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Masters Degrees (Creative Editing)

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Unearth and connect the shared skills between writer, editor and publisher. With the Master of Creative Writing, Publishing and Editing, you can gain a globally recognised, vocationally viable qualification designed with the changing nature of the publishing industry in mind. Read more

Unearth and connect the shared skills between writer, editor and publisher. With the Master of Creative Writing, Publishing and Editing, you can gain a globally recognised, vocationally viable qualification designed with the changing nature of the publishing industry in mind.

This program has a practical focus aimed at building your knowledge and skill set across a broad spectrum of writing, publishing and editing, including digital writing and publishing, fiction and non‐fiction writing, print production, advanced editing for books and magazines and writing for young adults.

WHO IS IT FOR?

The Master of Creative Writing, Publishing and Editing is for those who currently work in the creative writing, editing and publishing industry, or have recently completed and undergraduate degree. This qualification is for you if you want to build your project management, research and critical thinking in writing, editing and publishing projects, or develop sound knowledge of the commercial impetus of the global publishing industry.

WHERE WILL IT TAKE ME?

On graduation from the Master of Creative Writing, Publishing and Editing, you will be ready for work in professional fields including:

  • Book publishing
  • Freelance writing
  • Journalism
  • Print production
  • Technical writing
  • Writing and editing for digital media


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Designed for experienced writers, this one-year full-time course will extend your knowledge and understanding of the practice of creative writing. Read more
Designed for experienced writers, this one-year full-time course will extend your knowledge and understanding of the practice of creative writing.

Developing your creative writing abilities and ideas beyond first degree, you will attend workshops, produce a portfolio of creative writing, attend classes in various topics in creative writing and gain experience in teaching creative writing.

A series of complementary courses stress an integrated experience of literary development and pedagogy of creative writing.

You will master the ability to independently produce literary works of refinement and skill, and to conduct writers’ workshops. You will also develop your knowledge and skills in the writing of one or more literary genre(s), the teaching of creative writing and the processes of editing and revision.

You will be assessed on two portfolios of creative writing and two essays or projects. There are no formal examinations.

Distinctive features:

• Dedicated teaching staff of professional writers;

• Opportunities for hands-on experience in teaching Creative Writing;

• Workshops and readings by eminent authors, along with Open Mic nights at a city centre venue, enabling you to share your writing with an audience to enhance your skills and confidence in public presentations;

• Small Group workshops;

• You will have the opportunity to attend a residential writing retreat at Gregynog Hall, a country mansion with a distinguished artistic heritage in mid-Wales.

Structure

The degree programme consists of four modules which are assessed at separate stages of the academic year. Overall, the degree is worth 180 credits. This is split by a portfolio of writing (60 credits), two essays (60 credits) and a second portfolio (60 credits).

From May to September, you will devote your time to completing your second portfolio of writing, produced exclusively during the course.

You must successfully complete the second portfolio to gain your Master’s degree.

Throughout both semesters you will attend a writer’s workshop, which leads to the first portfolio of written work (approximately 6,000 words, with a critical commentary of 1,000 words). One-to-one sessions with portfolio tutors also run in your second semester.

The Creative Process module gives you the chance to sit in on undergraduate classes and to teach a session and to visit local schools and colleges. Part one will be complete when you successfully pass an essay on teaching creative writing.

Core modules:

Creative Writing Portfolio I: The Writers' Workshop
The Creative Process
Teaching Creative Writing
Creative Writing Portfolio II

Teaching

Teaching is by a combination of small-group seminars, workshops, tutor led one-to-ones, placements in undergraduate classes and visits to outside schools and colleges anda three-day residential at Gregynog Hall.

You will be expected to read and analyse a range of critical and literary texts, read and assess peer work and develop self-reflective skills.

The learning activities will vary from module to module, but may include writing exercises, critical reading, analysis of craft, the presentation of critical and creative work to others, micro-teaching, etc. You are expected to give focused and constructive feedback in our supportive group workshops.

Assessment

You will be assessed through submission of two portfolios and two essays over the course of your degree.

The second portfolio, completed between May-September in your second semester, must be successfully completed and passed for you to gain your Master’s degree.

Career prospects

Postgraduate study is a gateway to many careers within and beyond academia. Many overseas postgraduates return to lectureships with much enhanced career prospects. Example employers in the UK include Cardiff University, HMRC, Mencap, Poetry Wales Magazine, Teach First, and the Welsh Government, with jobs that include Creative Writing Lecturer, Librarian, Poet, Recruitment Consultant, Teacher, and Writer.

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The Creative Writing programme at Glasgow has gained an excellent reputation amongst writers, agents and publishers. It is perfect for talented and aspiring writers who want to develop their craft, take risks in their work, and gain creative and critical skills; all as part of a supportive community of fellow writers. Read more

The Creative Writing programme at Glasgow has gained an excellent reputation amongst writers, agents and publishers. It is perfect for talented and aspiring writers who want to develop their craft, take risks in their work, and gain creative and critical skills; all as part of a supportive community of fellow writers. Skills gained in the study of Creative Writing may lead to career opportunities in literary and cultural fields such as editing, publishing and arts development.

Why this programme

  • Our dedicated teaching staff comprises successful and well-regarded writers who work in and encourage a variety of genres and forms.
  • We have strong links with literary agents and publishers, and an impressive number of our graduates are published and acclaimed authors.

Programme structure

The MLitt in Creative Writing is directed at those who are already engaged in writing. The programme’s clear three-part structure, focused on creative, critical and practical issues, distinguishes it from others offered in the UK.

The programme structure covers:

Semester 1

  • Creative workshops and guest speakers
  • Reading as a writer (Craft & Experimentation 1)
  • Copyright, publishing and the culture of reception (Editing & Publication 1)

Semester 2

  • Creative workshops and guest speakers 
  • Experimentation (Craft & Experimentation 2)
  • Editing the twenty-first century: editorial project (Editing & Publication 2)

These courses have been developed to:

  • encourage you to experiment with a range of voices, techniques and genres alongside a consideration of major creative and editorial engagements from the modern through the contemporary period.
  • provide a space to undertake extended portfolios of creative and editorial work.
  • familiarise you with the writing context (audience, publishing in all its forms, the legal framework, modes of transmission); help you develop a critical understanding of diverse creative, theoretic and critical texts through consideration of major creative and editorial engagements in modern and contemporary writing.
  • and most importantly, to help you develop the discipline of regular writing by providing a stimulating workshop and tutorial environment in which writing skills can be acquired, discussed and honed.

Your portfolio, consisting of fiction, poetry, creative non-fiction, or script-writing, is at the heart of the summative assessment.

Glasgow is a city known for its culture and our students are involved in festivals, events, radio and literary magazines.

Career prospects

Graduates have gone into writing, journalism, publishing, and many other professions.

Many of our students have gone on to become published authors. You can find a list of alumni on our Creative Writing subject pages. Others have been published in magazines and journals, or have had their work produced and broadcast on radio and television. A number of our graduates have won or been shortlisted for major prizes for poetry, short fiction and fiction including the Dundee Book Prize, Booker Prize, Bailey’s Women’s Prize, Orange Prize, Fish Short Story Award, Bridport Prize, McCash Scots Poetry Competition, Macallan and Canongate short story awards, Saltire Awards, Scottish Book of the Year Awards. 

Positions held by recent graduates include Managing Director, Freelance Writer, Editor, Programme Manager, Author, Copywriter, Author and Community Arts Worker.



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Looking to further your career within the creative industries? Southampton Solent’s innovative and transmedia MA Critical Creative Practice programme focuses… Read more

Looking to further your career within the creative industries? Southampton Solent’s innovative and transmedia MA Critical Creative Practice programme focuses on individual student-centred learning and encourages critical creative practice across the creative spectrum, including art, design, fashion, photography, media arts and technology, helping to enhance employability and leaving you well-prepared to progress within your chosen creative field.

Taught by both creative industry professionals and academic practitioners, the course enables students to develop ideas and engage with the emerging material and digital cultures of the future, as well as the fast-changing demands of the creative industries and the associated changes to cultural production, consumption and interpretation.

The course structure is theory and practice based. The theoretical element consists of critical core units which reference visual culture, cultural theory, critical theory, art and design history, media culture, and material and digital culture. The interdisciplinary practice element relates to creative practice in the fields of art, design, fashion, photography, media arts and technology.

The integration of theory and practice is central to the course and learning is carefully structured through these interdependent units to develop a broad base of interrelated experiences, whilst also providing the opportunity to specialise through the professional practice unit and the choice of final dissertation or final project.

Students will also have the opportunity to take optional technician-supported introductory workshops which could include contemporary arts practice, photography, new media practice, 3D printing and laser cutting, material manipulation, performance, beauty and the body, film editing, and sound and image production. To complement their studies, students may be able to take part in international and European study exchange opportunities through the University's study abroad programmes.

The unique approach of this course can enhance employability, enabling students to progress into the workplace equipped with valuable critical thinking and practice-based skills required for working in the creative industries and forming innovative hybrid engagements. 

What does this course lead to?

Graduates from this course will be well-placed for careers in a broad range of the creative industries, such as art, design, media, film, fashion, photography, education, culture and heritage, and curation.

Who is this course for?

This course is well-suited to graduates who wish to further their career within the creative industries by gaining a solid understanding of creative practice and critical thinking across a broad range of disciplines.

What you will study

Units include:

  • Writing Criticism: critical and analytical frameworks
  • Critical Practice: cultures of convergence
  • Professional Practice 
  • Research Methods
  • Cultural Production, Curation and Consumption
  • Master's Project/Dissertation

Optional technician supported introductory workshops to be run in both semester one and two: Contemporary Arts Practice, Photography, New Media Practice, 3D Printing and Laser Cutting, Material Manipulation, Performance, Beauty and the Body, Film Editing, and Sound and Image Production.

Facilities

Solent University provides a well-resourced environment to help students develop and harness enterprising and entrepreneurial practice. Students on this course have access to dedicated studio space to develop their individual creative practice. Other creative spaces and equipment available to students include photographic studios, fashion studios, Mac rooms, recording equipment, editing suites, and performance and exhibition space.

Solent is also home to a 24-hour library, modern IT facilities and a range of expert learning and employability support services.

Industry links

The course team has strong industry links and students may have the opportunity to benefit from relevant industry contacts and academic links including John Hansard Gallery, V&A Museum, ICA Education and Events Programme, Solent Showcase exhibition space, Solent Research and Innovation Office, Solent Learning and Teaching Institute, Solent Material and Digital Archive.

Students may also benefit from internship and partnership collaboration opportunities with Hampshire Cultural Trust (Arts Council England-funded South East Museum Development Programme.

Students studying on courses within the School of Art, Design and Fashion may also have the opportunity to gain additional industry insights through an excellent guest speaker programme which has included internationally acclaimed artists, designers, photographers, curators, stylists, writers, musicians, performers, filmmakers and Oscar and Bafta award-winning film editors.



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Do you love writing but also want to earn a living? The MA in Creative, Digital and Professional Writing is an exciting and innovative new course that will… Read more
Do you love writing but also want to earn a living? The MA in Creative, Digital and Professional Writing is an exciting and innovative new course that will allow you to develop your creative writing abilities while equipping you with the multimedia, digital skills required by professional writers working in the creative industries – media, journalism, film,publishing, e-books, marketing and the communications industry. You will be taught by lecturers who are academics and award-winning professionals, with the skills, contacts and profile in these industries to help you develop a distinctive and individual writing voice that is also attractive to employers. This MA benefits from an advisory, industry-based panel, connecting the degree with the latest professional knowledge, innovation and changes.

More about this course

This innovative MA will help students develop cutting-edge, flexible writing skills that they can apply to a wide range of professional settings and literary modes, allowing them to develop their own creative ideas while also equipping them with the abilities necessary for the creative industries.

Making use of both the University's £100,000 newsroom, its award-winning staff, guest lecturers from the industry and a professional advisory panel, students will develop an understanding of the demands and opportunities of a professional writing career.

They will benefit from work placements and the activities organised by the University's Centre for Research into Media, Identity and Culture (MiC).

Assignments, coursework, media artefacts, and portfolios made up of written/visual/audio original work.

Modular structure

The modules listed below are for the academic year 2016/17 and represent the course modules at this time. Modules and module details (including, but not limited to, location and time) are subject to change over time.

Year 1 modules include:
-Creative Writing (core, 20 credits)
-Creative, Digital and Professional Writing Project / Dissertation (core, 60 credits)
-Digital Storytelling (core, 20 credits)
-Feature Journalism (core, 20 credits)
-Researching Media, Communication and the Creative Industries (core, 20 credits)
-Accredited Work-Based Learning in the School of MCC (option, 20 credits)
-Advanced English for Masters Studies (option, 20 credits)
-Advertising (option, 20 credits)
-Creative Nonfiction (option, 20 credits)
-Digital Video Production (option, 20 credits)
-Multimedia Journalism (option, 20 credits)
-Principles of Digital Media (option, 20 credits)
-Routes into Publishing (option, 20 credits)
-Scriptwriting (option, 20 credits)

After the course

The Creative, Digital and Professional Writing MA will give you the skills you need to forge a successful career in the media and creative industries. Key areas in these industries include media, creative writing, editing, journalism, marketing, publishing and PR, the arts and arts management, the music industry, web design, software design, curating, fine art consultancy, arts and cultural sector management and administration, events management, and other creative and cultural professions. Almost every commercial and public company now has a communications manager and graduates of this MA would have specialist skills that they could bring to such a role. They could also combine roles in creative writing and journalism, editing and marketing.

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Digital technology has transformed the editing process, yet it has also dramatically diminished the role of the assistant editor so that opportunities to learn the art of editing as an apprentice are increasingly hard to find. Read more
Digital technology has transformed the editing process, yet it has also dramatically diminished the role of the assistant editor so that opportunities to learn the art of editing as an apprentice are increasingly hard to find.

-Unique course in UK.
-Creative and technical skills developed.
-Study in a collaborative, filmmaking environment.
-Students assigned individual editing suites.
-The NFTS is an Avid Education Partner.
-Unlike other schools, all production costs are met by the School.

We welcome EU/EEA Students. Those accepted onto courses starting in 2018 will have their fees guaranteed at the UK rate for both years of the course. Postgraduate students can apply for a loan to help with their studies via the Student Loans Company Loans. A £ 10,000 loan is available to contribute to course and living costs. The Post Graduate Loan is only open to EU/EEA and UK Students who normally live in England. It is not currently available to Scottish, Welsh or Northern Ireland Students. Find out more here: https://nfts.co.uk/fees-funding/funding-guide

COURSE OVERVIEW

This course commences in January each year. This course provides a thorough education in editing skills in a professional filmmaking environment. Editing students are encouraged to consider their craft as part of the whole process of film and television production and not merely as the final stage, making them true collaborators, not just efficient technicians.

The emphasis of the Editing curriculum is firmly on storytelling and the relationship between editor and director. Students learn to apply their craft to the demands of fiction, documentary and animation, creating visual narratives while working with sound, music and, where appropriate, special effects. Workshops with other departments develop concepts of visual storytelling, mise-en-scène, storyboarding, sound design, music and scriptwriting.

Editing graduates have a high rate of employment on feature films, shorts and television programmes. Many new graduates quickly become editors on independent productions or assistant editors on features or TV drama, while others gravitate to visual effects, promos and i-dents. One recent graduate was joint winner of the Best Young Editor Award at Broadcast Magazine's B+ Awards. Recent graduate editing credits include Florence Foster Jenkins, Our Kind of Traitor, The Queen, Hannibal Rising, Reprise at the cinema and Downton Abbey, Paul Merton in China, Holby City, Hustle, CSI: Crime Scene Investigation and Spooks on television.

CURRICULUM

YEAR ONE
With Sound Design and Composing students Abstract Film Workshop
Without Images - a sound-only project
Dramaturgy Workshop - focusing on script and script analysis, blocking and cover, and performance
Modules and workshops include Foundation exercises for fiction and documentary editing
Storyboarding workshop with Animation students Short documentary
Zen and Beyond - fiction workshop focusing on visual storytelling
Comedy Workshop - workshop using rushes from a feature film and focusing on editing for comedy and/or drama
Animation Project - developed and produced to a soundtrack Investigative Documentary - the major first year documentary production First Year Film - the major 1st year fiction production collaborating with all other departments

YEAR TWO
Fiction editing exercise focusing on drama editing and co-editing using complete rushes from a feature film
2nd year fiction production, shot on a digital format
Graduation films in documentary, fiction and animation
Unlike other schools, all production costs are met by the School. In addition you will be given a cash Production Budget. NFTS students are engaged in more productions as part of the curriculum than any of our competitors.

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This course encourages a lively environment where as a budding writer you can experiment, be imaginative and ambitious, as well as critically reflect on your practice. Read more

Why take this course?

This course encourages a lively environment where as a budding writer you can experiment, be imaginative and ambitious, as well as critically reflect on your practice.

You will have the opportunity to write literary novels, historical fiction, crime, science fiction, children’s stories, as well as screenwriting or short fiction – we encourage and respect all genres.

What will I experience?

On this course you can:

Be taught by lecturers with professional experience, many of whom are established practising writers
Complete a major project in the form of your own novel, screenplay or poem and learn about the market and current debates within differing genres in the process
Tap in to our Library’s vast selection of electronic resources, which can be accessed from anywhere with an internet connection

What opportunities might it lead to?

We continuously encourage you to seize as many opportunities as possible to make your writing visible to publishers and the public. Strengthening your creative writing skills on this course can lead to a variety of different creative career paths from roles in publishing to writing children’s books.

Alternatively, many of our graduates find roles within a variety of media industries and a number of them have gone on to study for PhDs or teaching qualifications.

Here are some routes our graduates have pursued:

Teaching
Writing
Journalism
PR

Module Details

The course consists of units focusing on creative practice, academic contexts and critical understanding. For the final stage of the course you will write a creative dissertation which can take the form of a novel (or portion thereof – 30,000 to 40,000 words in length), a collection of prose, poetry or a screenplay.

Here are the units you will study:

Writer's Workshop – Exploration: In this unit, you will be encouraged to experiment in differing genres to build confidence in writing and research.

Writer's Workshop – Resolution: During the course of this unit, you will research your chosen genre or idea and write a proposal and first chapters for the major project (dissertation). Your research and writing practice will be led by reading, discussion, debate and some substantial formative work that will eventually lead to the written proposal and/or opening chapters of a novel or pages of a screenplay or poetry.

Critical Reading for Creative Writers: This is an essay-based unit, in which you will explore critical approaches to the written word with oral presentations and researched essays.

Critical Thinking for Creative Writers: This unit allows you to approach a critical theory by relating it to your own creative writing, with reference to your major creative project. This unit is also essay-based.

The Final Project – The Creative Writing Dissertation: This unit will allow you to complete a major work in any genre (prose, poetry or screenplay) of up to 30,000 words (or equivalent). You will receive guidance and support from tutors throughout this unit of study.

Programme Assessment

Your learning will primarily be via workshop-based sessions where you will explore and develop your own writing as well as constructively contribute to the work of other writers around you. We aim to create a friendly atmosphere in which you will receive feedback to continually help evolve your creative writing style.

Your progress will be assessed by regularly submitted work and a final creative writing project in the form of a literary form or genre of your choice and geared to a specific market.

Student Destinations

You are encouraged to attend and read at ‘open mic’ sessions to develop performance skills. Previous students have found this invaluable not only when reading their own work aloud but also in professional practice. You are also encouraged to build a portfolio of work to show publishers and exhibit your work in other ways through creative blogs, or by submitting your work to online magazines and competitions.

On graduating, many of our students are equipped with the skills and confidence to continue to write and publish after the course has ended. This MA in Creative Writing can lead to a range of employment opportunities in publishing, editing, journalism and education.

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The MA in Creative Writing is an exciting new programme at Durham University. Taught by award-winning writers Dr Paul Batchelor and Dr Vidyan Ravinthiran, this is an academically rigorous programme that will develop students’ practical knowledge of writing poetry and prose fiction. Read more

The MA in Creative Writing is an exciting new programme at Durham University. Taught by award-winning writers Dr Paul Batchelor and Dr Vidyan Ravinthiran, this is an academically rigorous programme that will develop students’ practical knowledge of writing poetry and prose fiction. Students will receive structured support through writing workshops and one-to-one tutorials in order to develop their own ideas. Students will also study a broad range of literature from the 20th and 21st centuries, and produce new work in response.

Core Modules

Creative Writing Poetry OR Creative Writing Prose Fiction

Each student will take one of these writing-workshop modules. In these modules students will write longer pieces within their chosen literary discipline, sharing their work and giving and receiving feedback and suggestions from the module convenor and the other students. There are few if any writing exercises. Each student can expect to have their work scrutinised closely in a workshop setting several times. These modules are assessed via a portfolio of ten pages of poetry plus 2,000-word self-critique, OR a 6,000-word portfolio of prose fiction plus 2,000-word self-critique.

Reading as a Writer

This seminar module brings poets and prose writers together, and (unlike any of the other core modules for Creative Writing) is also open to English Studies students. Each week we discuss some key poetry and prose from across the twentieth century, focusing on the technical innovations introduced by the writers studied, and the ways in which writers learn from one another, both within their medium and beyond it. The module combines breadth and depth of coverage, offering students an advanced understanding of a range of writers, schools, and styles in order to broaden their research interests, and help them to identify and research a topic of their own choosing with guidance from a subject specialist in the extended essay part of the Research Project. It is assessed via two 3,000-word essays. 

Reading as a Writer: the Workshop

This is very much a companion module to Reading as a Writer, and is a writing-workshop module focusing on short, directed writing assignments and their discussion. The focus will be on formal and technical experiments, stretching students’ technical facility via assignments inspired by the texts studied on Reading as a Writer. Prose writers and poetry students will once again work side by side, sharing work and ideas, learning to appreciate literary conventions and their subversion. Each student can expect to have their work work shopped several times, though these engagements will not be as formal or thorough as those in Creative Writing Prose Fiction or Creative Writing Poetry. Assignments might include adapting syntactical techniques; investigative creative non-fiction; experimenting with poetic forms; creative translation; writing an opening paragraph; or trying out editing methods. It is assessed via a portfolio of EITHER ten pages of poetry OR 6,000 words of prose fiction, plus 2,000-word self-critique. 

Research Project

The Research Project provides students with the opportunity to produce a 6-8,000-word extended critical essay on a subject of their choosing. Students choose their own extended essay titles, with guidance from the module convenor and subject to the approval of the English Studies Board of Examiners. Focusing on depth rather than breadth, the essay is independently researched and builds on the work covered in the taught elements of the programme. Students will be expected to choose a research topic with particular bearing on their own creative practice, and to reflect on how their critical and creative work have informed one another, either in the main body of the essay, the introduction, or chapter dedicated to integrative reflection. Students may wish to refer to specific aspects of their own writing when writing this part of the essay. The Research Project also provides the opportunity for students to to produce a final portfolio of creative work: poets will be asked to produce ten pages of poetry; prose writers produce 6-8,000 words of fiction. The portfolio will consist of new work, produced after the completion of the structured workshop-oriented modules. The module is assessed via an extended essay of 6,000-8,000 words and a creative writing portfolio of EITHER ten pages of poetry OR 6,000-8,000 words of prose fiction.

Optional Modules

Creative Writing students would take one module of their own choosing, either from the English Studies MA modules or taking this new optional module:

The Word in the World

This module focuses on the ways in which the students’ writing can be made available to the public. It would take the form of a series of lectures and seminars covering topics such as: how writers make a living; the possibilities and challenges presented by collaborating with other artists; how to adjust teaching methods according to the setting and audience; how to write a pitch letter; how to get a literary agent; submitting work to poetry journals; how to make the most of web resources; how to communicate with an editor; book design, blurbs, jackets; writing copy; formats; sales and distribution channels; publicity and promotion; book reviewing, etc. This part of the module will be taught both in-house at Durham and via visiting speakers such as editors, industry experts. Students would also be invited to either collaborate with a student in another medium (most likely music or the visual arts) or go on a teaching or literary-industry placement that would take place in July. This module is assessed via one 3,000-word essay and one 3,000-word report on the industry placement, teaching placement, or collaborative project.



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The Master of Studies (MSt) in Creative Writing is designed for those who wish to develop high-level skills in creative writing both in fiction and non-fiction literatures. Read more
The Master of Studies (MSt) in Creative Writing is designed for those who wish to develop high-level skills in creative writing both in fiction and non-fiction literatures. The MSt is taught over two years in short, intensive study blocks. It has been designed to be accessible to those in full- or part-time employment and to international students.

You will be guided in the production of creative work in a range of genres and styles, and also in critical reflection on your own work and that of other writers. The course tutors and guest speakers are all established literary professionals.

See the website http://www.ice.cam.ac.uk/mst-creative-writing

Who is the course designed for?

The MSt aims to facilitate students' creative practice, whether for their own personal creative development as writers or because their professional work impinges on these areas.

Examples could include teachers of English at secondary level for whom the teaching of creative writing is increasingly necessary for GCSE and A-level English Language and English Literature. It is also designed to be of professional value to those working in areas such as journalism, broadcasting, publishing and editing.

Aims of the programme

By the end of the course students should have:

- Developed their own writing and self-editing skills in a range of fiction and non-fiction genres
- Developed a solid and substantial understanding of the history (in terms of innovative developments) of fiction and non-fiction writing and of critical, analytical and narrative theory

Format

The MSt is structured around four modules, each of which includes a residential block at Madingley Hall that students must attend. In the first year, each of the four residential blocks is preceded by guided preparatory reading and other activities, and followed by two writing assignments: one critical and one creative.

A Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) offers learning support to students while they are on the programme, including learning resources, peer-to-peer and student-to-tutor discussion between modules to build a virtual community of practice.

Lectures, seminars and classes: 4 x 4-day residential sessions in Year 1; a 2-day residential session in Year 2.

Supervisions and tutorials: each student has their own tutor to whom they will have several one-to-one sessions during the first year. During the second year students have 5 x 1-hour sessions with their supervisor.

Year 1

The first year is characterised by variety. Students will engage and experiment with a wide variety of genres, building on existing strengths and exploring unfamiliar territories.

Module 1: Writing for readers: the art of poetry and the craft of criticism (17-20 October 2016)
This module will combine close critical reading of selected example of poetry and autobiographical prose with the writing of both by students.

Module 2: Writing for readers: imagined worlds - fiction, long and short (12-15 December 2016)
This module focuses on prose fiction, examining the relationship between memory, imagination and research and exploring the essential concerns of the fiction-writer, including plot and narrative, voice and character and the importance of place.

Module 3: Writing for performance: monologue and polyphonic scripts (13-16 February 2017)
This module explores various forms of writing for an audience, encompassing writing for radio, theatre, television, cinema and other forms of scripted public address and performance.

Module 4: Writing life: creative non-fiction (15-18 May 2017)
This module explores the concept of creative non-fiction and examines examples drawn from a range of sub-genres. These are likely to include biography, memoir, travel-writing and writing about the environment. Sessions on study and research skills will prepare students for Year 2. Visiting speakers for this module will include those from the world of publishing.

Year 2

The second year is characterised by focus on a specialist genre. Students will work independently to explore further and develop their own literary and critical skills, resulting in an extended piece or portfolio of writing. They will work under the supervision of an expert in their chosen field with whom they will have regular contact.

Students will have five supervisions in the second year. The first will take place in October 2017, ideally at Madingley Hall, but Skype can also be used. The dates of this and the next three supervisions will be arranged between you and your supervisor (these can also be face-to-face or via Skype). The fifth and final supervision will usually take place at Madingley Hall at the time of the only residency in the second year, the Presentation and Discussion of Portfolios, on 16-17 April 2018.

Assessment

- Year 1 -

Following the first residency students will produce 750 words of poetry and a critical commentary of 3,000 words. Following the other three residencies students will produce 4,000 words of creative prose and a critical commentary of 3,000 words.

- Year 2 -

Students will produce a portfolio consisting of 15,000 words of creative prose (or 5,000 words of poetry) and a 3,000-word critical commentary.

- Feedback -

Students are given formal written feedback on their assignments and informal feedback throughout the course, including during tutorials and supervisions. Tutors produce a report for each student at the end of Year 1 and supervisors produce termly reports for each student during Year 2.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding

Sources of government funding and financial support - including Professional and Career Development Loans: https://www.gov.uk/browse/education/student-finance

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The MA in Creative Writing at Kent offers you the opportunity to study fiction and poetry (exclusively or together) along with optional modules in translation, and writing and the environment. Read more
The MA in Creative Writing at Kent offers you the opportunity to study fiction and poetry (exclusively or together) along with optional modules in translation, and writing and the environment.

Designed with serious, ambitious writers in mind, our programme uses seminars, tutorials, workshops, and precise editing to enable you to take control of your own work and write exciting, contemporary material.

You are taught exclusively by members of the permanent creative writing team, all of whom are practising, award-winning writers: Patricia Debney, David Flusfeder, David Herd, Nancy Gaffield, Dragan Todorovic, Alex Preston, Amy Sackville, Simon Smith and Scarlett Thomas. (See staff research interests for further details.(https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/211/creative-writing#!staff-research))

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/211/creative-writing

About the School of English

The School of English has a strong international reputation and global perspective, apparent both in the background of its staff and in the diversity of our teaching and research interests.

Our expertise ranges from the medieval to the postmodern, including British, American and Irish literature, postcolonial writing, 18th-century studies, Shakespeare, early modern literature and culture, Victorian studies, modern poetry, critical theory and cultural history. The international standing of the School ensures that we have a lively, confident research culture, sustained by a vibrant, ambitious intellectual community. We also count a number of distinguished creative writers among our staff, and we actively explore crossovers between critical and creative writing in all our areas of teaching and research.

The Research Excellence Framework 2014 has produced very strong results for the School of English at Kent. With 74% of our work graded as world-leading or internationally excellent, the School is ranked 10th out of 89 English departments in terms of Research Intensity (Times Higher Education). The School also received an outstanding assessment of the quality of its research environment and public impact work.

Course structure

You are encouraged to put together an MA programme that suits you and your plans. It is a requirement of the programme that you take either Fiction 1 and Fiction 2 or Poetry 1 and Poetry 2 along with one other Creative Writing module. You may choose to take only creative modules, or to augment your study with a module from the literature programmes or from other Humanities programmes.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year:

EN838 - Re-visioning:Twenty-first Century Translation (30 credits)
EN839 - Writing and the Environment (30 credits)
EN812 - Creative Writing (30 credits)
EN891 - Fiction 1 (30 credits)
EN892 - Poetry 1 (30 credits)
EN893 - Fiction 2 (30 credits)
EN894 - Poetry 2 (30 credits)
EN897 - Advanced Critical Reading (30 credits)
EN818 - American Modernism 1900-1930 (Teaching Period I) (30 credits)
EN832 - Hacks, Dunces and Scribblers: Authorship and the Marketplace in the Eig (30 credits)
EN834 - Imagining India (30 credits)
EN835 - Dickens, The Victorians and the Body (30 credits)
EN836 - Dickens and the Material Culture of the Victorian Novel (30 credits)
EN842 - Reading the Contemporary (30 credits)
EN850 - Centres and Edges: Modernist and PostcolonialQuest Literature (30 credits)
EN852 - Colonial and Postcolonial Discourses (30 credits)
EN857 - Body and Place in the Postcolonial Text (30 credits)
EN862 - Contemporary Arab Novel (30 credits)
EN865 - Post-45: American Literature and Culture in the Cold War Era (30 credits)
EN866 - The Awkward Age: Transatlantic Culture and Literature in Transition, 18 (30 credits)
EN872 - Provocations and Invitations (30 credits)
EN876 - Dickens and the Condition of England (30 credits)
EN888 - Extremes of Feeling: Literature and Empire in the Eighteenth Century (30 credits)
EN889 - Literary Theory (30 credits)
MT864 - Reading the Medieval Town: Canterbury, an International City (30 credits)
MT865 - Encountering the Holy: Devotion and the Medieval Church (30 credits)
EN803 - Critical Race Theory (30 credits)

Assessment

You take a total of four modules, for which you will produce approximately 8,000 words each (or an equivalent number of poems or translations). In addition, you write a creative dissertation of about 12,000 words.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- provide you with the opportunity to obtain a postgraduate qualification (MA) in one year, and to allow you, if required, a smooth transition to doctoral studies

- extend and deepen your understanding of your own writing practice through coursework and research

- enable you to develop an historical awareness of literary and creative writing traditions

- develop your independent critical thinking and judgement

- develop your independent creative thinking and practice

- develop your understanding and critical appreciation of the expressive resources of language

- enable you to make connections across your various modules and transfer knowledge between modules

- provide you with teaching, workshops and other learning opportunities that are informed by current research and practice and that require you to engage with aspects of work and practice at the frontiers of knowledge.

Careers

Many career paths can benefit from the writing and analytical skills that you develop as a postgraduate student in the School of English. Our students have gone on to work in academia, journalism, broadcasting and media, publishing, writing and teaching; as well as more general areas such as banking, marketing analysis and project management.

This programme is also available at Paris only or split site between Canterbury and Paris.
https://www.kent.ac.uk/paris/programmes/index.html

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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Do you want to develop your own work, your own voice and your own ideas?. Are looking for an insight into the industry by professional editors and publishers? Define and refine your discipline at Birmingham. Read more
Do you want to develop your own work, your own voice and your own ideas?

Are looking for an insight into the industry by professional editors and publishers? Define and refine your discipline at Birmingham: short fiction, the novel, poetry, scripts.

If you have completed an undergraduate degree containing some creative writing or are an English graduate with considerable experience in writing creatively and wish to proceed to a career of further study in this area then our innovative MA in Creative Writing is for you.

Learn among a community of writers and scholars with structured modules across the discipline and engage collaboratively before specialising in screenwriting, playwriting, fiction or poetry for your dissertation.

The programme brings together students who are working in different genres so that you can engage collaboratively across genres before specialising in screenwriting, playwriting, fiction or poetry for your dissertation.

You will take five core modules

Creative Writing Research Skills I: Theories and Practice
Creative Writing Research Skills II: Theories, Models, Self
Poem as Story - Story as Poem
Intertextuality: Story, Genre, Craft
Editing as Collaborative Practice

You will also take one optional module from within English, Film Studies or from another discipline.

You will complete the programme with a dissertation which will be 75% creative portfolio and 25% critical essay. You will write a 12,000-word portfolio of creative work as a screenplay, novella, excerpt of a novel, a collection of short fiction or a collection of poetry (600 lines). This will be accompanied by a 3,000-word essay placing your work in a critical and creative context, with reference to your development as a writer over the course of the MA. You will receive feedback on work in progress during one-to-one tutorials and in work-sharing seminars with peers (groups divided along the lines of genre/form).

The programme is also assessed by creative portfolios and assignments throughout the taught modules.

About the School of English, Drama and American & Canadian Studies

"Welcome to the School of English, Drama and American & Canadian Studies, in the College of Arts and Law. This is one of the largest Schools in the College, and variety is our watchword. We offer one of the most extensive ranges of undergraduate and postgraduate programmes in the country. Our research expertise is equally diverse, and we welcome students and researchers from all over the world." - Professor Andrzej Gasiorek, Head of School

We particularly encourage creative thinking, with a range of pioneering programmes including Masters opportunities in Creative Writing, Film and Television and Shakespeare and Creativity. Our creative offerings are also strengthened by the development of our Department of Film and Creative Writing – established in 2015 – which has opened up exciting new opportunities for postgraduates to benefit from synergies between the two fields.

Our well-established Departments also provide an excellent environment for postgraduate study. The Department of Drama and Theatre Arts has a highly respected national and international reputation for excellence in teaching and research. We are also one of the leading centres for the postgraduate study of English in the UK, spanning language and literature. The Department of English Language and Applied Linguistics is a world-leading centre of excellence for both teaching and research in this field.

We are also proud to be home to the world-renowned Shakespeare Institute, based in Stratford-upon-Avon. Situated within walking distance of Shakespeare’s birthplace, school and grave, and the theatres of the Royal Shakespeare Company (RSC), the Shakespeare Institute offers postgraduate students and scholars an academic experience unrivalled by any other university.

Funding and Scholarships

There are many ways to finance your postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. To see what funding and scholarships are available, please visit: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/funding

Open Days

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open days.
Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/visit

Virtual Open Days

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

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Have you been writing creatively for a while and feel the need for some professional support? Do you wish to be read by like-minded people? Do you sense that you can write but struggle with the mechanics of form and structure? Do you harbour a desire to see how far your writing can get you? Do you dream of being a published author?. Read more

Have you been writing creatively for a while and feel the need for some professional support? Do you wish to be read by like-minded people? Do you sense that you can write but struggle with the mechanics of form and structure? Do you harbour a desire to see how far your writing can get you? Do you dream of being a published author?

For 13 years, our MA Creative Writing has been enabling students to achieve some, if not all, of these goals. In 2016 alone, 11 of our graduates published novels with major publishing houses.

The course is taught through small, dynamic seminars and one-to-one tuition. We offer modules in fiction writing and options in playwriting, poetry, screenwriting and creative non-fiction, and practical courses on publishing, producing and editing creative work.

To find out more, read our programme handbook (http://www.bbk.ac.uk/english/current-students/postgraduate/).

You will taught by successful, published authors and practitioners, including:

- Julia Bell

- David Eldridge

- Richard Hamblyn

- Russell Celyn Jones

- Toby Litt

- Luke Williams

- Benjamin Wood

- Jonathan Kemp.

Visit the website http://www.bbk.ac.uk/study/2016/postgraduate/programmes/TMACWRIT_C/

Our research

Birkbeck is one of the world’s leading research-intensive institutions. Our cutting-edge scholarship informs public policy, achieves scientific advances, supports the economy, promotes culture and the arts, and makes a positive difference to society.

Birkbeck’s research excellence was confirmed in the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (http://www.bbk.ac.uk/news/ref-results/), which placed Birkbeck 30th in the UK for research, with 73% of our research rated world-leading or internationally excellent.

In the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF), English Language and Literature at Birkbeck achieved 100% for a research environment conducive to producing research of the highest quality, while 91% of eligible staff submitted research, of which 75% was recognised as world-leading or internationally excellent.

Read about Birkbeck research that enriches our experience and understanding of our shared history, culture and art (http://www.bbk.ac.uk/arts/research).

Why study this course at Birkbeck?

- Arts and humanities courses at Birkbeck are ranked third best in London and 11th in the UK in the Times Higher Education 2015-16 World University Subject Rankings.

- Aims to develop the craft of fiction at a professional level and includes practical courses on publishing, producing and editing creative work.

- In addition to working with the established writers who teach the degree, you will have contact with industry professionals, such as publishers and literary agents, who offer a series of platform discussions in the summer term.

- In the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF), English Language and Literature at Birkbeck achieved 100% for a research environment conducive to producing research of the highest quality, while 91% of eligible staff submitted research, of which 75% was recognised as world-leading or internationally excellent.

- Our Department of English and Humanities (http://www.bbk.ac.uk/english) is a lively centre of world-class research and teaching.

- We offer a range of world-class research resources (http://www.bbk.ac.uk/english/study-here/world-class-research-resources).

- Our annual creative writing magazine, The Mechanics' Institute Review, is edited by Birkbeck MA Creative Writing students and features writing from the course as a showcase for the degree, with wide distribution beyond Birkbeck to literary agents, publishers, etc.

- Read an account of how our students created the most recent issue of The Mechanics' Institute Review (http://blogs.bbk.ac.uk/george/2014/10/07/editing-the-mechanics-institute-review-11/).

- MIROnline is an interactive website, edited by PhD students and volunteers, with all the latest news and writing from this programme and beyond.

- Find out more about our range of world-class research resources (http://www.bbk.ac.uk/english/our-research).

- Watch videos of our postgraduate students discussing their experience of studying at Birkbeck (http://www.bbk.ac.uk/mybirkbeck/get-ahead-stay-ahead/student-experience-videos).

Teaching and assessment

- Teaching

Teaching is seminar-based. Each session is generally 2 hours, and there are further regular one-to-one tutorials throughout the year.

- Assessment

4 short creative pieces with critical essays (50%). A dissertation (15,000 words) in one of the following genres: a novella, novel or collection of short stories, with a preface of 3000 words (50%).

Careers and employability

Birkbeck Creative Writing graduates include:

Sally Hinchcliffe

Niki Aguirre

Heidi James

Matthew Loukes

Iphgenia Baal

Nii Parkes

Emma Henderson

Liz Fremantle

Anna Hope

Karin Salvalaggio

Olya Knezevic

Phoebe Blatton

Melissa De Villiers

Nik Korpon

Louise Lee

Tray Butler

Helen Pike

David Savill

Laura Allsop

Sarah Alexander

Nadim Safdar

A. J. Grainger

Julia Gray

Nicole Burstein

Jules Grant

Amy Bird

Stefanie Seddon

Fiona Melrose.

Graduates go in to careers in editing, teaching, and writing professionally. Possible professions include creative writer, magazine or newspaper journalist, or editorial assistant. This degree can also be useful in becoming an academic librarian, English as a second language (ESOL) teacher, or information officer.

Find out more about these professions (http://www.prospects.ac.uk/options_with_your_subject.htm).

Find out more about the destinations of graduates in this subject (http://www.bbk.ac.uk/prospective/careers-and-employability/department-of-english-and-humanities).

We offer a comprehensive Careers and Employability Service to help you advance your career, while our in-house, professional recruitment consultancy, Birkbeck Talent, works with London’s top employers to help you gain work experience that fits in with your evening studies.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.bbk.ac.uk/prospective/postgraduate/apply



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Why Surrey?. Our unique Creative Practices and Direction programme will develop your creative-practice and leadership skills through engagement with practice-oriented theory and new collaborations. Read more

Why Surrey?

Our unique Creative Practices and Direction programme will develop your creative-practice and leadership skills through engagement with practice-oriented theory and new collaborations.

As a student of this programme, you will develop strong relationships with active professionals in your discipline and learn within a leading theatrical conservatoire that benefits from the intellectual stimulus of a major research-led university.

Programme overview

This unique programme is aimed at creative producers and directors and those who train and work with actors and performers to develop and direct their skills.

The programme offers three specialist pathways, including choreography and movement direction, directing, musical theatre creation, and you will also have the opportunity to develop a specialist practice within your chosen pathway.

The programme is primarily designed for graduates in drama, theatre and dance from universities and conservatoires, but will also appeal to those who have established themselves professionally and wish to refresh their skills and perspectives and take on leadership, coaching, creative or directing roles.

Programme structure

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year and part-time over two academic years. It consists of eight taught modules and an Advanced Creative Practice module.

Students enter the MA Creative Practices and Direction to a specified pathway, personally supervised by their pathway leader, an expert in the subject area.

Example module listing

The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.

Pathways

Movement Direction and Choreography pathway

Students on this pathway follow and practically investigate a number of techniques and ideas dealing with onstage physicality.

The focus is also on the development of movement language, through the investigation of the ideas and practices of seminal dance-based ideas (Laban, Bausch, Cunningham, Fosse, Graham, Horton, etc.) and methods for working with music and sound.

Directing pathway

This programme is a practice-led pathway incorporating methodologies and techniques that focus on approaches to theatre directing, dramaturgy, collaboration with other practitioners.

Musical Theatre Creation pathway

This pathway is designed for those who wish to study writing, and creative roles specifically in Musical Theatre. These might be as a director, choreographer, composer, librettist, musical director or creative producer.

Educational aims of the programme

  • Provide advanced study and practice in creative leadership and direction in theatre-making and/or the training of theatre artists, specific to the pathway chosen
  • Equip students for employment in the theatre industry and/or related performing arts industries as specialist practitioners in one of the following areas:
  1. Directing
  2. Movement Direction and Choreography
  3. Musical Theatre Creation
  • Provide students with integrated practical and theoretical knowledge of specialist creative and/or pedagogic practices relevant to their chosen pathway; contemporary technical and scholarly contexts; and industry-specific contexts
  • Enable students to develop intellectual and practical skills to inform and articulate self-reflection and critical awareness, through specialist study and practice, and work with other students in cognate fields
  • Develop critical and independent practitioners imbued with a sense of learning as a lifetime pursuit via a commitment to professional and personal development

Facilities, equipment and academic support

The School of Arts facilities include the 200-seat theatre in the Ivy Arts Centre, dark and light studios, digital creation stations and editing facilities, scenic, props and costume workshops, and interconnected sound recording and music facilities.

Teaching and workshop activity takes place largely in GSA’s dedicated rehearsal rooms, performance studios and design workshops. Lectures, presentations and seminars will occur in rooms across campus.

The University Library contains the majority of set texts, key journals, scripts, play texts and video materials necessary for the programme. Students have access to extensive facilities through the virtual learning environment, SurreyLearn, and IT Services.

Additional support is available in the Learning Resource Centre in the University Library.

Equipment is provided on a project-by-project basis according to the nature of the work in hand and the parameters of the project, which are negotiated with the tutor.

Facilities and equipment for production work will be booked by students according to specific project briefings and advertised resource parameters.

Academic support is provided by way of ongoing contact with the programme director and module leaders, group briefings and feedback, individual tutorials, and mentoring.

The programme makes use of a peer feedback system designed to provide a useful and supportive account of areas of strength and effectiveness, along with areas for improvement.

You are encouraged to identify personal learning and creative objectives that can be pursued in alignment with group project work.

Research

The School of Arts includes study in dance, digital arts, film, music, sound and theatre, with research activity in all areas, often with significant interdisciplinary connections.

With an integrated approach that comprises documentation, analysis and performance, Surrey’s agenda for research aims to engage critically with the past and present, while rigorously articulating new frameworks for understanding and practising the arts and culture in the twenty-first century.

Research infrastructure includes the Digital World Research Centre and the Laban Archive in the National Resource Centre for Dance (NRCD).

The School of Arts hosts and supports established research centres, research groupings and networks as well as individual research projects. Our research extends to partnerships with the artistic community, for instance, in support of public debates or in the dissemination of documentation for arts practice through the digital and print media.

Global opportunities

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.



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This is an exciting, supportive and non-residency online course that offers you the opportunity to develop your writing practice at the times that work for you, wherever you are in the world. Read more

This is an exciting, supportive and non-residency online course that offers you the opportunity to develop your writing practice at the times that work for you, wherever you are in the world.

Course details

We understand how difficult it can be to find the space and structure to develop your writing - this course makes it easy for you to adapt your weekly studies to your personal circumstances. This course is taught throughout by tutors who are both practicing creative writers and experienced teachers of creative writing at postgraduate level. The emphasis is on developing practical writing skills and techniques whilst gaining an understanding of your own work within a critical context and framework. The course consists of four 30-credit taught modules plus the Creative Writing Project (60 credit), which is the final portfolio of your creative writing. Each module offers you opportunities to experiment and develop your interests, whether these are in prose fiction, poetry, creative life writing, dramatic writing and screen writing or in using writing to work with people in personal and professional development and healthcare settings. For more information, take a look at our module descriptions. This course is available to all international applicants. Individual modules can be taken on a stand-alone basis.If you apply for this course, you must submit a portfolio of your creative writing of up to and no more than 2,000 words in any one or two forms or genres, for example poetry, prose fiction, life writing, screen writing. Please include this portfolio in your online application.

What you study

Course structure

Core modules

  • Core Skills and Techniques
  • Creative Writing Project
  • The Professional Writer in the World
  • Writing and the Self
  • Writing Specialisms

Modules offered may vary.

Teaching

How you learn

The course is taught by distance learning. There is no requirement to attend classes at a set time. You can access the course space and complete the coursework at times that work best for you. 

Each taught module will consist of eight weekly units. Each unit will usually consist of:

  • a short introductory video, in which your tutor introduces the week’s key themes
  • writing prompts and exercises
  • supporting materials, reading questions and suggestions for further reading and research to discuss in the discussion forum
  • a dedicated private space to workshop your ideas and writing-in-progress with the tutor and fellow students.

You will also receive help, support and feedback on your work directly from the tutor, both through the online course space and by email. 

You don't need to be a technology expert to take this course. All you need is a PC, laptop or tablet to access the course materials and forum and share your writing with the tutors and your peers.

How you are assessed

Each taught 30-credit module is assessed against clear learning outcomes through written assignments, usually consisting of both creative work and some critical or reflective work. In addition to the taught modules, you produce a final project (60 credits) in your chosen form and genre.

Employability

MA Creative Writing graduates go on to a wide choice of professions and careers. Apart from the more obvious routes of publishing, editing and freelance writing, many work in the wider creative industries (television, journalism, new media) or in workplaces that require advanced writing skills in the workplace. 

The practical and flexible design of the course means that it is also highly suited to teachers wishing to up-skill their portfolios in relation to the new Creative Writing A level; writers developing their teaching and workshopping skills to work in the community; and those using writing in therapy, healthcare and other professional settings. 

If your job has a requirement to work on live briefs and projects with an imaginative or research element, you will also find the transferable skills offered by this MA a natural fit. 

Although the course will help you if you want to develop a career using writing, many students take our MA to extend their skills for their own personal development and fulfilment.



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This is an innovative and interdisciplinary MA programme, combining taught modules and a dissertation, which allows you to share your year between Canterbury and Paris. Read more
This is an innovative and interdisciplinary MA programme, combining taught modules and a dissertation, which allows you to share your year between Canterbury and Paris.

Designed with serious, ambitious writers in mind, our programme uses seminars, tutorials, workshops, and precise editing to enable you to take control of your own work and write exciting, contemporary material.

Following a similar path to our Creative Writing MA, this programme allows you to spend your first term at our Canterbury campus with full access to its excellent academic and recreational facilities before relocating to our Paris centre for the spring term.

During your studies in Paris, you are based at Columbia Global Center (known as Reid Hall) in a historic corner of Montparnasse. You choose from a range of Paris-focused modules which are taught in English. In your final term, you complete your MA by writing a 15,000-word dissertation on a research topic defined in collaboration with your academic supervisors.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/214/creative-writing-canterbury-and-paris

About the School of English

The School of English has a strong international reputation and global perspective, apparent both in the background of its staff and in the diversity of our teaching and research interests.

Our expertise ranges from the medieval to the postmodern, including British, American and Irish literature, postcolonial writing, 18th-century studies, Shakespeare, early modern literature and culture, Victorian studies, modern poetry, critical theory and cultural history. The international standing of the School ensures that we have a lively, confident research culture, sustained by a vibrant, ambitious intellectual community. We also count a number of distinguished creative writers among our staff, and we actively explore crossovers between critical and creative writing in all our areas of teaching and research.

The Research Excellence Framework 2014 has produced very strong results for the School of English at Kent. With 74% of our work graded as world-leading or internationally excellent, the School is ranked 10th out of 89 English departments in terms of Research Intensity (Times Higher Education). The School also received an outstanding assessment of the quality of its research environment and public impact work.

Course structure

You take either Fiction 1 in the first term and Paris: The Residency (or Fiction 2) in the second, or Poetry 1 in the first term and Paris: The Residency (or Fiction 2) in the second. In the first term, you may choose from any of the other creative writing modules on offer and in the second term, you choose from the Paris modules list. While in Paris, you are also encouraged to attend readings and talks, and to organise your own writing workshops.

For further information about the University of Kent, Paris, please see http://www.kent.ac.uk/paris/.

Modules

The above modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation.

Assessment

You take a total of four modules, for which you will produce approximately 8,000 words each (or an equivalent number of poems or translations). In addition, you write a creative dissertation of about 12,000 words.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- provide you with the opportunity to obtain a postgraduate qualification (MA) in one year, and to allow you, if required, a smooth transition to doctoral studies

- give you the breadth of experience of studying creative writing modules in Canterbury in the Autumn term, and then spending the Spring term in Paris writing ‘in residence’ while pursuing one other Kent at Paris module

- extend and deepen your understanding of your own writing practice through coursework and research

- enable you to develop an historical awareness of literary and creative writing traditions, particularly those that have been located in, or in some other way focussed on, Paris develop your independent critical thinking and judgement

- develop your independent creative thinking and practice

- develop your knowledge and understanding of relevant aspects of contemporary Paris and the literary history of the city with a view to you incorporating some of these aspects into your own creative and critical writing

- develop your understanding and critical appreciation of the expressive resources of language

- enable you to make connections across your various modules and transfer knowledge between modules

- provide you with teaching, workshops and other learning opportunities that are informed by current research and practice and that require you to engage with aspects of work and practice at the frontiers of knowledge.

Careers

Many career paths can benefit from the writing and analytical skills that you develop as a postgraduate student in the School of English. Our students have gone on to work in academia, journalism, broadcasting and media, publishing, writing and teaching; as well as more general areas such as banking, marketing analysis and project management.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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