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Masters Degrees (Creative Director)

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The term creative director originated in advertising agencies, but in the last few years has also become prevalent in the fashion and beauty industries. Read more

Overview

The term creative director originated in advertising agencies, but in the last few years has also become prevalent in the fashion and beauty industries. The role of creative director within fashion and beauty is multi-faceted and varied. Generally speaking, creative directors find themselves responsible for the creative direction and visual identity of a brand, publication, website or event.

- Students study a curriculum with a unique focus on the increasingly in-demand role of art director.
- Students learn how to strategically guide imagery, style and brand to align with overarching creative and corporate directions.
- This course is specifically geared towards those who wish to pursue art direction within the fashion and beauty industry.
- After graduation, students will be able to apply their knowledge to a range of areas within fashion and beauty including magazine publication, event production, e-commerce and advertising.
- The professional practice unit gives students the chance to delve deep into their chosen industry, researching potential next steps and exploring career opportunities.
- Students benefit from the course’s strong focus on employability and are expected to carry out one month of work experience during their studies.
- Course staff hold a wealth of experience within fashion, beauty and the wider creative industries, opening up opportunities for industry engagement and guest speakers.

The industry -

Creative directors specialise in reading, interpreting and making use of complex visual language; using their unique vision of fashion and beauty to sell products and support brands across a range of different visual mediums. Southampton Solent’s MA Creative Direction for Fashion and Beauty programme offers students a unique opportunity to build the image-making, creative thinking and project management skills required to thrive in this prominent role.

The course examines a wide range of processes and practices found in high-level creative leadership, helping students to develop an expert understanding of fashion and beauty imagery within the contexts of culture, ethics and sustainability.

The programme -

Solent’s fashion and beauty programmes have strong links with industry, giving students the chance to work with experienced academics and industry professionals. Students can leverage these industry links when they are looking for work placements as part of the essential work-based learning unit.

Students also benefit from a programme of guest lectures throughout the course, with representatives from fashion, beauty, media, retail and other creative industries coming to campus and sharing their experiences. Recent events have included a guest lecture from professional makeup artist Laura Mercier, as well as visits from representatives of MAC, Illamasqua, Trendstop and Charles Fox.

The course culminates in a final major project, where students can either write a thesis or produce a major practical outcome. Students will have access to a wide range of industry-standard facilities in support of this project. Available facilities include photography studios; film studios; make-up studios; cameras; location lighting kits; ‘infinity cove’ studios and Mac suites with the latest industry software.

Course Content

Teaching, learning and assessment -

The course will be taught through a combination of seminars, technical workshops, small group sessions and 1:1 tutorials.

Work Experience -

The professional practice unit has been specifically designed to equip master’s students with an in-depth knowledge of their chosen industry and to give them the insights required to plan their long-term career. Students will be supported as they produce reflective professional development plans.

Work-based learning is essential to student development development. Students will be required to secure a work placement, freelance assignment or relevant work related experience in order to strengthen their knowledge and refine practical skills.

Assessment -

Assessment is through projects, reports and a dissertation.

Our facilities -

Available facilities include photography studios; film studios; make-up studios; camera loans; location lighting kits; an ‘infinity cove’ facility; and Mac suites with the latest industry software.

Web-based learning -

The course will be supported by a dedicated set of online resources. The course’s virtual learning environment will contain the unit descriptor, reading list, week by-week teaching and learning schemes, tutors’ contact details and availability, assessment briefs, grading criteria and details of assessment submission.

Students will also be expected to engage with social and web based media as a part of their professional development. This may include Facebook, Instagram, YouTube, Tumblr, Snapchat, Twitter and blogging platforms.

Students will also benefit from access to online journals and subscription based websites including Berg Fashion Library, WGSN, WWD and Mintel.

Why Solent?

What do we offer?

From a vibrant city centre campus to our first class facilities, this is where you can find out why you should choose Solent.

Facilities - http://www.solent.ac.uk/about/facilities/facilities.aspx

City living - http://www.solent.ac.uk/studying/southampton/living-in-southampton.aspx

Accommodation - http://www.solent.ac.uk/studying/accommodation/accommodation.aspx

Career Potential

The role of creative director has become prevalent in the fashion and beauty industries in recent years. Generally speaking, creative directors find themselves responsible for the creative direction and visual identity of a brand, publication, website or event. As such, graduates may find themselves working with fashion and beauty brands, magazines, retail businesses, media production companies or communications agencies.

Links with industry -

Industry professionals share their knowledge and experiences with students through guest presentations, lectures, one-to-one tutorials and portfolio-viewing workshops.
Recent visiting lecturers have included: Caryn Franklin, Perry Curties, Iain R Webb, Wayne Johns, Bruce Smith, Ellen Rogers, Hannah Al-Shemmeri, Elaine Waldron, Maria Bonet and Richard Billingham.

Transferable skills -

The programme area and its staff have strong links with the industry, recently hosting a guest lecture from professional makeup artist Laura Mercier, as well as visits from representatives of MAC, Illamasqua, Trendstop and Charles Fox.

Tuition fees

The tuition fees for the 2016/2017 academic year are:

UK and EU full-time fees: £6,695 per year

International full-time fees: £11,260 per year

UK and EU part-time fees: £3,350 per year

International part-time fees: £5,630 per year

Other costs -

Compulsory costs: Hard drive, hosting, domain name

Optional costs: Creative software packages.

Trips offered to undergraduate students include New York and Paris - costs vary according to current prices. It is anticipated that these trips will also be offered to postgraduate students.

Graduation costs -

Graduation is the ceremony to celebrate the achievements of your studies. For graduates in 2015, there is no charge to attend graduation, but you will be required to pay for the rental of your academic gown (approximately £42 per graduate, depending on your award). You may also wish to purchase official photography packages, which range in price from £15 to £200+. Graduation is not compulsory, so if you prefer to have your award sent to you, there is no cost.
For more details, please visit: http://www.solent.ac.uk/studying/graduation/home.aspx

Next steps

Solent’s MA Creative Direction for Fashion and Beauty programme encourages students to develop high level research and critical thinking skills. For those who wish to pursue PhD study after graduation, this represents the perfect opportunity to identify potential research areas.

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The Master of Media and Creative Technologies (MMCT) allows you to choose from one of the four subjects available. Read more

The Master of Media and Creative Technologies (MMCT) allows you to choose from one of the four subjects available: Creative Practices, Creative Technologies, Screen and Media Studies (offered under the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences) and Māori Media and Communication (offered under the Faculty of Maori and Indigenous Studies). Each area offers you the opportunity to blend artistic and technical forms in new combinations.

Alongside taught papers, you will work on a year-long supervised programme where you will develop a major work (or works) that serves as the flagship of your graduate portfolio of creative works.

Study under the MMCT will give you extensive collaborative project experience which is supported by technical expertise and advanced creative skills. You will also benefit from substantial grounding in postgraduate academic practice and the deployment of critical and methodological skills in original research.

Course Structure

The MMCT involves one calendar year or one and a half academic years of full-time study, or the equivalent in part-time study.

Candidates must complete 180 points at 500 level, including a creative research thesis equivalent to 90 points and a theory paper equivalent to 30 points, as prescribed in a subject offered for the MMCT:

  • Creative Practices
  • Creative Technologies
  • Māori Media and Communication
  • Screen and Media Studies

Students enrolled in the MMCT may take up to 60 points from other subjects, subject to approval from the School. You should discuss your intended programme with the Graduate Adviser in each of the Faculties or Schools concerned. Individual subjects may have their own guidelines for numbers and types of papers outside the subject.

Industry Connections

This programme maintains strategic links with the broader New Zealand community at a number of levels, and we have close links with Hamilton City Council. Our staff members have strong links with international networks in media and creative technologies, and boast strong links with top ranked institutions in Asia, Europe, North America and within the Pacific region.

Career Opportunities

With an MMCT degree, you will be in demand from large private and public sector organisations where digital technologies now take a priority focus. There will also be a wide range of opportunities arising in commercial design and in the broader field of creative and performing arts. The degree will provide significant skill upgrades for those with professional backgrounds, while also giving younger learners aspiring to enter the creative professions an invaluable opportunity to develop portfolios of a professional standard.

Creative Practice Career Examples

Event Manager, Media Artist, Musician, Performing Artist, Scriptwriter

Creative Technologies Career Examples

Animation Artist, Audio-visual Technician, Digital Artist, Film or Television Editor, Interface Designer (information technology), Media Artist, Musician, Sound Designer, Web Designer

Māori Media and Communications Career Examples

Communications Officer, Director of Intercultural Communication, Film or Television Producer/Director, Higher Educationalist (in media, creative arts, technology), Performing Artist.

Screen and Media Studies Career Examples

Commercial Researcher (entertainment and communication), Communications Officer, Film or Television Producer/Director, Higher Educationalist



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The MLitt Creative Writing offers the opportunity to produce a body of work – poetry, fiction, or creative non-fiction – over the course of a creative and stimulating year. Read more

Introduction

The MLitt Creative Writing offers the opportunity to produce a body of work – poetry, fiction, or creative non-fiction – over the course of a creative and stimulating year. The degree combines intensive writers’ workshops, technique-focused option modules, and one-to-one tuition by the distinguished writers on staff, along with stimulating visits from authors, agents and publishers.

Key information

- Degree type: MLitt
- Study methods: Full-time, Part-time
- Duration: Full time: MLitt-12 months; Diploma-9 months; Certificate-3 months Part time: MLitt-27 months; Diploma 21 months; Certificate-3 months
- Start date: September
- Course Director: Professor Kathleen Jamie

Course objectives

The course is designed to develop the talents of creative individuals, allowing them to focus in-depth on a project while offering them creative encounters with a range of genres and working practices, drawing on Stirling’s rich expertise in contemporary literature, publishing, film, media, and journalism.
 Students learn skills in listening and diplomacy, advocacy, and in producing fine, nuanced writing.

English language requirements

If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills:
- IELTS: 6.0 with 5.5 minimum in each skill
- Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C
- Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade C
- Pearson Test of English (Academic): 54 with 51 in each component
- IBT TOEFL: 80 with no subtest less than 17

For more information go to English language requirements https://www.stir.ac.uk/study-in-the-uk/entry-requirements/english/

If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. View the range of pre-sessional courses http://www.intohigher.com/uk/en-gb/our-centres/into-university-of-stirling/studying/our-courses/course-list/pre-sessional-english.aspx .

Delivery and assessment

Assessment for the workshops will depend on the literary form chosen (prose or poetry) but will be based on reading journals and/or working notebooks, book reviews and in some cases completed pieces of creative work. Assessment for each option module will likewise vary but may include a critical essay, a journal, a creative project.
The most significant piece of work in the course is the creative dissertation, due at the end of the summer. This will be circa 15,000 words of prose or a collection of circa 15 poems. A dissertation may be a portfolio of shorter texts – stories, personal essays, poems – or part of a novel. It is expected to be revised and polished original work, written and presented to professional standards.
Those who do not embark on the dissertation may be awarded a Diploma. The work of the best students completing the course may be deemed worthy of an MLitt with Distinction.

Why Stirling?

REF2014
In REF2014 Stirling was placed 6th in Scotland and 45th in the UK with almost three quarters of research activity rated either world-leading or internationally excellent.

Strengths

From September 2013 this course will be taught by Stirling’s Creative Writing team: poet and essayist Kathleen Jamie, and fiction writers Meaghan Delahunt and Liam Murray Bell.
Kathleen Jamie is an internationally recognised poet, and winner of, amongst other awards, the Scottish Book of the Year Award, a Forward Prize, and the Costa Poetry Prize.
Meaghan Delahunt has published three novels, with Granta. Originally from Melbourne, her work has won The Commonwealth Prize for First Book, and been shortlisted for the Scottish Fiction Book of the Year.
Liam Murray Bell’s first novel ‘So It Is’ attracted Arts Council funding. Set in Belfast, it was hailed as ‘a beautifully written debut novel’ concerning the Troubles. His latest novel 'The Busker' is a Scottish Book Trust 'Pick' for 2014.
All three tutors also write non-fiction, reviews, essays etc and are popular figures at festivals, literary events, and residencies. We offer a dynamic mix of youth and experience, and encourage students in an atmosphere which is both rigorous and creative. Regular visits from other established writers, publishers, editors etc offer a wide view of the literary life.

Careers and employability

- Career opportunities
Our Creative Writing students find a place for their creativity in many fields: teaching, broadcasting, publishing, community work. Many chose to become self-employed as writers and tutors. Some develop their interest further by studying for a PhD. Some actually publish books!

- Skills you can develop through this course
Graduates in Creative Writing will be highly literate self-managers capable of realising sustained projects using their own initiative and creativity. They will be emotionally intelligent and diplomatic and have skills in:
----Communication and presentation - being able to articulate complex ideas and information in imaginative, comprehensible and entertaining forms. They will be able to present ideas in verbal and written forms to audiences in a range of situations; and to encourage, evaluate and assist with the work of others.
----Self-management – students will have the ability to work independently, set goals and meet deadlines. They will be able to work with creativity and imagination to meet challenges, and to respond positively to change and uncertainty.
----Critical engagement – students will have the ability to formulate independent judgements, articulate arguments and research relevant material, presenting their findings in engaging and creative ways.

- Chances to expand your horizons
In any given year a number of course-specific talks and literary events are arranged for and by the students. These include but are not limited to:
----visits from literary agents and or publishers
----public events by poets and novelists (with students’ input and assistance)
----visits to research centres

- Where are our graduates now?
As well as becoming professional writers our students find employment in many sectors. Some students have gone on to further study, in particular the creative writing PhD. Others are teachers, editors, librarians, some work in publishing.
Our course is particularly attractive to students are already well established in careers, or even retired and who take our MLitt later in life to enhance their skills and develop new creative prospects.

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Why Surrey?. Our unique Creative Practices and Direction programme will develop your creative-practice and leadership skills through engagement with practice-oriented theory and new collaborations. Read more

Why Surrey?

Our unique Creative Practices and Direction programme will develop your creative-practice and leadership skills through engagement with practice-oriented theory and new collaborations.

As a student of this programme, you will develop strong relationships with active professionals in your discipline and learn within a leading theatrical conservatoire that benefits from the intellectual stimulus of a major research-led university.

Programme overview

This unique programme is aimed at creative producers and directors and those who train and work with actors and performers to develop and direct their skills.

The programme offers three specialist pathways, including choreography and movement direction, directing, musical theatre creation, and you will also have the opportunity to develop a specialist practice within your chosen pathway.

The programme is primarily designed for graduates in drama, theatre and dance from universities and conservatoires, but will also appeal to those who have established themselves professionally and wish to refresh their skills and perspectives and take on leadership, coaching, creative or directing roles.

Programme structure

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year and part-time over two academic years. It consists of eight taught modules and an Advanced Creative Practice module.

Students enter the MA Creative Practices and Direction to a specified pathway, personally supervised by their pathway leader, an expert in the subject area.

Example module listing

The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.

Pathways

Movement Direction and Choreography pathway

Students on this pathway follow and practically investigate a number of techniques and ideas dealing with onstage physicality.

The focus is also on the development of movement language, through the investigation of the ideas and practices of seminal dance-based ideas (Laban, Bausch, Cunningham, Fosse, Graham, Horton, etc.) and methods for working with music and sound.

Directing pathway

This programme is a practice-led pathway incorporating methodologies and techniques that focus on approaches to theatre directing, dramaturgy, collaboration with other practitioners.

Musical Theatre Creation pathway

This pathway is designed for those who wish to study writing, and creative roles specifically in Musical Theatre. These might be as a director, choreographer, composer, librettist, musical director or creative producer.

Educational aims of the programme

  • Provide advanced study and practice in creative leadership and direction in theatre-making and/or the training of theatre artists, specific to the pathway chosen
  • Equip students for employment in the theatre industry and/or related performing arts industries as specialist practitioners in one of the following areas:
  1. Directing
  2. Movement Direction and Choreography
  3. Musical Theatre Creation
  • Provide students with integrated practical and theoretical knowledge of specialist creative and/or pedagogic practices relevant to their chosen pathway; contemporary technical and scholarly contexts; and industry-specific contexts
  • Enable students to develop intellectual and practical skills to inform and articulate self-reflection and critical awareness, through specialist study and practice, and work with other students in cognate fields
  • Develop critical and independent practitioners imbued with a sense of learning as a lifetime pursuit via a commitment to professional and personal development

Facilities, equipment and academic support

The School of Arts facilities include the 200-seat theatre in the Ivy Arts Centre, dark and light studios, digital creation stations and editing facilities, scenic, props and costume workshops, and interconnected sound recording and music facilities.

Teaching and workshop activity takes place largely in GSA’s dedicated rehearsal rooms, performance studios and design workshops. Lectures, presentations and seminars will occur in rooms across campus.

The University Library contains the majority of set texts, key journals, scripts, play texts and video materials necessary for the programme. Students have access to extensive facilities through the virtual learning environment, SurreyLearn, and IT Services.

Additional support is available in the Learning Resource Centre in the University Library.

Equipment is provided on a project-by-project basis according to the nature of the work in hand and the parameters of the project, which are negotiated with the tutor.

Facilities and equipment for production work will be booked by students according to specific project briefings and advertised resource parameters.

Academic support is provided by way of ongoing contact with the programme director and module leaders, group briefings and feedback, individual tutorials, and mentoring.

The programme makes use of a peer feedback system designed to provide a useful and supportive account of areas of strength and effectiveness, along with areas for improvement.

You are encouraged to identify personal learning and creative objectives that can be pursued in alignment with group project work.

Research

The School of Arts includes study in dance, digital arts, film, music, sound and theatre, with research activity in all areas, often with significant interdisciplinary connections.

With an integrated approach that comprises documentation, analysis and performance, Surrey’s agenda for research aims to engage critically with the past and present, while rigorously articulating new frameworks for understanding and practising the arts and culture in the twenty-first century.

Research infrastructure includes the Digital World Research Centre and the Laban Archive in the National Resource Centre for Dance (NRCD).

The School of Arts hosts and supports established research centres, research groupings and networks as well as individual research projects. Our research extends to partnerships with the artistic community, for instance, in support of public debates or in the dissemination of documentation for arts practice through the digital and print media.

Global opportunities

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.



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The Creative Writing programme at Glasgow has gained an excellent reputation amongst writers, agents and publishers. It is perfect for talented and aspiring writers who want to develop their craft, take risks in their work, and gain creative and critical skills; all as part of a supportive community of fellow writers. Read more
The Creative Writing programme at Glasgow has gained an excellent reputation amongst writers, agents and publishers. It is perfect for talented and aspiring writers who want to develop their craft, take risks in their work, and gain creative and critical skills; all as part of a supportive community of fellow writers. Skills gained in the study of Creative Writing may lead to career opportunities in literary and cultural fields such as editing, publishing and arts development.

Why this programme

◾Our dedicated teaching staff comprises successful and well-regarded writers who work in and encourage a variety of genres and forms.
◾We have strong links with literary agents and publishers, and an impressive number of our graduates are published and acclaimed authors.

Programme structure

The MLitt in Creative Writing is directed at those who are already engaged in writing. The programme’s clear three-part structure, focused on creative, critical and practical issues, distinguishes it from others offered in the UK.

The programme structure covers:

Semester 1
◾Creative workshops and guest speakers
◾Reading as a writer (Craft & Experimentation 1)
◾Copyright, publishing and the culture of reception (Editing & Publication 1)

Semester 2
◾Creative workshops and guest speakers
◾Experimentation (Craft & Experimentation 2)
◾Editing the twenty-first century: editorial project (Editing & Publication 2)

These courses have been developed to:
◾encourage you to experiment with a range of voices, techniques and genres alongside a consideration of major creative and editorial engagements from the modern through the contemporary period.
◾provide a space to undertake extended portfolios of creative and editorial work.
◾familiarise you with the writing context (audience, publishing in all its forms, the legal framework, modes of transmission); help you develop a critical understanding of diverse creative, theoretic and critical texts through consideration of major creative and editorial engagements in modern and contemporary writing.
◾and most importantly, to help you develop the discipline of regular writing by providing a stimulating workshop and tutorial environment in which writing skills can be acquired, discussed and honed.

Your portfolio, consisting of fiction, poetry, creative non-fiction, or script-writing, is at the heart of the summative assessment.

Glasgow is a city known for its culture and our students are involved in festivals, events, radio and literary magazines.

Career prospects

Graduates have gone into writing, journalism, publishing, and many other professions.

Many of our students have gone on to become published authors. You can find a list of alumni on our Creative Writing subject pages. Others have been published in magazines and journals, or have had their work produced and broadcast on radio and television. A number of our graduates have won or been shortlisted for major prizes for poetry, short fiction and fiction including the Dundee Book Prize, Booker Prize, Bailey’s Women’s Prize, Orange Prize, Fish Short Story Award, Bridport Prize, McCash Scots Poetry Competition, Macallan and Canongate short story awards, Saltire Awards, Scottish Book of the Year Awards.

Positions held by recent graduates include Managing Director, Freelance Writer, Editor, Programme Manager, Author, Copywriter, Author and Community Arts Worker.

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The Institute for Creative and Cultural Entrepreneurship has a strong research base in all areas of cultural policy; creative, cultural and social entrepreneurship; cultural diplomacy; and arts management- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/mphil-phd-creative-cultural-entrepreneurship/. Read more
The Institute for Creative and Cultural Entrepreneurship has a strong research base in all areas of cultural policy; creative, cultural and social entrepreneurship; cultural diplomacy; and arts management- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/mphil-phd-creative-cultural-entrepreneurship/

The Institute for Creative and Cultural Entrepreneurship (ICCE) provides a unique environment to study and research, with world leading academic thinkers within a university globally recognised for its research excellence.

ICCE welcomes proposals from highly qualified individuals. These research projects should be of the highest quality, in keeping with Goldsmiths' reputation as a leading producer of exceptional research.

We are particularly interested in hearing from people interested in carrying out research into:

cultural and creative entrepreneurship
creative industries
business models for the creative economy
social entrepreneurship
cultural tourism
culture and regeneration
cultural relations and diplomacy
audience development
cultural policy

Current research studies being undertaken in ICCE include:

21st century competencies
leadership of arts and cultural organisations
personalisation of the arts offer
value and how to assess this in the creative industries
audience development
the business of comedy
applied conceptual art
cultural diplomacy
Find out more about research degrees at Goldsmiths.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact ICCE.

Structure

You'll be supervised by a full-time member of staff, generally agreed during the preliminary discussions regarding your research with the ICCE Director.

The MPhil programme offers the opportunity for the student to continue their research to a PhD. PhD theses are up to a maximum of 100,000 words.

You should aim to complete and submit your thesis within the time-frame specified by Goldsmiths. This is normally three to four years for full-time students and four to six years for part-time.

A thesis for the award of MPhil may be submitted after two years of full-time or three years of part-time study. Registration can be changed from full-time to part-time status, and vice-versa, with the agreement of your supervisor. You'll be required to complete the appropriate form for change of status available from the Admissions Office or from the ICCE Administrator.

Research training programme

All students enrolled in the MPhil programme are initially required to attend a weekly seminar in research methodology conducted by the Goldsmiths Graduate School. These seminars are designed to bring together research students with diverse interests in a cooperative and stimulating environment.

Its objectives include training students for the Spring Review Week, written and oral presentations, preparation for upgrading procedures and publication of articles.

Assessment

Examination is by thesis and a viva.

Department

We engage directly with external partners from the creative industries, and make use of our home in the heart of this thriving global city

The creative industries and cultural sector are continuing to grow at a rapid rate. In the Institute for Creative and Cultural Entrepreneurship (ICCE) we specialise in preparing our students to understand, manage and innovate in these fascinating areas.

Many of our programmes are taught in partnership with international, regional and local cultural organisations, giving you the opportunity to gain direct experience of professional practice.

Skills & Careers

Possible careers include:

Academia
Research
Practice-orientated work
Development work
Work in social innovation and social economy
Work in the arts and cultural sector and cultural and creative industries
Publishing

How to apply

Before you start at Goldsmiths, the actual topic of your research has to be agreed with your proposed supervisor, who will be a member of staff active in your general field of research. The choice of topic may be influenced by the current research in the department or the requirements of an external funding body.

If you wish to study on a part-time basis, you should also indicate how many hours a week you intend to devote to research, whether this will be at evenings or weekends, and for how many hours each day.

Your research proposal

Along with your application details, personal statement and academic reference, you should also upload a research proposal at the point of application.

This should be in the form of a clear, concise and coherent statement of the proposed area of research of at least five pages and no more than seven pages of A4 and should include:

1) A working title for your research project.

2) A clear statement about what you want to work on and why it is important, interesting, relevant and realistic. Detail your main research objectives; these could be articulated as hypotheses, propositions, research questions, or problems to solve. What difference do you think your research will make? Is your research achievable in the time allocated? (e.g. 3 years full‐time)

3) Some background knowledge and context of the area in which you wish to work, including key literature, key people, key research findings. Think about how your work links to the work of others in the same or related fields?

4) Some consideration of the methods/approach you might use. Describe how will you conduct your research? Will you use existing theories, new methods/approaches or develop new methods/approaches?

5) Some indication of the strategy and timetable for your research project and any research challenges you may face. What would be the main stages of your project and what would you be expecting to do in each year of your PhD?

6) A short list of the key references which support your research proposal. References should be listed in an appropriate convention (e.g. Harvard). Such references should be used throughout your research proposal to demonstrate that you have read and understood the work of others. Other relevant material that you are aware of, but not actually used in writing your proposal, can also be added as a bibliography.

When preparing a research proposal it is useful to have a good awareness of the whole of the MPhil process. Goldsmiths' Professor Les Back has a series of podcasts on the topic that can be very helpful. These are all available on our podcasts page.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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Young fashion designers have become the key element in reshaping today’s fashion panorama. Read more
Young fashion designers have become the key element in reshaping today’s fashion panorama. From the appointment of JW Anderson as Creative Director to Loewe to the acquisition of stakes of Christopher Kane by Kering Group, all events seem to indicate that now more than ever fashion creation remains essential for the activities of large luxury brands and mass-market brands.

Despite an apparent return to a pure and fresh creativity, the components of fashion design related jobs have dramatically changed. Imagining garments in an intuitive way is only one aspect of a designer’s responsibilities. A head designer or a creative director must not only anticipate social and aesthetic changes, but also understand the strategic issues faced by brands in terms of positioning, market potential and communication.

Our Master of Arts in Contemporary Fashion Design was specifically designed to address these changes and is aimed at Fashion Design graduates who want to go beyond product design and development.

The program has 3 main objectives :

- Enriching our students’ fashion and creative culture with modules especially designed for this course. For instance our ‘Fashion Cross Culture’ module was developed with the Musée des Arts Décoratifs to provide a more sophisticated approach towards the analysis of cultural discrepancies and their effect on fashion. Another key module would be “Fashion Product Semiology”. It uses semiology as a methodology to decode a garment and to decrypt its aesthetic aspect in order to better understand how it is perceived.

- Developing student creativity with modules such as « Creative Process» that helps students become more aware of their own “creative logic” and increase their potential. The addition of practical workshops will provide students with a new approach on known production and designing techniques. For example the “Pattern and Draping Development” module introduces new research methods based on experimentation and opens new perspectives for students when it comes to finding inspiration.

- Helping our students understand how the fashion industries work and how brand strategies are crafted on a global context. Marketing, organisational issues, financial challenges as well as image and communication strategies will be discussed in a series of various modules

The course ends with students developing their own collection project with the guidance of a tutor. This project includes creating a garment and/or an accessories collection. The process involves designing prototypes for 12 silhouettes as well as developing marketing and business plans. This collection is then examined by a jury of professionals and the best students receive the opportunity to show their work to fashion professionals at the IFA Graduate Show that takes place during The Haute Couture Fashion Week. Students are also tutored to take part in several international contests that represent a great platform for young fashion designers.

As with the other IFA Paris courses, the Master of Arts in Contemporary Fashion Design benefits greatly from its Paris location. With its rich cultural life, its two museums dedicated to fashion, its 6 annual fashion weeks, hundreds of showrooms and textile fairs as well as the vicinity of small-scale crafts industries, the city of lights remains the undisputed fashion capital of the world.

All our programs are articulated around the ECTS framework as defined by the Bologne convention. After completing their course, students receive a total of 120 ECTS that can easily be transferred if they decide to study further. This program also received the IDEL/IDEART accreditation and is certified as an “International Master.”

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Oxford University's Master of Studies in Creative Writing is a two-year, part-time master's degree course offering a unique combination of high contact hours, genre specialization, and critical and creative breadth. Read more
Oxford University's Master of Studies in Creative Writing is a two-year, part-time master's degree course offering a unique combination of high contact hours, genre specialization, and critical and creative breadth.

The emphasis of this postgraduate creative writing course is cross-cultural and cross-genre, pointing up the needs and challenges of the contemporary writer who produces his or her creative work in the context of a global writerly and critical community. The master's degree in creative writing offers a clustered learning format of five Residences, two Guided Retreats and one Placement over two years. The research Placement, a distinguishing feature of the course, offers between one and two weeks' hands-on experience of writing in the real world. Students may undertake their placement in a literary agency, a publishing house, the offices of a literary periodical, a theatre company, a screen production company, or other relevant organization. Placement organisations have included Macmillan, Initialise Films, Random House, the BBC, the Literary Review, AM Heath, Pegasus Theatre, the Poetry Society, and Carcanet.

The virtual open event for this programme is available to watch at http://www.conted.ox.ac.uk/cwopenday. The open event features acting Course Director Jane Draycott and course administrator Rebecca Rue, who discuss the programme, its requirements and the student experience. Participants' questions were texted in and answered during the event. A FAQ of all the questions and their answers is available at the top of this section.

The MSt has a blog, a resource for Oxford events, calls for submission, competitions, news, interviews and more, which is available at http://blogs.conted.ox.ac.uk/mstcw/.

"The Oxford MSt enables you to fast-track your career in writing."
- Fortuna Burke

"… the freedom to explore and experiment… has been fundamental to my development as a writer."
- Clare Tetley

"The range and variety of the group … offers truly exciting opportunities for the kind of exchanges that really accelerate your development as a writer."
- Michael Schuller

"What does the course offer? Self-discipline, professionalism and confidence."
- Abigail Green-Dove

"My life has been so enriched and expanded. My writing evolves daily through the tools that you gave me. Not to mention the wonderful friendships formed throughout our two years together."
- Lindsay Moore

"The Masters in Oxford, while encouraging creativity, raised the bar on the quality of the finished work and gave me the discipline to be a professional."
- Bette Adriaanse

"I doubt there’s a more suitable MSt in the United Kingdom for work which challenges boundaries and takes risks."
- Jennifer Thorp

Students and alumni have won a wide range of prizes. These successes include winning the Gregory O’Donoghue Prize, the Writers’ Village International Short Fiction Award 2014, the Parallel Universe Poetry Competition, the Martin Starkie Prize, the International Jane Martin Poetry Prize, the Heritage Arts Radio play competition, the Cascade Pictures Writer’s Couch pitching competition, first prize in the Poetry Book Society Student Poetry Competition, the Miracle Poetry Competition, Best Photography Book Award from POYi (Pictures of the Year international), and the Yeovil Literary Prize for Poetry. Two alumni have won the Oxford University’s DL Chapman Memorial Prize, another was a finalist in the 2013 Writers at Work Fellowship Competition, and another won the London Fringe Festival’s Short Fiction Award. Alumni have been awarded a Toshiba Studentship, a Hawthornden Fellowship, and funded residencies at the Banff Centre, Canada, and at the Expansionists Project, Whitstable.

Students and alumni have had their work shortlisted across the genres for, among others, the Asham Award, the Bridport Prize, the Bridport Prize for Flash Fiction, the Fish Flash Fiction prize, the Yeoville Literary Prize, the Oxonian poetry prize, the Fish Short Story Prize 2013, the Big Issue in the North’s New Writing Award, the Oxonian review, and the Aesthetica Creative Writing Competition. A 2010 graduate was short-listed for the Crime Writers’ Association Debut Dagger award 2011. Two alumni were longlisted for the Dylan Thomas Prize, and one was shortlisted. An alumnus’ debut novel also made the longlist for the Not the Booker Prize.

Visit the website https://www.conted.ox.ac.uk/about/mst-in-creative-writing

Destinations

Many of our graduate students have signed with agents, and each year a number go on to undertake doctoral study in creative writing or English Literature. Our graduates have obtained positions in publishing, media and the creative arts industries, as well as teaching positions in tertiary education.

The MSt has enjoyed a very strong application field since its inception, attracting record interest in recent years from a global constituency of writers. The course`s emphasis on critical analysis as well as on writerly and creative excellence attracts students of commensurately strong academic potential as well as of significant creative promise. This combination of academic rigour and creativity is a central distinctive feature of the course. The resulting emphasis on exploration and the development of an individual writerly voice serve to attract particularly talented students from around the world as well as a strongly diverse group of UK students of varied backgrounds and ethnicity.

Continuing education and life-long learning in Oxford have been formally linked to the collegiate system of the University since 1990, when Kellogg College, the University’s 36th college, was established. Please consult http://www.kellogg.ox.ac.uk/.

Who should apply?

We are looking for writers with a proven record of commitment to their craft. You should be a keen reader, and bring an open-minded, questioning approach to both reading and writing. You will not necessarily have yet achieved publication, but you will have written regularly and read widely over a sustained period. You will be keen to dedicate time and energy and staying-power to harnessing your talent, enlarging your skills, and aiming your writerly production at consistently professional standards. It is likely you will have a first degree, or equivalent, although in some cases other evidence of suitability may be acceptable.

For applicants with a degree from the USA, the minimum GPA we normally seek is 3.6 out of 4.0. We do not seek a Graduate Record Examination (GRE) or GMAT score. Although a GRE or GMAT score is not a formal requirement, if one is available it should be supplied.

The high number of contact hours are concentrated into Residences and Retreats. Students should be at a stage in their writing where, with appropriate guidance, they can undertake agreed assignments, projects and essays between meetings. There is a dedicated Course Website for provision of up-to-date information; contact and exchange between students; and contact between students and tutors. The course, however, is not a ‘distance-learning’ course, and tutors, while being happy to help with questions or problems, do not offer regular weekly ‘office hours’.

The M.St is unlikely to be suitable for those who are just starting out on their writerly and critical development.

If you have any doubts about whether the M.St is right for your stage of development, please consult the website for information on our Undergraduate Diploma in Creative Writing https://www.conted.ox.ac.uk/dipcw

What does the course cover?

The first year concentrates equally on prose (fiction and narrative non-fiction), poetry and drama. There is a significant critical reading and analysis component, which is linked to the writerly considerations explored in each of the three genres. Students are expected to engage fully with all three genres, in a spirit of exploration and with the aim of discovering what impact and relevance unaccustomed genres have for the development of their individual writerly voice. This necessarily involves undertaking assignments and exercises in areas that are new to students, and do not relate directly to any work they may have in progress. Students may be able to continue with their own longer term pieces-in-progress but the concentration of year 1 teaching is on producing new work, and the exercises and assignments, which should take priority, reflect this emphasis.

The second year offers specialisation in a single genre, again accompanied by a significant critical element focused around issues of interest to the individual student and related to the genre of choice.

Your specialisation choices are as follows:

- The novel
- Short fiction
- Radio drama
- TV drama
- Screenwriting
- Stage drama
- Poetry
- Narrative non-fiction

In year 2, the specialisation in the genre of students’ choice provides an opportunity for significant concentration on either new work, or, subject to consultation with supervisor, on existing work-in-progress.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/graduate/applying-to-oxford

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This programme caters for teachers and educators who are keen to develop as both writers and educational practitioners, and is delivered in collaboration with London-based cultural institutions- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-writer-teacher/. Read more
This programme caters for teachers and educators who are keen to develop as both writers and educational practitioners, and is delivered in collaboration with London-based cultural institutions- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-writer-teacher/

There is a growing interest in linking cultural sector practices to those of education, to the benefit of both. This programme creates a valuable partnership across the Educational Studies and the creative writing team in the English and Comparative Literature at Goldsmiths, in collaboration with London-based cultural institutions.

The course caters for teachers and educators who are keen to develop as both writers and educational practitioners. It develops insights into creative writing practices that provide a critical perspective on relations and discourses of teaching and learning in contemporary education.

The programme enables students to establish and strengthen their identity as writers and educators in informal and formal learning contexts (eg Writing Workshop and project based dissertation).

You'll develop strong writing skills to a potentially publishable level and will be able to engage in sustained practical and theoretical research into writing practices. Practices of creative writing and practices of teaching and learning are brought into a productive relationship.

As part of the programme you'll rethink notions of writing pedagogy in a range of contexts, including local community sites.

You may be given the opportunity to contribute to:

-performance poetry workshops and events conducted by Apples and Snakes
-poetry performances and sessions run by the Poetry Society
-drama projects created by The Complete Work
-writing projects developed by the English and Media Centre
-writing workshops in a range of forms led by the Ministry of Stories
-creative research projects run by the British Library
-Storytelling workshops run by Discover Children's Story Centre

Spoken Word Education programme

The Spoken Word Education Training Programme is led by Jacob Sam-La Rose (Artistic Director) and Bohdan Piasecki (Education Director). All Spoken Word Educators need to first apply to the MA Writer/Teacher programme and, if they are accepted, they will then be interviewed for the Spoken Word Education Training programme.

MA Writer/Teacher student shortlisted for the Costa Short Story Award 2015:
'Gerado Dreams of Chillies', written by Niall Bourke as part of his MA studies at Goldsmiths is one of six shortlisted for the £3,500 prize.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Vicky Macleroy (Educational Studies)

Modules & Structure

You'll have the opportunity to develop your own creative writing practices and explore a range of educational approaches towards creative writing.

You'll work with practising and published creative writing lecturers and education lecturers in collaboration with professionals working in local cultural institutions.

You'll participate in creative and life writing workshops and research creative writing pedagogies in classrooms and educational settings.

You have to complete 180 credits points, made up from:

-one compulsory core module in the Department of English and Comparative Literature:
–Workshop in Creative and Life Writing (30 credits)

-two compulsory core modules in the Department of Educational Studies in association with the British Library, Poetry Society, English and Media Centre, Apples and Snakes, Ministry of Stories, The Complete Works:
–Contemporary Writer Identity and Education (30 credits)
–Research into Writing Practices (30 credits)

-an option module in the Department of Educational Studies (30 credits)

-the Dissertation in the Department of Educational Studies and the Department of English and Comparative Literature (60 credits)

Practitioners who already have existing M-level credits may transfer these on to the MA.

Assessment

Assessment for the Workshop in Creative and Life Writing module is by the submission of a piece or pieces of creative or life-writing of 5,000 words plus a critical account of how you have structured and developed your work.

Assessment for the Educational Studies modules is by the submission of assignments.

You'll also be assessed on a project-based dissertation.

Skills

The programme will enable you to develop creative writing skills to a potentially publishable level, participate in local cultural events as writers, and develop advanced theoretical and critical skills in creative writing pedagogy.

Careers

The programme provides and enhances continuing professional development in creative writing for educators and teachers, opening up opportunities to work with local cultural institutions and schools, and enriching current professional practice.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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Our celebrated creative writing programme is perfect for talented and aspiring writers looking to gain adventurous and needed creative and critical skills. Read more
Our celebrated creative writing programme is perfect for talented and aspiring writers looking to gain adventurous and needed creative and critical skills. This is an exciting and supportive online course that offers you the opportunity to develop your writing practice wherever you are in the world.

Why this programme

◾You will be taught by a number of successful and well-regarded writers and many of our graduates have gone on to be published and acclaimed authors.
◾We have strong links with literary agents and publishers, and an impressive list of published alumni.
◾This programme is delivered online and offers flexible study around your existing commitments.

Programme structure

This programme is directed at those who are already engaged in writing. Its clear three-part structure, focused on creative, critical and practical issues, distinguishes this programme from the others offered in the UK.

Taking the online distance learning MLitt full-time:

The programme structure covers:

Semester 1:
◾Creative workshops and guest speakers
◾Reading as a writer (CX1)
◾Copyright, publishing and the culture of reception

Semester 2:
◾Creative workshops and guest speakers
◾Experimentation (CX2)
◾Editing the twenty-first century: editorial project

These courses have been developed to:
◾allow you to experiment with a range of voices, techniques and genres alongside a consideration of major creative and editorial engagements from the modern through the contemporary period.
◾help you develop a critical understanding of diverse creative, theoretic and critical texts.
◾provide a space to undertake extended portfolios of creative and editorial work.
◾familiarise you with the writing context (audience, publishing in all its forms, the legal framework, modes of transmission);
◾And most importantly, to subject you to the discipline of regular writing by providing a stimulating workshop and tutorial environment in which writing skills can be acquired, discussed and honed.

Taking the online distance learning MLitt part-time:
◾Part-time year one: students take one semester of workshops and Craft and Experimentation both semesters, and have two tutorials.
◾Part-time year two: students take one semester of workshops and Editing and Publication both semesters, and have three tutorials.

Career prospects

Graduates have gone into writing, journalism, publishing, and many other professions.

Positions held by recent graduates include Managing Director, Freelance Writer, Author, Copywriter, Author and Community Arts Work.

Find out more about our alumni and their publications by visiting our Creative Writing subject page.

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Our Creative Writing. First Novel Master's degree works with a very small cohort. This means you'll receive one-to-one tuition on a far more regular basis compared to many other Creative Writing postgraduate courses. Read more
Our Creative Writing: First Novel Master's degree works with a very small cohort. This means you'll receive one-to-one tuition on a far more regular basis compared to many other Creative Writing postgraduate courses.

Here, you will be personally guided through the journey of your first draft, rather than being another student at the back of a large class. No short stories, no poetry, no screenplay, just your novel.

Your novel deserves a tutor that understands all - not just some of its parts - and you deserve a tutor who will coach not just the first draft of your novel, but also the development of your creative process.

Why St Mary's?

Our tutors are practising writers, and have between them written best-selling novels and won major literary awards. Drawing on our connections with the industry you'll also have seminars with some of the most sought-after agents and publishers in London.

When you have finished the degree, you can choose to continue workshopping and drafting with the dedicated cohorts we establish every year. We are passionate about our craft and about your craft too. That's why our first PhD student in Creative Writing struck a major two-book deal with Canongate and sales in multiple foreign territories.

Current students are receiving visits from high profile industry experts from the publishing world throughout this semester. These include visits, Q&As and masterclasses from Conville and Walsh, Canongate, Bookouture, Janklow and Nesbit, Little Brown, Corsair and Atom and Picador, and pitching opportunities to top agents and publishers: Hellie Ogden, Jo Unwin, Francesca Main, James Gurbutt, Natalie Butlin, Jessie Botterill, Sophie Lambert

We want to hear about your novel – the one you know you have to write. Pick up the phone or email the Programme Director: or call 020 8240 4380.

Course Content

A full list of modules is available on our website:
https://www.stmarys.ac.uk/postgraduate-courses-london/creative-writing-first-novel

Assessment

Each module produces a creative element of your draft which will be assessed. In the seminar modules, you will also be assessed by presentation to the group.

One-to-one tutorial feedback and support is essential for the writer aiming to complete a productive draft in just one year.

In formal assessment, each module will produce a mixture of creative submission to deadline, workshop engagement, critical reflection and seminar presentation. The weight of marking always rests with creative submission and the aim is to complete a draft of a novel through continuous assessment.

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Our Arts, Business and Creativity MA provides an entrepreneurial education for creative graduates who aspire to a variety of careers in a creative industry. Read more
Our Arts, Business and Creativity MA provides an entrepreneurial education for creative graduates who aspire to a variety of careers in a creative industry.

The course was created in conjunction with the School of Arts and Cultures and key stakeholders from the creative industries.

It examines the theoretical aspects of creativity and the creative industries within their social, cultural, economic, political and increasingly, international contexts. It provides you with a setting to start-up a business and to engage on real projects with regional stakeholders.

The Arts, Business and Creativity MA has been developed in response to the increasing worldwide demand for creativity in practice from:
-Strategists
-Managers
-Entrepreneurs
-Government policy makers

What you'll learn

The course is for creative graduates who want to turn their artistic and creative talents to a viable career or business start-up. It will also suit those involved in developing and growing enterprises within the sector.

It has been designed specifically for individuals with some involvement in or experience of creative industries.

Your development

On completion of the course, you will be able to:
-Create business, marketing and promotional plans suitable for use within the creative industries
-Develop and apply advanced management tools and techniques to support profitability, sustainability and growth within the context of commercially creative work
-Demonstrate enhanced skills in decision-making and critical thinking
-Act autonomously in planning and implementing projects at a professional level
-Develop your strategic and creative thinking
-Recognise the need for change and the ability to manage this change
-Establish and manage a real-life business

Since entrepreneurship education needs to be experiential, there is a significant practical element to the course, including:
-Starting up an enterprise
-Acting as a consultant in a creative business
-Working with practitioners across the sector

Career focus

Key decision makers within business and government recognise the vital importance of the creative industries and the creative business sector in regeneration and the economic growth of regions and whole nations. Graduates in this field are very much in demand.

Graduates from the course have undertaken various roles including:
-Art Director
-Art Manager
-Marketing Manager
-Entrepreneur
-Social and Digital Marketing Manager
-Delivery

The course has been developed in conjunction with industry practitioners and is taught by a team of academics with strong links to regional organisations and extensive professional backgrounds in the business world.

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'NFTS' reputation and facilities should make this practical course a 'must' for anyone wanting to direct commercials’ Sir Alan Parker. Read more
'NFTS' reputation and facilities should make this practical course a 'must' for anyone wanting to direct commercials’ Sir Alan Parker
This unique part-time diploma course delivered in partnership with D&AD, will equip students with the skills required to become a successful Commercials Director.

-Leave the course with a professional standard show reel of three commercials
-Attend weekly talks from key speakers in the advertising industry including Creative Directors, successful Commercials Directors and Brand Managers
-Based in London amongst the hub of the commercials industry
-One evening a week (with additional production activity as required)
-Improve career prospects by gaining an unrivalled knowledge and an invaluable list of industry contacts
-Access to NFTS's Masterclasses led by major creative figures from film, television and game
-The course is supported by a wide range of commercials production companies, agencies etc. For example Great Guns and Blink have been integral to the design of the course and will contribute teaching sessions to the course.

We welcome EU/EEA Students. Course fees charged at UK rate.

COURSE OVERVIEW

Working as a director in commercials involves a unique skillset. Not only does it require creative vision and technical knowledge but a successful director will have a good understanding of how to successfully negotiate working in a commercial environment in a highly collaborative way.

ABOUT D&AD

Since 1962, D&AD has been inspiring a community of creative thinkers by celebrating and stimulating the finest in design and advertising. The D&AD Professional Awards are recognised globally as the ultimate creative accolade, entered and attended by the best from around the world. But it's much more than just awards. Members join a vibrant global community, whilst creatives and clients are inspired by a world-class Training programme. As a non-profit advertising association, all D&AD's surpluses go straight into programmes such as New Blood, inspiring the next generation of creative talent and stimulating the creative industry to work towards a fairer more sustainable future.

CURRICULUM

This course will facilitate students making three commercials combining practical production experience and specialist training.

Specifically students will learn about:
-The commercials market
-Developing ideas
-Creating moodboards and storyboards
-Pitching
-Managing the client
-Working with agencies and production companies
-Responding to briefs
-Understanding brands
-Casting
-Shoot processes and protocols
-The use of music in commercials

Each term, a key project will be to direct a commercial. By the end of the course you will have made three commercials.

The course has been developed to meet industry demand and NFTS students are engaged in more productions as part of the curriculum than any other film school. And, unlike other schools, all production costs are met by the NFTS and productions are given cash production budgets.

The diploma course is 12 months part-time, one evening a week (with additional production activity as required) and is delivered in central London. Each week Creative Directors, Successful Commercials Directors, Agency staff, Brand Managers etc will speak to students to elucidate a different aspect of the commercials sector.

Participant production activity will be supported by NFTS students studying on craft courses including Cinematography and Production Sound.

NFTS BENEFITS

Directing Commercials and Promos course participants will have full access to our creative masterclasses and clubs, including: Cinema Club, Screen Arts and NFTS Masterclasses - these strands see major creative figures from film, television and games screening their work and discussing with students in the campus cinema. Recent speakers include David Fincher (Director, Seven, Gone Girl), Graham Linehan (The IT Crowd, Father Ted), Dougal Wilson (award winning commercials director), Abi Morgan (Suffragette, The Hour), and Christopher Nolan (Interstellar, The Dark Knight).

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The MFA in Film Production and Creative Writing Program is primarily a film production degree with an additional focus on screenwriting. Read more

MFA Film/Creative Writing

The MFA in Film Production and Creative Writing Program is primarily a film production degree with an additional focus on screenwriting. The final thesis for the Joint MFA is a completed film which the student normally writes, directs and produces.

The degree is designed for students who already have a comprehensive background in filmmaking and some screenwriting who wish to pursue a specific creative or intellectual vision that includes screenwriting, in an academic environment.

The Program is very small. Normally only 2-3 students are admitted per year. This total includes students in the MFA in Film Production. There are normally 30-40 applications for these positions.

The MFA is a two-year course of resident study. However, many students find it may take 3-4 years to complete the thesis requirement, as students must fund their thesis films entirely on their own.

Applicants must first apply to the Film Program and be accepted by the MFA in Film Production Program. The Film Program will then arrange for the application and materials to be sent to the Creative Writing Program for consideration for the Joint Degree.

Please note: In order to be accepted for the Joint MFA in Film Production and Creative Writing, students must already be experienced filmmakers and have completed films on which they were a principal creator to submit as part of their portfolio.

Quick Facts

- Degree: Master of Fine Arts
- Specialization: Film Production and Creative Writing
- Subject: Creative and Performing Arts
- Mode of delivery: On campus
- Program components: Coursework + Thesis required
- Faculty: Faculty of Arts

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The MA Performing Arts. Creative Practice and Leadership develops your capacity to create and lead projects in the performing arts. Read more
The MA Performing Arts: Creative Practice and Leadership develops your capacity to create and lead projects in the performing arts.

From Shakespeare to hip hop theatre and dance, you are encouraged to engage with and reconceptualise classical, avant-garde, contemporary and global practices into distinct and innovative practical work.

You will enhance your understanding of the exciting and varied approaches to work in this key sector of the creative industries, while also considering the specific challenges that face emerging leaders in this field.

Reflecting upon your own artistic viewpoint you will explore the role of the arts in today’s complex societies and the implications from your practise.

You will be encouraged to develop as an agent of innovation in professional and/or community contexts, fostering your capacity to both lead performing arts projects and to work collaboratively.

Visit the website: https://www.beds.ac.uk/howtoapply/courses/postgraduate/next-year/performing-arts-creative-practice-and-leadership#entry

Course detail

• Study with the University’s team of performing arts professionals, visiting artists and facilities that include a professionally theatre.
• Engage with lecturers who draw on their research into, and experience of, creative practices to facilitate your reflections upon the role of performing arts today to refine your own artistic vision.
• Develop as an agent of innovation in professional and/or community contexts, fostering your capacity to both lead performing arts projects and to work collaboratively.
• Explore a unique approach that places the emphasis on practice as the focus for critical reflection and development.
• Benefit from our links with professional networks locally, nationally and internationally as you work towards your final project where you present the culmination of your studies in the manner that best represents your approach to performing arts.
• Benefit from the expertise of performing arts professionals
• Gain from opportunities to present your choreographic or theatre based explorations in our professionally equipped theatres
• Explore practices at the boundaries of theatre making and choreography
• Learn how to engage people in your work and to access new opportunities
• Develop your skills in leadership, networking, project management and collaboration

Modules

• Researching Performance
• Performing Arts Research Project
• Performing Artists and Communities
• Project Planning and Leadership for Performing Artists
• Inter-professional Working Project
• Choreographic Research or Contemporary Theatre Making
• Somatic Practices or The Dancing Mind: Dance Psychology or
• Performance for Inclusion and Diversity

Assessment

Assessment of practice mirrors professional working environments and expectations as far as possible, and tests skills and abilities as a means of enhancing and preparing you for the demands of future employment.

Assessments are designed to help you acquire professionally equivalent skills and abilities, while also promoting and testing your independent critical thinking to develop you as a reflective and articulate artist and researcher as well as an independent and confident future leader.Methods of assessment typify expectations of postgraduate study in advanced performance and include: public and in-studio performances, presentations, oral examinations, literature reviews, essays, and portfolio.

This range and diversity of testing offers opportunities for you, and for the staff team, to explore your relative strengths and weaknesses, and to respond positively to individual challenges through a supportive and personalised learning environment.

Careers

You will be equipped to develop and promote projects and to apply for opportunities in the performing arts suited to your particular skills and abilities. Depending upon your choice of electives these may include:

• Performer: independent/freelance performer Interdisciplinary Performance Practitioner: collaborative and interdisciplinary performance work, self-generated performance-based practice

• Choreographer: independent dance maker/artist, choreographer to specific brief and/or group/project, collaborative artist in interdisciplinary projects

• Director/Theatre maker: independent theatre director and theatre maker

• Educator: lecturer/teacher/leader in a range of formal HE, FE and schools context, in addition to freelance work in wider community and professional environments

• Independent Portfolio Worker in the Creative Industries: consultant and researcher

Previous graduates from the University of Bedfordshire courses currenl work as directors of their own companies, entertaininers, workshop leaders and lecturers.

Funding

For information on available funding, please follow the link: https://www.beds.ac.uk/howtoapply/money/scholarships/pg

How to apply

For information on how to apply, please follow the link: https://www.beds.ac.uk/howtoapply/course/applicationform

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