interfaces with other disciplines such as clinical, social and cognitive psychology, as well as criminology and law in order to address issues of major concern to the justice system, organisations, individuals and society.

This is a unique course informed by research at the forefront of the field, with many opportunities to get involved with ongoing projects within the Department.

Applications for this course close 15 January 2016 to be considered for interview on 23 or 25 February and close 15 February 2016 to be considered for interview on 22 and 24 March.

What will I experience?

On this course you can:

Be taught by the largest group of actively researching academics at the cutting edge of forensic psychology research in the UK
Put your investigative techniques to the test in our Forensic Interviewing Suite
Benefit from our connections with a variety of custodial establishments including adult male and women's prisons, young offenders' institutions and secure hospitals

What opportunities might it lead to?

Accredited by the BPS, our Master’s degree is recognised as providing an important step towards eventual chartered status as a forensic psychologist. It aims to provide you with a systematic knowledge and understanding of forensic psychology, in accordance with the academic requirements of the Division of Forensic Psychology (DFP), the British Psychological Society (BPS) for accredited courses and eventual progression to autonomous practice.

Here are some routes our graduates have pursued:

Working in prisons
Probation work
The police force
Social work
Health services
The courts
Academia
Private practice

Module Details

The course content is structured to reflect developments and priorities in the field of forensic psychology and is kept under constant review to keep it up-to-date.

Here are the units you will study:

Theory into Practice: Foundations of Professional Competence in Forensic Psychology: This unit provides a foundation for working as a scientist-practitioner. From an early introduction to concepts of reflective practice, personal development and core skills relevant to completing the course, it moves to encouraging an awareness of factors involved in criminal behaviour and their implications. The focus is on the application and development of skills in analysis and less on the learning of facts and theories. In the second part of the unit, the focus moves to tasks and challenges that forensic psychologists encounter in applied settings. Some, such as the design and evaluation of training for other personnel or consultancy skills, are of major relevance to Stage 2 of the system for progression to chartered status that usually follows the course. Others such as countering manipulation, stress and managing aggression can be crucial to survival as well as effectiveness as a practitioner.

Assessment and Interventions with Offenders: This unit is concerned with providing an understanding of the theoretical and empirical underpinnings, contents and methods of current and widely-used approaches to assessment (including risk assessment) and interventions with offenders. These approaches are linked and provide a framework for the organisation and evaluation of information, particularly in relation to efficient, useful and accurate formulation and what works in the delivery of interventions. It will build upon knowledge of factors related to criminal behaviour with a focus on effective approaches and context-related factors in the understanding and management of offenders in a variety of settings.

Empirical Research Project for Forensic Psychology: For this unit you will undertake a complete piece of empirical research in an area of forensic psychology that you find particularly interesting. It provides an opportunity to develop and integrate a range of skills and areas of knowledge including creative formulations, problem-solving, ethics, handling interpersonal demands, use of IT and analytical techniques, and writing to a publishable standard.

Investigative Psychology and the Legal Process: This focuses on the contribution made by psychology in the context of forensic investigations and the role of psychologists in criminal and civil law proceedings. It is concerned with the application of psychological research and theory in an effort to critique (and improve) practice in criminal and civil justice systems as an applied context for testing the validity and efficacy of psychological theories and innovative practice derived from these theories. Topics cover relevant procedural information to ensure you appreciate investigative, judicial and custodial processes, and the role of psychologists within these frameworks. Theory and research relevant to applied cognitive and social psychology are presented to inform an understanding of eyewitness recall and recognition memory (and memory errors), effective protocols for testing/probing witness memory, detecting deception and juror decision making.

Research Methods and Data Analysis: This unit is designed to provide a familiarity with psychological research methods and data analysis commensurate with understanding and conducting research at the postgraduate and professional level. Specific methodologies and issues of relevance to specific research areas are addressed within a perspective that emphasises creative problem-solving.

Programme Assessment

We give high priority to integrating our research activities with your teaching programme. This ensures that you learn about the most important and current issues in forensic psychology that effect real-life practice.

Teaching usually takes the form of lectures and small tutorial groups, together with practical sessions in our labs and studios.

We assess you in a variety of ways throughout the course. Here’s how:

Written examinations
Briefing reports and essays
Oral presentations
The giving of expert testimony
A research dissertation

Student Destinations

The work of forensic psychologists is varied. Depending on where practitioners work, it can range from criminal investigations to organisational change, from work with offenders to work with staff who work with offenders, and from matters of civil justice such as child access to operational emergencies such as hostage incidents.

Accredited by the BPS, our Master’s degree is recognised as providing the next important step towards eventual chartered status as a forensic psychologist. Following successful completion of this course, you will usually go on to do a minimum of two years full-time supervised practice in an employment setting.

Roles our graduates have taken on include:

Clinical psychologist
Forensic psychologist
Educational psychologist
Counsellor
Health planning analyst

Read less
This course has been designed to meet the significant growth in the job market for forensic psychologists. Read more
This course has been designed to meet the significant growth in the job market for forensic psychologists. It draws on the University's established expertise in criminology and psychology, and includes the opportunity to undertake a work placement, enabling you to put what you have learnt into practice and gain valuable skills and experience. On successful completion, you will be able to develop your career as a forensic psychologist in, for example, prison settings, probation, crime analysis units and academia.

This course is accredited by the British Psychological Society (BPS).

You can also study the joint degree of Criminology with Forensic Psychology MA.

Key features
-This course is accredited by the Forensic Psychology Division of the British Psychological Society (BPS) as an accredited Stage 1 masters programme.
-A minimum of 15 weeks will be spent on an organised placement at a number of settings including high and medium security hospitals and in-reach prison teams.
-The course content is underpinned by research, and modules will be informed by the latest research in the subject area, keeping it up to date with the latest developments.
-You will benefit from the close links our staff have with forensic settings located in the southwest of London and the surrounding area.

What will you study?

Forensic psychology is concerned with the psychological issues associated with criminal behaviour and the treatment of those who have committed offences. It refers to the investigation of deception fraud, crime and the psychological aspects of legal and judicial process. You will learn how psychology is applied in various forensic settings and will be introduced to the role of the forensic psychologist in practice. You will also gain knowledge of the legal aspects of forensic psychology, such as considerations for courts and sentencing, and will examine the aetiology of criminal behaviour in depth.

Assessment

A variety of assessment methods is employed on this course, including essays, reports, presentations, evaluation of placement activities, laboratory reports and a dissertation.

Course structure

Please note that this is an indicative list of modules and is not intended as a definitive list.

Core modules
-Antisocial behaviours across the lifespan; Treatment and intervention
-Applications of Forensic Psychology
-Investigative and Legal Processes in Forensic Psychology
-Psychology Dissertation
-Research Design and Analysis

Optional modules to be confirmed.

Read less
The degree includes components necessary to provide the areas of subject-specific expertise and research methods training identified by the ESRC as essential for recognition for the ‘1 + 3’ (MA and PhD) programme. Read more
The degree includes components necessary to provide the areas of subject-specific expertise and research methods training identified by the ESRC as essential for recognition for the ‘1 + 3’ (MA and PhD) programme.

The full-time MA starts in October and continues in three consecutive terms over 12 months. The part-time MA takes place over 24 months with candidates taking an equal balance of credits in each year of study.

You will be required to complete 180 credits for the award of an MA. The programme is comprised of the following modules.

The degree follows a logical progression in that ‘Perspectives on Social Research’ and ‘Statistical Exploration and Reasoning’ are taught in the first term. 'Research Design and Process' is also taught in the first term to help students develop a research proposal for dissertation. These modules provide introductions to the specific areas and are intended to provide a foundation for later work. In term two, ‘Quantitative Research Methods in the Social Sciences’,‘Qualitative Research Methods in the Social Sciences’ and 'Policy Related and Evaluation Research' are taught. These modules develop the work introduced in the first term.

The subject specific module – Theorising Crime and Criminal Justice - run through terms one and two and provide the ‘spine’ to the programme, bringing together issues identified in other modules. These modules also specifically relate more generic issues arising in research to subject-specific questions.

Breadth

The programme is broadly based, covering conceptual and practical underpinnings and implications of research, and covering various research techniques and the rationale behind them. It enable students to develop essential skills in both quantitative and qualitative work and to apply those skills to specific criminological issues.

Depth

The programme covers issues in depth, as appropriate to a Master’s programme. The depth at which students learn progressively increases, with the dissertation providing an opportunity for an in-depth piece of scholarly work at an advanced level.

These are the knowledge and skills students who complete their training in research methods are expected to have acquired and to be able to apply:
-Comprehension of principles of research design and strategy, including an understanding of how to formulate researchable problems and an appreciation of alternative approaches to research problems.
-Competence in understanding, and applying appropriately in a specific subject area, a range of research methods and tools, including essential qualitative and quantitative techniques.
-Capabilities for managing research, including managing data, and conducting and disseminating research in such a way that is consistent with both professional practice and principles of research ethics and risk assessment.

In addition, students are expected to have acquired or further developed a range of transferable employment-related key skills:
-The ability to evaluate and synthesise information obtained from a variety of sources (written, electronic, oral, visual); to communicate relevant information in a variety of ways and to select the most appropriate means of communication relative to the specific task. Students will also be able to communicate their own formulations in a clear and accessible way; they will be able to respond effectively to others and to reflect on and monitor the use of their communication skills.
-The ability to read and interpret complex statistical tables, graphs and charts; to organize, classify and interpret numerical data; to make inferences from sets of data; to design a piece of research using advanced techniques of data analysis; and an appreciation of the scope and applicability of numerical data.
-Competence in using information technology including the ability to word-process, to use at least one quantitative and one qualitative computer software package effectively; to use effective information storage and retrieval; and to use web-based resources.
-The ability to plan work with others, to take a lead role in group work when required, to establish good working relationships with peers, to monitor and reflect on group work (including the student’s own group-work skills) and to take account of external feedback on contributions to group work, and on the group work process as a whole.
-Effective time-management, working to prescribed deadlines.
-The ability to engage in different forms of learning, to seek and to use feedback from both peers and academic staff, and to monitor and critically reflect on the learning process.

Subject-specific learning outcomes based on their ‘spine’ module as follows:
-An advanced knowledge of the relative strengths and weaknesses of core criminology concepts and principles – the social problem of crime and the politics and practice of criminal justice ; the construction and deconstruction of what constitutes crime.
-A clear, systematic and advanced level of understanding criminological theories and their application to criminal behaviour, criminal justice and crime control.
-An advanced understanding of key ideological and theoretical perspectives in criminology – e.g. the shift from social theories of ‘deviance’ to struggles for ‘social justice’.
-An advanced knowledge of key phenomena in criminological analysis, particularly the significance of criminological analysis and contemporary national and international issues that are redefining the study of crime, criminal behaviour and crime control.
-An advanced knowledge of the functions and practices of criminal justice as well as the relationship of these practices to political concerns of crime, disorder and security.

An appreciation of how particular criminal justice policies may be experienced by different social groups.

Course modules

Typical modules outlined below are those that were available to students studying this programme in previous years.
-Perspectives on Social Research (15 Credits)
-Statistical Exploration and Reasoning (15 Credits)
-Research Design and Process (15 credits)
-Qualitative Research Methods in Social Science (15 credits)
-Quantitative Research Methods in Social Science (15 credits)
-Theorising Crime and Criminal Justice (30 credits)
-Policy Related and Evaluation Research (15 credits)
-Dissertation (60 Credits)

Read less
Whether you're already involved in the criminal justice sector, or looking to get started within it, our course will be of great benefit to your interests. Read more
Whether you're already involved in the criminal justice sector, or looking to get started within it, our course will be of great benefit to your interests. We explore the interdisciplinary nature of analysing criminal activity and behaviour at a local and global level. You'll enhance your ability to identify, analyse and challenge current discourses on crime and crime control.

We will help you to develop and practice advanced analytical skills, learning to understand and evaluate crime and justice policy and practice. You can also hone your project management skills by planning and undertaking a research project selecting appropriate methods. By taking this course, you'll improve your ability to explain, justify and defend a course of action, making you highly valued by employers within this sector. Enhance your job opportunities within the criminal justice sector by improving on your skills through our postgraduate programme!

Course outline

We seek to critically analyse and address core issues in Criminology and Criminal Justice, focusing on the nature of crime and the challenged created for contemporary society and criminal justice practitioners. This makes us ideal for criminal justice practitioners looking to enhance their professional development.

Researching Crime and Criminal Justice will provide the methods and tools necessary to undertake a research project. A dissertation or practitioner research will complete the programme.

Graduate destinations

You'll be able to enter careers in the criminal justice system either in the public, private or third sector organisations. If you're already working in this area, you can benefit from enhanced career opportunities and continued professional development.

Read less
Whether you're already involved in the criminal justice sector, or looking to get started within it, our course will be of great benefit to your interests. Read more
Whether you're already involved in the criminal justice sector, or looking to get started within it, our course will be of great benefit to your interests. We explore the interdisciplinary nature of analysing criminal activity and behaviour at a local and global level. You'll enhance your ability to identify, analyse and challenge current discourses on crime and crime control.

We will help you to develop and practice advanced analytical skills, learning to understand and evaluate crime and justice policy and practice. You can also hone your project management skills by planning and undertaking a research project selecting appropriate methods. By taking this course, you'll improve your ability to explain, justify and defend a course of action, making you highly valued by employers within this sector. Enhance your job opportunities within the criminal justice sector by improving on your skills through our postgraduate programme!

Course outline

We seek to critically analyse and address core issues in Criminology and Criminal Justice, focusing on the nature of crime and the challenged created for contemporary society and criminal justice practitioners. This makes us ideal for criminal justice practitioners looking to enhance their professional development.

Researching Crime and Criminal Justice will provide the methods and tools necessary to undertake a research project. A dissertation or practitioner research will complete the programme.

Graduate destinations

You'll be able to enter careers in the criminal justice system either in the public, private or third sector organisations. If you're already working in this area, you can benefit from enhanced career opportunities and continued professional development.

Read less
Whether you're already involved in the criminal justice sector, or looking to get started within it, our course will be of great benefit to your interests. Read more
Whether you're already involved in the criminal justice sector, or looking to get started within it, our course will be of great benefit to your interests. We explore the interdisciplinary nature of analysing criminal activity and behaviour at a local and global level. You'll enhance your ability to identify, analyse and challenge current discourses on crime and crime control.

We will help you to develop and practice advanced analytical skills, learning to understand and evaluate crime and justice policy and practice. You can also hone your project management skills by planning and undertaking a research project selecting appropriate methods. By taking this course, you'll improve your ability to explain, justify and defend a course of action, making you highly valued by employers within this sector. Enhance your job opportunities within the criminal justice sector by improving on your skills through our postgraduate programme!

Course outline

We seek to critically analyse and address core issues in Criminology and Criminal Justice, focusing on the nature of crime and the challenged created for contemporary society and criminal justice practitioners. This makes us ideal for criminal justice practitioners looking to enhance their professional development.

Researching Crime and Criminal Justice will provide the methods and tools necessary to undertake a research project. A dissertation or practitioner research will complete the programme.

Graduate destinations

You'll be able to enter careers in the criminal justice system either in the public, private or third sector organisations. If you're already working in this area, you can benefit from enhanced career opportunities and continued professional development.

Read less
The focus of this programme is on contemporary substantive issues in criminology and criminal justice and on criminological research methods. Read more
The focus of this programme is on contemporary substantive issues in criminology and criminal justice and on criminological research methods. It is particularly appropriate for those engaged in criminal justice policy analysis and development or similar work in allied fields.

The programme develops a theoretical, policy and technical understanding of key issues within criminology, criminal justice and research methods. More specifically, it aims to develop an advanced understanding of the complex nature of crime, harm and victimisation together with an appreciation of the role of the state/criminal justice system in the regulation of human behaviour, deviance and crime. The programme will equip you to design and implement social scientific research using a broad range of methodologies, consider research ethics, analyse and present the material such research generates.

Through combining criminology and research methods, the programme enables you to think logically and in an informed manner about criminological issues. The programme fosters a critical awareness of the relationship between theory, policy and practice and enables you to utilize your research knowledge of research skills and translate these into research practice in the field of criminology and broader social science research professions.

See the website http://www.lsbu.ac.uk/courses/course-finder/criminology-social-research-methods-msc

Modules

You'll undertake modules from a broad base of subject areas including:

- Criminological theory
This module charts the development of criminological thinking from the onset of modernity through to the present day. It will place discrete theories in their proper sociological, historical, political and cultural contexts. It will seek to establish the implications and relationships of various theories to criminal justice policy. A number of contemporary issues (terrorism, urban disturbances, and gang culture) will be explored with a view to critically evaluating the value of competing theoretical frameworks.

- Crime, harm and victimisation
The module aims to deconstruct the fundamental elements of criminology: the crime, the criminal and the victim. It begins by examining historical and contemporary patterns of crime and criminality, as officially measured, within the UK and beyond. It then engages with more critical academic debates about defining and measuring crime, considering definitions of crime as: a breach of criminal law; a violation of collective conscience; a product of conduct norms; a social construct; ideological censure; a gendered reality; a violation of human rights, and; social or environmental harm. The module engages with critical deconstructions of the 'offender' and the 'victim', considering how these are socially constructed and how our understanding of these, like of 'crime', has changed and continues to change in late-/post-modern society.

- Responding to crime: justice, social control and punishment
This module explores some of the key issues and controversies in the delivery of justice, social control and punishment. It begins with a critical consideration of the concept of justice and emphasises the significance of this in relation to how the state responds to various forms of crime. It encourages you to think critically about the role of the state in the regulation of behaviour and provides an overview of key changes that have occurred in the field of crime control and criminal justice. One of the key features of contemporary crime control discourse is the rise of risk management and the pursuit of security. This module outlines the ways in which such a discourse has transformed criminal justice thinking and practices of both policing and penal policy, and also of crime (and harm) prevention.

- Criminological research in practice
This module uses examples from recent and current research conducted by members of the Crime and Justice Research Group at LSBU and external guest speakers to develop both the research training and subject understanding elements of the MSc, demonstrating how research becomes knowledge – generating theoretical advances, policy initiatives, new research questions and university curricula. Lectures/seminars will take the form of a research commentary, talking you through a research project from idea inception through research design, fieldwork, analysis and dissemination and, where appropriate, on to the influences research has had (or could have) on subsequent academic works and policy developments. Particular emphasis will be placed on challenges peculiar to criminological research.

- Methods for social research and evaluation: philosophy, design and data collection
This module introduces you to core concepts in social research and shows how they can be used to address social scientific questions and practical issues in policy evaluation. You'll be introduced to central topics in the philosophy of social sciences and the effect they have on research choices. You are then introduced to different ways research can be designed and the ways design affects permissible inferences. You are then introduced to the theory of measurement and sampling. The final third of the module focuses on acquiring data ranging from survey methods through qualitative data collection methods to secondary data.

- Data analytic techniques for social scientists
You are introduced to a range of analytic techniques commonly used by social scientists. It begins by introducing you to statistical analysis, it then moves to techniques used to analyse qualitative data. It concludes by looking at relational methods and data reduction techniques. You'll also be introduced to computer software (SPSS, NVivo and Ucinet) that implements the techniques. Students will gain both a conceptual understanding of the techniques and the means to apply them to their own research projects. An emphasis will be placed on how these techniques can be used in social evaluation.

- Dissertation
The dissertation is a major part of your work on the MSc, reflected in its value of 60 credits. The aim of the dissertation is to enable students to expand and deepen their knowledge of a substantive area in criminology, whilst simultaneously developing their methodological skills. You'll choose an area of investigation and apply the research skills of design and process, modes of data generation and data analysis techniques to undertake a 15,000 word dissertation. You'll be allocated a dissertation supervisor from the departmental team and will meet regularly for personal supervision meetings.

Employability

This MSc will enable you to pursue a range of professional careers in criminal justice related work in statutory, commercial or community voluntary sectors and operating at central, regional and local government levels, for example, the Home Office; police forces; local government; crime and disorder reduction partnerships and their equivalencies throughout the world.

The acquisition of specific criminological and research methods knowledge will also enhance the career opportunities if you are currently working in the field. The specialist focus on research methods also offers an excellent foundation for those interested in undertaking subsequent doctoral research in the field.

LSBU Employability Services

LSBU is committed to supporting you develop your employability and succeed in getting a job after you have graduated. Your qualification will certainly help, but in a competitive market you also need to work on your employability, and on your career search. Our Employability Service will support you in developing your skills, finding a job, interview techniques, work experience or an internship, and will help you assess what you need to do to get the job you want at the end of your course. LSBU offers a comprehensive Employability Service, with a range of initiatives to complement your studies, including:

- direct engagement from employers who come in to interview and talk to students
- Job Shop and on-campus recruitment agencies to help your job search
- mentoring and work shadowing schemes.

Professional links

The Crime and Criminal Justice Research Group, (CCJRG), at LSBU has developed a strong national and international reputation for delivering high quality and real life impact research. It has worked closely with a range of government agencies, including the Office for Criminal Justice Reform (Ministry of Justice); Government Office for London; the Scottish Executive, Northern Ireland Office and the Equalities and Human Rights Commission. It has also undertaken extensive research in collaboration with various London local authorities together with a range of voluntary and charity-based agencies.

Placements

Our criminology programme also has a strong voluntary work scheme.You're encouraged to undertake voluntary work in a variety of criminal justice related agencies. Recent positions have been within the police service, the prison service, legal advice, victim support, domestic violence and child abuse agencies and youth offending and youth mentoring schemes.

Teaching and learning

Study hours:
Year 1 class contact time is typically 6 hours per week part time and 12 hours per week full time plus individual tutorial and independent study.

Read less
Study Policing and Criminal Investigation at LJMU and work with crime victims and witnesses to enhance your knowledge and key skills in this area. Read more
Study Policing and Criminal Investigation at LJMU and work with crime victims and witnesses to enhance your knowledge and key skills in this area.

-Commences January 2017
-Explore investigative issues to gain the knowledge and practical skills to operate as a crime investigator in serious and complex cases
-Consider the links between investigation, forensics and psychology
-Work with crime victims and witnesses
-Ideal for serving officers and those about to embark on their policing or academic career
-Excellent employment opportunities in policing/investigative work, private investigation and with bodies such as Trading Standards and the Inland Revenue
-A valuable foundation for progression to PhD

The MSc Policing and Criminal Investigation combines supervised independent research with specialist training in research methods and academic skills, while also helping students become aware of emerging approaches currently practiced in the discipline.
​Over the course of the programme you will be introduced to key developments in policing studies and given the skills necessary to produce a successful postgraduate research project. You will work individually with a supervisor throughout the year, as well as taking part in taught modules with fellow Policing Studies students and/or students from other disciplines/Faculties. In addition, you will be part of the wider research activities of the Liverpool Centre for Advanced Policing Studies.

You will receive specialist supervision and study within a diverse community of fellow researchers. Staff are active in a wide range of fields including: Crime Prevention, GIS, People Trafficking, Public Order, Mental Health, Multi Agency and Partnership Working in the Public Sector, Computer Crime, Investigation, Terrorism and Counter-terrorism, Port Security, Risk Management and Education.

What you will study on this degree

Please see guidance below on core modules:

Policing in Context

Gain insights into current policing, community safety and criminal justice priorities by exploring different perspectives that relate to policing, regulatory processes, professional values and ethics

Advanced Research Skills

In preparation for your dissertation, this module introduces key epistemological and methodological issues that impact upon research into crime, security, community safety and criminal justice

Advanced Investigation Skills

Examine the administrative difficulties posited during a criminal investigation and the importance of investigative ethics

Forensic and Medicolegal Death

Discover core foundational concepts of criminal investigations, enabling you to understand, explain, analyse and evaluate causes, sustainment and consequences of processing a death scene

Forensic Cognition

Critically explore why offenders commit acts of sexual and physical violence by examining influential theories that have been developed to aid in investigating sexual/violent offences

Investigative Interviewing

Examine current practices, techniques and applications of police interviewing by being exposed to comparative international techniques in interviewing, interpretation of verbal and physical behaviour, causes of denial, deception and defensiveness

Dissertation

Analyse and interpret an issue in your chosen field

​Further guidance on modules

The information listed in the section entitled 'What you will study' is an overview of the academic content of the programme that will take the form of either core or option modules. Modules are designated as core or option in accordance with professional body requirements and internal Academic Framework review, so may be subject to change. Students will be required to undertake modules that the University designates as core and will have a choice of designated option modules. Additionally, option modules may be offered subject to meeting minimum student numbers.

Academic Framework reviews are conducted by LJMU from time to time to ensure that academic standards continue to be maintained.

Please email if you require further guidance or clarification.

Read less
If you want to examine how the science of psychology can further our understanding of offending behaviour and how psychological knowledge is utilised in improving policing and victim services, as well as those working with offenders in order to reduce re-offending, this course will be of interest to you. Read more

Why take this course?

If you want to examine how the science of psychology can further our understanding of offending behaviour and how psychological knowledge is utilised in improving policing and victim services, as well as those working with offenders in order to reduce re-offending, this course will be of interest to you.

This degree is not accredited by the British Psychological Society (BPS).

The course can be studied through campus-based or distance learning.

What will I experience?

On this course you can:

Examine how psychology can further our understanding of offending behaviour
Study how psychological knowledge informs practice within a range of criminal justice agencies
Explore psychology's contribution to working with offenders in order to reduce re-offending

What opportunities might it lead to?

Given the broad range of issues considered and the skills acquired throughout the degree programme, you will graduate with a portfolio of knowledge and abilities that will support a diverse range of career development opportunities in this field. Most of our students are in full-time employment in areas such as police, probation, law and youth programmes, etc. Their career prospects involve transfers to other units or advancing to more senior levels of management.

Module Details

You will study the following units:

Criminology Past and Present (30 credits)
Psychology and Offending Behaviour (30 credits)
Investigation and Psychology (30 credits)
Research Methods and Research Management (30 credits)
15,000-word Dissertation (60 credits)

Please note that the course structure may vary from year to year; course content and learning opportunities will not be diminished by this.

Programme Assessment

All ICJS campus-based students will be assigned a personal tutor, responsible for pastoral support and guidance, and have access to university support services including careers, financial advice, housing and counselling etc.

Assessment is based upon a range of written assignments including essays, case study, a literature review and research proposal focused on your chosen project, and finally a 15,000-word dissertation. For each assignment full academic support is provided by an academic subject expert and you will be provided with academic supervisor once you have identified your dissertation subject area.

Student Destinations

Most of our students are in full time employment in areas such as police, probation, law and youth programmes etc. Their career prospects involve transfers to other units or advancing to more senior levels of management.

Read less
If you want to examine how the science of psychology can further our understanding of offending behaviour and how psychological knowledge is utilised in improving policing and victim services, as well as those working with offenders in order to reduce re-offending, this course will be of interest to you. Read more

Why take this course?

If you want to examine how the science of psychology can further our understanding of offending behaviour and how psychological knowledge is utilised in improving policing and victim services, as well as those working with offenders in order to reduce re-offending, this course will be of interest to you.

This degree is not accredited by the British Psychological Society (BPS).

The course can be studied through campus-based or distance learning.

What will I experience?

On this course you can:

Examine how psychology can further our understanding of offending behaviour
Study how psychological knowledge informs practice within a range of criminal justice agencies
Explore psychology's contribution to working with offenders in order to reduce re-offending

What opportunities might it lead to?

Given the broad range of issues considered and the skills acquired throughout the degree programme, you will graduate with a portfolio of knowledge and abilities that will support a diverse range of career development opportunities in this field. Most of our students are in full-time employment in areas such as police, probation, law and youth programmes, etc. Their career prospects involve transfers to other units or advancing to more senior levels of management.

Module Details

You will study the following units:

Criminology Past and Present (30 credits)
Psychology and Offending Behaviour (30 credits)
Investigation and Psychology (30 credits)
Research Methods and Research Management (30 credits)
15,000-word Dissertation (60 credits)

Please note that the course structure may vary from year to year; course content and learning opportunities will not be diminished by this.

Programme Assessment

All ICJS distance learning students are supported in the initial stages by the extended Induction Programme (online and face-to-face). Immediately following induction, an engagement officer proactively ensures any issues are resolved rapidly, and thereafter personal support is provided by your course leader for the duration of your studies.

Assessment is based upon a range of written assignments including essays, case study, a literature review and research proposal focused on your chosen project, and finally a 15,000-word dissertation. For each assignment full academic support is provided by an academic subject expert and you will be provided with academic supervisor once you have identified your dissertation subject area.

Student Destinations

Most of our students are in full time employment in areas such as police, probation, law and youth programmes etc. Their career prospects involve transfers to other units or advancing to more senior levels of management.

Read less
Our MA Applied Criminology course has been designed for both recent graduates and practitioners who wish to develop their understanding of the debates surrounding crime and the criminal justice system. Read more
Our MA Applied Criminology course has been designed for both recent graduates and practitioners who wish to develop their understanding of the debates surrounding crime and the criminal justice system. It offers an exciting opportunity to study both theoretical criminology and the more applied aspects of criminology and criminal justice issues.

The course has three formal stages:
-The Diploma stages consist of three taught modules, a proposal module that is delivered through work groups and a practice-based module involving reflection upon work or volunteering experience.
-Those proceeding to the Master's stage will be required to complete an extended project to be determined individually.
-It is possible to complete your studies at any of the Certificate, Diploma or Master's stages.

Full-time students will complete all these stages in one year. Part-time students would normally complete the diploma and masters stages over two years.

What's covered in the course?

During study, you are asked to reflect upon your experience of crime and the criminal justice system, looking at significant factors involved in crime in contemporary society. These include globalisation, consumerism and political economy, as well as considering more psychological and theoretical drivers of harmful and criminal behaviour and the responses to crime.

In order to provide an engaging and flexible educational experience to diverse range of students, the course utilises a wide range of learning and teaching methods and technologies. Given the small size of each group of students recruited, the postgraduate status of the programme and the experience which many of its recruits have had of the criminal justice system, the course is highly participative. While sessions will provide periods of structured teaching, they will also provide a forum, within which you will take responsibility for your own learning, and share your knowledge and views with other students and staff.

The precise nature of sessions and delivery will vary with the year, the cohort of students, and the general and specific experience possessed by individual students. The programme team also makes increasing use of the University’s virtual learning environment, Moodle, where teaching staff will upload lecture notes, web links, video programmes and extracts from academic sources. Moodle is also used for general announcements and communication with a group of students, many of whom are unlikely to be on campus every day.

The course has a strong link with research practice, and will help you develop and understand the principles and practice of research, as well as enabling you to form judgements on the relative merits of, and relationships between, different research tools and methods. You will also develop the capability to design, manage and disseminate a research project to a professional standard.

Why Choose Us?

-The course has strong links with the University’s Centre for Applied Criminology, a leading research centre staffed by established criminologists. They are renowned for their international reputations, with their specialist areas including homicide, violence and organised crime.
-You’ll have flexible study options, enabling you to focus on either an academic route or a more practice-based approach.
-The course will help you develop and understand the principles and practice of research, and allow you to form judgements on different research tools.
-The course team has valuable links with the regional criminal justice system and leading non-Government organisations, including therapeutic prison HMP Grendon, where the University holds an annual debate.

How you learn

The course is taught in weekly seminars, tutorials and workshops, which encourage substantial student participation. Our virtual learning environment is also used to deliver some content and facilitate communication remotely.

The MA Applied Criminology will normally be studied on a one-year full-time basis and a two-year part-time basis, with the taught elements of the programme being delivered over a teaching period of approximately 30 weeks from September to May/June.

The programme is divided into study units called modules, each of 20 credits (excluding the Extended Project which amounts to 60 credits). Most modules on the programme are core, but there is also optional modules which cover influential areas of work undertaken in the Centre for Applied Criminology. You’ll complete 120 credits at the Postgraduate Certificate and Diploma Stage, and a further 60 credits at the Master’s stage. It is expected that most applicants will wish to progress to Master's stage, which is delivered and assessed through an extended project supervised through evening workgroups and through one-to-one supervision, which will come from an expert academic attached to the Centre for Applied Criminology.

The taught Master’s component covers a range of core and option modules, including topics such as - Research Methods (where you will develop your proposal for the final Applied Research Proposal module); Criminological Thought; Criminal Psychology; Penal Theory and Practice; Crime and Rehabilitation in Media; and Reflective Practice or Criminological Issues.

At the Diploma stage, you may select options modules covering topics such as Restorative Justice, Crime Prevention in Homicide and Organised Violent Crime (HAVOC), and Understanding Domestic and Sexual Violence (UDSV). Additionally, the MA is awarded on the completion of the Applied Research Project [Dissertation] module (60 credits), which contains a taught component with evening sessions.

Employability

The teaching team draws on the combined with the expertise of members of the Centre for Applied Criminology, who will give you cutting-edge criminological knowledge from their impactful and high-profile research, as well as giving you excellent access to experienced practitioners and Criminal Justice System organisations.

The access provided to professionals, the presence of practitioners among fellow students and the capacity to reflect upon relevant volunteering or work experience within the structure of the course means that the course provides excellent opportunities for building contacts and networking, as well as developing opportunities for employment.

The School of Social Sciences has relationships with a number of criminal justice agencies and non-government organisations, including the local Community Safety Partnership, HMP Grendon and the Howard League.

Read less

Show 10 15 30 per page


Share this page:

Cookie Policy    X