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Masters Degrees (Crime Fiction)

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The two year, part-time, low-residency Creative Writing MA in Crime Fiction at UEA provides the opportunity to create a full-length novel under the guidance of award-winning crime writers and experienced creative writing tutors – without having to relocate or give up work. Read more
The two year, part-time, low-residency Creative Writing MA in Crime Fiction at UEA provides the opportunity to create a full-length novel under the guidance of award-winning crime writers and experienced creative writing tutors – without having to relocate or give up work. The course is delivered via a specifically designed, highly inclusive online platform, and three short residential periods per year. These incorporate a mix of creative and critical workshops and seminars, and a masterclass from a leading crime writer. Those involved include Lee Child, Melanie McGrath, Mark Billingham and Ian Rankin. Visits from literary agents and editors also take place during the May residential period.

Modules delivered by distance learning include tutor and student lead group presentations, discussions, workshopping, and one-on-one Skype tutorials. Course material, including original recordings, is easily available on the programme’s specific web pages.

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This is the only degree which offers students the opportunity to specialise as a translation expert in audiovisual translation and in the translation of popular culture. Read more
This is the only degree which offers students the opportunity to specialise as a translation expert in audiovisual translation and in the translation of popular culture.

Who is it for?

This course is for you if you:
-Are interested in popular culture, films, TV, literature, comics or graphic novels
-Love languages, other cultures and their differences
-Are interested in translation and want to learn about systematic decision-making
-Know about translation and want to specialise
-Have an amateur or fan background in translation and want to become a professional
-Have studied foreign languages, linguistics, literature, media, film, theatre, drama or cultural studies.
-Are looking for a thorough grounding in the theory and practice of translation.
-Want to gain an insight into professional practice in audiovisual translation or in literary translation.

The course aims to make students fit for the market as properly trained and highly qualified translation experts.

Objectives

This course:
-Provides you with training in audiovisual translation techniques.
-Uses industry-standard software for subtitling, dubbing and voice over.
-Specialises in the translation of children’s literature; crime fiction; science fiction and fantasy; comics, graphic novels, manga and video games.
-Introduces you to the different conventions and styles associated with popular culture in its varied forms and genres.
-Focuses on the specifics of genre translation and how these shape translation decisions.
-Provides a theoretical framework for the practical application of translation, working with a wide range of source texts from different popular genres and media.

The course:
-Aims to give you a secure foundation in theoretical strategies underpinning and supporting the practice of translation.
-Develops your awareness of professional standards, norms and translational ethics.
-Works closely with professional translators and the translation industry helping you to develop a professional identity.
-Has optional modules in dubbing, translation project management, screenplay translation and publishing.

Placements

There are no course-based placements on this course. Literary translation does not offer placements, while audiovisual companies offer internships which are competitive.

We support and guide our students through the application process for audiovisual translation internships and have a very good record of achievement. Each year, several of our students win one of these very competitive internships and they tend to be offered full time work on completion.

The course is very industry-oriented and we work closely with the translation industry. Industry professionals teach on the course, supervise students or give guest seminars and lectures.

Academic staff have run Translation Development courses, for example in genre translation for professional translators for the Chartered Institute of Linguists, and they are involved in running Continuing Professional Development courses in specialised translation.

We run a preparatory, distance learning course for the professional Diploma in Translation examined by the Chartered Institute of Linguists. We organise a Literary Translation Summer School each July which is taught by professional, literary translators and with lectures by prestigious translators, academics or writers.

The Translation department runs the John Dryden Translation Competition for the British Comparative Literature Association. The competition is sponsored by the British Centre for Literary Translation and the Institut Français. We offer one internship per year in working on this Translation Competition, interacting with translators, translation judges, managing competition entries and learning about the judging process.

Teaching and learning

The course is taught by academics, industry professionals (for example, audiovisual translation project manager) and translation professionals (for example, award winning literary translators, experienced subtitlers).

Teaching is delivered in a combination of lectures, seminars, practical workshops and lab-based sessions for audiovisual translation. In workshop sessions students work individually, in pairs, group work or plenary forum in a multilingual and multicultural environment.

In all translation modules, there is also a translation project prepared in independent guided study under the supervision of a translation professional in the student’s language pair and language directionality. You can expect some on-line learning, supported by seminar sessions, and industry visits to audiovisual translation companies.

In the Translation project management module, students work in project groups performing real-life translation roles and tasks in a collaborative environment.

Assessment

Assessment is 100% coursework – there are no examinations.

Coursework assignments are a mixture of essays, translation projects, translation commentaries, subtitling and voice over files or project work. The dissertation is 12,000 to 15,000 words long and can either be a research project on any topic relevant to Audiovisual Translation or Popular Literary Translation / Culture or it can be practice oriented: a translation of an extended text or AV clip with critical introduction to and analysis of the translation.

Coursework assignments: 66.6% (120 credits)

Dissertation: 33.3% (60 credits)

Modules

There are five compulsory taught modules plus three elective taught modules, selected by the student from a pool of module choices, plus a dissertation which can be a research dissertation or a practice-oriented dissertation of an extended translation with critical introduction and analysis.

Each taught module is an estimated 150 hours of study. Teaching consists of lectures, seminars and workshops plus independent individually supervised work.

The first part of the translation modules is taught in three-hour sessions (lecture + seminar + practical workshop). In the second part of each translation module, students work on a translation project which is individually supervised by a translation professional who gives written feedback on drafts and provides tailored advice and guidance in individual supervision sessions.

Students can expect between ten and 12 hours of classroom-based study per week, plus time spent on preparatory reading, independent study and research, preparation of assignments.

The dissertation is 60 credits and an estimated 600 hours of study. There are four two-hour research method seminars guiding students through the process of writing a dissertation, plus individual supervision sessions.

All taught modules are in term 1 and term 2 (January – April). Term 3 is dedicated to the dissertation (and completion of assignments from term 2 modules).

Core modules
-Principles and practice of translation theory (15 credits)
-Translating children’s literature (15 credits)
-Subtitling (15 credits)
-Translating crime fiction (15 credits)
-Translating science fiction and fantasy (15 credits)

Elective modules - choose three:
-Principles of screenwriting and the translation of screenplays (15 credits)
-Creating and managing intellectual property (15 credits).
-Dubbing and voice over (15 credits)
-Translation project management (15 credits)
-Translating multimodal texts (comics, graphic novels, manga, video games) (15 credits)
-International publishing case studies (20 credits)

Dissertation - 60 credits
-Dissertation option A (discursive/research)
-Dissertation option B (extended translation with critical introduction and analysis)

Career prospects

The degree is designed to produce graduates who are fit for the market, either working in translation agencies / companies or as a freelancer, addressing the need for properly trained and highly qualified translation experts.

Career options come in a wide range of jobs in the translation industry, ranging from self-employed translator, staff translator or localisation expert to editor, researcher or project manager.

Recent graduate destinations include: video game testing and localisation at Testronic Laboratories; video game translation at Sega; Dubbing, subtitling and voice over at VSI London; translation at the World Health Organisation; project management at Maverick Advertising and Design and at Deluxe Media Europe; freelance translator creative and literary texts.

The degree also lays the foundation to continue to a research degree / doctoral study in any area of translation studies. Currently, graduates from the course are pursuing doctoral study at City, specialising in crime fiction translation.

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Taught at our Parkgate Road Campus in Chester, our MA in Modern and Contemporary Fiction is an innovative and stimulating course that explores a rich variety of 20th- and 21st-century fiction. Read more
Taught at our Parkgate Road Campus in Chester, our MA in Modern and Contemporary Fiction is an innovative and stimulating course that explores a rich variety of 20th- and 21st-century fiction.

Why Study Modern and Contemporary Fiction with us?

This distinctive course is taught by a dynamic and experienced team with research strengths in modern and contemporary British, Irish, American, and South African fiction. Department members have published on a wide range of modernist, postmodernist, and postcolonial authors; on genres including science fiction, historical fiction, and crime/detective fiction; and on representations of addiction, terrorism, apartheid, fashion, and the female body. Two of the teaching team edit Flash: The International Short-Short Story Magazine.

The Parkgate Road Campus library is well stocked with texts on modern and contemporary fiction, and houses the Flash Fiction Special Collection, the world’s largest archive of flash-related books and magazines.

What will I learn?

The course comprises six modules. Shorter Fiction typically covers flash fiction, the short story, and the novella. Novel Histories: Past, Present, Future considers historical fiction, representations of the contemporary, and ‘future histories’ (including utopian/dystopian fiction), while Popular Fictions analyses such ‘genre fictions’ as crime/ detective fiction, science fiction, and the campus novel. Special Author(s)/Topic(s) focuses on an area in which the Department has particular expertise, and Research Methods will equip you to pursue your own interest in the Dissertation.

How will I be taught?

Typically, the first five modules are each taught by nine two-hour seminars. These are distributed over 23 weeks, generally with two two-hour seminars per week. One-to-one tutorials are also available. For the Dissertation, you will work one-to-one with a supervisor.

The total workload (including reading, preparation, seminars, tutorials, research, and writing) is approximately 37.5 hours per week.

How will I be assessed?

Modules are assessed by coursework. The first five modules each have 4,000 words of assessment, followed by the 16,000-word Dissertation. There are no exams.

Postgraduate Visit Opportunities

If you are interested in this courses we have a number of opportunities to visit us and our campuses. To find out more about these options and to book a visit, please go to: https://www1.chester.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/postgraduate-visit-opportunities

Request a Prospectus

If you would like to know more about the University please request a prospectus at: http://prospectus.chester.ac.uk/form.php

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Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Literary Translation at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Literary Translation at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

We are an established centre for research into literary translation with expertise in the following languages: Chinese, French, German, Italian, Spanish, and Welsh. We are currently leading a project on the Visualisation of Translation Variation and are particularly interested in proposals which articulate with it. See: http://www.delightedbeauty.org/vvv/Home/Project.

Key Features of MA by Research in Literary Translation

An MA by Research in Literary Translation gives you the chance to pursue a project based around your own passions and interests in Literary Translation, leading to a qualification which can open the door to an academic career or boost employment prospects outside academia (in the private sector, the Civil Service, education, or the translation industry).

The Literary Translation research programme will give you the freedom to explore a topic of your own choosing in Literary Translation and develop a methodology under the close supervision of two experienced academics but without attending regular classes as required in taught programmes.

As a student enrolled on the MA by Research in Literary Translation, you will be supervised closely by two experienced academics in your field. Typically, you will meet them fortnightly in the first term and at regular intervals thereafter. Meetings are logged and goals agreed each time.

All research students are required to attend skills and training courses at College and Institutional level. They give presentations to other research students and staff at departmental seminars and the annual departmental postgraduate symposium in June and the College of Arts and Humanities conference in October. Advanced research students may have opportunities to teach undergraduate tutorials and seminars. You have a budget (currently £200 per year) to attend conferences outside Swansea.

MA by Research in Literary Translation degree typically lasts from one year (full-time study) to two years (part-time study).

The MA by Research in Literary Translation is ideal for those who want:

-an MA qualification in niche areas where taught programmes are not offered;
- the experience of a research degree without committing to a PhD.

Research proposals are invited on any topic in Literary Translation for which staff can provide supervision. You may analyse multiple translations of a classic text, for instance, or the consistency of the translation decisions taken by a particular translator. You may like to investigate a whole genre, such as crime fiction, or you may want to try your own hand at a piece of literary translation, explaining your strategy in a detailed theoretical commentary. It is advisable to email a member of academic staff in the appropriate area before applying (see staff web pages).

For informal enquiries regarding Literary Translation please contact Professor Julian Preece ().

Research Interests

Staff research interests in Translation and Interpreting cover a range of themes, including:

• Literary Translation
• Theatre translation/adaptation
• Translation Theory (including non-Western)
• History of Translation
• Comparative Translation Studies
• Translation and Social Discourse
• Corpus-based Translation Analysis
• Translation and the Lexicon
• Computer-based Lexicography and Terminography
• Translation processes: psycholinguistics of translation, translation workflows
• Translation tools and technologies
• Translation visualisation

Research proposals are invited on any topic in Literary Translation for which staff can provide supervision. You may analyse multiple translations of a classic text, for instance, or the consistency of the translation decisions taken by a particular translator. You may like to investigate a whole genre, such as crime fiction, or you may want to try your own hand at a piece of literary translation, explaining your strategy in a detailed theoretical commentary. The Department benefits from extensive library holdings in print and online form. All postgraduate students have access to two computer-based language laboratories, an advanced Translation and Media computing lab, and a more specialised Translation Research facility housing the latest digitisation, corpus analysis and computer assisted translation tools.

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The UK’s only dedicated degree in narrative non-fiction writing. This master’s programme is designed for those with an ambition to write within the range of non-fiction genres. Read more
The UK’s only dedicated degree in narrative non-fiction writing.

Who is it for?

This master’s programme is designed for those with an ambition to write within the range of non-fiction genres. Running over two years, it attracts students from a wide variety of backgrounds and ages, all of whom work closely within workshop and tutorial settings to produce a publishable work. The unifying factor for all writers on the programme is their intention to deliver their research or story through a narrative structure.

Objectives

Our definition of narrative non-fiction includes biography, travel, history, life writing, true crime, sports and other forms of sustained and structured non-fiction storytelling. The Creative Writing (Non-Fiction) MA provides you with essential skills and a supportive and challenging environment in which to write a full-length work of narrative non-fiction. You will develop your research skills, experiment with different writing styles, reflect on your own and other writer’s work and learn the essentials of the publishing industry.

Teaching and learning

The teaching, all by published authors, across the two years is front-end loaded in terms 1 and 2 with workshops, with workshops, lectures and seminars held two days a week. Here you will extend your writing skills, your understanding of non-fiction genres and your awareness of creative possibilities. You will also analyse the work of leading writers and explore writing through a variety of exercises, encouraging you to experiment with new approaches.

All workshops are based around the students’ own writing assignments which work towards the completion, or opening chapters, of a book. We also closely analyse published works of non-fiction, taking apart books to examine their style, structure and research methods.

Throughout the two years there are readings and workshops with visiting authors. In terms 3, 4, 5 and 6 you work principally on your own book project with the support of one-to-one tutorials.

In term 6 (the final term) the lectures and guest sessions focus on the publishing industry which will provide you with the knowledge to be placed with a literary agent. During the final term you will have the opportunity to read from your work in progress, to contribute to anthology of writing and to submit a full draft of your book.

Modules

Term 1
-CWM 959 The Fundamentals of Non-fiction (core)
-CWM 958 Literary Criticism (core)
-CWM935 Storytelling (core)
-CWM956 Complete Book (core)

Term 2
-CWM957 The Process of Writing (core)
-CWM 958 Literary Criticism (core)
-CWM935 Storytelling (core)
-CWM956 Complete Book (core)

Terms 3,4,5 and 6
-CWM956 Complete Book

Career prospects

The MA creative writing non-fiction is proud of its track record in publishing with students from the programme winning publishing contracts every year.

Graduates include:
-Peter Moore, The Weather Experiment (Chatto and Windus),
-Anne Putnam, Navel Gazing (Faber and Faber)
-Bridge O’Donnell, Inspector Minahan Makes a Stand (Picador).

Graduates have also gone on to work for media outlets and used their transferrable skills in a variety of professions including teaching, political campaigning and in the charity sector.

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This course provides an environment in which directors can find their individual style and their own distinctive voice. Supported by the David Lean Foundation, this is the UK’s premier MA course in directing. Read more
This course provides an environment in which directors can find their individual style and their own distinctive voice. Supported by the David Lean Foundation, this is the UK’s premier MA course in directing.

Quick Facts:

2 Year Course
Full-time
Course runs Jan-Dec each year
Next intake: January 2017
NFTS Scholarships available for UK Students

Visit the website https://nfts.co.uk/our-courses/masters/directing-fiction

TO APPLY CONTACT REGISTRY - https://nfts.co.uk/contact-us

COURSE OVERVIEW

- Unique specialist course.
- Students of all key film-making disciplines work together on productions.
- Purpose-built film and television studios.
- Industry standard post- production facilities.
- The MA Course in Directing Fiction is supported by the David Lean Foundation.
- Unlike other schools, all production costs are met by the School.

This course commences in January each year. The MA course at the NFTS provides two years in which directing students will be adding depth and understanding to their abilities whilst regularly producing work. This is an environment where they will be both challenged and supported by staff and fellow students. The tutor to student ratio is high, thus allowing the teaching to be specific to the needs of the individual director. One great advantage of having different departments within the school is not only that students gain from the practical experience of working with the other specialisations but that their thinking is informed by the various collaborative engagements that together convey an idea to the screen.

The essence of the course is the practical experience of film-making, combined with a wide-ranging series of work-shops emphasising performance, mise-en-scène and an examination of how narrative works in cinema and in television. Engagement with students of other disciplines at the NFTS is a crucial aspect of the course. The curriculum of each specialisation is designed to link with the others throughout the course, so that students work together on projects of varying scale and complexity, increasing their understanding of the various specialist roles involved in film and television programme-making. The course includes weekly sessions on film and television culture, both contemporary and historical, and opportunities to learn from the work of more established directors through masterclasses and set visits. It also involves interaction with other disciplines, ranging from visual art, literature and architecture to installation and performance art.

*There are a number of different scholarships that support this course, including the Wellcome Trust Science Media Studentship. For more information see Scholarships and the Wellcome Trust. - http://www.wellcome.ac.uk/Funding/Public-engagement/Funding-schemes/Broadcast-games-and-film-awards/Science-Media-Studentships/index.htm

TUTORS

The Fiction department is led by Lynda Myles (The Commitments) and the senior tutor is Ian Sellar (Venus Peter, Prague). Many other leading directors teach on the programme, including, Stephen Frears (The Queen, Tamara Drew, High Fidelity), Brian Gilbert (Wilde) and Udayan Prasad (Gabriel & Me, The Yellow Handkerchief).

ALUMNI

Directors David Yates (Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince), Beeban Kidron (Bridget Jones: The Edge of Reason), Lynne Ramsay (Ratcatcher, We need to talk about Kevin), Terence Davies (The House of Mirth, The Deep Blue Sea), Michael Radford (Il Postino), Danny Cannon (Judge Dredd, Crime Scene Investigation) and Michael Caton Jones (Memphis Belle, Rob Roy) studied at the NFTS.

CURRICULUM

In the first year, Directing Fiction students take part in a series of workshops exploring all aspects of directing, acquiring a solid understanding of current practices and technology across related specialist crafts. The workshops are supported by seminars on screen language and history, as well as individual tutorial sessions; which can guide students in self-motivated research to supplement their particular learning needs. Besides the weekly Screen Arts programme of screenings and seminars, the Directing Fiction department has regular sessions of screenings, scene by scene analysis and discussion led by tutors and students.

The Directing Fiction department workshops focus on isolating and building on skills used in collaboration with other departments. Each series of workshops culminates in a practical production exercise. Production experience is considered essential because the ability to maintain clarity of ideas and their expression within the conflicting demands of script, cast, crew and practical parameters – it is the test of the learning that has come before.

The first year work is aimed not only at developing skills, but at exposing weak areas of understanding and concept. In the final term of the first year, the directors collaborate with a team to make the First Year Film. This is a project which, apart from temporal and budgetary restrictions, gives the students considerable freedom and which encourages them to take responsibility for their work. During the first year, the student will have begun work on developing second year projects and their dissertation.

The second year of the Directing Fiction course provides more of an opportunity for the self- motivated student to develop his or her own voice through two different types of production experience. The dissertation allows for examining a particular area in depth and should be complementing and informing further work. Longer form storytelling is developed through the digital production. The primary collaboration on this production is focused on director/cinematographer/actor.

Short form storytelling and collaboration with a larger crew is developed through a film production called The Summer Fiction. Both it and the Digital Film are heavily supported by individual tutorials.
The productions also include scheduled workshops/seminars/tutorial support for casting, rehearsals, shot planning, set procedures and working with the A.D., as well as intensive and continuous viewings and critiques of rushes and edits. Editing, Sound and Music tutors also provide tutorials during post-production.

Unlike other schools, all production costs are met by the School. In addition you will be given a cash Production Budget. NFTS students are engaged in more productions as part of the curriculum than any of our competitors.

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

Students come from a wide range of backgrounds: you may be an independent filmmaker, you might have a first degree or you may have experience of working in the Industry.

Your application must include a DVD of a short fiction piece - or an extract of a longer work - that you have directed recently and a short treatment for another narrative-based project.

APPLY WITH

- A treatment for an original film or video project of no more than 5 sides of A4 paper, typed and double spaced. This should not be a treatment for the same project as your DVD below. It should be a treatment for either a short film or a feature length project. This treatment should include:
- the basic situation,
- the characters and other elements and
- the main thrust of the story as it changes from beginning, through middle, to end

- Three copies of your film (on three separate DVDs) of up to 15 minutes’ running time, which you have directed. Please note that you can specify which 15 minutes should be viewed. The technical quality of the work submitted is not a priority in assessment. (If dialogue is not in English and the DVDs do not have English subtitles please email a dialogue transcript in English).

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From Shakespeare to Hollywood, as a culture we are fascinated by crime. Discover what makes crime captivating with City’s Criminology and Criminal Justice MSc. Read more
From Shakespeare to Hollywood, as a culture we are fascinated by crime. Discover what makes crime captivating with City’s Criminology and Criminal Justice MSc.

Who is it for?

This degree is for independent, critical thinkers who want to work, or are working, within criminal justice or want to undertake further research. Many of our students have undergraduate criminology degrees, and come from universities across the world. Often they want to continue their learning or specialise within a specific subject area. Students also come from other science, humanities and legal backgrounds and from within the criminal justice system. Research methods form a key component of the programme so having an interest in data collection and analysis is valuable.

"To understand crime in the 21st century you have to have specialist criminological knowledge. We don’t just focus on the criminal act; we look at the societal reaction to crime and the cultural narratives that exist around it. At City we will encourage you to develop your criminological imagination but also to use it." - Professor Eugene McLaughlin

Objectives

At City we believe crime is multi-dimensional, which is why this MSc course brings the victim into focus, not just the offender. The criminal mind is complex and our understanding of it matters – not just to the individual, but also to their family, the community and wider society at large.

We live in a criminogenic global society; one that is producing new forms of crime, and new criminal opportunities. City’s Criminology and Criminal Justice MSc course unpicks the power of the criminological imagination within this society.

This is not a Masters that focuses purely on criminal justice or crime control – instead we emphasise cutting-edge theoretical analysis and methodological training, so you can research the contemporary significance of crime and see how it can be a powerful marker of social and institutional change.

Originally part of City’s MA in Human Rights, this degree offers a distinctive perspective on the relationship between criminology and human rights violations. It is global in outlook because, by its nature, crime is transnational and is taught by eminent criminologists who author the books that appear on reading lists across the country.

Here are some of the questions the course poses:
-Why don’t more people commit criminal acts?
-What does crime tell us about the society in which we live?
-Why is crime considered abnormal but at the same time central to news, fiction and popular culture?
-What would a victim-centred justice system look like?

Academic facilities

When it comes to studying criminology, London is an amazing facility. It is one of the most sociologically diverse laboratories offering a wide range of accessible resources. From the myriad centres of policy, justice and media to the endless range of public events, at City you can become a researcher in a global city. As part of the University of London you can also become a member of Senate House Library for free with your student ID card.

Teaching and learning

We will teach you through a combination of lectures, interactive workshops and seminars, in the first and second term (September-April). This is supplemented by insight from external visiting criminologists, criminal justice charities, research agencies and, in some cases, retired criminals. This gives you the opportunity to ask questions, debate your ideas and present your own evidence around particular arguments.

During the dissertation phase of the degree you also have the chance to visit the Central Criminal Court (otherwise known as the Old Bailey) and in some cases undertake a prison visit. One student is currently in New York, researching the New York Police Department, as part of her dissertation on the stresses of being a police officer in 2016.

The majority of postgraduate sociology modules are assessed by coursework. However, if you choose to study some modules outside of the department you may have different assessment methods so please check this carefully. You will need to gain a minimum pass mark of 50% in all assessment components.

The dissertation marks the point in the course where you begin to take hold of your research and let your criminological imagination come into play. The dissertation (of 15,000 words) accounts for one third of the total marks for the Criminology and Criminal Justice MSc degree. By the end of the first term you will have to start considering your dissertation topic. You may already know you area of focus, but we offer guidance and support through dissertation workshops.

Modules

You will take three 30-credit compulsory core modules and two 15-credit elective modules. You can then choose from two of four elective modules to hone your degree towards your own area of interest. In the final part of the course you take part in a dissertation workshop and produce a dissertation over the summer period.

The first module, ‘Analysing crime’ makes up the course’s theoretical base. You then research contemporary developments in criminal justice and penal policy within the second core module. At this point in the course you get to choose from a number of elective modules covering diverse topics including the dark side of media notoriety and celebrity, and the criminal mind. All these modules draw on the School’s research strengths making them unique to City.

Core modules
-Analysing crime
-Criminal justice policy and practice
-Research Workshop
-Dissertation

Elective modules
-The criminal mind
-Victims: policy and politics
-Developments in communication policy
-Celebrity

NB: Elective module choices are subject to availability and timetabling constraints.

Career prospects

The Criminology and Criminal Justice course is taught by internationally recognised experts and prepares you for careers across the public, private and voluntary sectors.

From research to policy development and from the security services to the criminal justice system and victim support, you will have a wealth of employment options once you graduate. Previous graduates are now working in:
-The Metropolitan Police
-The National Probation service
-The UK Foreign Office
-The prison service
-Education
-Mental health
-Criminal justice charitable sector
-Doctoral research
-Prison Service

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The MA Prose Fiction at UEA is the oldest and most prestigious Creative Writing programme in the UK. It is uniquely focused on the writing of fiction. Read more
The MA Prose Fiction at UEA is the oldest and most prestigious Creative Writing programme in the UK. It is uniquely focused on the writing of fiction. We take a rigorous and creative approach to enabling students' ideas, voices, technique and craft. The course can be taken over one year full-time or two years part-time.

Our students’ success is unparalleled - around 38% go on to publish. While at UEA, however, our focus is very much on exploring students’ creative potential in a highly supportive, and well-resourced environment. Recent visiting professors include Margaret Atwood, Ali Smith, Tim Parks, and Ian Rankin.

Aside from the core workshops, students can choose from a wide range of optional modules, either critical or creative critical in focus, and where you can explore specific forms and genres, such as the short story, the writing of crime/thriller fiction, and the dialogue between theory and practice in fiction.

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An MA in English is increasingly regarded as a valuable extension from undergraduate study in that it goes beyond a “baseline” BA qualification by. Read more
An MA in English is increasingly regarded as a valuable extension from undergraduate study in that it goes beyond a “baseline” BA qualification by:

--offering students an anticipated edge in the professional job market;

--enhancing applications for teacher training where advanced specialist knowledge can be an asset;

--providing necessary postgraduate experience for students who intend to continue their study of literature at MPhil/PhD level;

--providing a year of literary study for those who wish to take a career break.

Intended to meet the needs of students who have a passion for English literature and wish to extend their undergraduate study by engaging in further fast-track study leading to a Master’s qualification, our MA is designed as a one-year full-time programme. (In some years a part-time route may be available-please check our website for details).

The MA timetable has been designed to enable concentration of seminars within two days (Monday and Tuesday) to offer flexibility with students’ other commitments.

Our MA offers opportunities to those who wish to pursue an eclectic generalist programme of modules and to those who seek specialisation in particular areas of literary study. Students, therefore, enrol on one of three pathways.

MA IN ENGLISH LITERATURE
The MA in English Literature pathway enables students to select from a range of modules and work in a variety of areas either not covered in their undergraduate choices, or which they desire more deeply to examine. Contributing tutors are acknowledged experts in their specialisms.

MA IN ENGLISH: CHILDREN'S LITERATURE
The MA in English: Children's Literature focuses on key areas within children’s literature and draws on the department’s long-established reputation in this field. Our 1981 introduction of an undergraduate module in Children’s Literature made us one of the earliest English departments, nationally or internationally, to offer modules in this rapidly expanding and popular field of study.

MA IN ENGLISH: LITERATURES VICTORIAN AND MODERN
The MA in English: Literatures Victorian and Modern attends to specific genres, types, and sub-periods of literature within the consistently popular Victorian and Modern periods. It differs from period-based MAs in other institutions by offering modules in specific literary types rather than generalist or panoramic treatments of period.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE
All MA students complete “Issues, Scholarship and Method in Literary Research” 1 and 2, four option modules, and produce a 15,000-word dissertation. Taught modules run for one term each. The dissertation is completed during Term 3 and the summer.

MANDATORY ELEMENTS:

MLS4ISM1: Issues, Scholarship and Method in Literary Research 1

MLS4ISM2: Issues, Scholarship and Method in Literary Research 2

MLS4DIS: Dissertation

OPTION MODULES:

MLS4CMCL: Classics of Modern Children’s Literature *#

MLS4NCCL: Nineteenth-century Children’s Literature *#

MLS4VCF: Victorian Crime Fiction #

MLS4LFS: Literature of the Fin de Siècle #

MLS4LWTC: Literature and War in the Twentieth Century #

MLS4LYAF: Young Adult Fiction *#

PATHWAY REQUIREMENTS
Students taking the MA in English Literature pathway can choose any four options and may write their dissertation on an approved topic in any area of English literature.

Students taking the MA in English: Children's Literature pathway must take at least two of the modules marked * over the course of the year and complete their dissertation on an approved topic in children’s literature.

Students taking the MA in English: Literatures Victorian and Modern pathway must take at least two of the modules marked # over the course of the year and complete their dissertation on an approved topic in Victorian and/or Modern literatures.

Please see our website for further details. The Programme Convenor welcomes enquiries about any aspect of the programme.

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The MLitt in English Studies is a literature degree offering specialist options in each of the major literary periods, from Old English to the present day. Read more
The MLitt in English Studies is a literature degree offering specialist options in each of the major literary periods, from Old English to the present day. Our expert tutors will introduce you to the very latest academic debates, along with longstanding critical issues such as race, class and sexuality.

Why study English Studies at Dundee?

The MLitt English Studies is a taught one year full-time, or two years part-time, postgraduate degree, which can be tailored to your needs, allowing you to pursue any literary interest you can imagine, whether it’s Arthurian literature or American crime fiction, animal rights or post colonialism.

This degree will:
Provide training in literary and cultural research as a firm basis for proceeding to doctoral work
Provide a taught postgraduate programme to suit individual student research interests and research needs
Enable completion of a dissertation of 18,000 words: an independent piece of work based on primary texts and sources, on your own topic, under the direction of an expert in the field.

Unique to Dundee is the “Special Author” option module, which allows you to explore in depth the full range of your chosen author’s works, whether it might be the Harry Potter series, Walter Scott’s Waverley novels, or the poems of Geoffrey Hill. Other examples include: Shakespeare, Jonathan Swift, Robert Burns, Jane Austen, Charles Dickens, George Orwell, Joseph Conrad, or Angela Carter.

What's so good about English Studies at Dundee?

Research Excellence:
English Studies is part of the School of Humanities at Dundee, is a centre of research excellence, we have recognized strengths in book history, authorship studies and visual culture, and we lead the way in interdisciplinary scholarship. Our research culture thrives on probing the creative relationships between literature and film, poetry and theatre, word and image.

In the most recent RAE, a full 90% of English's research publications were rated as of international excellence in terms of their 'originality, significance and rigour' and 45% of our research output was rated in the two very highest categories of 'international excellence'.

Postgraduate Culture

The English at Dundee offers a lively postgraduate culture, including a regular postgraduate forum, visiting speakers and an annual postgraduate conference.

We are also home to an annual Literary Festival which regularly attracts high profile writers to Dundee.

"The English department at the University of Dundee is worth recommending for a number of reasons ... I greatly enjoyed the fact that I was allowed a free hand with my own research; supervision being present and supportive, but not controlling or stifling in the least."
Samira Nadkarni, MLitt English Studies

Who should study this course?

As well as being a research preparation degree for students who intend to proceed to a PhD, this course also caters directly for students who wish to take their first degree to a higher level of advanced study, for either career development or merely general interest.

The start date is September each year, and lasts for 12 months on a full-time basis, or 24 months part-time

How you will be taught

All the core teaching is conducted 5.30-7.30pm to allow attendance by part-time and full-time students alike. Other classes are scheduled for the mutual convenience of staff and students.

What you will study

There is one core module: Approaches to Literary and Visual Culture which runs over two semesters, and you choose two optional modules, from the list available each year, plus the English Studies Dissertation.

Below is a typical list of modules, which varies from year to year, and is subject to demand and availability. You can also choose your optional modules from any grouping.

Medieval and Renaissance Literature

History of the Book, 1500-1800
Arthurian Literature from Chaucer to Malory and Beyond
The History of Drama: from the Greeks to the Victorians
Exploring Old English Texts
Special Author: directed reading
Eighteenth- and Nineteenth-Century Literature

History of the Book, 1500-1800
The Scottish Novel
Arthurian Literature from Chaucer to Malory and Beyond
Approaches to Film Adaptation
The History of Drama: from the Greeks to the Victorians
British and Irish Poetry, 1680-1830
Intermedial Poetic-Visual Art Works
The Pictured Page: Literature to Comics
Literature & Society, 1750-1900
The Irish Novel
Special Author: directed reading
Modern and Contemporary Literature

The Scottish Novel
Constructing Identities: Self, Subject and Persona in Contemporary Poetry
Virginia Woolf
The History of Drama: from the Greeks to the Victorians
The Pictured Page: Literature to Comics
The Irish Novel
The Literature of Hollywood
Writing, Texts and Books
Joyce and the Cinema
Postwar American Fiction and Transatlantic Exchange
Intermedial Poetic-Visual Art Works
Gender, Ethnicity, Text: Contemporary Readings
Special Author: directed reading
For the current list, visit the Humanities website.

How you will be assessed

Assessment is normally by extended essays for each module. All students allowed to progress to the MLitt phrase must attempt the dissertation. Students whose dissertation fails to satisfy the examiners will be awarded the PG Diploma, provided that the taught elements of the course have been successfully completed.

Careers

Students who take this course will gain a solid foundation from which they can proceed to doctoral research.

However, due to the non-vocational nature of a Humanities degree many students also enter jobs unrelated to their course of study. For these students this course provides them with an opportunity to further develop their written presentation skills, as well as the ability to work independently and plan independent research and study.

"I am so glad I did the Creative Writing module offered by the English department at Dundee as part of my MLitt degree pathway in Humanities. I am currently finishing a second novel, halfway through writing the script of a play, and working on a paper for the Conference of Clinical Anatomists. I am also involved in two or three different writing-in-the-community projects. The contacts I've made, and my confidence in trying different genres, is in large part attributable to that module."
Eddie Small, recent graduate

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Students have the opportunity to explore the key developments in modern and contemporary literary studies in dialogue with leading scholars in the fields… Read more

MLitt in Modern and Contemporary Literature and Culture

Students have the opportunity to explore the key developments in modern and contemporary literary studies in dialogue with leading scholars in the fields of Modernism, including T S Eliot and Virginia Woolf; women’s writing and gender studies; crime fiction; contemporary critical theory; modern and contemporary poetry; postcolonialism; Scottish literature; war writing; literature of the 1940s; British cinema and music.
• Detailed exploration of a range of topics and texts from the period.
• Enhance textual knowledge.
• Promote thinking about the interconnections between modern and contemporary literature and its historical, cultural and theoretical context.

Teaching methods: Seminar (and some didactic classes and hands-on practical sessions).
Assessment: Coursework essays, assessed exercises, Dissertation.
Contact hours: Variable from module to module: see individual module descriptions for details.

See the website http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/english/postgraduate/

Features

* The School admits around 30 new taught postgraduate students each year.

* Research excellence in all periods of English literature from Old English to the present day.

* Members of the School include winners of the Queen’s Gold Medal for Poetry, Whitbread Prize, T S Eliot Prize for Poetry, the Forward Poetry Prize, the Geoffrey Faber Prize, the Somerset Maugham Award, the Canongate Prize, the Petrarca Preis, the Prix Zepter Prize and a Commonwealth Writers Prize for fiction.

* The University has one of the highest concentrations of mediaevalists in the UK, united by the St Andrews Institute of Mediaeval Studies (SAIMS).

* The School is home to the Cambridge University Press edition of Virginia Woolf edited by Susan Sellers and Jane Goldman (University of Glasgow), making St Andrews a prestigious international centre for Woolf studies.

* Members of the School sit on the editorial board of Forum for Modern Language Studies, a humanities journal published by Oxford University Press.

Postgraduate community

The School has a vibrant postgraduate community of around 80 students (full and part time) with a dedicated administrator who manages and advises on all postgraduate matters from admissions queries to PhD vivas, ensuring continuity for both postgraduates and staff.

Postgraduates meet regularly at the School’s Postgraduate Forum and at various voluntary seminar series organised by English or other Schools within the Faculty of Arts. The crossfertilisation of ideas between traditional literary / theoretical research and creative writing provides a uniquely stimulating environment supporting the usual individual meetings between postgraduate students and their supervisors. All taught postgraduates have access to research funds to help offset the costs of attending conferences or other research libraries.

Students are part of a welcoming and lively academic community. There is an active student-run Literary Society and the Postgraduate Forum, where postgraduates meet to present and discuss their ongoing work. Each semester, the School invites distinguished visiting academics and creative writers to lead seminars, lectures and workshops as part of our regular research events.

Facilities

The teaching rooms and staff offices of the School of English are housed in two nineteenth-century stone buildings, Castle House
and Kennedy Hall, opposite St Andrews Castle and overlooking the sea. 66 North Street, the School’s dedicated Centre for research students, is only a few minutes’ walk away. It offers bench rooms with PC workstations for all postgraduates, both taught and research. This lovely nineteenth-century building also has a well-used kitchen, common room and sunny garden. The encouragement of postgraduate study is a special concern of ours, and the number of postgraduate students has grown markedly in recent years.

The University Library has outstanding resources for research in English. The Copyright Deposit Collection contains approximately 40,000 volumes, covering the whole subject area from 1709 to 1837, and approximately 5,000 volumes of periodicals which ceased publication before 1841. Some of this material is not held in the National Library of Scotland. The print collection therefore offers an impressive range of opportunities for research in eighteenth-century literature, the Scottish Enlightenment and Romanticism.

The University Library also subscribes to a wide variety of online databases, including JISC Historic Books for access to almost all printed books to 1800, and Defining Gender 1450- 1910 for material supporting the School’s work in gender and sexuality studies. Manuscript collections extend from mediaeval archives through some of the world’s most detailed records of eighteenth and nineteenth-century reading to the papers of the contemporary poet Douglas Dunn. Postgraduates have the opportunity to work with expert Library staff in areas ranging from palaeography to digital humanities.

Additional application information

All MLitt applicants should submit a sample of written work of around 2,000 words. This must be a critical academic essay (or extract) related to the proposed field of study. Applicants for the MLitt programme in Creative Writing should also include a typed portfolio of original verse, prose or play/ screenwriting (around 10 poems or 10-15 pages of prose or play/screenwriting). In addition, all applicants should submit a Supplementary Application Form in place of a personal statement. The form may be downloaded from the website at: http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/english/postgraduate/applying/documents/

Funding: investing in your future

The School of English normally offers a small number of its own awards for suitably qualified applicants who have been accepted for an MLitt. These are open to both home/EU and overseas students. Up-to-date information can be found at: http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/english/postgraduate/funding/

Recent School of English taught postgraduate students have also succeeded in obtaining funding from a variety of external sources in order to study here, including the Marshall Scholarship, the Ransome Trust and Scotland’s Saltire Scholarship fund.

Details of these and other scholarship opportunities and initiatives can be found on the University’s scholarships webpages: http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/study/pg/fees-and-funding/scholarships/taught/

Careers

Following a taught postgraduate course in English at the University, students go on to pursue careers in a range of sectors including journalism, marketing, publishing and teaching. Others continue in academia, moving on to a PhD. The Careers Centre offers one-to-one advice to all students on a taught postgraduate course and offers a programme of events to assist students to build their employability skills.

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The English team at Canterbury Christ Church University is based in the School of Humanities and has a proven track record of excellent supervision by active and internationally acclaimed academic researchers. Read more
The English team at Canterbury Christ Church University is based in the School of Humanities and has a proven track record of excellent supervision by active and internationally acclaimed academic researchers. It has an established and vibrant postgraduate community.

Visit the website: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/courses/postgraduate/english-literature.aspx

An MA in English is increasingly regarded as a valuable extension of undergraduate study in that it:

• offers you an anticipated edge in the professional job market;
• enhances applications for teacher training where advanced specialist knowledge can be an asset. The PGCE English team in the Education department at Canterbury Christ Church University strongly encourages students to gain an MA before applying for the PGCE;
• provides essential postgraduate experience for you if you intend to continue your study of literature at MPhil/PhD level;
• provides a period of literary study if you wish to take a career break.

Course detail

The course offers opportunities to those who wish to pursue an eclectic generalist programme of modules and to those who seek specialisation in particular areas of literary study. You'll therefore enrol on one of four pathways:

• MA in English Literature
• MA in English (Literatures of Childhood)
• MA in English (Literatures Victorian and Modern)
• MA in English (Literatures Medieval and Early Modern)

For more details on pathways please contact the School of Humanities.

Suitability

The MA in English Literature is aimed at anyone interested in studying literature in depth. Our students usually include recent graduates wishing to continue their studies and mature students returning to literary studies after a longer or shorter time of pursuing other interests.

Content

Term one
• Imagining England: Landscape and Identity in Medieval and Early Modern Literature (20 credits)
• Modern and Contemporary Literature of Childhood (20 credits)
• Victorian Crime Fiction (20 credits)

Term two
• Case Studies in Early Modern Literature (20 credits)
• Classic Children’s Literature (20 credits)
• Literature of the Fin de Siècle (20 credits)
• Literature and War from 1914 to the Present (20 credits)

Format

Learning and teaching is predominantly by two-hour seminars designed to facilitate scholarly debate on specific topics and texts. Individual tutorials are also offered to students in all modules, and individual supervision forms an essential part of work on the dissertation.

Assessment

Assessment is mainly by a range of written coursework including research essays and a 15,000-word dissertation. There are no exams.

What can I do next?

This programme is a significant qualification in its own right, but if you wish to pursue further study it will also give you an opportunity to progress to an MPhil/ PhD or take a PGCE.

The research and writing skills you'll gain, together with the specialist disciplinary knowledge developed during the course, will enhance your employability and can provide an invaluable grounding for careers in teaching, media and journalism, publishing and marketing.

How to apply

For information on how to apply, please follow this link: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/how-to-apply/how-to-apply.aspx

Funding

-Masters Loans-

From 2016/17 government loans of up to £10,000 are available for postgraduate Masters study. The loans will be paid directly to students by the Student Loans Company and will be subject to both personal and course eligibility criteria.

For more information available here: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/funding-your-degree/funding-your-postgraduate-degree.aspx

-2017/18 Entry Financial Support-

Information on alternative funding sources is available here: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/funding-your-degree/2017-18-entry-financial-support.aspx

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Oxford University's Master of Studies in Creative Writing is a two-year, part-time master's degree course offering a unique combination of high contact hours, genre specialization, and critical and creative breadth. Read more
Oxford University's Master of Studies in Creative Writing is a two-year, part-time master's degree course offering a unique combination of high contact hours, genre specialization, and critical and creative breadth.

The emphasis of this postgraduate creative writing course is cross-cultural and cross-genre, pointing up the needs and challenges of the contemporary writer who produces his or her creative work in the context of a global writerly and critical community. The master's degree in creative writing offers a clustered learning format of five Residences, two Guided Retreats and one Placement over two years. The research Placement, a distinguishing feature of the course, offers between one and two weeks' hands-on experience of writing in the real world. Students may undertake their placement in a literary agency, a publishing house, the offices of a literary periodical, a theatre company, a screen production company, or other relevant organization. Placement organisations have included Macmillan, Initialise Films, Random House, the BBC, the Literary Review, AM Heath, Pegasus Theatre, the Poetry Society, and Carcanet.

The virtual open event for this programme is available to watch at http://www.conted.ox.ac.uk/cwopenday. The open event features acting Course Director Jane Draycott and course administrator Rebecca Rue, who discuss the programme, its requirements and the student experience. Participants' questions were texted in and answered during the event. A FAQ of all the questions and their answers is available at the top of this section.

The MSt has a blog, a resource for Oxford events, calls for submission, competitions, news, interviews and more, which is available at http://blogs.conted.ox.ac.uk/mstcw/.

"The Oxford MSt enables you to fast-track your career in writing."
- Fortuna Burke

"… the freedom to explore and experiment… has been fundamental to my development as a writer."
- Clare Tetley

"The range and variety of the group … offers truly exciting opportunities for the kind of exchanges that really accelerate your development as a writer."
- Michael Schuller

"What does the course offer? Self-discipline, professionalism and confidence."
- Abigail Green-Dove

"My life has been so enriched and expanded. My writing evolves daily through the tools that you gave me. Not to mention the wonderful friendships formed throughout our two years together."
- Lindsay Moore

"The Masters in Oxford, while encouraging creativity, raised the bar on the quality of the finished work and gave me the discipline to be a professional."
- Bette Adriaanse

"I doubt there’s a more suitable MSt in the United Kingdom for work which challenges boundaries and takes risks."
- Jennifer Thorp

Students and alumni have won a wide range of prizes. These successes include winning the Gregory O’Donoghue Prize, the Writers’ Village International Short Fiction Award 2014, the Parallel Universe Poetry Competition, the Martin Starkie Prize, the International Jane Martin Poetry Prize, the Heritage Arts Radio play competition, the Cascade Pictures Writer’s Couch pitching competition, first prize in the Poetry Book Society Student Poetry Competition, the Miracle Poetry Competition, Best Photography Book Award from POYi (Pictures of the Year international), and the Yeovil Literary Prize for Poetry. Two alumni have won the Oxford University’s DL Chapman Memorial Prize, another was a finalist in the 2013 Writers at Work Fellowship Competition, and another won the London Fringe Festival’s Short Fiction Award. Alumni have been awarded a Toshiba Studentship, a Hawthornden Fellowship, and funded residencies at the Banff Centre, Canada, and at the Expansionists Project, Whitstable.

Students and alumni have had their work shortlisted across the genres for, among others, the Asham Award, the Bridport Prize, the Bridport Prize for Flash Fiction, the Fish Flash Fiction prize, the Yeoville Literary Prize, the Oxonian poetry prize, the Fish Short Story Prize 2013, the Big Issue in the North’s New Writing Award, the Oxonian review, and the Aesthetica Creative Writing Competition. A 2010 graduate was short-listed for the Crime Writers’ Association Debut Dagger award 2011. Two alumni were longlisted for the Dylan Thomas Prize, and one was shortlisted. An alumnus’ debut novel also made the longlist for the Not the Booker Prize.

Visit the website https://www.conted.ox.ac.uk/about/mst-in-creative-writing

Destinations

Many of our graduate students have signed with agents, and each year a number go on to undertake doctoral study in creative writing or English Literature. Our graduates have obtained positions in publishing, media and the creative arts industries, as well as teaching positions in tertiary education.

The MSt has enjoyed a very strong application field since its inception, attracting record interest in recent years from a global constituency of writers. The course`s emphasis on critical analysis as well as on writerly and creative excellence attracts students of commensurately strong academic potential as well as of significant creative promise. This combination of academic rigour and creativity is a central distinctive feature of the course. The resulting emphasis on exploration and the development of an individual writerly voice serve to attract particularly talented students from around the world as well as a strongly diverse group of UK students of varied backgrounds and ethnicity.

Continuing education and life-long learning in Oxford have been formally linked to the collegiate system of the University since 1990, when Kellogg College, the University’s 36th college, was established. Please consult http://www.kellogg.ox.ac.uk/.

Who should apply?

We are looking for writers with a proven record of commitment to their craft. You should be a keen reader, and bring an open-minded, questioning approach to both reading and writing. You will not necessarily have yet achieved publication, but you will have written regularly and read widely over a sustained period. You will be keen to dedicate time and energy and staying-power to harnessing your talent, enlarging your skills, and aiming your writerly production at consistently professional standards. It is likely you will have a first degree, or equivalent, although in some cases other evidence of suitability may be acceptable.

For applicants with a degree from the USA, the minimum GPA we normally seek is 3.6 out of 4.0. We do not seek a Graduate Record Examination (GRE) or GMAT score. Although a GRE or GMAT score is not a formal requirement, if one is available it should be supplied.

The high number of contact hours are concentrated into Residences and Retreats. Students should be at a stage in their writing where, with appropriate guidance, they can undertake agreed assignments, projects and essays between meetings. There is a dedicated Course Website for provision of up-to-date information; contact and exchange between students; and contact between students and tutors. The course, however, is not a ‘distance-learning’ course, and tutors, while being happy to help with questions or problems, do not offer regular weekly ‘office hours’.

The M.St is unlikely to be suitable for those who are just starting out on their writerly and critical development.

If you have any doubts about whether the M.St is right for your stage of development, please consult the website for information on our Undergraduate Diploma in Creative Writing https://www.conted.ox.ac.uk/dipcw

What does the course cover?

The first year concentrates equally on prose (fiction and narrative non-fiction), poetry and drama. There is a significant critical reading and analysis component, which is linked to the writerly considerations explored in each of the three genres. Students are expected to engage fully with all three genres, in a spirit of exploration and with the aim of discovering what impact and relevance unaccustomed genres have for the development of their individual writerly voice. This necessarily involves undertaking assignments and exercises in areas that are new to students, and do not relate directly to any work they may have in progress. Students may be able to continue with their own longer term pieces-in-progress but the concentration of year 1 teaching is on producing new work, and the exercises and assignments, which should take priority, reflect this emphasis.

The second year offers specialisation in a single genre, again accompanied by a significant critical element focused around issues of interest to the individual student and related to the genre of choice.

Your specialisation choices are as follows:

- The novel
- Short fiction
- Radio drama
- TV drama
- Screenwriting
- Stage drama
- Poetry
- Narrative non-fiction

In year 2, the specialisation in the genre of students’ choice provides an opportunity for significant concentration on either new work, or, subject to consultation with supervisor, on existing work-in-progress.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/graduate/applying-to-oxford

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Add expertise to your talent and ideas and learn in the company of industry experts on this innovative, inspiring course for aspiring writers. Read more
Add expertise to your talent and ideas and learn in the company of industry experts on this innovative, inspiring course for aspiring writers.

If you want to make a career in writing, this course is for you. You already have talent and ideas, we’ll add the expertise you need to approach your chosen market with confidence, originality and skill. No ambitions are out of bounds: we love commercial genre fiction and literary experiments equally.

We aim to ensure our graduates are equipped to succeed - and to change the culture they choose to enter.

See the website http://www.napier.ac.uk/en/Courses/MA-Creative-Writing-Postgraduate-FullTime

What you'll learn

We take an innovative approach to the training and support of aspiring writers, driven by intellectual ambition and practical industry experience. There are four strands to the programme:

• developing narrative technique
• practising vocational skills (including abridgement, adaptation and collaborative creation)
• experimental, theoretical and personal development work
• regular one-to-one editorial mentoring

Uniquely, the course offers a dynamic range of cross-disciplinary options. Writing for graphic fiction, screenwriting, interactive media and creative non-fiction are all offered as specialisms, while our pioneering module in genre fiction covers crime, horror, fantasy and science fiction with YA options in each.

We host an exciting programme of lectures and master classes from award-winning authors and high-profile industry experts. In addition, an internationally recognised author joins us for 12 months as Writer in Residence, to develop new work alongside students, share experience and offer one-to-one consultations.

Our approach to full-length narrative development trains you to deploy a range of unique and dynamic pre-writing techniques invented by our programme. This energetic combination of conceptual development and critical self-reflection will transform you into a technically adept, purposeful writer ready to make your mark.

The course is taught by industry professionals Sam Kelly, a former literary agent and David Bishop, a successful working writer and former editor. In addition to campus facilities, our students have access to the Writers’ Room, a private workspace with Wi-Fi, available evenings and weekends. It houses an exclusive library of 2,000 hand-picked books, DVDs and graphic novels and is the venue for reading groups and social events.

The MA is piloting a Teaching Internship Scheme, offering selected graduates the opportunity to develop their teaching practice with the course for a further year.

Modules

• Creating Narrative – Writer’s Toolkit
• Innovation and Authorship
• Creative and Editorial Development
• Writing Practice – First Person Narrative
• Writing Graphic Fiction
• Writing Genre Fiction
• Creative Non-Fiction
• Interactive Media
• Major Project

Study modules mentioned above are indicative only. Some changes may occur between now and the time that you study.

Careers

Among our graduates’ achievements are:

• book deals
• representation by literary agents
• international and national competition wins
• publication in magazines and anthologies
• Edinburgh International Book Festival appearances
• paid editing and writing commissions
• performances and teaching
• working for national literary organisations

How to apply

http://www.napier.ac.uk/study-with-us/postgraduate/how-to-apply

SAAS Funding

Nothing should get in the way of furthering your education. Student Awards Agency Scotland (SAAS) awards funding for postgraduate courses, and could provide the help you need to continue your studies. Find out more: http://www.napier.ac.uk/study-with-us/postgraduate/fees-and-funding/saas-funded-courses

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Digital technology has transformed the editing process, yet it has also dramatically diminished the role of the assistant editor so that opportunities to learn the art of editing as an apprentice are increasingly hard to find. Read more
Digital technology has transformed the editing process, yet it has also dramatically diminished the role of the assistant editor so that opportunities to learn the art of editing as an apprentice are increasingly hard to find.

Quick Facts:

2 Year Course
Full-time
Course runs Jan-Dec each year
Next intake: January 2017
NFTS Scholarships available for UK Students

Visit the website https://nfts.co.uk/our-courses/masters/editing

TO APPLY CONTACT REGISTRY - https://nfts.co.uk/contact-us

COURSE OVERVIEW

- Unique course in UK.
- Creative and technical skills developed.
- Study in a collaborative, filmmaking environment.
- Students assigned individual editing suites.
- The NFTS is an Avid Education Partner.
- Unlike other schools, all production costs are met by the School.

This course commences in January each year. This course provides a thorough education in editing skills in a professional filmmaking environment. Editing students are encouraged to consider their craft as part of the whole process of film and television production and not merely as the final stage, making them true collaborators, not just efficient technicians.

The emphasis of the Editing curriculum is firmly on storytelling and the relationship between editor and director. Students learn to apply their craft to the demands of fiction, documentary and animation, creating visual narratives while working with sound, music and, where appropriate, special effects. Workshops with other departments develop concepts of visual storytelling, mise-en-scène, storyboarding, sound design, music and scriptwriting.

Editing graduates have a high rate of employment on feature films, shorts and television programmes. Many new graduates quickly become editors on independent productions or assistant editors on features or TV drama, while others gravitate to visual effects, promos and i-dents. One recent graduate was joint winner of the Best Young Editor Award at Broadcast Magazine's B+ Awards. Recent graduate editing credits include Florence Foster Jenkins, Our Kind of Traitor, The Queen, Hannibal Rising, Reprise at the cinema and Downton Abbey, Paul Merton in China, Holby City, Hustle, CSI: Crime Scene Investigation and Spooks on television.

Tutors

Acting Head of Editing is Robin Sales, whose numerous credits include Walking On Sunshine, The Gruffalo, Miss Potter, Johnny English, Miss Brown.

Alumni

Editors Lucia Zucchetti (The Queen; Mrs Henderson Presents), Alex Mackie (Downton Abbey; St Trinian's; CSI), David Freeman (The Full Monty), Peter Lambert (A Better Life; New Moon), Nicolas Chaudeurge (Wuthering Heights; Fish Tank; Red Road), Valerio Bonelli (Hannibal Rising; Cemetery Junction; Gladiator), Nick Fenton (Submarine; The Arbor), Claire Dodgson (Minions, The Lorax, Charlie and Lola) and Ewa J Lind (Far North; The Warrior) studied here.

CURRICULUM

YEAR ONE

- With Sound Design and Composing students Abstract Film Workshop
- Without Images - a sound-only project
- Dramaturgy Workshop - focusing on script and script analysis, blocking and cover, and performance
- Modules and workshops include Foundation exercises for fiction and documentary editing
- Storyboarding workshop with Animation students Short documentary
- Zen and Beyond - fiction workshop focusing on visual storytelling
- Comedy Workshop - workshop using rushes from a feature film and focusing on editing for comedy and/or drama
- Animation Project - developed and produced to a soundtrack Investigative Documentary - the major first year documentary production First Year Film - the major 1st year fiction production collaborating with all other departments

YEAR TWO

- Fiction editing exercise focusing on drama editing and co-editing using complete rushes from a feature film
- 2nd year fiction production, shot on a digital format
- Graduation films in documentary, fiction and animation

Unlike other schools, all production costs are met by the School. In addition you will be given a cash Production Budget. NFTS students are engaged in more productions as part of the curriculum than any of our competitors.

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

The Editing course is part of the Post Production department, where we are looking to assemble a group of students with diverse and varied backgrounds. There is no 'typical' student or perfect candidate who conforms to a mandatory list of qualifications.

You are likely to have some Industry experience or training in your chosen field. Your background may be in the arts or other media, you might be looking for a further professional qualification or wish to broaden your knowledge of film and video editing, taking you to a higher level of work.

APPLY WITH

- A DVD no more than 15 minutes running time, of material originally shot on film or video edited by you the applicant. If dialogue is not in English or the DVD does not have subtitles you should send a dialogue transcript in English via email.

- A creative video montage on DVD of found images (obtained from the television, the internet or another source) or existing film footage edited with a soundtrack. The montage should be between 2 and 5 minutes running time, edited by you the applicant. If you do not have access to an editing facility please create a montage of collected photographs which when laid out together tell a story.

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