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Masters Degrees (Creative Writing And Journalism)

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The MFA (Master of Fine Arts) Creative Writing programme at the University of Surrey is a two-year, full-time course of study that offers you a unique opportunity to enhance your creative, critical and professional skills as a writer. Read more
The MFA (Master of Fine Arts) Creative Writing programme at the University of Surrey is a two-year, full-time course of study that offers you a unique opportunity to enhance your creative, critical and professional skills as a writer.

Teaching is research-led, so you will be mentored by passionate, dynamic writers and academics with multidisciplinary expertise, as well as our Distinguished Writer in Residence and Poet in Residence.

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW

Our MFA Creative Writing programme will expose you to the practical skills and challenges involved in a specific branch of creative practice (such as poetry or screenwriting) and offers the option to gain hands-on experience in a creative industry relevant to your own practice, to better prepare you for a wide variety of careers, including writing, publishing, communications, marketing, advertising, journalism, teaching, or to undertake a PhD.

In your first year, you will study alongside students in the MA programmes in Creative Writing and English Literature, where you will hone your research skills to produce critically informed creative work and deepen your practice as a writer.

To prepare for your second year, an academic advisor will offer guidance on choosing an appropriate form of Situated Professional Practice and your summative creative portfolio proposal.

During your second year you will work on producing an extended creative portfolio and critical commentary, as well as complete the Situated Professional Practice of your choice.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

This programme is studied full-time over two academic years. It consists of eight taught modules, a professional placement, a critical commentary module and a creative portfolio project. The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.
-Research and Writing Skills I
-Research and Writing Skills II
-Literary Scholarship and Creativity I
-Literary Scholarship and Creativity II
-Creative Writing Workshop I
-Creative Writing Workshop II
-Open Creative Piece I
-Open Creative Piece II
-Genres and Contemporary Writing
-Humour in Literature
-Realism and Its Critics
-Creative Nonfiction
-Found Materials
-Situated Professional Placement
-Summative Critical Commentary
-Summative Creative Portfolio
-Children’s Literature
-Screenwriting

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF THE PROGRAMME

A Creative Writing MFA degree builds on the work of a traditional MA but distinguishes itself in a number of ways:
-It is intensely craft and practice-based
-It requires students’ immersion, for a part of their study time, in work environments that offer the opportunity to collaborate with established practitioners
-It is firmly based on a model of reflection in practice and on practice
-It requires teaching and learning that consistently balance theory and practice through well honed research skills
-It aims at enhancing students’ own sense of creativity and professional ambitions in specific artistic fields

For students to achieve an optimum balance between theory, practice and critical reflection, MFAs traditionally last at least two academic years and this is common practice both in the UK and the USA.

The MFA in Creative Writing is designed to assist aspiring writers to:
-Hone and develop their writing skills in prose fiction and/or poetry
-Locate their work in historical and cultural context, and to familiarize themselves with the history of literary production
-Equip themselves with the research and writing skills they will need to produce both critically informed prose or poetry and creative criticism
-Reflect productively on both the creative process itself and the finished work that has resulted from it
-Gain experience, through the Situated Professional Practice module, of the practical skills and creative challenges involved in a specific branch of creative practice (such as poetry, or writing for the stage) and/or of the workings and structure of a creative industry relevant to the student’s own practice

These educational aims accord neatly with the defining principles of Creative Writing as set out by the QAA’s NAWE Creative Writing Subject Benchmark Statement.

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes in the following areas:

Knowledge and understanding
-Demonstrate a thorough understanding of the main principles and challenges of creative writing
-Relate developments in the field of English Literature to the social, political and historical contexts of their own creative work
-Distinguish different approaches to literary production and reflect upon these in their own
-Develop a critical engagement with various theoretical approaches and methods
-Recognize the critical language required in advanced literary studies
-Identify and explain relevant techniques and strategies for producing high-quality creative writing

Intellectual / cognitive skills
-Critically appraise both scholarly and creative writing;
-Strategically develop research skills for retrieving information crucial for text production;
-Conduct conceptual and advanced research related to specific creative projects;
-Formulate and address research questions relating to creative and research projects.

Professional practical skills
-Produce high-quality creative work in and analysis of a variety of literary genres
-Verbally present abstract ideas and concepts in a clear and appropriate fashion
-Confidently deal with reading complex texts
-Acquire a sound knowledge of the key debates in literary studies
-Acquire review/evaluation skills for textual analyses at M-level
-Combine an understanding of text and context within and between periods

Key / transferable skills
-Display competence in a range of skills at postgraduate level, including creative writing, advanced analysis and synthesis of arguments, presentation, the conducting of independent research, and the efficient processing of complex ideas and arguments
-Collaborate by working in small groups to exchange ideas and engage in debates
-Develop knowledge in a specialized subject, area or period and command of terminology
-Organize, research and deliver a sustained piece of work to a high standard
-Create and carry out a research project of significant complexity

ACADEMICS AND EVENTS

As a student on the MFA Creative Writing, you will benefit from the expertise of a vibrant, multidisciplinary group of academics and published authors.

You will also have access to a number of conferences, seminars and workshops hosted throughout the year. These events cover a range of topics to broaden your thinking in the fields of literature, language and linguistics, cultural studies and creative writing. Writers to have recently visited the University of Surrey include the novelist Monica Ali and the poet and critic Rod Mengham.

Each year’s cultural activities begin with a poetry lecture on campus by a visiting speaker and feature readings by students at the Guildford School of Acting.

The annual Surrey New Writers’ Festival – affiliated with the Creative Writing graduate programs at the University of Surrey – aims to engage with writing and creativity in dynamic ways, and involves readings, book signings, performances, panel discussions and talks by writers, thinkers, editors and literary agents.

The year’s activities culminate in the annual Morag Morris Poetry Festival, held in Guildford, which combines readings and performances by prominent, innovative and up-and-coming poets with the opportunity for Creative Writing students to present their own work in public.

This event is organised and hosted by our poet-in-residence – a position that is held by a different poet each year. English at Surrey also has a close relationship with English PEN, the charity dedicated to promoting literature and human rights.

GLOBAL OPPORTUNITIES

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.

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Our programme will build your confidence and technical ability in composing creative prose and/or poetry, while deepening your critical awareness of the cultural, literary and theoretical history of text production. Read more
Our programme will build your confidence and technical ability in composing creative prose and/or poetry, while deepening your critical awareness of the cultural, literary and theoretical history of text production.

Teaching is research-led, so you benefit from the individual expertise and passion of a vibrant, multidisciplinary group of published authors and academics, including our Poet in Residence and Distinguished Writer in Residence.

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW

The MA Creative Writing programme will hone your research and writing skills to produce critically informed prose or poetry, and creative criticism. We will help you to locate your work in its literary and cultural context, and you will have the chance to reflect on your creative process and the finished work.

You will have access to a yearly calendar of events hosted at the University created to broaden your thinking, and develop your writing skills such as the Morag Morris Poetry Lecture, the annual Surrey New Writers’ Festival and the Surrey Poetry Festival.

The MA in Creative Writing provides a strong foundation to embark upon a career in writing, communications, publishing, marketing, advertising, journalism or teaching, or to undertake a PhD.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year and part-time over two academic years. It consists of eight taught modules and an extended portfolio.

The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand
-Research and Writing Skills I
-Research and Writing Skills II
-Literary Scholarship and Creativity I
-Literary Scholarship and Creativity II
-Creative Writing Workshop I
-Creative Writing Workshop II
-Extended Portfolio
-Open Essay I
-Open Essay II
-Special Author I
-Special Author II
-Open Creative Piece I
-Open Creative Piece II
-Beat Writing
-Realism and Its Critics
-Found Materials: Poetry and Practice
-Advanced Studies in 19th Century Literature
-Advanced Studies in 20th and 21st Century Literature
-Literature and Science
-Issues in Literary Translation
-Identity: Communication in Practice
-Organisations and Written Communications
-Children’s Literature
-Screenwriting

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF THE PROGRAMME

The MA Programme in Creative Writing will prepare graduates to undertake a PhD programme in the relevant field.

It will also provide students with the transferable skills of creative writing, critical thinking, textual analysis and communication that are attractive to a wide range of employers, from the cultural industries to marketing and advertising to tourism and leisure to the civil service and public/private partnerships.

It is designed to build confidence and technical ability in a variety of modes of imaginative writing, and to provide students with a clear-eyed grounding in contemporary and historical contexts of text production and circulation, including practical advice on the workings of the publishing industry.

Devoted to assisting students to understand and meet the challenges of producing high quality creative writing in poetry and prose, the programme also provides advanced understanding of the contexts, theoretical paradigms, methodologies and modes of interpretation that are vital in a full understanding of literary production.

The main aims are to:
-Produce work that reflects a high level of technical ability and engages productively with its historical, cultural and literary contexts
-Acquire sound knowledge of the major principles of literary criticism
-Reflect on their own practice as literary critics and how this can help to improve their own creative practice

As a Master’s level programme, it also aims to instil in students the capacity for carrying out independent research.

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes in the following areas:

Knowledge and understanding
-Demonstrate a thorough understanding of the main principles and challenges of creative writing
-Relate developments in the field of literary studies to the social, political and historical contexts of their own creative work
-Distinguish different approaches to literary studies and reflect upon these in their own
-Develop a critical engagement with various theoretical approaches and methods
-Recognize the critical language required in advanced literary studies
-Identify and explain relevant techniques and strategies for producing high quality creative writing

Intellectual / cognitive skills
-Able to critically appraise scholarly and creative writing
-Able to strategically develop research skills for retrieving information crucial for understanding the context of textual production
-Able to conduct conceptual and advanced research related to specific creative projects
-Able to formulate and address research questions relating to creative and research projects

Professional practical skills
-Able to produce high-quality creative work in and analysis of a variety of literary genres
-Able to verbally present abstract ideas and concepts in a clear and appropriate fashion
-Able to confidently deal with reading complex texts
-Able to acquire a sound knowledge of the key debates in literary studies
-Able to acquire review/evaluation skills for textual analyses at M-level
-Able to combine an understanding of text and context within and between periods

Key / transferable skills
-Display competence in a range of skills at postgraduate level, including creative writing, advanced analysis and synthesis of arguments, presentation, the conducting of independent research, and the efficient processing of complex ideas and arguments
-Collaborate by working in small groups to exchange ideas and engage in debates
-Develop knowledge in a specialized subject, area or period and command of terminology
-Organize, research and deliver a sustained piece of work to a high standard
-Create and carry out a research project of significant complexity
-Reflect upon the knowledge gained and incorporate this into independent learning strategies
-Manage learning self-critically
-Exercise initiative and personal responsibility

ACADEMICS AND EVENTS

As a student on this Masters, you will benefit from the expertise of a vibrant, multidisciplinary group of published academics and authors.

You will have access to a number of conferences, seminars and workshops hosted throughout the year. These events cover a range of topics to broaden your thinking in the fields of literature, language and linguistics, cultural studies and creative writing.

Writers to have recently visited the University of Surrey include:

Novelists
-Iain Sinclair
-Monica Ali
-Jaspreet Singh
-Nikita Lalwani

Poets
-J.H. Prynne
-Robert Fitterman
-Allen Fisher
-Gilbert Adair

Critics
-Rod Mengham
-Bernard O’Donoghue
-Barbara Hardy

Each year’s cultural activities begin with the Morag Morris Poetry Lecture on campus by a visiting speaker and feature readings by students at the Guildford School of Acting.

The annual Surrey New Writers’ Festival and Surrey Poetry Festival – both affiliated with the Creative Writing programmes at the University of Surrey – aim to engage with writing and creativity in dynamic ways, and involve readings, book signings, performances, panel discussions and more.

This graduate program is delivered by the University's Creative Writing team, all of whom are published authors and poets:
-Dr Paul Vlitos, Lecturer in Creative Writing
-Dr Holly Luhning, Lecturer in Creative Writing
-Dr Stephen Mooney, Lecturer in Creative Writing and former Poet in Residence
-Dr Angela Szczepaniak, Lecturer in Creative Writing

GLOBAL OPPORTUNITIES

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.

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The Aberystwyth Master's course in Literature and Creative Writing is your opportunity to combine the practice of creative writing with an in-depth exploration of literary studies. Read more
The Aberystwyth Master's course in Literature and Creative Writing is your opportunity to combine the practice of creative writing with an in-depth exploration of literary studies. You will be required to engage with a range of writers and writing techniques so that you can develop your own creative approach and improve your own writing. You will also engage in discussions about theory and the wider issues of textual analysis and the craft of writing, including writing for publication and the importance of research.

You will receive individual tuition from expert departmental staff and, under their guidance, produce a substantial dissertation or portfolio of creative writing. In addition, you will develop a host of key transferable skills which will help you excel in further academic study or employment.

See the website http://courses.aber.ac.uk/postgraduate/literature-creative-writing-masters/

Suitable for

This degree will suit you:

- If you want comprehensive training in methods of creative writing
- If you want to develop your critical faculties in the context of literary studies
- If you are looking for a detailed and constructive critique of your work
- If you want to inform your creative choices with a sophisticated understanding of literary theory

Course detail

This MA course is designed to help you develop your creative vision and critical approach to both writing and textual analysis. In a balanced programme of writing workshops and study of literary texts, you will choose modules to a total of 60 credits in Creative Writing and a total of 60 credits from Literary Studies. You will then demonstrate your learning through the completion of a 60-credit project in the form of a Creative Writing portfolio or a Literary Studies dissertation. By the time you graduate, you will be a more productive writer, reader and researcher, capable of constructive and critical evaluation of your own and others' work. An important part of the MA is your Literary Studies dissertation or Creative Writing portfolio. Aberystwyth University takes great care in assigning a supervisor to each student whose interests will be as closely matched to yours as possible. In tackling the subject, you will be required to produce original writing that is rigorously researched, and justified in appropriate analytical terms. This piece may define your way forward into writing-related work or further study, either as a writer or critic and researcher.

The department has a proud tradition of research excellence, as demonstrated in the most recent Research Excellence Framework (2014) assessment. It found that 97% of research assessed was found to be of international standing or higher.

Core Modules

- Research Skills In English Studies (2): Tackling Textuality ENM0620
- Writing And Publication ENM6520
- Master's Dissertation ENM0560
- The Writing Portfolio ENM0660

Assessment

Assessment takes the form of; research proposals including a related bibliographic element, case studies, oral assessments and essays. Each student will produce a substantial final project piece, in the form of either a literary studies dissertation or creative writing portfolio.

Employability

Every Master's course at Aberystwyth University is specifically designed to enhance your employability. In addition to developing your writing and research abilities, this course will help you to master key skills that are required in almost every postgraduate workplace. You will be pushed to improve your approaches to planning, analysis and presentation so that you can tackle complex projects thoroughly and with professional independence, and confidently present robust projects to the scrutiny of a group. Your Master's in Literature and Creative Writing will place you in the jobs marketplace as a professional writer with highly desirable skills suitable for a career in the arts, literature, journalism and many others.

Key Skills and Competencies:

- Study Skills:
Upon graduating from this Master's in Literature and Creative Writing, you will have mastered an array of critical and creative skills relating to writing and other forms of texts. You will be highly competent in factual research, evaluative writing and problem-solving in the process of writing. You will understand genre and register, narrative viewpoint and voice, and be able to justify your creative choices within your chosen form. Your abilities in critical appreciation will be sharpened by your study of literary theory, and you will gain first-hand experience of giving and receiving stringent but supportive criticism within a positive group setting.

- Self-Motivation and Discipline:
Studying at Master’s level requires high levels of discipline and self-motivation from every candidate. Though you will have access to the expertise and helpful guidance of departmental staff, you are ultimately responsible for devising and completing a sustained programme of scholarly research in pursuit of your Master’s degree. This process will strengthen your skills in planning, executing and analysing work projects in ways that reflect standard practice in the world of employed work.

- Transferable Skills:
The Master’s is designed to give you a range of transferable skills that you can apply in a variety of academic and employment contexts. A significant proportion of postgraduate jobs demand both particular expertise and strength in breadth. Therefore, as a trained writer and researcher with proven creative and analytical abilities, you will be desirable to any employer seeking individuals who can balance creative flair and artistic vision with a dependable work ethic and highly adaptable writing skills.

Find out how to apply here https://www.aber.ac.uk/en/postgrad/howtoapply/

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The Aberystwyth Masters’ in Creative Writing will help you develop your creative vision and writing abilities through a balanced programme of reading, analysis and writing workshops. Read more
The Aberystwyth Masters’ in Creative Writing will help you develop your creative vision and writing abilities through a balanced programme of reading, analysis and writing workshops. You will be exposed to a range of contemporary writers of both prose and poetry, so that your own creative approach may be stimulated and developed into a more mature form. You will also engage in discussions about technique and undertake an exploration of the wider issues related to the practice of writing, such as the significance of myth, autobiography and publication.

You will receive individual tuition from the excellent Departmental staff, many of whom are published creative writers. Under their guidance, you will produce a substantial portfolio in the form of poetry (10,000 words) or prose fiction (20,000 words). In addition, you will develop a host of key transferrable skills that you may deploy in a range of academic or employment contexts.

The department has a proud tradition of research excellence, as demonstrated in the most recent Research Excellence Framework (2014) assessment. It found that 97% of research assessed was found to be of international standing or higher.

See the website http://courses.aber.ac.uk/postgraduate/creative-writing-masters/

Suitable for

This degree will suit you:

- If you want comprehensive training in methods of creative writing
- If you want to develop your creative vision and writing skills
- If you are looking for a detailed and constructive critique of your work
- If you want to work within a dynamic structure for producing a portfolio of creative writing

Course detail

You will study two core modules together with four option modules from the Department’s portfolio of MA provision or other relevant study areas. The core modules will cover the essential subjects of narratology and poetics to illuminate theoretical approaches to writing, and the option modules will enable you to direct your study into areas of specific interest. Each module comprises five weeks of study with a weekly two-hour group meeting and provision for tutorial consultation. This framework for learning will inspire you to widen your artistic horizons and push you to develop your abilities within a constructive critical environment.

The centrally important component of the course is your Writing Portfolio. This piece, to comprise either prose or poetry, will be accompanied by a critical commentary explaining the work in its context and in appropriate analytical terms. We will take great care in assigning a supervisor to guide you whose interests will be as closely matched to your own as possible.

Format

Twelve months full-time. The academic year (September to September) is divided into three semesters: September to January; January to June; June to September.

Assessment

Assessment takes the form of: portfolios of prose and poetry, including critical commentaries and annotated bibliographies; a case study of a research project; and a study of a particular publisher of creative writing or type of publication. In the third semester, each student will complete a Writing Portfolio of creative writing with a critical commentary. The Portfolio can be in the form of poetry (10,000 words) or prose fiction (20,000 words), but not a combination of the two.

Application Details

In addition to completing the standard University application package (How to apply), candidates are asked by the Department to supply the following supplementary documents:

(1) A letter of application (1 side of A4) that explains why you want to enrol on the Creative Writing MA. It should include a brief account of your creative work to date, touching on relevant literary issues as appropriate – you might mention, for example, the authors who have influenced you, or themes and ideas of particular significance to you. The account will be important in helping us to arrive at a decision about your general suitability for the programme.

(2) A representative sample of creative work, written during the past three years, to include:
- EITHER 5–6 poems of not more than 40 lines each
- OR two prose pieces of 1,500 to 2,000 words each
- OR one prose piece of 3,000 to 4,000 words in total

You are allowed to send work submitted as part of a previous degree. If your work has been published we should like to see a copy, in its published form; this will be returned

Employability

Every MA course at Aberystwyth University is specifically designed to enhance your employability. In addition to developing your writing and research abilities, this course will help you to master key skills that are required in almost every postgraduate workplace. You will be pushed to improve your approaches to planning, analysis and presentation so that you can tackle complex projects thoroughly and with professional independence, and confidently present robust projects to the scrutiny of a group. Your MA in Creative Writing will place you in the jobs marketplace as a professional writer with highly desirable skills suitable for a career in the arts, literature, journalism or many other fields.

- Key Skills and Competencies:
Study Skills Upon graduating from this MA in Creative Writing, you will have mastered an array of technical and creative skills relating to writing. You will be highly competent in factual research, evaluative writing and problem-solving with the process of writing. You will understand genre and register, narrative viewpoint and voice, and be able to justify your creative choices within your chosen form. You will possess an awareness of your intended readership and identify your place in the wider context of literary fiction and/or poetry. You will also have experience in giving and receiving stringent but supportive criticism within a positive group setting.

- Self-Motivation and discipline:
Studying at MA level requires high levels of discipline and self-motivation from every candidate. Though you will have access to the expertise and helpful guidance of Departmental staff, you are ultimately responsible for devising and completing a sustained programme of scholarly research in pursuit of your MA degree. This process will strengthen your skills in planning, executing and analysing work projects in ways that reflect standard practice in the world of employed work.

- Transferable Skills:
The MA is designed to give you a range of transferable skills that you can apply in a variety of academic and employment contexts. A significant proportion of postgraduate jobs demand both particular expertise and strength in breadth. Therefore, as a trained writer with proven creative abilities, you will be desirable to any employer seeking individuals who can balance creative flair and artistic vision with a dependable work ethic and highly adaptable writing skills.

Find out how to apply here https://www.aber.ac.uk/en/postgrad/howtoapply/

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This programme is designed to meet the needs of committed students who are interested in exploring and exploiting their own possibilities as writers, and in critically examining their own writing. Read more
This programme is designed to meet the needs of committed students who are interested in exploring and exploiting their own possibilities as writers, and in critically examining their own writing. It is unique in combining creative and life writing in a stimulating and enriching programme- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-creative-life-writing/

We examine relevant literary and cultural theory as well as the politics and practicalities of language and writing from the point of view of the writer.

Practitioner-led, the programme offers you the opportunity to work with a range of published writers who visit the College to give readings and lead workshops.

Visiting writers have included William Fiennes, Jackie Kay and Aminatta Forna.

Poetry Masterclasses have been led by Sharon Olds, Les Murray, Derek Walcott and C K Williams

We also expect to draw fully upon London’s rich tradition as a converging point for culturally diverse literary practices.

Our graduates have gone on to have successful careers as writers and have won awards including the Guardian First Book Award, the Eric Gregory Award, the Sunday Times Young Writer of the Year Award, and the Dylan Thomas Prize. Two of our graduates (Ross Raisin and Evie Wyld) were recognised in Granta's Best of Young British Novelists 2013 list.

Explore the work of students currently enrolled on the programme in the Goldfish online journal.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Maria Macdonald.

There are three main components of the Masters:

Creative and life writing workshops
Contemporary Contexts for Creative and Life Writing
One-to-one tutorials
There will be two core modules: a two-term workshop in creative and life writing, and a one-term Contemporary Contexts for Creative and Life Writing seminar module.

Workshop in Creative and Life Writing

All students attend this two and-a-half-hour compulsory workshop – part-time students attend in their first year. In the first term you will be encouraged to experiment with a variety of genres in creative and life writing, and then in the second term to develop your individual interests in poetry, fiction, autobiography and biography, or perhaps a fusion of those genres.

Each term you submit a piece of your own writing together with a critical account of how you have structured and developed it. Presentations of your work to other students with an account of your aims and approaches form an additional important element.

Some workshops will be taken by visiting writers, introducing you to a range of practices, concerns and techniques. The workshop also enables you to debate issues raised in the Contemporary Contexts module in relation to your own practice.

Contemporary Contexts for Creative and Life Writing

This is a two-hour seminar module, made up of informal talks by visiting speakers, followed by a seminar. These talks might be by practising writers, biographers, critics or philosophers (from both outside and inside Goldsmiths).

Our notable visitors have included Ali Smith, A L Kennedy, Daljit Nagra and Jon McGregor. Wide-ranging topics have included: the role of the writer and politics; writing the self; the relationship between contemporary fiction and biography; the relationship between fictional and non-fictional autobiography; writers and their readers; the publishing world; contemporary ideas about language; gender and writing.

In both the Contemporary Contexts module and the workshops you will be asked to consider works by significant contemporary writers in relation to your own writing practice. Assessment is by a critical essay on a writer or literary issue. Full-time students take the Contemporary Contexts module in their first term and part-time students in their second year.

Tutorials will be offered at regular intervals during the year (12 in all).

Options

You also choose an option module lasting one term. Full-time students take the module in the second term, while part-time students take it in the second year (second term). You can choose from a specialist workshop in fiction, poetry or life writing, or an option from the list of MA options offered by ECL including topics such as European Avant-Garde, Postmodernist Fiction or Re-writing Sexualities.

Assessment

Assessment is by the submission of four pieces of writing of 5,000 words each – either an essay, or, for workshops, a piece or pieces of creative or life-writing – plus a critical account of how you have structured and developed your work. You will also be assessed on a portfolio (maximum of 20,000 words) containing a piece or pieces of creative or life-writing together with a critical account of how you have structured and developed your work. In all cases, the number of words applies to prose.

Careers

Graduates of this programme include Tom Lee, Lucy Caldwell, Ross Raisin, Amy Sackville, Rohan Kriwaczek, Evie Wyld, Sara Grant, Naomi Foyle, Bronia Kita, Lijia Zhang, Ashley Dartnell and Suzanne Joinson and the poets Emily Berry, Andy Spragg, Kate Potts, Jack Underwood, Abigail Parry, Anthony Joseph, Katrina Naomi and Matthew Gregory.

Among them they've won or been shortlisted for awards including The Sunday Times/EFG Private Bank Short Story Award 2012, the Rooney Prize for Literature 2011, the 2008 and 2011 Dylan Thomas Prize, several Eric Gregory Awards, The Sunday Times Young Writer of the Year Award 2009, the John Llewellyn Rhys Prize 2009 and 2010, the Guardian First Book Award, the New Writing Ventures Prize, and several Betty Trask Awards.

Other graduates have gone on to work in publishing (for example, as senior commissioning editors), journalism, public relations, teaching, advertising, the civil service, business, industry, and the media.

Skills

The MA will enable you to develop transferable skills, including: enhanced communication and discussion skills in written and oral contexts; the ability to analyse and evaluate different textual materials; the ability to organise information, and to assimilate and evaluate competing arguments.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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This is an exciting, supportive and non-residency online course that offers you the opportunity to develop your writing practice at the times that work for you, wherever you are in the world. Read more
This is an exciting, supportive and non-residency online course that offers you the opportunity to develop your writing practice at the times that work for you, wherever you are in the world.

Course details

We understand how difficult it can be to find the space and structure to develop your writing - this course makes it easy for you to adapt your weekly studies to your personal circumstances. This course is taught throughout by tutors who are both practising creative writers and experienced teachers of creative writing at postgraduate level. The emphasis is on developing practical writing skills and techniques whilst gaining an understanding of your own work within a critical context and framework. The course consists of four 30-credit taught modules plus the Creative Writing Project (60 credit), which is the final portfolio of your creative writing. Each module offers you opportunities to experiment and develop your interests, whether these are in prose fiction, poetry, creative life writing, dramatic writing and screen writing or in using writing to work with people in personal and professional development and healthcare settings. For more information, take a look at our module descriptions. This course is available to all international applicants. Individual modules can be taken on a stand-alone basis.

What you study

Modules
-Core Skills and Techniques
-Creative Writing Project
-The Professional Writer in the World
-Writing and the Self
-Writing Specialisms

Modules offered may vary.

Teaching

The course is taught by distance learning. There is no requirement to attend classes at a set time. You can access the course space and complete the coursework at times that work best for you.

Each taught module will consist of eight weekly units. Each unit will usually consist of:
-A short introductory video, in which your tutor introduces the week’s key themes
-Writing prompts and exercises
-Supporting materials, reading questions and suggestions for further reading and research to discuss in the discussion forum
-A dedicated private space to workshop your ideas and writing-in-progress with the tutor and fellow students.

You will also receive help, support and feedback on your work directly from the tutor, both through the online course space and by email.

You don't need to be a technology expert to take this course. All you need is a PC, laptop or tablet to access the course materials and forum and share your writing with the tutors and your peers.

Each taught 30-credit module is assessed against clear learning outcomes through written assignments, usually consisting of both creative work and some critical or reflective work. In addition to the taught modules, you produce a final project (60 credits) in your chosen form and genre.

Employability

MA Creative Writing graduates go on to a wide choice of professions and careers. Apart from the more obvious routes of publishing, editing and freelance writing, many work in the wider creative industries (television, journalism, new media) or in workplaces that require advanced writing skills in the workplace.

The practical and flexible design of the course means that it is also highly suited to teachers wishing to up-skill their portfolios in relation to the new Creative Writing A level; writers developing their teaching and workshopping skills to work in the community; and those using writing in therapy, healthcare and other professional settings.

If your job has a requirement to work on live briefs and projects with an imaginative or research element, you will also find the transferable skills offered by this MA a natural fit.

Although the course will help you if you want to develop a career using writing, many students take our MA to extend their skills for their own personal development and fulfilment.

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The Master of Studies (MSt) in Creative Writing is designed for those who wish to develop high-level skills in creative writing both in fiction and non-fiction literatures. Read more
The Master of Studies (MSt) in Creative Writing is designed for those who wish to develop high-level skills in creative writing both in fiction and non-fiction literatures. The MSt is taught over two years in short, intensive study blocks. It has been designed to be accessible to those in full- or part-time employment and to international students.

You will be guided in the production of creative work in a range of genres and styles, and also in critical reflection on your own work and that of other writers. The course tutors and guest speakers are all established literary professionals.

See the website http://www.ice.cam.ac.uk/mst-creative-writing

Who is the course designed for?

The MSt aims to facilitate students' creative practice, whether for their own personal creative development as writers or because their professional work impinges on these areas.

Examples could include teachers of English at secondary level for whom the teaching of creative writing is increasingly necessary for GCSE and A-level English Language and English Literature. It is also designed to be of professional value to those working in areas such as journalism, broadcasting, publishing and editing.

Aims of the programme

By the end of the course students should have:

- Developed their own writing and self-editing skills in a range of fiction and non-fiction genres
- Developed a solid and substantial understanding of the history (in terms of innovative developments) of fiction and non-fiction writing and of critical, analytical and narrative theory

Format

The MSt is structured around four modules, each of which includes a residential block at Madingley Hall that students must attend. In the first year, each of the four residential blocks is preceded by guided preparatory reading and other activities, and followed by two writing assignments: one critical and one creative.

A Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) offers learning support to students while they are on the programme, including learning resources, peer-to-peer and student-to-tutor discussion between modules to build a virtual community of practice.

Lectures, seminars and classes: 4 x 4-day residential sessions in Year 1; a 2-day residential session in Year 2.

Supervisions and tutorials: each student has their own tutor to whom they will have several one-to-one sessions during the first year. During the second year students have 5 x 1-hour sessions with their supervisor.

Year 1

The first year is characterised by variety. Students will engage and experiment with a wide variety of genres, building on existing strengths and exploring unfamiliar territories.

Module 1: Writing for readers: the art of poetry and the craft of criticism (17-20 October 2016)
This module will combine close critical reading of selected example of poetry and autobiographical prose with the writing of both by students.

Module 2: Writing for readers: imagined worlds - fiction, long and short (12-15 December 2016)
This module focuses on prose fiction, examining the relationship between memory, imagination and research and exploring the essential concerns of the fiction-writer, including plot and narrative, voice and character and the importance of place.

Module 3: Writing for performance: monologue and polyphonic scripts (13-16 February 2017)
This module explores various forms of writing for an audience, encompassing writing for radio, theatre, television, cinema and other forms of scripted public address and performance.

Module 4: Writing life: creative non-fiction (15-18 May 2017)
This module explores the concept of creative non-fiction and examines examples drawn from a range of sub-genres. These are likely to include biography, memoir, travel-writing and writing about the environment. Sessions on study and research skills will prepare students for Year 2. Visiting speakers for this module will include those from the world of publishing.

Year 2

The second year is characterised by focus on a specialist genre. Students will work independently to explore further and develop their own literary and critical skills, resulting in an extended piece or portfolio of writing. They will work under the supervision of an expert in their chosen field with whom they will have regular contact.

Students will have five supervisions in the second year. The first will take place in October 2017, ideally at Madingley Hall, but Skype can also be used. The dates of this and the next three supervisions will be arranged between you and your supervisor (these can also be face-to-face or via Skype). The fifth and final supervision will usually take place at Madingley Hall at the time of the only residency in the second year, the Presentation and Discussion of Portfolios, on 16-17 April 2018.

Assessment

- Year 1 -

Following the first residency students will produce 750 words of poetry and a critical commentary of 3,000 words. Following the other three residencies students will produce 4,000 words of creative prose and a critical commentary of 3,000 words.

- Year 2 -

Students will produce a portfolio consisting of 15,000 words of creative prose (or 5,000 words of poetry) and a 3,000-word critical commentary.

- Feedback -

Students are given formal written feedback on their assignments and informal feedback throughout the course, including during tutorials and supervisions. Tutors produce a report for each student at the end of Year 1 and supervisors produce termly reports for each student during Year 2.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding

Sources of government funding and financial support - including Professional and Career Development Loans: https://www.gov.uk/browse/education/student-finance

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This MA in Creative Writing degree is designed for ambitious, committed writers who are developing their independent writing practice. Read more

Summary

This MA in Creative Writing degree is designed for ambitious, committed writers who are developing their independent writing practice. You'll be supported throughout your postgraduate studies by academic staff engaged in world-leading research.

Taught by published, working writers including acclaimed poets, novelists, journalists and screenwriters, this programme will focus on four main forms of writing: Fiction, Creative Nonfiction, Poetry and Fiction for Young Readers.

You will be supported to develop your personal writing style, learn how to make your writing more effective, how to break bad habits and how to professionally assess your work. You will graduate with the skills needed for professional practice in the creative writing industry, and with an understanding of the professional context in which those skills are marketed.

Every module on our MA Creative Writing degree has a strong focus on the writing industry, which means that it will prepare you for working in this competitive sector or for further academic study. Topics include the specifics of manuscript preparation; editing and redrafting; getting published and performance opportunities.

The department has thriving partnerships with Wimbledon Bookfest, Barnes Children’s Literature Festival, as well as with local schools, providing you with the chance to volunteer or undertake paid work experience during your time at Roehampton. Our in-house publishing imprint, Fincham Press, means you could see your work published or be involved in publishing other people’s work.

You’ll be part of a department that combines tradition and innovation, excellent teaching and world-class research - 80% of our research publications are ranked as “world-leading” or “internationally excellent” for their impact. Plus, we are home to the National Centre for Research in Children’s Literature, which is regarded as the premier institution for children’s literature research in the UK. We also house the Roehampton Poetry Centre, which places the department at the forefront of the UK poetry scene.

The department also offers this MA Creative Writing programme with a specialist pathway, allowing you to specialise in one of the following: Fiction, Creative Nonfiction, Poetry or Fiction for Young Readers.

Content

This MA focuses on four main forms of writing: Fiction, Creative Nonfiction, Poetry or Fiction for Young Readers.

In Fiction, you will explore two primary forms: the short story and the novel. Emphasis will be placed on structure and craft, and you will have the opportunity to engage with a variety of storytelling tools and models.

In Creative Nonfiction, you will consider a wide range of nonfiction forms including travel writing, biography, memoir, the personal essay and the more ambitious narrative forms of journalism such as reportage. You will develop an understanding of story structure, writing craft and a sense of audience, and become familiar with the professional criteria and standards.

In Poetry, you will have the opportunity to explore the contemporary context of poetry and poetics, with a special focus on writing formally innovative work. You will question assumptions about language and the function of poetry and engage with diverse topics, including poetry as process; the materiality of language; literary affiliations and schools of poetry; intertextuality and found text; the contemporary long poem and non-narrative poetry.

In Fiction for Young Readers, you will explore a wide range of theoretical texts exploring definitions and concepts of children’s literature, from picture-books, fiction for young readers (6-12 years old) to texts for Young Adults (YAs), enabling you to contextualise and extend your own creative practice.

The compulsory module, Creative Contexts, introduces you to theoretical and research-based issues faced by creative writers, investigates “critical” writing as a form in its own right, and provides guidance on study skills.

Your seminars, workshops and tutorials will be complemented by guest lectures from industry specialists and off-site visits. Recent guest lectures have been given by Hellie Ogden at Literary Agency Janklow and Nesbitt, and trips have been organised to Tate Modern, the London Bookfair and Apiary Studios.

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The MA in Creative Writing at Kent offers you the opportunity to study fiction and poetry (exclusively or together) along with optional modules in translation, and writing and the environment. Read more
The MA in Creative Writing at Kent offers you the opportunity to study fiction and poetry (exclusively or together) along with optional modules in translation, and writing and the environment.

Designed with serious, ambitious writers in mind, our programme uses seminars, tutorials, workshops, and precise editing to enable you to take control of your own work and write exciting, contemporary material.

You are taught exclusively by members of the permanent creative writing team, all of whom are practising, award-winning writers: Patricia Debney, David Flusfeder, David Herd, Nancy Gaffield, Dragan Todorovic, Alex Preston, Amy Sackville, Simon Smith and Scarlett Thomas. (See staff research interests for further details.(https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/211/creative-writing#!staff-research))

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/211/creative-writing

About the School of English

The School of English has a strong international reputation and global perspective, apparent both in the background of its staff and in the diversity of our teaching and research interests.

Our expertise ranges from the medieval to the postmodern, including British, American and Irish literature, postcolonial writing, 18th-century studies, Shakespeare, early modern literature and culture, Victorian studies, modern poetry, critical theory and cultural history. The international standing of the School ensures that we have a lively, confident research culture, sustained by a vibrant, ambitious intellectual community. We also count a number of distinguished creative writers among our staff, and we actively explore crossovers between critical and creative writing in all our areas of teaching and research.

The Research Excellence Framework 2014 has produced very strong results for the School of English at Kent. With 74% of our work graded as world-leading or internationally excellent, the School is ranked 10th out of 89 English departments in terms of Research Intensity (Times Higher Education). The School also received an outstanding assessment of the quality of its research environment and public impact work.

Course structure

You are encouraged to put together an MA programme that suits you and your plans. It is a requirement of the programme that you take either Fiction 1 and Fiction 2 or Poetry 1 and Poetry 2 along with one other Creative Writing module. You may choose to take only creative modules, or to augment your study with a module from the literature programmes or from other Humanities programmes.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year:

EN838 - Re-visioning:Twenty-first Century Translation (30 credits)
EN839 - Writing and the Environment (30 credits)
EN812 - Creative Writing (30 credits)
EN891 - Fiction 1 (30 credits)
EN892 - Poetry 1 (30 credits)
EN893 - Fiction 2 (30 credits)
EN894 - Poetry 2 (30 credits)
EN897 - Advanced Critical Reading (30 credits)
EN818 - American Modernism 1900-1930 (Teaching Period I) (30 credits)
EN832 - Hacks, Dunces and Scribblers: Authorship and the Marketplace in the Eig (30 credits)
EN834 - Imagining India (30 credits)
EN835 - Dickens, The Victorians and the Body (30 credits)
EN836 - Dickens and the Material Culture of the Victorian Novel (30 credits)
EN842 - Reading the Contemporary (30 credits)
EN850 - Centres and Edges: Modernist and PostcolonialQuest Literature (30 credits)
EN852 - Colonial and Postcolonial Discourses (30 credits)
EN857 - Body and Place in the Postcolonial Text (30 credits)
EN862 - Contemporary Arab Novel (30 credits)
EN865 - Post-45: American Literature and Culture in the Cold War Era (30 credits)
EN866 - The Awkward Age: Transatlantic Culture and Literature in Transition, 18 (30 credits)
EN872 - Provocations and Invitations (30 credits)
EN876 - Dickens and the Condition of England (30 credits)
EN888 - Extremes of Feeling: Literature and Empire in the Eighteenth Century (30 credits)
EN889 - Literary Theory (30 credits)
MT864 - Reading the Medieval Town: Canterbury, an International City (30 credits)
MT865 - Encountering the Holy: Devotion and the Medieval Church (30 credits)
EN803 - Critical Race Theory (30 credits)

Assessment

You take a total of four modules, for which you will produce approximately 8,000 words each (or an equivalent number of poems or translations). In addition, you write a creative dissertation of about 12,000 words.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- provide you with the opportunity to obtain a postgraduate qualification (MA) in one year, and to allow you, if required, a smooth transition to doctoral studies

- extend and deepen your understanding of your own writing practice through coursework and research

- enable you to develop an historical awareness of literary and creative writing traditions

- develop your independent critical thinking and judgement

- develop your independent creative thinking and practice

- develop your understanding and critical appreciation of the expressive resources of language

- enable you to make connections across your various modules and transfer knowledge between modules

- provide you with teaching, workshops and other learning opportunities that are informed by current research and practice and that require you to engage with aspects of work and practice at the frontiers of knowledge.

Careers

Many career paths can benefit from the writing and analytical skills that you develop as a postgraduate student in the School of English. Our students have gone on to work in academia, journalism, broadcasting and media, publishing, writing and teaching; as well as more general areas such as banking, marketing analysis and project management.

This programme is also available at Paris only or split site between Canterbury and Paris.
https://www.kent.ac.uk/paris/programmes/index.html

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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This course encourages a lively environment where as a budding writer you can experiment, be imaginative and ambitious, as well as critically reflect on your practice. Read more

Why take this course?

This course encourages a lively environment where as a budding writer you can experiment, be imaginative and ambitious, as well as critically reflect on your practice.

You will have the opportunity to write literary novels, historical fiction, crime, science fiction, children’s stories, as well as screenwriting or short fiction – we encourage and respect all genres.

What will I experience?

On this course you can:

Be taught by lecturers with professional experience, many of whom are established practising writers
Complete a major project in the form of your own novel, screenplay or poem and learn about the market and current debates within differing genres in the process
Tap in to our Library’s vast selection of electronic resources, which can be accessed from anywhere with an internet connection

What opportunities might it lead to?

We continuously encourage you to seize as many opportunities as possible to make your writing visible to publishers and the public. Strengthening your creative writing skills on this course can lead to a variety of different creative career paths from roles in publishing to writing children’s books.

Alternatively, many of our graduates find roles within a variety of media industries and a number of them have gone on to study for PhDs or teaching qualifications.

Here are some routes our graduates have pursued:

Teaching
Writing
Journalism
PR

Module Details

The course consists of units focusing on creative practice, academic contexts and critical understanding. For the final stage of the course you will write a creative dissertation which can take the form of a novel (or portion thereof – 30,000 to 40,000 words in length), a collection of prose, poetry or a screenplay.

Here are the units you will study:

Writer's Workshop – Exploration: In this unit, you will be encouraged to experiment in differing genres to build confidence in writing and research.

Writer's Workshop – Resolution: During the course of this unit, you will research your chosen genre or idea and write a proposal and first chapters for the major project (dissertation). Your research and writing practice will be led by reading, discussion, debate and some substantial formative work that will eventually lead to the written proposal and/or opening chapters of a novel or pages of a screenplay or poetry.

Critical Reading for Creative Writers: This is an essay-based unit, in which you will explore critical approaches to the written word with oral presentations and researched essays.

Critical Thinking for Creative Writers: This unit allows you to approach a critical theory by relating it to your own creative writing, with reference to your major creative project. This unit is also essay-based.

The Final Project – The Creative Writing Dissertation: This unit will allow you to complete a major work in any genre (prose, poetry or screenplay) of up to 30,000 words (or equivalent). You will receive guidance and support from tutors throughout this unit of study.

Programme Assessment

Your learning will primarily be via workshop-based sessions where you will explore and develop your own writing as well as constructively contribute to the work of other writers around you. We aim to create a friendly atmosphere in which you will receive feedback to continually help evolve your creative writing style.

Your progress will be assessed by regularly submitted work and a final creative writing project in the form of a literary form or genre of your choice and geared to a specific market.

Student Destinations

You are encouraged to attend and read at ‘open mic’ sessions to develop performance skills. Previous students have found this invaluable not only when reading their own work aloud but also in professional practice. You are also encouraged to build a portfolio of work to show publishers and exhibit your work in other ways through creative blogs, or by submitting your work to online magazines and competitions.

On graduating, many of our students are equipped with the skills and confidence to continue to write and publish after the course has ended. This MA in Creative Writing can lead to a range of employment opportunities in publishing, editing, journalism and education.

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This Creative Writing. Writing the City Masters course is the first to focus entirely on the city of London. It will allow you to explore the city as subject matter from a range of perspectives and across all genres. Read more
This Creative Writing: Writing the City Masters course is the first to focus entirely on the city of London. It will allow you to explore the city as subject matter from a range of perspectives and across all genres. It will also give you a theoretical and practical platform from which to develop your understanding, and become part of the London writing scene.

Taught by professional writers and researchers, the course offers plenty of opportunities to network with other writers, agents, TV producers and performance poets. You will be based in the University's headquarters building at 309 Regent Street, which means you will be writing about the city in the heart of London, with ready access to the capital's excellent academic, social and cultural opportunities, including the vibrant West End theatre scene.

Course content

If studying full-time, you will normally take three modules in Semester One and tree modules in Semester Two. You can begin in January or in September. Part-time students take two modules in each semester. The availability of option modules will depend on overall demand and staff availability, but you will normally told which options are on offer at the beginning of your course. You can choose one 'free choice' option module from other Master courses at Westminster, subject to timetabling constraints and the approval of the project during the first semester an submit it after all other modules have been attempted.

To receive your Masters award, you will need to complete taught modules for a total of 120 credits, and the 60-credit Writing Project (giving a total of 180 credits). If you do not meet the requirements for a Masters award, you will be eligible for the award of a Postgraduate Diploma or a Postgraduate Certificate.

The workshop-based structure of the course will allow you to learn through interactive practice. Modules are taught by one two-hour or tree-hour seminar/workshop per week, depending on your subject. Teaching will also include visits to selected London institution to support certain aspects of writing, and you will be encourage to use various archives, theatres and galleries. Assessment methods include coursework portfolios (allowing you to experiment in a variety of genres, reflective logs, essays, and workshop leadership) as well as the 10-12,000-word writing project. There are no formal examinations.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of what you will study on this course.

Core modules
-CONFLICT AND THE CITY (DRAMA)
-TALES OF THE CITY (FICTION)
-CREATIVE PRACTICE
-PORTFOLIO: HOW TO WRITE CREATIVELY (JANUARY STARTERS)
-THE WRITING BUSINESS (YEAR-LONG)
-THE WRITING PROJECT

Option modules - You will choose either a further core module or one of the following:
-ANALYSING SPOKEN AND WRITTEN DISCOURSE
-DIGITAL LONDON
-LANGUAGE AND THE IMAGINATION (POETIC WRITING)
-READING CONTEMPORARY CULTURE
-URBAN CULTURES

Associated careers

The course will enable you to develop sophisticated critical and creative skills and a widely applicable knowledge base that can be adapted to various fields of creative practice and writing business. This course is intended to move you to a new level in your career as a writer by developing your skills as a sophisticated critical practitioner, and your knowledge of literature about the city as well as the writing business. You will be encouraged to network with other writers and identify useful opportunities for career development, partly through a wide range of extra-curricular activities, including writers’ events and talks. The critical and practical skills you will acquire by the end of the course will make you a strong candidate in many areas, including arts management, copy editing, education, freelance writing, journalism, media, publishing, theatre and performance-based writing, and research and academia.

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This is an innovative and interdisciplinary MA programme, combining taught modules and a dissertation, which allows you to share your year between Canterbury and Paris. Read more
This is an innovative and interdisciplinary MA programme, combining taught modules and a dissertation, which allows you to share your year between Canterbury and Paris.

Designed with serious, ambitious writers in mind, our programme uses seminars, tutorials, workshops, and precise editing to enable you to take control of your own work and write exciting, contemporary material.

Following a similar path to our Creative Writing MA, this programme allows you to spend your first term at our Canterbury campus with full access to its excellent academic and recreational facilities before relocating to our Paris centre for the spring term.

During your studies in Paris, you are based at Columbia Global Center (known as Reid Hall) in a historic corner of Montparnasse. You choose from a range of Paris-focused modules which are taught in English. In your final term, you complete your MA by writing a 15,000-word dissertation on a research topic defined in collaboration with your academic supervisors.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/214/creative-writing-canterbury-and-paris

About the School of English

The School of English has a strong international reputation and global perspective, apparent both in the background of its staff and in the diversity of our teaching and research interests.

Our expertise ranges from the medieval to the postmodern, including British, American and Irish literature, postcolonial writing, 18th-century studies, Shakespeare, early modern literature and culture, Victorian studies, modern poetry, critical theory and cultural history. The international standing of the School ensures that we have a lively, confident research culture, sustained by a vibrant, ambitious intellectual community. We also count a number of distinguished creative writers among our staff, and we actively explore crossovers between critical and creative writing in all our areas of teaching and research.

The Research Excellence Framework 2014 has produced very strong results for the School of English at Kent. With 74% of our work graded as world-leading or internationally excellent, the School is ranked 10th out of 89 English departments in terms of Research Intensity (Times Higher Education). The School also received an outstanding assessment of the quality of its research environment and public impact work.

Course structure

You take either Fiction 1 in the first term and Paris: The Residency (or Fiction 2) in the second, or Poetry 1 in the first term and Paris: The Residency (or Fiction 2) in the second. In the first term, you may choose from any of the other creative writing modules on offer and in the second term, you choose from the Paris modules list. While in Paris, you are also encouraged to attend readings and talks, and to organise your own writing workshops.

For further information about the University of Kent, Paris, please see http://www.kent.ac.uk/paris/.

Modules

The above modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation.

Assessment

You take a total of four modules, for which you will produce approximately 8,000 words each (or an equivalent number of poems or translations). In addition, you write a creative dissertation of about 12,000 words.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- provide you with the opportunity to obtain a postgraduate qualification (MA) in one year, and to allow you, if required, a smooth transition to doctoral studies

- give you the breadth of experience of studying creative writing modules in Canterbury in the Autumn term, and then spending the Spring term in Paris writing ‘in residence’ while pursuing one other Kent at Paris module

- extend and deepen your understanding of your own writing practice through coursework and research

- enable you to develop an historical awareness of literary and creative writing traditions, particularly those that have been located in, or in some other way focussed on, Paris develop your independent critical thinking and judgement

- develop your independent creative thinking and practice

- develop your knowledge and understanding of relevant aspects of contemporary Paris and the literary history of the city with a view to you incorporating some of these aspects into your own creative and critical writing

- develop your understanding and critical appreciation of the expressive resources of language

- enable you to make connections across your various modules and transfer knowledge between modules

- provide you with teaching, workshops and other learning opportunities that are informed by current research and practice and that require you to engage with aspects of work and practice at the frontiers of knowledge.

Careers

Many career paths can benefit from the writing and analytical skills that you develop as a postgraduate student in the School of English. Our students have gone on to work in academia, journalism, broadcasting and media, publishing, writing and teaching; as well as more general areas such as banking, marketing analysis and project management.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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This is an integrated multimedia journalism course that prepares you for a career in the global journalism industry by providing you with the core skills for print, broadcast, magazine and online platforms. Read more
This is an integrated multimedia journalism course that prepares you for a career in the global journalism industry by providing you with the core skills for print, broadcast, magazine and online platforms.

During the course you learn how to gather, organise, write and present information to a professional standard across a variety of platforms and to different audiences.

Key areas of study include:
-Print.
-Broadcast.
-Digital/online journalism.
-Writing and presentation skills.
-Interviewing.
-TV and radio presentation skills.
-Professional practice.
-Global journalism.
-Shorthand.

By selecting options to meet your own interests you are able to specialise in print journalism, magazine journalism, radio journalism and television journalism. You can also choose to stud: media law and regulation; public affairs; practical PR and professional experience; PR: politics and lobbying; sports journalism.

Throughout the course you gain an understanding of how your chosen area operates in Britain and internationally by examining different examples of journalistic practice. You are able to bring your own experience of journalism in your home country and gain insight into practices in Britain, Europe and the wider world. You study case-studies from regions of the world that interest you in order to compare different approaches to journalism.

Print and online journalism modules prepare you to develop the multiplatform skills to operate effectively as a news and feature journalist in any global newsroom. This means learning to develop a strong news sense, an ability to select and prioritise key facts and quotes, and writing skills for different platforms.

You also:
-Learn how to produce accurate material for publication to a given length and deadline.
-Develop an understanding of how news is consumed and how to meet the needs and expectations of a range of audiences.
-Develop both multidisciplinary and team working skills that equip you to work with people from a range of backgrounds.

Increasingly, both consumer and specialist and business-to-business magazines attract readers and consumers from across the world. The magazine journalism module develops the skills to enable you to work in one of the fastest growing areas of journalism. You learn the business of magazines – including branding and marketing and use of social media techniques – as well as how to source and write lively and creative features, edit copy and write attention-grabbing headlines and coverlines, and how to design and layout magazines.

Broadcast journalism modules develop your skills in radio and TV broadcasting, and in interviewing and presenting. You produce radio and TV packages in a dedicated TV and radio studio and two dedicated newsrooms.

Alongside practical skills, the course gives you the opportunity to study the ethical, legal and regulatory context in which journalism is practised. Theoretical content deepens your understanding and critical awareness of on-going debates about the economic and political role played by journalists and global news organisations in modern societies.

If you want to work as a journalist in the UK, you may choose to follow a National Council for the Training of Journalists pathway and sit the professional examinations necessary to gain a job in journalism in the UK market. You need an IELTS equivalent of 7.0 to follow this pathway.

Sheffield Hallam University acts as a centre for the NCTJ national examinations.

For more information, see the website: https://www.shu.ac.uk/study-here/find-a-course/ma-international-journalism

Course structure

Full time – typically 13 months.
Part time – typically 3 years.
Starts September.

Modules
Semester One core modules
-Writing for the media
-Radio journalism
-Magazine journalism
Semester One optional modules
-Sports journalism 1
-Media law and regulation 1
-Practical PR and professional experience

Semester Two core modules
-Print and online reporting
-TV journalism
-International journalism and PR
Semester Two optional modules
-Sports journalism
-Media law and regulation 2
-Public affairs
-PR: politics and lobbying

Semester Three core modules
-International journalism project

Assessment: coursework; critical evaluation; dissertation or project; a combination of practical and theoretical work.

Other admission requirements

You may also be considered if you do not hold a degree but can provide evidence of relevant professional experience. We encourage applications from UK and international candidates who:
-Have a diversity of backgrounds.
-Are considering a career in journalism.
-Show the required aptitude and potential.

We base our selection criteria on your relevant experience and potential for development. Previous experience of journalism is preferable, but not necessary.

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The Creative Writing programme at Glasgow has gained an excellent reputation amongst writers, agents and publishers. It is perfect for talented and aspiring writers who want to develop their craft, take risks in their work, and gain creative and critical skills; all as part of a supportive community of fellow writers. Read more
The Creative Writing programme at Glasgow has gained an excellent reputation amongst writers, agents and publishers. It is perfect for talented and aspiring writers who want to develop their craft, take risks in their work, and gain creative and critical skills; all as part of a supportive community of fellow writers. Skills gained in the study of Creative Writing may lead to career opportunities in literary and cultural fields such as editing, publishing and arts development.

Why this programme

-Our dedicated teaching staff comprises successful and well-regarded writers who work in and encourage a variety of genres and forms.
-We have strong links with literary agents and publishers, and an impressive number of our graduates are published and acclaimed authors.

Programme structure

The MLitt in Creative Writing is directed at those who are already engaged in writing. The programme’s clear three-part structure, focused on creative, critical and practical issues, distinguishes it from others offered in the UK.

The programme structure covers:

Semester 1
-Creative workshops and guest speakers
-Reading as a writer (Craft & Experimentation 1)
-Copyright, publishing and the culture of reception (Editing & Publication 1)

Semester 2
-Creative workshops and guest speakers
-Experimentation (Craft & Experimentation 2)
-Editing the twenty-first century: editorial project (Editing & Publication 2)

These courses have been developed to:
-Encourage you to experiment with a range of voices, techniques and genres alongside a consideration of major creative and editorial engagements from the modern through the contemporary period.
-Provide a space to undertake extended portfolios of creative and editorial work.
-Familiarise you with the writing context (audience, publishing in all its forms, the legal framework, modes of transmission); help you develop a critical understanding of diverse creative, theoretic and critical texts through consideration of major creative and editorial engagements in modern and contemporary writing.
-To help you develop the discipline of regular writing by providing a stimulating workshop and tutorial environment in which writing skills can be acquired, discussed and honed.

Background

‎Among its alumni the University of Glasgow includes some notable writers, from Robert Henryson in the fifteenth century, to James Boswell, Tobias Smollett and Adam Smith in the eighteenth. It was in the twentieth century that Glasgow’s place as a centre of creativity was established. It numbers among its many writer-graduates William Boyd, James Bridie, John Buchan, A.J. Cronin, Janice Galloway, Alasdair Gray, Janice Hally, James Herriot, James Kelman, Helen MacInnes, Alistair MacLean, William McIllvanney, Edwin Morgan and Alexander Trocchi.

Career prospects

Graduates have gone into writing, journalism, publishing, and many other professions.

Many of our students have gone on to become published authors. You can find a list of alumni on our Creative Writing subject pages. Others have been published in magazines and journals, or have had their work produced and broadcast on radio and television. A number of our graduates have won or been shortlisted for major prizes for poetry, short fiction and fiction including the Dundee Book Prize, Booker Prize, Bailey’s Women’s Prize, Orange Prize, Fish Short Story Award, Bridport Prize, McCash Scots Poetry Competition, Macallan and Canongate short story awards, Saltire Awards, Scottish Book of the Year Awards.

Positions held by recent graduates include Managing Director, Freelance Writer, Editor, Programme Manager, Author, Copywriter, Author and Community Arts Worker.

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The English Language and Creative Writing MA allows you to explore the interconnections between your knowledge of how language is used and produced, and your literary compositions. Read more
The English Language and Creative Writing MA allows you to explore the interconnections between your knowledge of how language is used and produced, and your literary compositions. It will provide you with a thorough understanding of the linguistic features of English from a wide range of perspectives (theoretical and applied, synchronic and diachronic), as well as leading you to explore the writing process across genres and to take the city of London as one of your main sources of inspiration. The MA will equip you with the intellectual perspectives and the scholarly skills that will prepare you to conduct independent research, and will offer you many opportunities to network with other writers, agents, TV producers and performance poets.

Course content

The English Language and Creative Writing MA is suitable for students who have taken English language, literature and/or creative writing modules at undergraduate level, and others with experience in these fields. It is of particular interest to those wishing to pursue further study, and those aiming to apply their knowledge of language and the writing process in their careers.

If pursuing the degree full-time, you will study 180 credits in one academic year; if part-time, you will normally complete 180 credits in two academic years. You will study three or four core modules (including a 60-credit dissertation on a topic of English language or a creative writing project), as well as two modules from the list of options. The core module English Language in Use will help you acquire the scholarly tools necessary for the stylistic interpretation of literary and non-literary texts, while the modules Tales of the City and Conflict and the City invite you to explore the writing process in connection with prose and dramatic texts.

The teaching is mainly through weekly two- or three-hour sessions for each module, which include tutorials, seminars, practical sessions and workshops. There is also independent self-directed study, and you will be prepared for the Dissertation via structured sessions in research methodology. Assessment methods include submitted coursework such as essays, reviews and exercises; there are no formal examinations.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of what you will study on this course.

Core modules
-CONFLICT AND THE CITY (DRAMA)
-DISSERTATION
-ENGLISH LANGUAGE IN LITERARY CONTEXTS
-HOW TO WRITE CREATIVELY: PORTFOLIO
-TALES OF THE CITY (FICTION)
-WRITING PROJECT (YEAR-LONG)

Option modules
-ANALYSING SPOKEN AND WRITTEN DISCOURSE
-CREATIVE PRACTICE
-CURRENT DEVELOPMENTS IN LANGUAGE TEACHING
-INTERCULTURAL COMMUNICATION
-LANGUAGE AND THE IMAGINATION (POETIC WRITING)
-SOCIOLINGUISTICS
-THE WRITING BUSINESS
-TRANSLATION STUDIES

Teaching and assessment

Teaching is conducted mainly through weekly two or three hour sessions for each module, which include tutorials, seminars, practical sessions and workshops. Teaching will also include visits to selected London institutions to support certain aspects of writing, and you will be encouraged to use various archives, galleries, etc. There is also independent self-directed study, and you will receive one-to-one advice for your dissertation or writing project.

Assessment methods include submitted coursework such as essays, projects, reports or reflective logs. There are no timed written examinations.

Associated careers

The course will enable you to develop sophisticated critical and creative skills and a widely applicable knowledge base that can be adapted to various fields of language use and study, creative practice and writing business. This course is intended to move you to a new level in your career as a writer by developing your skills as a sophisticated critical practitioner, and your knowledge of literature about the city as well as the writing business. You will be encouraged to network with other writers and identify useful opportunities for career development, partly through the wide range of extra-curricular activities, including writers' events and talks, and partly through the workshops organised by the departmental employability coordinator. The critical and practical skills you will acquire by the end of the course will make you a strong candidate in many areas, including arts management, copy editing, education, freelance writing, journalism, media, publishing, research and academia.

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