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Masters Degrees (Crime Analysis)

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This MSc provides students with a thorough understanding of how science and scientifically based techniques can deliver immediate and sustainable reductions in crime. Read more
This MSc provides students with a thorough understanding of how science and scientifically based techniques can deliver immediate and sustainable reductions in crime. The programme focuses on how to better apply science to understand crime problems, develop strategies for preventing them, and increase the probability of detecting and arresting offenders.

Degree information

Students develop the ability to apply scientific principles to crime control, think more strategically in developing and implementing crime control policies, appreciate the complexity of implementation issues, critically assess the likely impact of planned crime reduction initiatives and generate more innovative proposals for reducing particular crime problems.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of four core modules (60 credits), four optional modules (60 credits) and a research dissertation (60 credits). A Postgraduate Diploma comprising four core modules (60 credits) and four optional modules (60 credits) is offered.

Core modules
-Foundations of Security and Crime Science
-Designing and Doing Research
-Preventing Crimes
-Quantitative Methods

Optional modules - students choose four of the following:
-Perspectives on Organised Crime
-Crime Mapping and Spatial Analysis
-Investigation and Detection
-Intelligence Gathering and Analysis
-Qualitative Methods
-Cybercrime
-Introduction to Cybersecurity

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of approximately 10,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through lectures, seminars, tutorials, projects, laboratory classes, and practical exercises. Practical work will involve the analysis and interpretation of data sets, and the development of new ideas for solving problems. Assessment is through lab and project reports, unseen written examination, coursework, presentations, and the dissertation.

Careers

Many graduates now work in the field of crime prevention and detection for public sector employers such as the Home Office, Police and Ministry of Defence, or private sector companies with a crime prevention and community safety focus. Other graduates go on to further doctoral research.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Supply Chain Analyst, Sainsbury's
-MSc Forensic Psychology, University of Portsmouth
-Security Co-Ordinator, Murphy
-Forensic Associate, Deloitte
-Detective Constable, Metropolitan Police Service

Employability
Each year we ask our graduates to tell us about their experience of the programme and their career after leaving UCL and we include some real-life graduate profiles on our website: http://www.ucl.ac.uk/scs/degree-programmes/postgraduate/graduate-profiles

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Security & Crime Science is a world-first, devoted specifically to reducing crime through teaching, research, public policy analysis and by the dissemination of evidence-based information on crime reduction.

The Crime Science MSc is a multidisciplinary degree, drawing on expertise in psychology, social science, statistics, mathematics, architecture, forensic sciences, design, geography and computing.

Our graduate students come from varied backgrounds; many are practitioners and are encouraged to contribute their experience in and out of the classroom.

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This programme provides students with a thorough understanding of how science and scientifically-based techniques can deliver immediate and sustainable reductions in crime. Read more
This programme provides students with a thorough understanding of how science and scientifically-based techniques can deliver immediate and sustainable reductions in crime. The programme focuses on how to apply science better to understand crime problems, develop investigative strategies for preventing them and increase the probability of detecting and arresting offenders.

Degree information

Students develop the ability to apply scientific principles to crime control, think more strategically in developing and implementing crime control policies, appreciate the complexity of implementation issues, critically assess the likely impact of planned crime reduction initiatives and generate more innovative proposals for reducing particular crime problems.

This programme can be taken as classroom based (full time or flexible) or by distance learning. Students undertake modules to the value of 60 credits. The programme consists of one core module (15 credits) and three optional modules (45 credits).

Core modules
-Foundations of Security and Crime Science

Optional modules - students choose three of the following:
-Designing and Doing Research
-Quantitative Methods
-Preventing Crimes
-Crime Mapping and Spatial Analysis
-Qualitative Methods
-Investigation and Detection
-Perspectives on Organised Crime
-Perspectives on Terrorism
-Prevention and Disruption

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through lectures, seminars, tutorials, projects, laboratory classes, and practical exercises. Practical work will involve the analysis and interpretation of data sets, and the development of new ideas for solving problems. Assessment is through laboratory and project reports, unseen written examinations, coursework and presentations.

Careers

Many graduates now work in the field of crime prevention and detection for public sector employers such as the Home Office, Police and Ministry of Defence (MOD), or private sector companies with a crime prevention and community safety focus. Other graduates go on to further doctoral research.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL Security & Crime Science is a world first, devoted specifically to reducing crime through teaching, research, public policy analysis and by the dissemination of evidence-based information on crime reduction.

Crime science is supported by the police, forensic psychologists, applied criminologists, economists, architects, statisticians and geographers, and has been strongly endorsed by the government.

This multidisciplinary programme draws on expertise in psychology, geography, criminology, philosophy and a range of forensic sciences. Our graduate students come from varied backgrounds; many are practitioners and are encouraged to contribute their experience in and out of the classroom.

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Criminology has a long and distinguished tradition at Kent with its research base in the Crime, Culture and Control Cluster. The MA was founded by the world-famous criminologist, the late Professor Jock Young. Read more
Criminology has a long and distinguished tradition at Kent with its research base in the Crime, Culture and Control Cluster.

The MA was founded by the world-famous criminologist, the late Professor Jock Young. You will be lectured, supervised and tutored by a team of scholars and researchers internationally renowned for their world-class teaching and publications.

Criminology is an important part of the activities of the School of Social Policy, Sociology and Social Research (SSPSSR), which is one of the four top institutions of its kind in the UK as ranked by the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise. In 2012, we were awarded the first National Award for Excellence in Teaching Criminology by the British Criminology Society in recognition of our innovative approach.

The atmosphere of the School is informal and friendly and there is a lively and diverse postgraduate community. Regular staff/graduate seminars introduce you to the work of academic staff and research students as well as academic visitors, and provide opportunities both for sociability and for intellectual stimulation. The large number of academic staff and our favourable staff/student ratios mean that academic staff are readily accessible. Where appropriate, research students are encouraged to teach part-time in the School.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/177/criminology

Research areas

Our research areas are listed below; wider research areas are also available from our European partner institutions.

- Crime, Control and Culture

The School has a long-established tradition of conducting criminological research. The group covers a diverse range of topics, employs both qualitative and quantitative methodologies and draws upon different theoretical traditions. We have particular expertise in the following areas: cultural criminology; crime, punishment and social change; drug use; gender, crime and criminal justice; penology and imprisonment (especially of female offenders); policing; quasi-compulsory treatment for drug-using offenders; race, crime and criminal justice; restorative justice and young offenders; crime and the ‘night-time economy’, terrorism and political crime; violence; youth crime and youth justice.

Present and current research has been funded by the ESRC, the Home Office and the Youth Justice Board.

Staff research interests

Kent’s world-class academics provide research students with excellent supervision. The academic staff in this school and their research interests are shown below. You are strongly encouraged to contact the school to discuss your proposed research and potential supervision prior to making an application. Please note, it is possible for students to be supervised by a member of academic staff from any of Kent’s schools, providing their expertise matches your research interests.

Full details of staff research interests can be found on the School's website (http://www.kent.ac.uk/sspssr/staff/).

- Dr Phil Carney:

Lecturer in Criminology; Erasmus and International Co-ordinator; Kent Co-ordinator, Common Study Programme in Critical Criminology

Photographic theory; spectacle; radical criminology; cultural criminology; critical visual culture; post-structuralist critical theory; desire and power; the micropolitics of fascism.

- Dr Caroline Chatwin:

Senior Lecturer in Criminology; Director of Studies for Undergraduate Criminology

European drug policy; young people and victimisation; drug use and subcultural studies.

- Dr Simon Cottee:

Senior Lecturer in Criminology

Sociology of crime and deviance; sociology of intellectuals; terrorism and apostasy; coercion; political violence.

- Professor Chris Hale:

Professor of Criminology

How political debates around law and order have affected responses to crime; quantitative analysis of crime data, especially the relationships between crime and fear of crime with wider economic and social changes; evaluations of new interventions and crime reduction strategies; policing; youth crime.

- Dr Jonathan Ilan:

Lecturer in Criminology

Cultural criminology; street culture; urban ethnography; media and crime; youth crime; justice and policing.

- Professor Roger Matthews:

Professor of Criminology; Director of Studies for Postgraduate Criminology

Penology, community safety and crime prevention, prostitution, armed robbery, punitiveness, left realism. Recent publications include: Prostitution Politics and Policy (2008); Doing Time: An Introduction to the Sociology of Imprisonment (2009).

- Professor Larry Ray:

Professor of Sociology

Sociological theory; globalisation; race and ethnicity; violence.

- Dr Simon Shaw:

Lecturer in Criminal Justice Studies; Director of Studies

Youth crime; youth justice; politics of crime; criminal justice policy-making.

- Emeritus Professor K. Stenson:

Professor of Criminology

Criminological theory, risk and governance, youth crime.

- Professor Alex Stevens:

Professor of Criminal Justice; Deputy Head of School (Medway)

The politics and practice of criminal justice, with a specific emphasis on national and international drug policy, youth justice, gangs, organised crime, probation practice and the use of evidence in policymaking.

Careers

Building on Kent’s success as the region’s leading institution for student employability we place considerable emphasis on you gaining specialist knowledge in your chosen subject alongside core transferable skills. We ensure that you develop the skills and competences that employers are looking for including: research and analysis; policy development and interpretation; independent thought; writing and presentation as well as time management and leadership skills. You also become fully involved in the professional research culture of the School. A postgraduate degree in the area of Criminology is a particularly valuable qualification that can lead to many exciting opportunities and professions.

Recent graduates have gone on to pursue careers across the criminal justice system, encompassing areas such as counter-terrorism, advocacy, probation, social policy and research. Our graduates have found positions in organisations such as the Civil Service, the Ministry of Justice, various police services and the Probation Service.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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This MSc, designed by a panel of academic departments, industrial partners and law enforcement and security agencies, introduces students to the fundamental knowledge, core expertise and advanced, evidence-driven methodological tools and approaches required to understand, analyse, prevent, disrupt and detect organised crime and terrorism. Read more
This MSc, designed by a panel of academic departments, industrial partners and law enforcement and security agencies, introduces students to the fundamental knowledge, core expertise and advanced, evidence-driven methodological tools and approaches required to understand, analyse, prevent, disrupt and detect organised crime and terrorism.

Degree information

Students develop an understanding of how science, engineering and a variety of professional disciplines can contribute to tackling organised crime and terrorism. By the end of the programme, they will be able to apply appropriate scientific principles and methods to security problems, think strategically to develop and implement countermeasures, and appreciate the complexity involved in the design and implementation of organised crime and terrorism threat-reduction technologies.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

Students are required to complete five core modules (75 credits), three optional modules (45 credits), and a dissertation (60 credits). A Postgraduate Diploma comprising five core modules (75 credits) and three optional modules (45 credits), and which may lead to the MSc, is offered.

Core modules
-Perspectives on Organised Crime
-Perspectives on Terrorism
-Foundations of Security and Crime Science
-Designing and Doing Research
-Quantitative Methods

Optional modules - students choose three of the following:
-Qualitative Methods
-Crime Mapping and Spatial Analysis
-Investigation and Detection
-Cybercrime
-Intelligence Gathering and Analysis
-Risk and Contingency Planning
-Introduction to Cybersecurity
-Prevention and Disruption
-Terrorism (External – Political Science)

NB: places for optional modules are awarded on a first-come first-served basis.

Dissertation/report
All MSc students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, tutorials, projects and laboratory classes. Student performance is assessed through laboratory and project reports, unseen written examination, coursework, presentations, and the research project and dissertation.

Careers

This unique linking of organised crime and terrorism, and the study of methodologies that can practically tackle both of these areas, means that this MSc holds appeal for employers across a broad range of industries.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Consultant, BAE Systems
-Criminal Intelligence Analyst, Avon and Somerset Constabulary
-Detective, Metropolitan Police Service
-Field Intelligence Officer, West Mercia Police
-Head of Counter Terrorism (Deputy Inspector General), Government of Pakistan

Employability
This programme equips students with the knowledge to develop operational strategies to counter organised crime and terrorism. This unique linking of organised crime and terrorism, and the study of methodologies that can practically tackle both of these areas, means that this MSc holds appeal for employers across a broad range of industries.

Each year we ask our graduates to tell us about their experience of the programme and their career after leaving UCL and we include some real-life graduate profiles on our website: http://www.ucl.ac.uk/scs/degree-programmes/postgraduate/graduate-profiles

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Jill Dando Institute, of which UCL Security & Crime Science is the core component, is the first research institution in the world devoted specifically to reducing crime through teaching, research, public policy analysis and by the dissemination of evidence-based information on crime reduction.

This MSc programme is delivered by experienced practitioners and researchers working in counter-terrorism, intelligence, law enforcement, risk assessment and security technology. It boasts a unique multidisciplinary platform, being the only postgraduate programme of its kind in the world taught in a faculty of engineering sciences, integrating the cutting-edge of the social and engineering sciences in the security domain.

Our graduate students come from varied backgrounds; many are practitioners and are encouraged to contribute their experience in and out of the classroom.

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Understand crime and policy in a global context. The MA in Global Crime and Justice is designed for students and professionals seeking to develop a career in criminal justice, international organisations, the media and research. Read more
Understand crime and policy in a global context.

Overview

The MA in Global Crime and Justice is designed for students and professionals seeking to develop a career in criminal justice, international organisations, the media and research. You'll study an increasingly important feature of society: transnational crime and the responses taken by states and non-state actors.

You'll engage with the reality of global crime and criminal and related social policies from an interdisciplinary perspective. You will explore global policy analysis and criminal justice with an international approach. You'll also be trained in research methods.

Course content

The MA in Global Crime and Justice is based around a combination of crime, social policy and research training modules. You'll start with an introduction to major theories, institutions and debates in global policy analysis and criminal justice. You'll also get a solid grounding in the core methods of social research. You'll progress to more advanced analysis of global crime and justice, exploring diverse global crimes ranging from drug and human trafficking to corporate and state crimes. You'll also spend time in workshops designed to help you gain the communication and presentation skills you need to disseminate your research in your own research project.

Most people study for full-time for 12 months, but part-time study over 24 months is also available.

Modules
In the autumn term you'll take two compulsory modules:
-Policy Analysis - Crime and Justice
-Introduction to Social Research Methods

In the spring term you'll take another compulsory module that builds upon your earlier study:
-Global Crime and Justice

In the spring term you'll also choose one optional module from:
-Global Social Policy and Global Social Problems
-Comparative Social Policy - Governance, Management and Delivery
-Globalisation and Social Policy

In the summer term and summer months you'll take part in the Graduate Dissertation Workshop. This will give you the chance to develop your research interests and participate in a group project with other students who have similar interests. You will also use this time to work on your individual research project.

Careers

The MA in Global Crime and Justice develops the skills that employers need in a number of areas, especially criminal justice, crime policy analysis and research methods from a global perspective. You'll also find you develop transferable skills that will allow you to progress to different career areas or to continue your studies at PhD level.

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Our MSc Advanced Forensic Analysis course is designed to give you an advanced understanding of the main areas of forensic science and is unlike any other postgraduate course in forensic science, in that it covers in more depth all of the areas touched on in UWE Bristol's undergraduate courses. Read more
Our MSc Advanced Forensic Analysis course is designed to give you an advanced understanding of the main areas of forensic science and is unlike any other postgraduate course in forensic science, in that it covers in more depth all of the areas touched on in UWE Bristol's undergraduate courses. There are modules in all three key areas of forensic science: biology, chemistry and crime scene science and we also offer a module covering more advanced aspects of research and statistics. You can base your in-depth research project aspect of the programme at UWE Bristol's Forensic Analysis department, or on placement with one of our partner forensic providers. These include West Technology or Mass Spec Analytical, and local fire services that rely on the analytical skills you'll develop.

Key benefits

A flexible and highly vocational postgraduate programme, accredited by the Chartered Society of Forensic Sciences, for those looking to enhance skills and knowledge to support careers in forensic science.

You'll have access to the specially modified Crime Scene House, which can be adapted to mimic the conditions typically found at a variety of crime scenes.

The two-bedroom house, which also includes a bathroom, kitchen and lounge, gives you authentic experience of what you might encounter as a forensics professional following a range of incidents and scenarios for example, a burglary, murder or abduction. There is CCTV and two-way communication in all the rooms, along with a control suite to allow live feedback from observing instructors. We can record sessions for analysis and evaluation an excellent learning tool.

Course detail

The department has an excellent bio- sensors research team, which supports this study programme and offers wider perspectives on the role of a forensic scientist.

Through your studies, you will follow evidence from the crime scene, through laboratory examination and analysis, to writing a report for court and giving evidence in a courtroom situation with examination-in-chief and cross examination.

The course is available as a full-time or part-time route, allowing flexibility and access for students already in related employment. It also offers excellent preparation for doctorate-levels studies.

Modules

• Advanced Crime Scene Science
• Forensic Biology and Genetics
• Forensic Analysis and Toxicology
• Research Methods and Practical Skills
• Research Project

Format

The research project is undertaken for the MSc award. Part-time students do this over two terms of the second year in the laboratory where they work. Full-time students carry out the project supervised by specialist subject tutors at UWE Bristol, or on placement with one of our partner forensic providers.

Students who complete all taught modules successfully, but do not undertake the research project, achieve a Postgraduate Diploma.

Students who complete the Forensic Biology and Genetics module successfully, plus any one of the other modules on the course, achieve a Postgraduate Certificate.

Assessment

We assess each taught module through written examinations and coursework. Coursework may be in the form of a case study, practical report, poster or oral presentation. One assessment involves collecting evidence from a mock crime scene, examining it in the laboratory, and providing a written report as you would for a court, plus examination-in-chief and cross examination in a mock courtroom.

Careers / Further study

Our postgraduate course in Advanced Forensic Analysis is highly regarded by forensic science employers it feeds into analytical careers and into specialisms such as DNA analysis. It is also ideal preparation for PhD routes, and UWE Bristol has excellent links with institutions providing doctorate-level programmes in forensic analysis. They use our departmental facilities for aspects of their research.
Graduates have gone on to work with our local partner providers, and in roles that include DNA analyst, forensic chemist and Scene of Crime Officer (SOCO).

How to apply

Information on applications can be found at the following link: http://www1.uwe.ac.uk/study/applyingtouwebristol/postgraduateapplications.aspx

Funding

- New Postgraduate Master's loans for 2016/17 academic year –
-
The government are introducing a master’s loan scheme, whereby master’s students under 60 can access a loan of up to £10,000 as a contribution towards the cost of their study. This is part of the government’s long-term commitment to enhance support for postgraduate study.

Scholarships and other sources of funding are also available.

More information can be found here: http://www1.uwe.ac.uk/students/feesandfunding/fundingandscholarships/postgraduatefunding.aspx

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Criminology has a long and distinguished tradition at Kent with its research base in the Crime, Culture and Control Cluster. The MA was founded by the world-famous criminologist, the late Professor Jock Young. Read more
Criminology has a long and distinguished tradition at Kent with its research base in the Crime, Culture and Control Cluster.

The MA was founded by the world-famous criminologist, the late Professor Jock Young. You are lectured, supervised and tutored by a team of scholars and researchers internationally renowned for their world-class teaching and publications.

Criminology is an important part of the activities of the School of Social Policy, Sociology and Social Research (SSPSSR), which is one of the four top institutions of its kind in the UK. In 2012, we were awarded the first National Award for Excellence in Teaching Criminology by the British Criminology Society in recognition of our innovative approach.

The atmosphere of the School is informal and friendly and there is a lively and diverse postgraduate community. Regular staff/graduate seminars introduce you to the work of academic staff and research students as well as academic visitors, and provide opportunities both for sociability and for intellectual stimulation. The large number of academic staff and our favourable staff/student ratios mean that academic staff are readily accessible.

A key feature of the MA Criminology is its involvement in a Common Study Programme. The Common Study Programme is a biannual student-centred conference at which students are invited to present papers, meet students and staff from other countries and exchange ideas.

The School has international links with colleagues and institutions and our current Visiting Professor of Criminology, Jeff Ferrell is an example of this extended network. Professor Ferrell is based at the Texas Christian University, USA where he is Professor of Sociology. He is a leading proponent of cultural criminology and has conducted research on urban culture, graffiti and media.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/173/criminology

Course structure

The programme involves:

- the sociological study of crime and its application to criminal justice and social policy

- the study of issues at the cutting edge of current criminological debate with a strong emphasis on the cultural context of crime

- advanced criminological theory and research methods as applied to crime and criminal justice.

It also offers opportunities for you to develop your career in the areas of criminal justice, policy development and academic research.

We are constantly developing the modules available to you in line with current issues and staff expertise. Each year we announce new choices, for example we are currently working on developing a module convened by Dr David Redmon which looks at documentary film-making from a social science perspective.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. You will be required to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

SO869 - Theories of Crime (20 credits)
SO870 - Research Methods in Criminology (20 credits)
SO875 - Drugs, Culture and Control (20 credits)
SO881 - Cultural Criminology (20 credits)
SO882 - Young People, Crime and Place (20 credits)
SO885 - Social Suffering (20 credits)
SO940 - Prisons and Penal Policy (20 credits)
LW870 - Introduction to the Criminal Justice System (20 credits)
LW871 - Policing (20 credits)
SO824 - Sociology of Violence (20 credits)
SO825 - Terrorism and Modern Society (20 credits)
SO830 - Gender, Crime and Criminal Justice (20 credits)
SO867 - Foundations of Sociology (20 credits)
SO868 - Critical Criminology (20 credits)
SO998 - Dissertation (60 credits)

Assessment

Assessment is by six coursework essays and the dissertation.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- provide a post-graduate programme in criminology of the highest standard with teaching that is informed by internationally recognised research and scholarship

- give you a comprehensive overview and understanding of contemporary debates in criminology and criminal justice including those around diversity and inequality

- involve you in a critical analysis of crime and punishment in relation to developments in social theory, sociology and social policy

- provide an understanding of the social processes that influence the relationship between individuals, groups and institutions

- focus on the relevance of social science for the analysis and assessment of crime and criminal justice policy

- provide you with an advanced understanding of the ways in which quantitative and qualitative research methodologies may be used to study crime and criminal justice

- give you a critical awareness of the political and populist influences on criminal justice policy

- enable you to understand the emergence of social problems (including crime) and the responses of welfare and criminal justice institutions, including analysis of the theoretical, political and economic underpinnings of these responses

- build on the University’s close European ties by providing the potential for students to participate in the European Common Study programme in Criminology.

Research areas

The School has a long-established tradition of conducting criminological research.

- Crime, Culture and Control:

The group covers a diverse range of topics, employs both qualitative and quantitative methodologies and draws upon different theoretical traditions. We have particular expertise in the following areas: cultural criminology; crime, punishment and social change; drug use; gender, crime and criminal justice; penology and imprisonment (especially of female offenders); policing; quasi-compulsory treatment for drug-using offenders; race, crime and criminal justice; restorative justice and young offenders; crime and the ‘night-time economy’, terrorism and political crime; violence; youth crime and youth justice.

Present and current research has been funded by the ESRC, the Home Office and the Youth Justice Board.

Careers

Building on Kent’s success as the region’s leading institution for student employability we place considerable emphasis on you gaining specialist knowledge in your chosen subject alongside core transferable skills. We ensure that you develop the skills and competences that employers are looking for including: research and analysis; policy development and interpretation; independent thought; writing and presentation as well as time management and leadership skills. You also become fully involved in the professional research culture of the School. A postgraduate degree in the area of Criminology is a particularly valuable qualification that can lead to many exciting opportunities and professions.

Recent graduates have gone on to pursue careers across the criminal justice system, encompassing areas such as counter-terrorism, advocacy, probation, social policy and research. Our graduates have found positions in organisations such as the Civil Service, the Ministry of Justice, various police services and the Probation Service.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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Forensic science is a dynamic discipline that is crucial to the investigation of crime, the collection of evidence and intelligence, and in securing justice. Read more
Forensic science is a dynamic discipline that is crucial to the investigation of crime, the collection of evidence and intelligence, and in securing justice. This multidisciplinary MSc programme offers students a unique opportunity to gain forensic science skills and methods within a holistic crime science framework.

Degree information

Students will develop an understanding of the fundamental principles of crime and forensic science, together with the key conceptual and philosophical frameworks in this field. They will gain practical skills in crime scene investigation, experimental design and implementation, statistical analysis, data analysis and modelling, and will be able to evaluate the weight and applicability of forensic evidence for investigative and court purposes.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits. The programme consists of five core modules (75 credits), three optional modules (45 credits) and a research dissertation (60 credits). An exit-only Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits) is offered.

Core modules
-Quantitative Methods
-Designing and Doing Research
-Understanding and Interpreting Forensic Evidence
-Foundations of Security and Crime Science
-Judicial Decision Making and Expert Evidence

Optional modules - students choose three of the following optional modules:
-Case Assessment and Interpretation for Forensic Scientists
-Fundamentals of Molecular Biology
-Information Security Management
-Forensic Archaeology
-Forensic Osteology
-Forensic Geoscience
-Frontiers in Experimental Physical Chemistry
-Judgment and Decision Making
-Practices of Crime Scene Investigation and Expert Testimony
-Structural Methods in Modern Chemistry

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through lectures, seminars, tutorials, practical exercises and statistical and computer classes. Assessment is through coursework, examination and the dissertation.

Careers

Graduates of this programme will gain the skills necessary for a career in crime investigation, forensic science provision, consultancy, policymaking, and with public sector employers such as police forces, Home Office, and Ministry of Defence. They will also have gained the research tools necessary for a PhD or further doctoral research.

Employability
Graduates from this programme gain a solid understanding of the key principles of crime and forensic science, along with the ability to analyse problems and use appropriate scientific and professional skills to solve them. They can evaluate forensic evidence and their CSI training (developed and delivered with input from London-based police forces) gives them the edge over other applicants for crime scene investigation roles, if this is what they decide to do. They have the opportunity to learn specialist techniques in areas such as forensic archaeology and forensic geoscience, and are given a thorough grounding in academic research methods.

Each year we ask our graduates to tell us about their experience of the programme and their career after leaving UCL and we include some real-life graduate profiles on our website: http://www.ucl.ac.uk/scs/degree-programmes/postgraduate/graduate-profiles

Why study this degree at UCL?

This MSc will train graduates to think strategically and critically about crime and forensic science, equipping them with transferable skills suitable for a wide range of careers.

The UCL Jill Dando Institute of Security and Crime Science (JDI) brings together academics from across the physical sciences, social sciences and humanities. Our graduate students come from varied backgrounds; many are practitioners and are encouraged to share their professional experience.

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Since the Al-Qaeda attacks on the United States in September 2001, there has been a dramatic shift in the nature, study and practices of global politics. Read more
Since the Al-Qaeda attacks on the United States in September 2001, there has been a dramatic shift in the nature, study and practices of global politics. Against a background of intensifying economic, political, cultural and military globalisation, there is now a heightened awareness of terrorism and international crime as threats to global security.

The Terrorism, International Crime and Global Security MA degree identifies the features of these respective threats and explores the challenges to national and global governance, human rights and ethics, criminality and regionalism. This course examines the character of these contemporary global threats, considers specific case studies, and contributes to the debate over how to respond intellectually and in practical policy to these major threats to global security in the post-9/11 world.

WHY CHOOSE THIS COURSE?

-Provides learners with an integrated security perspective
-Combines traditional militarised security concerns with contemporary threats of terrorism, international crime, and non-traditional security
-Provides the opportunity to develop the necessary analytical tools to critically explore the global security environment of the new century
-Among the first course of its kind to offer an integrated approach to studying the increasingly prevalent themes of terrorism, international crime and global security
-You will obtain a critical awareness of the complex and inter-connected diplomatic, legal and economic dimensions of these threats, as well as an understanding of counter-terrorist and counter-crime policies, strategies and operational responses at local, national and global levels

WHAT WILL I LEARN?

This dynamic and innovative course is aimed at both UK and international students and offers the opportunity to be studied on a full-time and part-time basis. Field trips are an integral part of the course, which will include visits to EU agencies and international NGOs.

The Terrorism, International Crime and Global Security MA degree course is among the first of its kind to offer an integrated approach to studying terrorism, international crime and global security. UK and International Competitive internships will be offered to the most motivated students.

The course comprises three mandatory topics designed to establish the core agenda of the course in terrorism, international crime and global security, and six core-option subjects from which you must study at least two.

The topics included in the course are delivered as interactive and multimedia workshops. They blend case studies, practical illustrations and theoretical analysis. Each session is designed to encourage interaction and debate. This concept is equally applicable to the numerous extra-curricular activities organised to complement the subjects.

Within all sessions, we draw on our own research experience and this ensures some lively debates and reassurance that there is no ‘right way’ of undertaking research. The course team ensures that you have extensive tutorial access to discuss your relationship with the course’s subject matter and their own intellectual development and to provide structure to their studies.

The key themes of this Masters degree are addressed in courses three core subjects:
-International organized crime
-International terrorism
-Threats to global security

You then have the opportunity to supplement these compulsory subjects with optional units, broadening your understanding of the concept of global security. Typical choices include:
-Counter crime and terrorism (study trip)
-Governance for security in the developing world
-Post-colonial African politics
-Gender and international human rights
-Case study: analysing primary sources
-Trafficking in human beings

In parallel to studying the above subjects, students also design, research and write a 15,000 word Masters dissertation addressing a topic of their own choice.

HOW WILL THIS COURSE ENHANCE MY CAREER PROSPECTS?

The MA in Terrorism, International Crime and Global Security is designed for those seeking to put current security debates into some sort of academic context. In terms of career advancement, the course offers generic skills and professional development that have seen past graduates go on to jobs within:
-International NGOs
-Civil service
-Private sector
-Management
-Journalism

In this sense, the degree is not designed to promote any one specific vocation. However, the issues studied would be of particular interest to those wishing to start, or advance, a career in:
-The armed forces
-The police force
-International agencies such as the United Nations or the European Union
-Other international NGOs

GLOBAL LEADERS PROGRAMME

To prepare students for the challenges of the global employment market and to strengthen and develop their broader personal and professional skills Coventry University has developed a unique Global Leaders Programme.

The objectives of the programme, in which postgraduate and eligible undergraduate students can participate, is to provide practical career workshops and enable participants to experience different business cultures.

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The MSc is building a reputation for producing excellent scientists and highly sought after graduates. Our postgraduates have been offered employment in some of the most prestigious companies in the UK and Europe, in fields ranging from analytical toxicology to forensic DNA analysis. Read more
The MSc is building a reputation for producing excellent scientists and highly sought after graduates. Our postgraduates have been offered employment in some of the most prestigious companies in the UK and Europe, in fields ranging from analytical toxicology to forensic DNA analysis.

On this course, you can study a range of specialist areas in analytical and forensic science. It focuses on cutting edge research, the latest analytical techniques, and transferable and professional skills that will prepare you to practise as a professional analytical or forensic scientist. A 60 credit research project of your choice allows you to customise the MSc and specialise in your chosen field.

“Completing this MSc gave me a much more advanced knowledge of analytical instruments and techniques and has been a great help in preparing me for the role that I now have in toxicology. The amount of hands on practical experience in the Masters is much more extensive than in a Bachelors degree and it’s the higher level of practical work that can make the difference. Covering a variety of techniques applied to a wide range of sample types ensures you have an understanding that other graduates will not have, particularly after the completion of your dissertation by spending a considerable amount of time in the lab. The addition of the PRINCE2 qualification also makes you more employable to commercial labs. I have no doubt that without this MSc my chances of gaining a job with a career path would be significantly less.” – Laura Miles, MSc Analytical and Forensic Science graduate.

What You Will Study

You will study the following modules:
- Advanced DNA analysis
- Separation science
- Analytical toxicology
- Interpretation, evalutation and presentation of casework
- Advanced crime scene and evidence analysis
- Project design, management and enterprise
- Laboratory research project

Our tuition offers detailed training in the following areas:

- DNA Analysis
You will gain a thorough understanding of DNA analysis and interpretation techniques. There is practical training in a large range of advanced extraction techniques, quantitation, amplification and electrophoresis of DNA, through simulated case-work using our crime scene house and DNA analysis laboratory.

- Analytical Toxicology and Separation Science
You will gain knowledge of the basis and application of a number of novel analytical and extraction techniques such as chiral chromatography, supercritical fluid chromatography, solid phase microextraction and derivatisation techniques. You will also receive high level practical training in ion mobility mass spectrometry, GCMS/MS, LCMS/MS and ICP-OES. There is a particular focus on hair as a matrix for forensic toxicological analysis. You will also be fully trained in experimental design and effective method development.

- Major crime scene analysis
You will learn how to effectively process major and specialist crime scenes through our simulation facilities, and will study novel mapping techniques such as 3D scanning and LIDAR as applied to crime scene investigation.

- Expert witness techniques
To improve your employment prospects, you will also learn about the law as it relates to the forensic scientist and their relationship with the police, lawyers and courts, and the role of the expert witness. You will receive training from professional case working forensic scientists in how to draft expert witness statements and how to give testimony in court.

- Data analysis and Prince 2 qualification
For added benefit, there will be guest lectures from eminent analytical scientists and forensic practitioners, and you will be encouraged to observe courtroom proceedings and visit analytical laboratories. You will receive training in advanced data analysis techniques which is very desirable for potential employers. You will even complete a PRINCE 2 foundation certificate as part of this course, which will stand you in good stead for the management of major projects in laboratories. The PRINCE 2 award is a prestigious, internationally recognized qualification. Please note additional fees apply.

- Additional Fees:
There is an additional fee of £1,500 for this course which covers the Prince2 Project Management course and laboratory costs.

Learning and teaching methods

Modules are studied sequentially throughout the course. There are periods of self directed learning where you will study online material including journals, research notes and recommended books before engaging in hands on laboratory training, lectures and seminars on campus.

The course is available as a one year full time option, or 2 years part time option. All students complete a research project in your chosen area of specialisation.

Work Experience and Employment Prospects

There are many exciting employment opportunities in the analytical and forensic science sector. Key recruitment areas are DNA profiling, analytical chemistry and toxicological analysis. In these competitive fields, a postgraduate qualification will really make you stand out from the crowd. We have had an excellent response to the MSc analytical and forensic science from science companies across the UK. Major national companies have even contacted the University specifically asking for our MSc Analytical and Forensic Science graduates to apply for positions with them.

Our MSc graduates have been offered employment in toxicology, DNA and forensic science companies across the UK. An MSc award in Analytical and Forensic Science will demonstrate to employers the highest level of achievement and training.

Work experience

Students have the opportunity to undertake a work placement with Synergy Health Laboratories where they will undertake laboratory training. There is also an opportunity to conduct your research project in collaboration with Synergy Health with the possibility of working towards developing UKAS accredited methods of analysis -the ultimate standard in analytical science and a huge boost to your C.V.

Assessment methods

You will complete 120 credits of taught modules across the course, and an original laboratory research project (60 credits). For this, you will apply and extend your practical skills and knowledge in a key area of analytical or forensic science that interests you.

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This course examines rapidly changing issues such as drug trafficking, terrorism, human trafficking, illegal arms trading and financial crime that are major areas of concern for politicians and policy makers and an increasingly important area of research. Read more
This course examines rapidly changing issues such as drug trafficking, terrorism, human trafficking, illegal arms trading and financial crime that are major areas of concern for politicians and policy makers and an increasingly important area of research.

This award provides an advanced programme in a new and rapidly changing area of study. During recent decades transnational crime has become a major area of concern for politicians and policy makers and an increasingly important area of research. Its context is the growth of global anxiety regarding activities such as drug trafficking, terrorism, human trafficking, illegal arms trading and financial crime which appear either to be on the increase or are assuming new and increasingly global forms.

In this award we intend to examine this phenomenon in terms of its recent emergence and further development, its historical precedents at a global level, typical forms and law enforcement responses, and the way in which transnational organised crime is typically represented by news and broadcasting media. Our intention is to provide you with a rigorous and critical education in this area which will provide you with the basis for both further study and for seeking employment in professional careers related to the award.

Course content

You will study a range of modules which cover the history, theory and analysis of transnational organised crime as well as providing a very wide range in-depth case study regarding both organised criminal groups and the global activities which they engage in.

This typically includes phenomena as diverse as international terrorism, drug trafficking, illegal arms deals, the smuggling of radioactive material, human trafficking, the global sex trade, racketeering, trading in human organs, counterfeiting of documents and identities, extortion and many different forms of state and corporate crime.

Modules studied
-Crimes against Humanity: State Crime, War Crimes and Transnational Terrorism
-Trafficking: The Illegal Trade in People, Goods and Services
-Crimes of the Powerful: Corporate, White Collar and Financial Crime
-Transnational Justice & Organised Crime
-Research Based Dissertation

Graduate destinations

The MA provides a curriculum which is suited to those seeking employment or further study in relation to careers in law enforcement, policing, customs and excise, the security industry, international governmental and non-governmental institutions, national foreign, security or defence ministries, and internationally oriented organisations of many types.

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The overall aim of this course is to produce graduates capable of ‘problem-solving’ in the fields of crime, safety and justice. Read more
The overall aim of this course is to produce graduates capable of ‘problem-solving’ in the fields of crime, safety and justice.

The structure of the scheme is based on the ‘SARA’ mnemonic (Scanning, Analysis, Response, Assessment) which is familiar in policing and crime prevention practice as well as in the academy and in applied as well as in basic criminological research.

We aim to develop your research skills by providing training in research methods and to maximise your career prospects by providing transferable skills.

Distinctive features

The course is informed by the priorities of the UK College of Policing, as well as dialogue with members of the School of Social Sciences external advisory group, including representatives from the police, local government and other regulatory agencies with an interest in issues of crime and community safety.

The course includes, when possible, guest lectures from analysts concerned with issues of community safety in outside agencies such as the police, local government, commercial security and other relevant organisations

Structure

The course can be completed in one year with full-time study or in two years by part-time study.

A 20-credit module comprises 200 hours of study, including about 30 hours of contact time, and the MSc as a whole, 1800 hours of study.

The MSc in Crime, Safety and Justice is organised around a sequence of two 20-credit specialist modules in criminology, two 30-credit modules in social science theory and research methods, and one 60-credit supervised dissertation on a criminological topic of your choice.

For a list of modules for the FULL-TIME route, please see website:

http://www.cardiff.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught/courses/course/crime,-safety-and-justice-msc

For a list of the modules for the PART-TIME route, please see website:

http://www.cardiff.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught/courses/course/crime,-safety-and-justice-msc-part-time

Teaching

Modules employ a diverse range of teaching including lectures, seminars, group and individual tutorials, and independent guided study. All modules within the programme make use of Cardiff University’s Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) Learning Central, on which you will find course materials, links to related materials and information on assessment.

The programme benefits from being located in an inter-disciplinary environment so that in parts of the course, you will come into contact with staff and students from other subject areas and, in other parts of the course, with staff and students in the same substantive area.

Assessment

Modules are assessed by a combination of essays, reports, reviews and presentations.

Career Prospects

The general shift from subject-centred to problem-oriented learning reflects, in part, the interests of prospective employers in graduates with the skill set to apply subject specific knowledge about crime, safety and justice to the analysis of, and response to, particular instances of these problems in the public, commercial and voluntary sectors. 

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This programme critically addresses a range of key issues and debates relating to crime and the criminal justice system. Students have the opportunity to develop in-depth understanding of crime, deviance and criminal justice from critical theoretical, policy, legal, political and practical perspectives. Read more
This programme critically addresses a range of key issues and debates relating to crime and the criminal justice system. Students have the opportunity to develop in-depth understanding of crime, deviance and criminal justice from critical theoretical, policy, legal, political and practical perspectives. Addressing issues of historical and contemporary concern such as terrorism, prostitution, legal and illegal drugs, crime in the night time economy, forced migration, gender and crime, domestic violence, crime prevention, punishment, policing, youth crime and justice, law enforcement and the use of new technologies. Students study issues of theoretical and social importance with lecturers who are international experts in their fields.

Course Structure

Students take a range of taught modules primarily in the first two terms of the academic year. Students also undertake a module on research design which enables students to develop a research proposal for their dissertation.

Core Modules:
Theorising Crime and Criminal Justice (30 credits)
-Apply theories of crime and justice to topical issues
-Theory and practice of criminal justice
-Analysis of contemporary politics
-Governance of criminal justice

Perspectives on Social Research (15 credits)
-Introduction to social scientific research
-Establishing cause and interpreting meaning in social sciences
-Essentials of quantitative and qualitative research in social science research

Research Design and Progress (15 credits)
-Formulating research questions
-Ethical review procedures
-Research proposal design, evaluation, and development
-Conversational analysis in practice
-Qualitative interviewing.

Dissertation (60 credits)
-A dissertation of up to 15,000 words.

Optional Modules:
Typical modules outlined below are those that were available to students styuding this programme in previous years. Choose modules to the value of 60 credits, listed below (60 credits)
-Gender, Violence and Abuse (30 credits)
-Drugs, Crime and Society (30 credits)
-Crime, Justice and the Sex Industry (30 credits)
-Cybercrime and cybersecurity: (30 credits)
-Sociology of Forensic Science (30 credits)
-Statistical Exploration and Reasoning (15 credits)
-Qualitative Research Methods in Social Science (15 credits)
-Quantitative Research Methods in Social Science (15 credits)

You will also have the opportunity to take a range of modules from other programmes within the Faculty such as those associated with the MSc in Risk and Security.

Learning and Teaching

The MSc Criminology and Criminal Justice is a 1 year full-time programme which may also be taken part-time. The programme’s core consists of a 60 credit dissertation module, one 30 credit module on Criminological Theory, one 15 credit module on Theories of Social Research and one 15 credit module on Research Design. Students are also required to undertake 60 further credits of modules from within SASS or other related departments which may be taught in a variety of ways.

Core teaching on the programme falls primarily within the two 10 week terms, the second of which commences one week prior to the Undergraduate Term. Depending on module choice students may receive between 6 and 8 hours of tuition per week in either or both of these terms.

The programme is taught according to a variety of approaches. Modules such as ‘Theorising Crime and Criminal Justice’ operate a standard 2 hour session within which lecturing, seminar discussion, workshops or presentations may take place. Modules such as ‘Perspectives on Social Research’, ‘Quantitative Methods’ and ‘Qualitative Methods’ operate a weekly lecture series followed by seminar discussion. Other modules such as ‘Statistical Exploration and Reasoning’ operate computer-based practicals.

Following completion of teaching in terms 1 and 2, the ‘Research Design’ module allows for 4 day long workshops. Reflecting on the process of research design, the module supports the student in formulating the research question for their dissertation.

The MSc programme is research-led at its core. The compulsory module 'Theorising Crime and Criminal Justice' links explicitly with the research activities of the criminology staff; the module ‘Crime Violence and Abuse’ links with the current research activities of the School’s research group of the same name; and ‘Drugs, Crime and Society’ is taught by an internationally renowned expert in the field . Students subsequently undertake a 60 credit dissertation on a topic of their choice supervised by staff who are actively researching in a relevant area. While this module is intended to afford an opportunity for a significant piece of independent and original research, it includes up to four hours of regular supervision which takes place typically from the end of term 2. Students will also participate in two one-hour workshops convened by a supervisor and usually alongside others researching in similar areas.

While teaching is intensive, particularly in terms 1 and 2, it is intended that the programme presents options for part-time study. Consequently, teaching is undertaken where possible in timetable slots which take place late in the afternoon.

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Research students in Forensic Science have the opportunity to work alongside a multidisciplinary team in the School of Life Sciences, and can benefit from strong links with industry practitioners. Read more
Research students in Forensic Science have the opportunity to work alongside a multidisciplinary team in the School of Life Sciences, and can benefit from strong links with industry practitioners.

You have the opportunity to engage in the work of the Forensic Analysis Research Group, to develop innovative methods and techniques to assist in solving crime and casework-related issues. The team are currently engaged in high-profile studies including collaborative projects with the Centre for Applied Science and Technology at the UK Home Office.

You have access to a range of training programmes to support you in your independent investigations and an experienced supervisory team are on hand to offer advice and direction. Ongoing research projects in the School include Chemical Analysis of Legal Highs and GHB, DNA Analysis in Forensic and Archaeological Contexts, and Microcrystalline Testing for Drugs.

Research Areas, Projects & Topics

Main research areas:
-Drug analysis
-Ignitable liquid and fuel analysis
-Explosives analysis
-DNA fingerprinting
-Fingerprinting science
-Dye and pigment analysis
-Forensic anthropology
-Spectroscopic techniques (including Raman) and separation science
-Surface analysis
-Mechanical properties of biological materials.

Recent research projects include:
-Chemical analysis of fingerprints
-Analysis of legal highs and GHB
-Analysis of fuel markers and detection of fuel adulteration
-Development of sensors for forensic applications
-Microcrystalline testing for drugs
-Analysis of smoke for fire investigation
-Enhancement of DNA at crime scenes
-Development of colloids and Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS)
-DNA analysis in forensic and archaeological contexts
-Molecular typing of skin micro-organisms in forensic identification
-Forensic analysis of the mechanical properties of biological materials.

How You Study

Due to the nature of postgraduate research programmes, the vast majority of your time will be spent in independent study and research. You will have meetings with your academic supervisors to assess progress and guide research methodologies, however the regularity of these will vary depending on your own individual requirements, subject area, staff availability and the stage of your programme.

How You Are Assessed

A PhD is usually awarded based on the quality of your thesis and your ability in an oral examination (viva voce) to present and successfully defend your chosen research topic to a group of academics. You are also expected to demonstrate how your research findings have contributed to knowledge or developed existing theory or understanding.

Career and Personal Development

These postgraduate research programmes allow you the opportunity to expand your knowledge and expertise in the specialist field of forensic science. They provide the chance to develop an in-depth foundation for further research or progression to careers in forensic science-related industries.

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From Shakespeare to Hollywood, as a culture we are fascinated by crime. Discover what makes crime captivating with City’s Criminology and Criminal Justice MSc. Read more
From Shakespeare to Hollywood, as a culture we are fascinated by crime. Discover what makes crime captivating with City’s Criminology and Criminal Justice MSc.

Who is it for?

This degree is for independent, critical thinkers who want to work, or are working, within criminal justice or want to undertake further research. Many of our students have undergraduate criminology degrees, and come from universities across the world. Often they want to continue their learning or specialise within a specific subject area. Students also come from other science, humanities and legal backgrounds and from within the criminal justice system. Research methods form a key component of the programme so having an interest in data collection and analysis is valuable.

"To understand crime in the 21st century you have to have specialist criminological knowledge. We don’t just focus on the criminal act; we look at the societal reaction to crime and the cultural narratives that exist around it. At City we will encourage you to develop your criminological imagination but also to use it." - Professor Eugene McLaughlin

Objectives

At City we believe crime is multi-dimensional, which is why this MSc course brings the victim into focus, not just the offender. The criminal mind is complex and our understanding of it matters – not just to the individual, but also to their family, the community and wider society at large.

We live in a criminogenic global society; one that is producing new forms of crime, and new criminal opportunities. City’s Criminology and Criminal Justice MSc course unpicks the power of the criminological imagination within this society.

This is not a Masters that focuses purely on criminal justice or crime control – instead we emphasise cutting-edge theoretical analysis and methodological training, so you can research the contemporary significance of crime and see how it can be a powerful marker of social and institutional change.

Originally part of City’s MA in Human Rights, this degree offers a distinctive perspective on the relationship between criminology and human rights violations. It is global in outlook because, by its nature, crime is transnational and is taught by eminent criminologists who author the books that appear on reading lists across the country.

Here are some of the questions the course poses:
-Why don’t more people commit criminal acts?
-What does crime tell us about the society in which we live?
-Why is crime considered abnormal but at the same time central to news, fiction and popular culture?
-What would a victim-centred justice system look like?

Academic facilities

When it comes to studying criminology, London is an amazing facility. It is one of the most sociologically diverse laboratories offering a wide range of accessible resources. From the myriad centres of policy, justice and media to the endless range of public events, at City you can become a researcher in a global city. As part of the University of London you can also become a member of Senate House Library for free with your student ID card.

Teaching and learning

We will teach you through a combination of lectures, interactive workshops and seminars, in the first and second term (September-April). This is supplemented by insight from external visiting criminologists, criminal justice charities, research agencies and, in some cases, retired criminals. This gives you the opportunity to ask questions, debate your ideas and present your own evidence around particular arguments.

During the dissertation phase of the degree you also have the chance to visit the Central Criminal Court (otherwise known as the Old Bailey) and in some cases undertake a prison visit. One student is currently in New York, researching the New York Police Department, as part of her dissertation on the stresses of being a police officer in 2016.

The majority of postgraduate sociology modules are assessed by coursework. However, if you choose to study some modules outside of the department you may have different assessment methods so please check this carefully. You will need to gain a minimum pass mark of 50% in all assessment components.

The dissertation marks the point in the course where you begin to take hold of your research and let your criminological imagination come into play. The dissertation (of 15,000 words) accounts for one third of the total marks for the Criminology and Criminal Justice MSc degree. By the end of the first term you will have to start considering your dissertation topic. You may already know you area of focus, but we offer guidance and support through dissertation workshops.

Modules

You will take three 30-credit compulsory core modules and two 15-credit elective modules. You can then choose from two of four elective modules to hone your degree towards your own area of interest. In the final part of the course you take part in a dissertation workshop and produce a dissertation over the summer period.

The first module, ‘Analysing crime’ makes up the course’s theoretical base. You then research contemporary developments in criminal justice and penal policy within the second core module. At this point in the course you get to choose from a number of elective modules covering diverse topics including the dark side of media notoriety and celebrity, and the criminal mind. All these modules draw on the School’s research strengths making them unique to City.

Core modules
-Analysing crime
-Criminal justice policy and practice
-Research Workshop
-Dissertation

Elective modules
-The criminal mind
-Victims: policy and politics
-Developments in communication policy
-Celebrity

NB: Elective module choices are subject to availability and timetabling constraints.

Career prospects

The Criminology and Criminal Justice course is taught by internationally recognised experts and prepares you for careers across the public, private and voluntary sectors.

From research to policy development and from the security services to the criminal justice system and victim support, you will have a wealth of employment options once you graduate. Previous graduates are now working in:
-The Metropolitan Police
-The National Probation service
-The UK Foreign Office
-The prison service
-Education
-Mental health
-Criminal justice charitable sector
-Doctoral research
-Prison Service

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