• University of Edinburgh Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Bristol Featured Masters Courses
  • Swansea University Featured Masters Courses
  • Jacobs University Bremen gGmbH Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Derby Online Learning Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Southampton Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Oxford Featured Masters Courses
  • Goldsmiths, University of London Featured Masters Courses
Middlesex University Featured Masters Courses
Barcelona Technology school Featured Masters Courses
Imperial College London Featured Masters Courses
Cass Business School Featured Masters Courses
University of Surrey Featured Masters Courses
"crime"×
0 miles

Masters Degrees (Crime)

We have 499 Masters Degrees (Crime)

  • "crime" ×
  • clear all
Showing 1 to 15 of 499
Order by 
This MSc provides students with a thorough understanding of how science and scientifically based techniques can deliver immediate and sustainable reductions in crime. Read more
This MSc provides students with a thorough understanding of how science and scientifically based techniques can deliver immediate and sustainable reductions in crime. The programme focuses on how to better apply science to understand crime problems, develop strategies for preventing them, and increase the probability of detecting and arresting offenders.

Degree information

Students develop the ability to apply scientific principles to crime control, think more strategically in developing and implementing crime control policies, appreciate the complexity of implementation issues, critically assess the likely impact of planned crime reduction initiatives and generate more innovative proposals for reducing particular crime problems.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of four core modules (60 credits), four optional modules (60 credits) and a research dissertation (60 credits). A Postgraduate Diploma comprising four core modules (60 credits) and four optional modules (60 credits) is offered.

Core modules
-Foundations of Security and Crime Science
-Designing and Doing Research
-Preventing Crimes
-Quantitative Methods

Optional modules - students choose four of the following:
-Perspectives on Organised Crime
-Crime Mapping and Spatial Analysis
-Investigation and Detection
-Intelligence Gathering and Analysis
-Qualitative Methods
-Cybercrime
-Introduction to Cybersecurity

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of approximately 10,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through lectures, seminars, tutorials, projects, laboratory classes, and practical exercises. Practical work will involve the analysis and interpretation of data sets, and the development of new ideas for solving problems. Assessment is through lab and project reports, unseen written examination, coursework, presentations, and the dissertation.

Careers

Many graduates now work in the field of crime prevention and detection for public sector employers such as the Home Office, Police and Ministry of Defence, or private sector companies with a crime prevention and community safety focus. Other graduates go on to further doctoral research.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Supply Chain Analyst, Sainsbury's
-MSc Forensic Psychology, University of Portsmouth
-Security Co-Ordinator, Murphy
-Forensic Associate, Deloitte
-Detective Constable, Metropolitan Police Service

Employability
Each year we ask our graduates to tell us about their experience of the programme and their career after leaving UCL and we include some real-life graduate profiles on our website: http://www.ucl.ac.uk/scs/degree-programmes/postgraduate/graduate-profiles

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Security & Crime Science is a world-first, devoted specifically to reducing crime through teaching, research, public policy analysis and by the dissemination of evidence-based information on crime reduction.

The Crime Science MSc is a multidisciplinary degree, drawing on expertise in psychology, social science, statistics, mathematics, architecture, forensic sciences, design, geography and computing.

Our graduate students come from varied backgrounds; many are practitioners and are encouraged to contribute their experience in and out of the classroom.

Read less
This programme provides students with a thorough understanding of how science and scientifically-based techniques can deliver immediate and sustainable reductions in crime. Read more
This programme provides students with a thorough understanding of how science and scientifically-based techniques can deliver immediate and sustainable reductions in crime. The programme focuses on how to apply science better to understand crime problems, develop investigative strategies for preventing them and increase the probability of detecting and arresting offenders.

Degree information

Students develop the ability to apply scientific principles to crime control, think more strategically in developing and implementing crime control policies, appreciate the complexity of implementation issues, critically assess the likely impact of planned crime reduction initiatives and generate more innovative proposals for reducing particular crime problems.

This programme can be taken as classroom based (full time or flexible) or by distance learning. Students undertake modules to the value of 60 credits. The programme consists of one core module (15 credits) and three optional modules (45 credits).

Core modules
-Foundations of Security and Crime Science

Optional modules - students choose three of the following:
-Designing and Doing Research
-Quantitative Methods
-Preventing Crimes
-Crime Mapping and Spatial Analysis
-Qualitative Methods
-Investigation and Detection
-Perspectives on Organised Crime
-Perspectives on Terrorism
-Prevention and Disruption

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through lectures, seminars, tutorials, projects, laboratory classes, and practical exercises. Practical work will involve the analysis and interpretation of data sets, and the development of new ideas for solving problems. Assessment is through laboratory and project reports, unseen written examinations, coursework and presentations.

Careers

Many graduates now work in the field of crime prevention and detection for public sector employers such as the Home Office, Police and Ministry of Defence (MOD), or private sector companies with a crime prevention and community safety focus. Other graduates go on to further doctoral research.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL Security & Crime Science is a world first, devoted specifically to reducing crime through teaching, research, public policy analysis and by the dissemination of evidence-based information on crime reduction.

Crime science is supported by the police, forensic psychologists, applied criminologists, economists, architects, statisticians and geographers, and has been strongly endorsed by the government.

This multidisciplinary programme draws on expertise in psychology, geography, criminology, philosophy and a range of forensic sciences. Our graduate students come from varied backgrounds; many are practitioners and are encouraged to contribute their experience in and out of the classroom.

Read less
This MSc, designed by a panel of academic departments, industrial partners and law enforcement and security agencies, introduces students to the fundamental knowledge, core expertise and advanced, evidence-driven methodological tools and approaches required to understand, analyse, prevent, disrupt and detect organised crime and terrorism. Read more
This MSc, designed by a panel of academic departments, industrial partners and law enforcement and security agencies, introduces students to the fundamental knowledge, core expertise and advanced, evidence-driven methodological tools and approaches required to understand, analyse, prevent, disrupt and detect organised crime and terrorism.

Degree information

Students develop an understanding of how science, engineering and a variety of professional disciplines can contribute to tackling organised crime and terrorism. By the end of the programme, they will be able to apply appropriate scientific principles and methods to security problems, think strategically to develop and implement countermeasures, and appreciate the complexity involved in the design and implementation of organised crime and terrorism threat-reduction technologies.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

Students are required to complete five core modules (75 credits), three optional modules (45 credits), and a dissertation (60 credits). A Postgraduate Diploma comprising five core modules (75 credits) and three optional modules (45 credits), and which may lead to the MSc, is offered.

Core modules
-Perspectives on Organised Crime
-Perspectives on Terrorism
-Foundations of Security and Crime Science
-Designing and Doing Research
-Quantitative Methods

Optional modules - students choose three of the following:
-Qualitative Methods
-Crime Mapping and Spatial Analysis
-Investigation and Detection
-Cybercrime
-Intelligence Gathering and Analysis
-Risk and Contingency Planning
-Introduction to Cybersecurity
-Prevention and Disruption
-Terrorism (External – Political Science)

NB: places for optional modules are awarded on a first-come first-served basis.

Dissertation/report
All MSc students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, tutorials, projects and laboratory classes. Student performance is assessed through laboratory and project reports, unseen written examination, coursework, presentations, and the research project and dissertation.

Careers

This unique linking of organised crime and terrorism, and the study of methodologies that can practically tackle both of these areas, means that this MSc holds appeal for employers across a broad range of industries.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Consultant, BAE Systems
-Criminal Intelligence Analyst, Avon and Somerset Constabulary
-Detective, Metropolitan Police Service
-Field Intelligence Officer, West Mercia Police
-Head of Counter Terrorism (Deputy Inspector General), Government of Pakistan

Employability
This programme equips students with the knowledge to develop operational strategies to counter organised crime and terrorism. This unique linking of organised crime and terrorism, and the study of methodologies that can practically tackle both of these areas, means that this MSc holds appeal for employers across a broad range of industries.

Each year we ask our graduates to tell us about their experience of the programme and their career after leaving UCL and we include some real-life graduate profiles on our website: http://www.ucl.ac.uk/scs/degree-programmes/postgraduate/graduate-profiles

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Jill Dando Institute, of which UCL Security & Crime Science is the core component, is the first research institution in the world devoted specifically to reducing crime through teaching, research, public policy analysis and by the dissemination of evidence-based information on crime reduction.

This MSc programme is delivered by experienced practitioners and researchers working in counter-terrorism, intelligence, law enforcement, risk assessment and security technology. It boasts a unique multidisciplinary platform, being the only postgraduate programme of its kind in the world taught in a faculty of engineering sciences, integrating the cutting-edge of the social and engineering sciences in the security domain.

Our graduate students come from varied backgrounds; many are practitioners and are encouraged to contribute their experience in and out of the classroom.

Read less
Forensic science is a dynamic discipline that is crucial to the investigation of crime, the collection of evidence and intelligence, and in securing justice. Read more
Forensic science is a dynamic discipline that is crucial to the investigation of crime, the collection of evidence and intelligence, and in securing justice. This multidisciplinary MSc programme offers students a unique opportunity to gain forensic science skills and methods within a holistic crime science framework.

Degree information

Students will develop an understanding of the fundamental principles of crime and forensic science, together with the key conceptual and philosophical frameworks in this field. They will gain practical skills in crime scene investigation, experimental design and implementation, statistical analysis, data analysis and modelling, and will be able to evaluate the weight and applicability of forensic evidence for investigative and court purposes.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits. The programme consists of five core modules (75 credits), three optional modules (45 credits) and a research dissertation (60 credits). An exit-only Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits) is offered.

Core modules
-Quantitative Methods
-Designing and Doing Research
-Understanding and Interpreting Forensic Evidence
-Foundations of Security and Crime Science
-Judicial Decision Making and Expert Evidence

Optional modules - students choose three of the following optional modules:
-Case Assessment and Interpretation for Forensic Scientists
-Fundamentals of Molecular Biology
-Information Security Management
-Forensic Archaeology
-Forensic Osteology
-Forensic Geoscience
-Frontiers in Experimental Physical Chemistry
-Judgment and Decision Making
-Practices of Crime Scene Investigation and Expert Testimony
-Structural Methods in Modern Chemistry

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through lectures, seminars, tutorials, practical exercises and statistical and computer classes. Assessment is through coursework, examination and the dissertation.

Careers

Graduates of this programme will gain the skills necessary for a career in crime investigation, forensic science provision, consultancy, policymaking, and with public sector employers such as police forces, Home Office, and Ministry of Defence. They will also have gained the research tools necessary for a PhD or further doctoral research.

Employability
Graduates from this programme gain a solid understanding of the key principles of crime and forensic science, along with the ability to analyse problems and use appropriate scientific and professional skills to solve them. They can evaluate forensic evidence and their CSI training (developed and delivered with input from London-based police forces) gives them the edge over other applicants for crime scene investigation roles, if this is what they decide to do. They have the opportunity to learn specialist techniques in areas such as forensic archaeology and forensic geoscience, and are given a thorough grounding in academic research methods.

Each year we ask our graduates to tell us about their experience of the programme and their career after leaving UCL and we include some real-life graduate profiles on our website: http://www.ucl.ac.uk/scs/degree-programmes/postgraduate/graduate-profiles

Why study this degree at UCL?

This MSc will train graduates to think strategically and critically about crime and forensic science, equipping them with transferable skills suitable for a wide range of careers.

The UCL Jill Dando Institute of Security and Crime Science (JDI) brings together academics from across the physical sciences, social sciences and humanities. Our graduate students come from varied backgrounds; many are practitioners and are encouraged to share their professional experience.

Read less
*New for 2017, subject to final approval. The MA Crime and Gothic Fictions will introduce you to the advanced study of two popular genres that have entertained and informed culture from the nineteenth century to the present day. Read more
*New for 2017, subject to final approval

The MA Crime and Gothic Fictions will introduce you to the advanced study of two popular genres that have entertained and informed culture from the nineteenth century to the present day. You’ll explore the ways crime and Gothic enrich each other, focusing on both equally during the taught element of the MA. We’ll give you the opportunity to specialise for your final dissertation, if so desired.

The programme is deliberately international and interdisciplinary. You’ll study an imaginative choice of texts from Britain, Europe and the Americas, as well as investigating cutting-edge research and relevant theory.

The MA is particularly suited to individuals who are interested in developing their critical and research skills in preparation for further study. It can also be pursued as an end in itself, if you’re interested in investigating crime writing and Gothic at taught postgraduate level.

For information on How to Get Ahead before the course, please go to our course webpage: https://www.bathspa.ac.uk/courses/pg-crime-and-gothic-fictions/

COURSE STRUCTURE

You’ll explore the ways crime and Gothic enrich each other, focusing on both equally during the taught element of the MA. We’ll give you the opportunity to specialise for your final dissertation, if so desired.

You’ll be taught the histories of the two genres, to ensure you have a good grounding, before moving on to consider contemporary and international examples from both genres. The programme will help strengthen your skills in comparison and criticism across genres, while allowing you to specialise in the genre of your choice.

MODULES

In the first trimester, you'll study Research: Methods, Resources and Dissemination which will account for 30 credits. You'll also study Crime and the Gothic: Pasts and Presents with will account for a further 30 credits.

In the second trimester, you'll have two more modules to study, equating to a further 30 credits each. These will be International Crime and Gothic; and Crime Stories: From Page to Screen.

Finally, in the third trimester you will work on the Dissertation module, equating to a final 60 credits.

TEACHING METHODS

This is a deliberately integrated programme of study; you’ll often work with crime fictions and Gothic texts within the same module. This will develop cross-disciplinary and cross-generic awareness, while still allowing you to specialise in the subjects that interest you most.

Teaching will take place in relatively small seminar groups, and will involve a variety of activities including tutor-led discussion; small-group activities; individual and group presentations; consideration of non-literary texts, documents and artefacts; and possibly optional field trips to relevant exhibitions, screenings or lectures.

ASSESSMENT

Modules are formally assessed primarily by essay, with the exception of the Research Methods module, which includes a bibliographical element.

Informal assessment may take the form of diagnostic essays, presentations and other exercises designed to enhance your research and presentation skills. The Dissertation module includes an assessed research proposal. There are no examinations.

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

Career opportunities for graduates with an MA in Crime and Gothic Fictions include:

• Working in cultural research and education.
• Academic and fictional publishing.
• Genre-related film, TV, and other media.
• Literary journalism.
• Dark tourism and the Gothic heritage industry.

For information on opportunities, facilities and resources please go to the course webpage: https://www.bathspa.ac.uk/courses/pg-crime-and-gothic-fictions/

Read less
Since the Al-Qaeda attacks on the United States in September 2001, there has been a dramatic shift in the nature, study and practices of global politics. Read more
Since the Al-Qaeda attacks on the United States in September 2001, there has been a dramatic shift in the nature, study and practices of global politics. Against a background of intensifying economic, political, cultural and military globalisation, there is now a heightened awareness of terrorism and international crime as threats to global security.

The Terrorism, International Crime and Global Security MA degree identifies the features of these respective threats and explores the challenges to national and global governance, human rights and ethics, criminality and regionalism. This course examines the character of these contemporary global threats, considers specific case studies, and contributes to the debate over how to respond intellectually and in practical policy to these major threats to global security in the post-9/11 world.

WHY CHOOSE THIS COURSE?

-Provides learners with an integrated security perspective
-Combines traditional militarised security concerns with contemporary threats of terrorism, international crime, and non-traditional security
-Provides the opportunity to develop the necessary analytical tools to critically explore the global security environment of the new century
-Among the first course of its kind to offer an integrated approach to studying the increasingly prevalent themes of terrorism, international crime and global security
-You will obtain a critical awareness of the complex and inter-connected diplomatic, legal and economic dimensions of these threats, as well as an understanding of counter-terrorist and counter-crime policies, strategies and operational responses at local, national and global levels

WHAT WILL I LEARN?

This dynamic and innovative course is aimed at both UK and international students and offers the opportunity to be studied on a full-time and part-time basis. Field trips are an integral part of the course, which will include visits to EU agencies and international NGOs.

The Terrorism, International Crime and Global Security MA degree course is among the first of its kind to offer an integrated approach to studying terrorism, international crime and global security. UK and International Competitive internships will be offered to the most motivated students.

The course comprises three mandatory topics designed to establish the core agenda of the course in terrorism, international crime and global security, and six core-option subjects from which you must study at least two.

The topics included in the course are delivered as interactive and multimedia workshops. They blend case studies, practical illustrations and theoretical analysis. Each session is designed to encourage interaction and debate. This concept is equally applicable to the numerous extra-curricular activities organised to complement the subjects.

Within all sessions, we draw on our own research experience and this ensures some lively debates and reassurance that there is no ‘right way’ of undertaking research. The course team ensures that you have extensive tutorial access to discuss your relationship with the course’s subject matter and their own intellectual development and to provide structure to their studies.

The key themes of this Masters degree are addressed in courses three core subjects:
-International organized crime
-International terrorism
-Threats to global security

You then have the opportunity to supplement these compulsory subjects with optional units, broadening your understanding of the concept of global security. Typical choices include:
-Counter crime and terrorism (study trip)
-Governance for security in the developing world
-Post-colonial African politics
-Gender and international human rights
-Case study: analysing primary sources
-Trafficking in human beings

In parallel to studying the above subjects, students also design, research and write a 15,000 word Masters dissertation addressing a topic of their own choice.

HOW WILL THIS COURSE ENHANCE MY CAREER PROSPECTS?

The MA in Terrorism, International Crime and Global Security is designed for those seeking to put current security debates into some sort of academic context. In terms of career advancement, the course offers generic skills and professional development that have seen past graduates go on to jobs within:
-International NGOs
-Civil service
-Private sector
-Management
-Journalism

In this sense, the degree is not designed to promote any one specific vocation. However, the issues studied would be of particular interest to those wishing to start, or advance, a career in:
-The armed forces
-The police force
-International agencies such as the United Nations or the European Union
-Other international NGOs

GLOBAL LEADERS PROGRAMME

To prepare students for the challenges of the global employment market and to strengthen and develop their broader personal and professional skills Coventry University has developed a unique Global Leaders Programme.

The objectives of the programme, in which postgraduate and eligible undergraduate students can participate, is to provide practical career workshops and enable participants to experience different business cultures.

Read less
Understand crime and policy in a global context. The MA in Global Crime and Justice is designed for students and professionals seeking to develop a career in criminal justice, international organisations, the media and research. Read more
Understand crime and policy in a global context.

Overview

The MA in Global Crime and Justice is designed for students and professionals seeking to develop a career in criminal justice, international organisations, the media and research. You'll study an increasingly important feature of society: transnational crime and the responses taken by states and non-state actors.

You'll engage with the reality of global crime and criminal and related social policies from an interdisciplinary perspective. You will explore global policy analysis and criminal justice with an international approach. You'll also be trained in research methods.

Course content

The MA in Global Crime and Justice is based around a combination of crime, social policy and research training modules. You'll start with an introduction to major theories, institutions and debates in global policy analysis and criminal justice. You'll also get a solid grounding in the core methods of social research. You'll progress to more advanced analysis of global crime and justice, exploring diverse global crimes ranging from drug and human trafficking to corporate and state crimes. You'll also spend time in workshops designed to help you gain the communication and presentation skills you need to disseminate your research in your own research project.

Most people study for full-time for 12 months, but part-time study over 24 months is also available.

Modules
In the autumn term you'll take two compulsory modules:
-Policy Analysis - Crime and Justice
-Introduction to Social Research Methods

In the spring term you'll take another compulsory module that builds upon your earlier study:
-Global Crime and Justice

In the spring term you'll also choose one optional module from:
-Global Social Policy and Global Social Problems
-Comparative Social Policy - Governance, Management and Delivery
-Globalisation and Social Policy

In the summer term and summer months you'll take part in the Graduate Dissertation Workshop. This will give you the chance to develop your research interests and participate in a group project with other students who have similar interests. You will also use this time to work on your individual research project.

Careers

The MA in Global Crime and Justice develops the skills that employers need in a number of areas, especially criminal justice, crime policy analysis and research methods from a global perspective. You'll also find you develop transferable skills that will allow you to progress to different career areas or to continue your studies at PhD level.

Read less
Forensic Archaeology is the specialist application of archaeological techniques to the search and recovery of evidential material from crime scenes, often but not always related to buried human remains. Read more
Forensic Archaeology is the specialist application of archaeological techniques to the search and recovery of evidential material from crime scenes, often but not always related to buried human remains.

This course is taught by staff with extensive crime scene experience who regularly work on a range of operations and are at the forefront of the professional development of the discipline.

The course will:
-Provide you with advanced practical, analytical and interpretative skills in forensic archaeology
-Provide training in discipline skills to enable graduates to pursue careers in Forensic Archaeology and Crime Scene Investigation (CSI)
-Prepare students for careers in non-cognate fields through emphasis on team working and application of a wide knowledge base to problem solving

This course combines approaches from different disciplines to provide students with a comprehensive forensic skill set.

It is essential that forensic archaeologists are able to appreciate their role within a wider police investigation and have a detailed understanding of crime scene management procedures. Forensic Archaeology in the United Kingdom is rapidly developing and recognised as a distinct discipline by the Home Office Forensic Science Regulator. Bradford staff have been actively involved in defining skills matrices for use by the Institute for Archaeologists as part of the process of professional regulation.

For more information on the part time version of this course, please view this web-page: http://www.brad.ac.uk/study/courses/info/forensic-archaeology-crime-scene-investigation-msc-part-time

Why Bradford?

-The course is underpinned by modules on English Law delivered by University of Bradford School of Law
-The course provides hands-on experience utilising simulated complex, multi-scene crime scene scenarios and is based upon direct case experience by the principal tutors working with UK police forces
-Flexible design means that the MSc award can include either a substantial research dissertation or a period of enhanced professional training
-The course can be studied full-time over 12 months or by flexible study up to 5 years

Modules

Semester 1 (60 Credits - 5 Modules):
-Crime Scene Management (10 Credits)
-English Legal System and Criminal Law for Non-Lawyers (Law 1) (10 Credits)
-Introduction to Forensic Anthropology for Crime Scene Investigators (10 Credits)
-Introduction to Forensic Archaeology (20 Credits)
-Recording Crime Scenes: the use of photographic and survey techniques (10 Credits)

Semester 2 (70 Credits - 5 Modules):
-Research Skills (10 Credits)
-Research and Brief Writing (10 Credits)
-Forensic Archaeology and Crime Scene Investigation (20 Credits)
-Elements of Forensic Taphonomy (20 Credits)
-Law of Evidence for Non-Lawyers (Law 2) (10 Credits)

End of Semester 2 onwards (60 Credits - 1 Module):
-Dissertation (MSc) (60 Credits)

The MSc award can be obtained with enhanced professional training (MSc without dissertation) in which case, the following modules are taken instead of the Dissertation:
-Advanced Fieldwork Programme for CSI (30 Credits)
-Independent Research Paper for CSI 1 (10 Credits )
-Independent Research Paper for CSI 2 (20 Credits)

Career support and prospects

The University is committed to helping students develop and enhance employability and this is an integral part of many programmes. Specialist support is available throughout the course from Career and Employability Services including help to find part-time work while studying, placements, vacation work and graduate vacancies. Students are encouraged to access this support at an early stage and to use the extensive resources on the Careers website.

Discussing options with specialist advisers helps to clarify plans through exploring options and refining skills of job-hunting. In most of our programmes there is direct input by Career Development Advisers into the curriculum or through specially arranged workshops.

Graduates from this programme have gone on to work in law enforcement (both as Police Officers and Scene of Crime/Scientific Support), Forensic Science as well as commercial archaeology with enhanced skill sets.

Read less
Forensic Archaeology is the specialist application of archaeological techniques to the search and recovery of evidential material from crime scenes, often but not always related to buried human remains. Read more
Forensic Archaeology is the specialist application of archaeological techniques to the search and recovery of evidential material from crime scenes, often but not always related to buried human remains.

This course is taught by staff with extensive crime scene experience who regularly work on a range of operations and are at the forefront of the professional development of the discipline.

The course will:
-Provide you with advanced practical, analytical and interpretative skills in forensic archaeology
-Provide training in discipline skills to enable graduates to pursue careers in Forensic Archaeology and Crime Scene Investigation (CSI)
-Prepare students for careers in non-cognate fields through emphasis on team working and application of a wide knowledge base to problem solving

This course combines approaches from different disciplines to provide students with a comprehensive forensic skill set.

It is essential that forensic archaeologists are able to appreciate their role within a wider police investigation and have a detailed understanding of crime scene management procedures.

Forensic Archaeology in the United Kingdom is rapidly developing and recognised as a distinct discipline by the Home Office Forensic Science Regulator. Bradford staff have been actively involved in defining skills matrices for use by the Institute for Archaeologists as part of the process of professional regulation.

For more information on the part time version of this course, please view this web-page: http://www.brad.ac.uk/study/courses/info/forensic-archaeology-crime-scene-investigation-pgdip-part-time

Why Bradford?

-The course is underpinned by modules on English Law delivered by University of Bradford School of Law
-The course provides hands-on experience utilising simulated complex, multi-scene crime scene scenarios and is based upon direct case experience by the principal tutors working with UK police forces
-Flexible design means that the MSc award can include either a substantial research dissertation or a period of enhanced professional training
-The course can be studied full-time over 12 months or by flexible study up to 5 years

Modules

Semester 1 (60 Credits - 5 Modules):
-Crime Scene Management (10 Credits)
-English Legal System and Criminal Law for Non-Lawyers (Law 1) (10 Credits)
-Introduction to Forensic Anthropology for Crime Scene Investigators (10 Credits)
-Introduction to Forensic Archaeology (20 Credits)
-Recording Crime Scenes: the use of photographic and survey techniques (10 Credits)

Semester 2 (70 Credits - 5 Modules):
-Research Skills (10 Credits)
-Research and Brief Writing (10 Credits)
-Forensic Archaeology and Crime Scene Investigation (20 Credits)
-Elements of Forensic Taphonomy (20 Credits)
-Law of Evidence for Non-Lawyers (Law 2) (10 Credits)

Career support and prospects

The University is committed to helping students develop and enhance employability and this is an integral part of many programmes. Specialist support is available throughout the course from Career and Employability Services including help to find part-time work while studying, placements, vacation work and graduate vacancies. Students are encouraged to access this support at an early stage and to use the extensive resources on the Careers website.

Discussing options with specialist advisers helps to clarify plans through exploring options and refining skills of job-hunting. In most of our programmes there is direct input by Career Development Advisers into the curriculum or through specially arranged workshops.

Graduates from this programme have gone on to work in law enforcement (both as Police Officers and Scene of Crime/Scientific Support), Forensic Science as well as commercial archaeology with enhanced skill sets.

Read less
Corporate and business crime presents one of the key contemporary challenges to society, not only in terms of the difficulties it poses to the criminal justice system, but also in relation to the wider social harm it furthers. Read more

Corporate and business crime presents one of the key contemporary challenges to society, not only in terms of the difficulties it poses to the criminal justice system, but also in relation to the wider social harm it furthers. The study of this highly relevant and rapidly developing area of criminological research prepares students to make a real contribution to shaping policy around corporate accountability and corporate control.

The combination of analytic criminological knowledge and applied research skills on this programme will equip you with a sophisticated understanding of current challenges and perspectives in the area of corporate crime and corporate responsibility, whilst also enhancing your understanding of the main theories and ideas within contemporary criminology.

The Masters in Criminology and Social Research (Corporate Crime and Corporate Responsibility) is aimed at graduates, professionals and practitioners with an appropriate first degree who have an interest in corporate crime or the fields of corporate ethics, governance and criminal behaviour.

It will also suit graduates and practitioners considering a PhD in this area; and practitioners and professionals in companies, business organisations, the criminal justice system and related government and voluntary agencies who wish to apply knowledge of criminology, corporate crime and corporate responsibility within their present position.

Programme structure

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year and part-time over two academic years. It consists of eight taught modules and a dissertation.

Example module listing

The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.

The department supports students in finding three-to-four-week research placements during spring and summer vacation periods, and this approach has recently been supplemented to include strategies of support for students seeking a wider range of opportunities for professional development in the first-hand experience of research organisation – including such activities as part-time internships over longer periods, workplace visits, or shadowing research professionals.

This introduces further flexibility in a student-led process of professional development in light of increasing external pressures on students’ commitments and responsibilities. All, however, involve opportunities to consider issues in career development and professional skills.

The support process involves the department working closely with students on a one-to-one basis toward their goals and requirements, in association with the University’s Careers Service, to offer pastoral advice and support.

Organisations the department has worked with in the past have included the Office of National Statistics, Cabinet Office, HM Inspectorate of Prisons, Sussex Youth Offending team and Surrey Police.

In some cases, the work experience may also be with projects in academic contexts. Students seek experiential learning opportunities with the support of the department’s Senior Placement Tutor, and assistance from the Faculty Placement Office.

Educational aims of the programme

The MSc pathway in Corporate Crime and Corporate Responsibility will combine grounding in the discipline of criminology and training in the full range of qualitative and quantitative methods of social research with specialised understanding of the key issues attached to a criminal offending by corporate agents.

It is designed to meet the needs of students graduating from a first degree who have an interest in corporate crime, people who are currently employed and wish to apply knowledge of criminology, corporate crime and corporate responsibility within their present job, or those who wish to move into specialised research or practice in the fields of corporate ethics, governance and criminal behaviour. 

The degree provides an ideal foundation to undertake a part-time or full-time PhD.

The degree is suitable for a wide range of students in terms of age, professional background, and current occupation and circumstances.

Because of this diversity of experience, students on the degree learn a great deal from each other, including at the residential Weekend Conference in the middle of the first semester, and the Day Conference at the end of the first semester.

The full-time MSc is taught over 12 months and the part-time course over 24 months. Students who do not wish to undertake the Masters dissertation can obtain the Postgraduate Certificate in Criminology and Social Research (Corporate Crime and Corporate Responsibility) after gaining 60 credits, or the Postgraduate Diploma after gaining 120 credits.

Students studying for the MSc in full-time mode are required to submit their dissertation during the academic year in which they commenced registration.

It is expected that students studying part-time will have obtained a minimum of 60 credits by the end of the first 12 months of registration in order to proceed into the second year.

Global opportunities

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.



Read less
This programme critically addresses a range of key issues and debates relating to crime and the criminal justice system. Read more

This programme critically addresses a range of key issues and debates relating to crime and the criminal justice system. You will have the opportunity to develop an in-depth understanding of crime, deviance and criminal justice from critical, theoretical, policy, legal, political and practical perspectives and will address issues of historical and contemporary concern such as terrorism, prostitution, legal and illegal drugs, crime in the night-time economy, forced migration, gender and crime, domestic violence, crime prevention, prison and punishment, policing, youth crime and justice, law enforcement and the use of new technologies. You will also study issues of theoretical and social importance with lecturers who are international experts in their fields.

Course Structure

You will take a range of taught modules primarily in the first two terms of the academic year. You will also undertake a module on research design which enables you to develop a research proposal for your dissertation.

Core Modules

Theorising Crime and Criminal Justice (30 credits)

  • Apply theories of crime and justice to topical issues
  • Theory and practice of criminal justice
  • Analysis of contemporary politics
  • Governance of criminal justice.

Perspectives on Social Research (15 credits)

  • Introduction to social scientific research
  • Establishing cause and interpreting meaning in social sciences
  • Essentials of quantitative and qualitative research in social science research.

Research Design and Progress (15 credits)

  • Formulating research questions
  • Ethical review procedures
  • Research proposal design, evaluation, and development
  • Conversational analysis in practice
  • Qualitative interviewing.

Dissertation (60 credits)

  • A dissertation of up to 15,000 words.

Optional Modules

You may choose modules to the value of 60 credits. 

In previous years, typical modules offered were:

  • Gender, Violence and Abuse (30 credits)
  • Drugs, Crime and Society (30 credits)
  • Crime, Justice and the Sex Industry (30 credits)
  • Cybercrime and cybersecurity (30 credits)
  • Sociology of Forensic Science (30 credits)
  • Prisons, Crime and Criminal Justice (Inside-Out prison exchange programme) (30 credits)
  • Statistical Exploration and Reasoning (15 credits)
  • Qualitative Research Methods in Social Science (15 credits)
  • Quantitative Research Methods in Social Science (15 credits).

You will also have the opportunity to take a range of modules from other programmes within the Faculty such as those associated with the MSc in Risk and Security.

Course Learning and Teaching

The MSc Criminology and Criminal Justice is a 1 year full-time programme which may also be taken part-time. The programme’s core consists of a 60 credit dissertation module, one 30 credit module on Criminological Theory, one 15 credit module on Theories of Social Research and one 15 credit module on Research Design. You are also required to undertake 60 further credits of modules from within SASS or other related departments which may be taught in a variety of ways.

Core teaching on the programme falls primarily within the two 10 week terms, the second of which commences one week prior to the undergraduate term. Depending on module choice you may receive between 6 and 8 hours of tuition per week in either or both of these terms.

The programme is taught according to a variety of approaches. Modules such as ‘Theorising Crime and Criminal Justice’ operate a standard 2 hour session within which lecturing, seminar discussion, workshops or presentations may take place. Modules such as ‘Perspectives on Social Research’, ‘Quantitative Methods’ and ‘Qualitative Methods’ operate a weekly lecture series followed by seminar discussion. Other modules such as ‘Statistical Exploration and Reasoning’ operate computer-based practicals. Prisons, Crime and Criminal Justice is an innovative module that emphasises transformative education. It is taught within a prison each week using the Inside-Out dialogical pedagogy whereby university students learn together with prisoners, completing the same readings and assessments, as well as group work and group projects (please see the website for further details). For this module you will need to undertake security clearance and mandatory prison training before being allowed to enter the prison.

Following completion of teaching in terms 1 and 2, the ‘Research Design’ module allows for 4 day long workshops. Reflecting on the process of research design, the module supports the student in formulating the research question for their dissertation.

The MSc programme is research-led at its core. The compulsory module 'Theorising Crime and Criminal Justice' links explicitly with the research activities of the criminology staff; the module ‘Crime Violence and Abuse’ links with the current research activities of the School’s research group of the same name; and ‘Drugs, Crime and Society’ is taught by an internationally renowned expert in the field. You will subsequently undertake a 60 credit dissertation on a topic of your choice supervised by staff who are actively researching in a relevant area. While this module is intended to afford an opportunity for a significant piece of independent and original research, it includes up to four hours of regular supervision which takes place typically from the end of term 2. You will also participate in two one-hour workshops convened by a supervisor and usually alongside others researching in similar areas.

While teaching is intensive, particularly in terms 1 and 2, it is intended that the programme presents options for part-time study. Consequently, teaching is undertaken where possible in timetable slots which take place late in the afternoon.



Read less
This course examines rapidly changing issues such as drug trafficking, terrorism, human trafficking, illegal arms trading and financial crime that are major areas of concern for politicians and policy makers and an increasingly important area of research. Read more
This course examines rapidly changing issues such as drug trafficking, terrorism, human trafficking, illegal arms trading and financial crime that are major areas of concern for politicians and policy makers and an increasingly important area of research.

This award provides an advanced programme in a new and rapidly changing area of study. During recent decades transnational crime has become a major area of concern for politicians and policy makers and an increasingly important area of research. Its context is the growth of global anxiety regarding activities such as drug trafficking, terrorism, human trafficking, illegal arms trading and financial crime which appear either to be on the increase or are assuming new and increasingly global forms.

In this award we intend to examine this phenomenon in terms of its recent emergence and further development, its historical precedents at a global level, typical forms and law enforcement responses, and the way in which transnational organised crime is typically represented by news and broadcasting media. Our intention is to provide you with a rigorous and critical education in this area which will provide you with the basis for both further study and for seeking employment in professional careers related to the award.

Course content

You will study a range of modules which cover the history, theory and analysis of transnational organised crime as well as providing a very wide range in-depth case study regarding both organised criminal groups and the global activities which they engage in.

This typically includes phenomena as diverse as international terrorism, drug trafficking, illegal arms deals, the smuggling of radioactive material, human trafficking, the global sex trade, racketeering, trading in human organs, counterfeiting of documents and identities, extortion and many different forms of state and corporate crime.

Modules studied
-Crimes against Humanity: State Crime, War Crimes and Transnational Terrorism
-Trafficking: The Illegal Trade in People, Goods and Services
-Crimes of the Powerful: Corporate, White Collar and Financial Crime
-Transnational Justice & Organised Crime
-Research Based Dissertation

Graduate destinations

The MA provides a curriculum which is suited to those seeking employment or further study in relation to careers in law enforcement, policing, customs and excise, the security industry, international governmental and non-governmental institutions, national foreign, security or defence ministries, and internationally oriented organisations of many types.

Read less
Want to make a real difference to society? With the Master of Security and Crime Science, you will develop the skills required to become a leader in the security, intelligence and crime-prevention areas in the public and private sectors. Read more

Want to make a real difference to society? With the Master of Security and Crime Science, you will develop the skills required to become a leader in the security, intelligence and crime-prevention areas in the public and private sectors.

You will combine skills from different disciplines such as Statistics, Computer Science, Geographic Information Systems, Population Studies, Psychology and Management. You'll develop analytical and creative methods to tackle real-world crime, and improve security in an ever-changing society.

This degree will provide a pathway to a career in policy development, crime or accident detection and analysis in both the public and private sectors. The skills you gain from the degree will enable you to promote and enhance security and community safety.

Learn from the experts

The Master of Security and Crime Science is the first of its kind in New Zealand and the Asia Pacific region, lead by the New Zealand Institute for Security and Crime Science (NZISCS).  The Institute is the primary research partner for the New Zealand Police, and a partner at the Evidence Based Policing Centre in Wellington. Papers and research topics will be delivered by world-leading researchers in psychology, statistics, artificial intelligence including machine learning, cyber security, political science, economics, management, law, education, Māori and indigenous development, and demographic research.

Develop real-world solutions

In collaboration with the New Zealand Police, students and researchers investigated drug abuse intervention, developed software to help police monitor offenders on bail, invented new methods to research burglary offences, researched sex abuse attitudes amongst school age children, and optimised traffic patrolling. The Masters degree requires students to investigate and tackle real security and crime problems in collaboration with public and private partners.

Career opportunities

  • Policy development for social agencies
  • Intelligence analyst (eg for MPI, National or International Police forces)
  • Traffic accident analyst
  • Security enhancement engineer
  • Senior law enforcement officer
  • Social investment expert
  • Senior policy adviser
  • Crime data scientist
  • Analyst specialising in emerging, organised or cyber crime
  • Counter-terrorism analyst


Read less
This masters degree explores new perspectives and ways of thinking about crime, harm and justice. It is concerned with examining problematic areas of social life, transgression, ‘crime’, social harm and justice in an increasingly global world. Read more

MA in Crime and Justice

This masters degree explores new perspectives and ways of thinking about crime, harm and justice. It is concerned with examining problematic areas of social life, transgression, ‘crime’, social harm and justice in an increasingly global world. You will consider the significance of power, social structure, and economic and social inequalities in understanding ‘crime’, processes of criminalisation, and ideas about justice.

The qualification will enhance your ability to construct clear, logical and theoretically informed arguments about problems of criminological interest. The skills you will develop include the ability to think differently about problems of crime, social harm and the delivery of justice. You will also hone your skills in identifying, assessing and authoritatively debating and presenting arguments and evidence.

Key features of the course

•Develops your expertise and authoritative command of topics and problems related to the investigation, exploration and contested terrain of crime, and social harm
•Extends skills and insights concerned with the criminal justice system, victim protection and support, civil liberties, human rights, security, safety and social justice
•Ideal preparation for work where analytical, nuanced and careful decision making is required, and where independence and initiative are valued.

This qualification is eligible for a Postgraduate Loan available from Student Finance England.

Modules

This 180-credit qualification comprises one standard and one long module. This weighting is reflected in the fees, the time expected to complete and the credits.

To gain this qualification, you need 180 credits as follows:

Compulsory modules

• Principles of social and psychological inquiry (DD801)
• Crime and global justice (DD804) planned for October 2018

Using real world examples, this module provides innovative insights into the complex interplay between local and global dimensions of crime, harm and justice.

The modules quoted in this description are currently available for study. However, as we review the curriculum on a regular basis, the exact selection may change over time.

Read less
This programme considers pressing contemporary global issues from a criminological perspective, including organised crime, trafficking, terrorism and environmental crime. Read more
This programme considers pressing contemporary global issues from a criminological perspective, including organised crime, trafficking, terrorism and environmental crime.

Why this programme

◾You will gain access to a wide range of potential careers and further academic pathways related to understanding international crime and developing strategies and policy for its prevention.
◾You will benefit from the combined strengths of staff from the University's Scottish Centre for Crime & Justice Research. The breadth and diversity of expertise represented within the teaching team is a key strength of the programme.
◾There will be a number of guest lectures, presentations and seminars throughout, with high-calibre speakers from the UK and abroad.
◾You will have the opportunity to link up with a criminal justice organisation for your dissertation work.

Programme structure

You will take four core and two optional courses, as well as submit a dissertation.

Core courses
◾Criminological perspectives on security and globalisation
◾Criminological theory in context
◾Research design
◾The global criminal economy.

Optional courses
◾Antiquities trafficking
◾Crime, media and popular culture
◾Gender, crime and criminal Justice
◾Punishment and in/justice
◾Rehabilitation and desistance from crime.

Career prospects

You will be well equipped for careers in public, private and third sector agencies concerned with crime prevention policy and strategy, especially with international and cross-border agencies.

Read less

Show 10 15 30 per page



Cookie Policy    X