• Northumbria University Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Derby Online Learning Featured Masters Courses
  • Aberystwyth University Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Bristol Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Edinburgh Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Leeds Featured Masters Courses
  • Jacobs University Bremen gGmbH Featured Masters Courses

Postgrad LIVE! Study Fair

Birmingham | Bristol | Sheffield | Liverpool | Edinburgh

Nottingham Trent University Featured Masters Courses
University of Bedfordshire Featured Masters Courses
Cardiff University Featured Masters Courses
Nottingham Trent University Featured Masters Courses
University of London International Programmes Featured Masters Courses
"creative" AND "arts" AND…×
0 miles

Masters Degrees (Creative Arts Practice)

We have 936 Masters Degrees (Creative Arts Practice)

  • "creative" AND "arts" AND "practice" ×
  • clear all
Showing 1 to 15 of 936
Order by 
The MA in Creative Art Practice takes one year full time or two years part time. It's designed for graduates from any form of creative practice. Read more
The MA in Creative Art Practice takes one year full time or two years part time. It's designed for graduates from any form of creative practice. The course is intended for people who want to work between disciplines while engaging critically with contemporary technology.

The programme also offers a grounding for those hoping to progress to PhD degree study. We admit around 15 students per year on to the course and encourage collaboration and exchange.

The course

You'll work in Culture Lab a centre for research into culture and technology. The course combines a core of critical making work with the opportunity to take modules from all around the faculty, extending your knowledge and skills.

Our course is strongly research led and is taught by practicing artists actively involved in research culture. We are committed to engaging with the creative city through collaborative public working.

You will have 24-hour access to Culture Lab and its world class facilities and equipment.

Your work

Our course supports creative work between and across disciplines. Our students often come from backgrounds in:
-Experimental and electronic music
-Visual arts
-Sound art
-Design
-Architecture
-Creative writing
-Curating
-Film making and photography

We encourage students to experiment with new forms of practice and to explore critical approaches to their work drawn from other research disciplines.

Our programme consists of:
-Lectures and seminars
-Technical workshops and group making sessions
-Focused collaborative projects
-Real world commissions
-Resources and support

You are expected to engage with your peers and contribute to collaborative studio culture. You’ll be supported through supervision and by regular studio discussions with course mates.

Read less
All applicants will be required to present a portfolio of their work and will be interviewed by teaching staff. The course welcomes international applicants and requires an English level of IELTS 6.5 or equivalent. Read more
All applicants will be required to present a portfolio of their work and will be interviewed by teaching staff. The course welcomes international applicants and requires an English level of IELTS 6.5 or equivalent.

One of two strands of enquiry in arts practice at masters level (the other beting Arts Practice, Fine Art) the MA Arts Practice (Arts, Health and Wellbeing) course offers students the opportunity to explore their own art practice or to take an outward facing approach, in partnership with others. Students of the course develop the skills to evaluate, critique and implement methodologies, gaining the ability to articulate sound arguments relevant to their practice.

Graduates exploring the role of the Arts in realising health and wellbeing focus on the value of the arts in community engagement and also its impact on the environment. They make a significant contribution to the advancement of Arts in Health within Wales and further afield.

The broad and interdisciplinary nature ensures that our course reflects the diversity of activity and interest in this dynamic field.

The role of the arts in health and well-being is widely recognised and valued. The MA Arts Practice (Arts, Health and Wellbeing) course will be of interest to artists, arts or health managers, community workers and teachers, plus those with an interest in the relationship between arts and health. It aims to support and develop innovative practice and research in this vibrant and expanding sector, so you will be encouraged to engage in creative dialogue,collaboration and interdisciplinary working

See the website http://courses.southwales.ac.uk/courses/940-ma-arts-practice-art-health-and-wellbeing

What you will study

The MA Art Practice course runs over two calendar years if you choose part-time study, or one calendar year for full-time study:

Part One
- Critical Studies in the Arts (20 credits)
Learn about systems of enquiry, how to understand and engage with objects and issues that affect your particular domain

- Arts Practice 1 (40 credits)
Develop your skills in your chosen discipline, challenging genre and context to develop an original body of work in either a studio context or placement.

Please note: For students studying part-time the above modules will be undertaken between October – June during your first year.

Part Two
- Arts Praxis (40 credits)
Refine and build upon your line of enquiry, develop new skills, producing a body of work within a studio context or placement which demonstrates complexity of understanding.

- Professional Practice in the Arts (20 credits)
Explore entrepreneurial, marketing and management aspects of contemporary practice within a framework of social, political, economic and cultural responsibility

- Major Arts Project (60 credits)
Complete a detailed project demonstrating praxis; an area of research and practice relevant to your concerns, utilising research methods appropriate for an arts scholar and an appropriate means of presentation.

Please note: For students studying part-time the above modules will be undertaken between October – September during your second year.

Learning and teaching methods

The MA Art Practice course is delivered using specialist facilities in our post-graduate studios which are available seven days a week. The MA Art Practice course makes use of lectures, guest speakers, workshops, demonstrations and tutorials, field trips and visits (additional costs will apply for field trips and visits). Contact time will include weekly workshops or seminars, and regular group and individual tutorials. You will also be expected to develop your area of practice independently.

Work Experience and Employment Prospects

The course acknowledges the value of experience and partnerships to enable employability. A key element of the course involves establishing partnerships, internships, residencies and placements with arts organisations and galleries, NHS Trusts, social services, charitable trusts, schools, colleges, care homes and commercial companies to develop these. The course also develops your professional skills and positions your practice within critical and contextual frameworks.

You will have the opportunity to develop your practice and gain experience in the field through practical placements, mentoring and live projects matched to your needs whilst benefiting from specialist facilities and expertise to extend your skill sets.

Graduates can progress to careers in academia, arts administration, artists in residence, arts education, arts and disability, community arts, commissioned works, gallery administration and curatorship, health sector management, public art, studio practice, social services, and youth work.

Assessment methods

You will usually have to complete coursework as you progress, and normally sit exams at the end of each academic year.

Facilities

Practical facilities available to students include an MA base room, computer lab with software for digital imaging and film editing, printmaking studio, ceramics, casting, wood and metal workshops, photographic darkroom and studio.

Learning resources include the campus library, access to online journals and research.

Teaching

Our MA Art Practice staff are actively engaged in research, they embody a high level of knowledge, expertise and professional experience across a range of arts practices. Students on this course will benefit from interdisciplinary teaching delivered by a teaching team with extensive experience in exhibiting; project management; project realisation and practice within the public realm, NHS and community contexts.

Read less
In a world dominated by visual imagery, artists need the appropriate skills, reflexive approaches and attitudes of critical enquiry to work as effective professionals within their field. Read more
In a world dominated by visual imagery, artists need the appropriate skills, reflexive approaches and attitudes of critical enquiry to work as effective professionals within their field. In this personalised course of study you can either explore your own specialism of fine art practice, or develop your practice across a broader range of interdisciplinary activity. In a supportive and challenging environment, you will be encouraged to be independent and enterprising in the promotion of yourself and your art.

The course is available to study either full-time over 1 calendar year or part-time over 2 calendar years. As a part time student it is possible to undertake the course from a distance and alongside existing employment.

You will develop new ways of looking at your own practice. You will explore distinct areas of contemporary fine art while reviewing your own and fellow students’ work-in-progress. Through negotiation, you will develop a proposal for new work that will form the framework for further development.

The course is structured to enable you to fully realise your ambitions for your practice. A lecture programme and regular contact with teaching staff, along with seminars from prominent practitioners, will assist you towards the production of a significant body of new work along with a key research folio within which you reflectively evaluate your practice. Students have in the past exhibited their final work at public galleries such as Chapter Arts Centre, Elysium Gallery, West Wharf Gallery and Arcade Cardiff.

See the website http://courses.southwales.ac.uk/courses/934-ma-arts-practice-fine-art

What you will study

The MA Arts Practice runs over two calendar years part-time or one calendar year full time:

- Part One:
Artist Practitioner 1 Critique 40 credits

Choice of one, 20 credit module from the three MA common modules, which you will study alongside Postgraduate students from other courses across the Faculty of Creative Industries:
- Creative and Cultural Entrepreneurship
- Research and Practice in the Creative and Cultural Industries
- Research Paradigms

- MA Common Modules:
You will receive a strong grounding in research knowledge and skills, enterprise and innovation as part of the core MA Arts Practice course, but because everyone has different requirements of their postgraduate experience, you can choose to study one of the following three, 20 credit common modules. Each of these has a different focus, enabling you to select the module that will be most beneficial to you.

- Creative and Cultural Entrepreneurship:
This module aims to develop your knowledge of the methods to identify, develop and manage enterprise and innovation in the creative sector. It will then help you apply this to your own entrepreneurial project.

- Research and Practice in the Creative and Cultural Industries:
The focus of this module is on the development of research knowledge and skills, while also encouraging critical engagement with approaches to creative practice. You will also explore ideas, debates and issues in the creative and cultural industries.

- Research Paradigms:
This module focuses on research paradigms and their theoretical underpinnings. It also looks at key conceptual tools drawn from a wide range of subject areas relevant to postgraduate research in the creative industries.

Part Two
- Artist Practitioner 2 Context (40 credits)
- Professional Practice in the Arts (20 Credits)
- Artist Practitioner 3 Major Project (60 Credits) or Research Project –Learning Through Employment (60 Credits)

Learning and teaching methods

The MA Arts Practice course is delivered using specialist facilities in our post-graduate studios which are available seven days a week. The programme makes use of lectures, guest speakers, workshops, demonstrations and tutorials, field trips and visits. The contact time you receive will include weekly workshops or seminars and regular group and individual tutorials. In addition, you will be expected to develop your area of practice independently.

Modules are taught via a combination of group seminars and lectures, with individual one-to-one tutorials taking place regularly to support your progress.

We encourage students to discuss and provide feedback on each other’s work, and to approach assignments in groups where appropriate to develop essential skills in teamwork and project management.

Work Experience and Employment Prospects

The course acknowledges the value of experience and partnerships to enable employability. A key element of the course involves establishing partnerships, internships, residencies and placements with arts organisations and galleries, NHS Trusts, social services, charitable trusts, schools, colleges, care homes and commercial companies to develop these. The course also develops your professional skills and positions your practice within critical and contextual frameworks.

- Work/study placements:
In addition to developing your personal area of art practice, you will benefit from the chance to gain practical exhibiting and curatorial experience and to explore other avenues of professional practice.

- Career options:
Graduates of MA Arts Practice (Fine Art), can progress to careers in academia, a Fine Artist, Teacher, Artist in residence, Public Artist, Community Artist, Ceramicist, Exhibitions Organiser, Socially Engaged Practitioner, Prop maker, Technician, Technical Demonstrator, Craft Designer, Gallery Owner, Art Dealer, Art Conservator, Curator, Art Gallery Technician, Art Transporter, Arts Journalist, Critical Commentator, Web Designer, Arts Administrator, Set Designer, Model Maker, Illustrator, Mural Designer, Creative Director, Art Director, Arts Business Manager or Arts Publicist.

Assessment methods

Modules are largely assessed via practical outcomes, project proposals and research folios. Some modules make use of presentations and discussion of working methods and final outcomes.

We will give you regular verbal feedback to help you develop your understanding during each module.

Facilities

Studying art at the University of South Wales means you can work in dedicated studio spaces and base rooms at our Treforest campus. Within your specialism, you will be able to accomplish a high standard of work in our extensive specialist facilities: 3D workshop, print room, and ceramic studios all equipped with traditional and state of the art facilities, including digital suites and a fully equipped lighting studio for photography. Opportunities are available to extend your technical skills through tailored undergraduate modules.

Facilities at our nearby Cardiff campus range from photographic darkrooms and professional-level printers, to video and audio production studios. While facilities are available in the first instance to students studying related courses, they are available more widely to students wishing to explore cross-disciplinary and multi-media techniques. You will be able to borrow a full range of equipment including cameras, microphones and lighting.

Our specialist library offers a comprehensive range of textbooks, research journals and other physical and online resources, as well as an interlibrary loan service.

Teaching

Our MA Arts Practice staff are actively engaged in research, they embody a high level of knowledge, expertise and professional experience across a range of arts practices. Students on this course will benefit from interdisciplinary teaching delivered by a teaching team with extensive experience in exhibiting; project management; project realisation and practice within the public realm, NHS and community contexts.

Read less
Our Managing in the Creative Economy MA programme bridges the gap between creativity and business. This unique business degree programme enables you to combine specific creative practice and skills with a rigorous business education customised for the creative industries. Read more

Our Managing in the Creative Economy MA programme bridges the gap between creativity and business. This unique business degree programme enables you to combine specific creative practice and skills with a rigorous business education customised for the creative industries. It has been developed by academics and creative economy practitioners at Kingston Business School to help you respond to emerging trends and opportunities to realise value in the creative economy.

The programme is designed for individuals who come from creative industries, or have graduated in another discipline, including engineering and humanities. You will need a strong motivation to look beyond the traditional boundaries of your discipline, a readiness to participate in a start-up, and a willingness to work in a multi-disciplinary and experiential environment. You will work with students from all over the world and from different creative sectors. This diversity challenges you to think differently and exposes you to differing perspectives on creativity and business.

The programme now has nine generations of graduates and an active alumni network. Our graduates work in a range of creative and leadership positions ranging from freelance work in the creative sector, through to business ownership and employment in large innovative companies in the creative economy.

The creative industries are outpacing traditional industries both in the UK and the rest of the world. In the UK, the creative industries represent 5.2 per cent of the UK economy and provide 1.9 million jobs (DCMS, 2016). With the growth of the creative industries, the creative economy has grown at a rate faster than the whole of the UK economy, and was worth £133.3billion in 2014, accounting for 8.2 per cent of the UK economy (DCMS, 2016).

An increasing number of countries has now placed the creative industries at the heart of their economic development. This creates opportunities for professionals who understand the critical success factors for commercialising creativity, and are equipped with the mix of creative and business knowledge and skills.

What will you study?

This unique business degree programme enables you to combine specific creative practice and skills with a rigorous business education customised for the creative industries. By the end of the programme, you will be equipped with an in-depth knowledge, understanding and skills required to successfully realise value in the creative economy context.

You will specialise and become closely involved in the practice of a specific creative industry through engagement with a real business in the creative sector. This will be the opportunity to experience practical work and realise value in a chosen creative industry:

-Advertising and marketing

-Architecture

-Crafts

-Product design, graphic design and fashion design

-Film, TV, video, radio and photography

-IT, software and computer services

-Publishing

-Museums, galleries and libraries

-Music, performing arts and visual arts

(Creative Industries Classification, Department for Culture, Media & Sport, 2015)

You will also explore the process of collaborative creativity and examine what it takes to successfully develop ideas into innovative products, service and processes. The core of the programme is a real-life business experience; working in a team, you will start and run your own creative industries business in the supportive and risk-free environment provided by Kingston Business School. Our entrepreneurship experts will guide you through the process of designing and running your own creative business, which will help you develop your creative, managerial and entrepreneurial skills.

Assessment

Assessments are innovative and include a mix of individual and group project work and formal assessments, including essays, case studies, reports and presentations, role-play, games and simulations, plus the final Personal Research Project (maximum 15,000 words). You will study in a supportive environment where regular feedback is provided by both academics and professionals.

Why study the Managing in the Creative Economy MA?

The course gives you the opportunity to gain a range of knowledge, skills and experiences:

-Develop your creative, entrepreneurial, managerial and leadership skills – participate in development of a start-up, pitch to real industry experts at our "Dragons' Den", and engage with a variety of professionals and entrepreneurial businesses.

-Experience practical work in a chosen creative industry by engaging with a real creative industries business to develop your CV and your understanding of the creative sector.

-Learn the fundamentals of business management theory and practice from the specific perspective of the creative industries, in the diverse and evolving context of the creative economy.

-Experience regular visits from industry experts and entrepreneurs, field trips to entrepreneurial businesses and events such as Frieze Art Fair that connect the creative industry to the local community and enable you to build a valuable network.

Will this course suit me?

The Managing in the Creative Economy MA is designed for individuals who come from creative industries, or have graduated in another discipline, including engineering and humanities.

-Are you a creative practitioner? We will give you the opportunity to gain first-hand experience in creating a product or service and taking it to markets.

-Are you a manager in a creative business? We will help you understand the processes of managing creativity and innovation and enhance your skills as a creative leader with a good grasp of strategy and appropriate business and management skills.

-Have you got years of experience? If you have substantial experience, you could benefit from undertaking the personal research project that will help you to apply your new skills and expertise to your specialist sector and enable you to identify new opportunities in the creative economy.

Course structure

Below are the core modules for this course:

Modules

-Mapping the Creative Economy

-Design Thinking for Start-ups

-Experiencing the Creative Industries - Professional Practice

-Conducting Collaborative Creativity

-Managing a Creative Business

-Personal Research Project/Gaining Insights



Read less
At Reading, you can develop your creative practice with a rigorous introduction to business and entrepreneurship. This innovative programme will take your practical and theoretical skills to a new level and develop a critical understanding of entrepreneurship and management for the fast-evolving creative industries. Read more

At Reading, you can develop your creative practice with a rigorous introduction to business and entrepreneurship.

This innovative programme will take your practical and theoretical skills to a new level and develop a critical understanding of entrepreneurship and management for the fast-evolving creative industries. Whether you wish to set up a business, consider a career change, or advance into a managerial role, this is the course for you.

Why Henley?

  • Consistently maintain highest standards: Henley is in top 1% of business schools worldwide to hold accreditation from all three bodies in the UK, Europe and US
  • Excellent networking potential : 72,000 Henley alumni members in 150 countries
  • High calibre students: always oversubscribed, 1,000 ambitious new Masters students join Henley each year
  • Award winning campus: beautiful, green, 134 hectares, with state of the art facilities
  • World-leading faculty: widely published, frequently asked for expert comment by media and to speak at events
  • Henley is proud to be part of the University of Reading. The University is ranked within the top 200 universities worldwide (Times Higher Education World University Rankings 2016/17 and QS World University Rankings 2018) and 98% of the research is rated as being of international standard.

Course content

Module descriptions are correct for modules taught in the academic year 2017/18. Optional module listings are indicative, and may be subject to change.

Compulsory Modules

Optional Modules

In addition students must choose optional modules from the list below up to the value of 60 credits.

Careers and accreditations

Students studying creative enterprise normally progress in entrepreneurial careers, either pursuing start-up opportunities on their own, or taking leading managerial roles in creative firms.

Many students come from backgrounds with considerable exposure to small or medium-sized enterprises within the creative sector. On completion of the programme, they use content from the course in the implementation of creative and commercial strategies for these firms.



Read less
Why Surrey?. The MFA (Master of Fine Arts) Creative Writing programme at the University of Surrey is a two-year, full-time course of study that offers you a unique opportunity to enhance your creative, critical and professional skills as a writer. Read more

Why Surrey?

The MFA (Master of Fine Arts) Creative Writing programme at the University of Surrey is a two-year, full-time course of study that offers you a unique opportunity to enhance your creative, critical and professional skills as a writer.

Teaching is research-led, so you will be mentored by passionate, dynamic writers and academics with multidisciplinary expertise, as well as our Distinguished Writer in Residence and Poet in Residence.

Programme overview

Our MFA Creative Writing programme will expose you to the practical skills and challenges involved in a specific branch of creative practice (such as poetry or screenwriting) and offers the option to gain hands-on experience in a creative industry relevant to your own practice, to better prepare you for a wide variety of careers, including writing, publishing, communications, marketing, advertising, journalism, teaching, or to undertake a PhD.

In your first year, you will study alongside students in the MA programmes in Creative Writing and English Literature, where you will hone your research skills to produce critically informed creative work and deepen your practice as a writer.

To prepare for your second year, an academic advisor will offer guidance on choosing an appropriate form of Situated Professional Practice and your summative creative portfolio proposal.

During your second year you will work on producing an extended creative portfolio and critical commentary, as well as complete the Situated Professional Practice of your choice.

Programme structure

This programme is studied full-time over two academic years. It consists of eight taught modules, a professional placement, a critical commentary module and a creative portfolio project.

Example module listing

The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.

Educational aims of the programme

A Creative Writing MFA degree builds on the work of a traditional MA but distinguishes itself in a number of ways:

  • It is intensely craft and practice-based
  • It requires students’ immersion, for a part of their study time, in work environments that offer the opportunity to collaborate with established practitioners
  • It is firmly based on a model of reflection in practice and on practice
  • It requires teaching and learning that consistently balance theory and practice through well honed research skills
  • It aims at enhancing students’ own sense of creativity and professional ambitions in specific artistic fields

For students to achieve an optimum balance between theory, practice and critical reflection, MFAs traditionally last at least two academic years and this is common practice both in the UK and the USA.

The MFA in Creative Writing is designed to assist aspiring writers to:

  • Hone and develop their writing skills in prose fiction and/or poetry
  • Locate their work in historical and cultural context, and to familiarize themselves with the history of literary production
  • Equip themselves with the research and writing skills they will need to produce both critically informed prose or poetry and creative criticism
  • Reflect productively on both the creative process itself and the finished work that has resulted from it
  • Gain experience, through the Situated Professional Practice module, of the practical skills and creative challenges involved in a specific branch of creative practice (such as poetry, or writing for the stage) and/or of the workings and structure of a creative industry relevant to the student’s own practice

These educational aims accord neatly with the defining principles of Creative Writing as set out by the QAA’s NAWE Creative Writing Subject Benchmark Statement.

Academics and events

As a student on the MFA Creative Writing, you will benefit from the expertise of a vibrant, multidisciplinary group of academics and published authors.

You will also have access to a number of conferences, seminars and workshops hosted throughout the year. These events cover a range of topics to broaden your thinking in the fields of literature, language and linguistics, cultural studies and creative writing. Writers to have recently visited the University of Surrey include the novelist Monica Ali and the poet and critic Rod Mengham.

Each year’s cultural activities begin with a poetry lecture on campus by a visiting speaker and feature readings by students at the Guildford School of Acting.

The annual Surrey New Writers’ Festival – affiliated with the Creative Writing graduate programs at the University of Surrey – aims to engage with writing and creativity in dynamic ways, and involves readings, book signings, performances, panel discussions and talks by writers, thinkers, editors and literary agents.

The year’s activities culminate in the annual Morag Morris Poetry Festival, held in Guildford, which combines readings and performances by prominent, innovative and up-and-coming poets with the opportunity for Creative Writing students to present their own work in public.

This event is organised and hosted by our poet-in-residence – a position that is held by a different poet each year. English at Surrey also has a close relationship with English PEN, the charity dedicated to promoting literature and human rights.

Global opportunities

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.



Read less
Looking to further your career within the creative industries? Southampton Solent’s innovative and transmedia MA Critical Creative Practice programme focuses… Read more

Looking to further your career within the creative industries? Southampton Solent’s innovative and transmedia MA Critical Creative Practice programme focuses on individual student-centred learning and encourages critical creative practice across the creative spectrum, including art, design, fashion, photography, media arts and technology, helping to enhance employability and leaving you well-prepared to progress within your chosen creative field.

Taught by both creative industry professionals and academic practitioners, the course enables students to develop ideas and engage with the emerging material and digital cultures of the future, as well as the fast-changing demands of the creative industries and the associated changes to cultural production, consumption and interpretation.

The course structure is theory and practice based. The theoretical element consists of critical core units which reference visual culture, cultural theory, critical theory, art and design history, media culture, and material and digital culture. The interdisciplinary practice element relates to creative practice in the fields of art, design, fashion, photography, media arts and technology.

The integration of theory and practice is central to the course and learning is carefully structured through these interdependent units to develop a broad base of interrelated experiences, whilst also providing the opportunity to specialise through the professional practice unit and the choice of final dissertation or final project.

Students will also have the opportunity to take optional technician-supported introductory workshops which could include contemporary arts practice, photography, new media practice, 3D printing and laser cutting, material manipulation, performance, beauty and the body, film editing, and sound and image production. To complement their studies, students may be able to take part in international and European study exchange opportunities through the University's study abroad programmes.

The unique approach of this course can enhance employability, enabling students to progress into the workplace equipped with valuable critical thinking and practice-based skills required for working in the creative industries and forming innovative hybrid engagements. 

What does this course lead to?

Graduates from this course will be well-placed for careers in a broad range of the creative industries, such as art, design, media, film, fashion, photography, education, culture and heritage, and curation.

Who is this course for?

This course is well-suited to graduates who wish to further their career within the creative industries by gaining a solid understanding of creative practice and critical thinking across a broad range of disciplines.

What you will study

Units include:

  • Writing Criticism: critical and analytical frameworks
  • Critical Practice: cultures of convergence
  • Professional Practice 
  • Research Methods
  • Cultural Production, Curation and Consumption
  • Master's Project/Dissertation

Optional technician supported introductory workshops to be run in both semester one and two: Contemporary Arts Practice, Photography, New Media Practice, 3D Printing and Laser Cutting, Material Manipulation, Performance, Beauty and the Body, Film Editing, and Sound and Image Production.

Facilities

Solent University provides a well-resourced environment to help students develop and harness enterprising and entrepreneurial practice. Students on this course have access to dedicated studio space to develop their individual creative practice. Other creative spaces and equipment available to students include photographic studios, fashion studios, Mac rooms, recording equipment, editing suites, and performance and exhibition space.

Solent is also home to a 24-hour library, modern IT facilities and a range of expert learning and employability support services.

Industry links

The course team has strong industry links and students may have the opportunity to benefit from relevant industry contacts and academic links including John Hansard Gallery, V&A Museum, ICA Education and Events Programme, Solent Showcase exhibition space, Solent Research and Innovation Office, Solent Learning and Teaching Institute, Solent Material and Digital Archive.

Students may also benefit from internship and partnership collaboration opportunities with Hampshire Cultural Trust (Arts Council England-funded South East Museum Development Programme.

Students studying on courses within the School of Art, Design and Fashion may also have the opportunity to gain additional industry insights through an excellent guest speaker programme which has included internationally acclaimed artists, designers, photographers, curators, stylists, writers, musicians, performers, filmmakers and Oscar and Bafta award-winning film editors.



Read less
IN BRIEF. Develop your knowledge and skills relating to current debates and practices. Access to your own studio space and workshop support. Read more

IN BRIEF:

  • Develop your knowledge and skills relating to current debates and practices
  • Access to your own studio space and workshop support.
  • You'll be offered placements, residencies and exhibition opportunities with key arts organisations.
  • Part-time study option
  • Work/industrial placement opportunity
  • International students can apply

COURSE SUMMARY

This programme is open for September 2018 entry only.

This course is designed for students to refine their subject specific practice through creative industry experience, studio based experimentation, contextual research and critical dialogue to enable them to graduate as professional artists within the wider context of contemporary arts networks.  

During your time with us, you will be encouraged to undertake independent contextual and theoretical research that will improve your capacity for independent enquiry, creativity and professional practice. 

There are plenty of opportunities to get involved in group exhibitions, residencies and live projects as we work closely with key cultural organisations within the North West. These include; The Center for Chinese Contemporary Art, Hotbed Press, Islington Mill, Castlefield Gallery, International 3, Salford Museum & Art Gallery, Artworks, Mark Devereux Projects and HOME.

COURSE DETAILS

This course embraces a range and diversity of practices and aims to:

  • Provide the skills needed to professionalise careers through embedded creative placements and live projects with industry and community organisations.
  • Develop creative, critical, analytical and intellectual competencies appropriate to Masters level degree study, which is informed by current industry practice.
  • Develop advanced understanding of research methods in the context of contemporary art & design practice and to understand how the boundaries of knowledge are advanced through research.
  • Enhance your knowledge and understanding of professional, contextual and collaborative frameworks appropriate to their experiences and objectives by establishing intellectual debate to enable the articulation and dissemination of their propositions.
  • Assist you at an advanced level in developing, extending and applying complex strategies and approaches to the development of a professional studio practice, embedding the knowledge and skills required to establish you as an arts practitioners within the wider context of contemporary arts networks.

Contemporary Arts Practice is for committed artists who wish to develop their personal creative practice towards a higher, professional level. It actively encourages the pursuit of individual agendas for study and for personal choice of media/disciplines selected from the range of practices within the field.  

You will contextualise your work via rigorous analysis of relevant cultural discourses and reflective studio-based practice. Running alongside this, is the notion of embedding this practice within the creative industries through public exhibition as well as responses to opportunities provided by our industry partners. Studio production is emphasised as a key driver for practice development and there is a challenging seminar programme and a comprehensive schedule of visiting or visits to artists/art professionals and venues.

COURSE STRUCTURE

The programme structure consists of five modules, four of which are delivered within a collaborative framework allowing all students across the Masters in Art & Design programmes (Contemporary Fine Art, Socially Engaged Arts Practice and Design for Communication) opportunities to engage with your peers whilst working through individual assignments focused around each programme. The remaining one module is tailored to the specific programme learning outcomes.

For the full-time study option:Semester 1 - September to February

Semester 2 - February to June

Semester 3 - June to September

You will take five core modules and will study one day a week. Full-time students will have concentrated module delivery in both the morning and afternoon.

TEACHING

This course uses a range of teaching and learning settings including lectures, seminars/workshops, tutorials, situated learning (e.g. ‘live’ projects) and independent learning. The combination of these aims is to develop an environment that allows students to progressively take ownership and direction of their learning so that they may develop as independent, life-long learners. The process of Masters level study, relating to an individual and independent arts practice, is one of dense critical self-reflection; this is achieved by including self-directed projects where students have the opportunity to negotiate their learning and assessment requirements.

Indicative to the course are:

  • formal lectures
  • seminar presentations
  • workshops
  • critical analysis and independent learning

Award specific learning activities include exercises; team and peer-based learning, studio practice and critical seminar-events, site visits, visiting professionals, work placements, online activities and critical debates.

ASSESSMENT

Assessment methods used on the course include:

  • Practical projects (60%)
  • Reflective writing and essays (30%)
  • Group presentations/ exhibitions (10%)

You will be assessed throughout the course on:

  • Body of work and contextual research: e.g studio/portfolio/exhibition/publication/etc.
  • Reflective journals: log or sketch-book/statement/critical writing/seminar or other presentation*  

All submissions are comprised of a body of arts practice: ‘studio’ plus a contextual and critical research portfolio, and reflective logs/journals. As the ‘thesis’ is embedded in the practice there is no requirement for a separate, written dissertation - although you may elect to do so, if appropriate, by negotiation with final award Course Team. 

*You can negotiate the format of your submissions, in response to the needs and priorities within your practice, and in line with contemporary professional practice habits.

EMPLOYABILITY

Our graduates have exhibited successfully in a range of venues and biennales. Many graduates establish themselves within the local creative economy and develop a studio presence in the region and beyond.  

We encourage students to pursue an international profile and presence as soon as possible in support of their professional reputation. Opportunities via MediaCityUK will facilitate internationalisation of practice on individual terms.

Many of our students succeed through related professions in: education, community development, healthcare environments or enterprise. Some graduates prefer to apply their creative practice to commissioning, consultancy or other professional outcomes.

FACILITIES

This programme is based at New Adelphi on the main campus. The facilities include:

  • 2D & 3D Printing Facilities
  • 3D workshop
  • Fibre Workshop
  • Photography studio which includes a lighting set-up
  • Computer suites
  • Gallery Spaces

You will be inducted into the workshops, which covers how to use all the machinery, by trained workshop technicians.



Read less
Hone your collaborative, creative and business skills as a practising artist over an intensive 12-month programme. Victoria’s Master of Fine Arts (Creative Practice) is an industry-focused, practical degree that will help you build new contacts and networks in Wellington’s creative industries. Read more

Hone your collaborative, creative and business skills as a practising artist over an intensive 12-month programme. Victoria’s Master of Fine Arts (Creative Practice) is an industry-focused, practical degree that will help you build new contacts and networks in Wellington’s creative industries.

You'll take advantage of our capital city location and study at Victoria’s Kelburn campus—plus our film and music programmes get to use a new purpose-refitted facility at the Miramar Creative Centre.

Find out what the MFA (CP) offers you in your fine arts discipline.

Practice opportunities

The MFA (CP) includes a creative project in which you'll be mentored to complete work that showcases your abilities and encourages you to push boundaries in your field.

As part of the programme you'll also do an internship with an arts organisation. This will give you valuable work experience and provide you with all-important connections in your industry.

Broad approach

While your studies will be centred around your specialty area of design, film, music or theatre, you'll have opportunities to take an interdisciplinary approach to your work. If you're a Design, Music or Theatre student, you may also be able to take a complementary course from another fine arts discipline.

And, because all artists need some business knowledge, you'll complete a course in arts management and marketing as part of the programme.

Creative capital

Be part of Wellington's thriving and internationally recognised creative scene. During your studies you'll have opportunities to collaborate with your artistic peers and many of New Zealand's top arts professionals.

Community

Become part of a community of talented and like-minded students from across all of the fine arts disciplines. You'll work closely with other postgraduate students in the programme to share ideas and inspiration.

Workload

Full-time students can expect a workload of 40–45 hours a week for much of the year.



Read less
Hone your collaborative, creative and business skills as a practising artist over an intensive 12-month programme. Victoria’s Master of Fine Arts (Creative Practice) is an industry-focused, practical degree that will help you build new contacts and networks in Wellington’s creative industries. Read more

Hone your collaborative, creative and business skills as a practising artist over an intensive 12-month programme. Victoria’s Master of Fine Arts (Creative Practice) is an industry-focused, practical degree that will help you build new contacts and networks in Wellington’s creative industries.

You'll take advantage of our capital city location and study at Victoria’s Kelburn campus—plus our film and music programmes get to use a new purpose-refitted facility at the Miramar Creative Centre.

Available subjects

Practice opportunities

The MFA (CP) includes a creative project in which you'll be mentored to complete work that showcases your abilities and encourages you to push boundaries in your field.

As part of the programme you'll also do an internship with an arts organisation. This will give you valuable work experience and provide you with all-important connections in your industry.

Broad approach

While your studies will be centred around your specialty area of design, film, music or theatre, you'll have opportunities to take an interdisciplinary approach to your work. If you're a Design, Music or Theatre student, you may also be able to take a complementary course from another fine arts discipline.

And, because all artists need some business knowledge, you'll complete a course in arts management and marketing as part of the programme.

Creative capital

Be part of Wellington's thriving and internationally recognised creative scene. During your studies you'll have opportunities to collaborate with your artistic peers and many of New Zealand's top arts professionals.

Community

Become part of a community of talented and like-minded students from across all of the fine arts disciplines. You'll work closely with other postgraduate students in the programme to share ideas and inspiration.

Workload

Full-time students can expect a workload of 40–45 hours a week for much of the year.



Read less
Join our diverse academic community for a year of challenges and collaborations that will help you change and shape your career trajectory. Read more

About the course

Join our diverse academic community for a year of challenges and collaborations that will help you change and shape your career trajectory. Our students are driven designers, architects, visual and fine artists, performing artists, writers and others who work in the creative and cultural industries. Our faculty members are a lively mix of management specialists and creatives. All of us are passionate about doing work that has a real impact on society.

This unique programme is designed to advance your career as a solo practitioner, an entrepreneur or a member of a larger organisation within the creative economy. During the 12-month programme, you will:

- Build knowledge of business and management within the context of creative and cultural industries
- Gain new methods of learning, creating and managing to improve your career success and satisfaction – in socially responsible and meaningful ways
- Develop a diverse international network of peers, mentors and industry professionals across creative and cultural fields

The interdisciplinary MSc in Management and Entrepreneurship in the Creative Economy is built around the unique learning styles and goals of creative people like you. Designed and taught by Audencia Business School and The Glasgow School of Art’s Institute of Design Innovation (InDI), each module has been created specifically for this programme and integrates a creative mix of teaching and learning methods for both business and arts/design education.

Your programme combines the design approaches and studio (project-based) teaching methods of The Glasgow School of Art (GSA) with the internationally recognised, innovative, collaborative and responsible business education of Audencia Business School. The programme includes:

- Modules designed and taught collaboratively by faculty members at Audencia and the GSA
- Study in Nantes, France, a vibrant, modern city with old-world flair
- Two-week International Winter School in the inspirational Scottish Highlands
- Real-world consulting or research project
- Optional internship in a creative industry
- Collaborative and creative live projects both online and offline, studio (project-based) work and more

Audencia and the Glasgow School of Art

Rather than putting pre-existing management and creative classes on a schedule to form a so-called “new” programme, Audencia and the GSA’s Institute of Design Innovation have jointly designed a customised programme of classes and projects that respond to emerging trends, circumstances and opportunities within the global creative economy.

Every aspect of the programme combines learning in business and management with creative processes and people. The programme is located in Nantes, France, but the GSA faculty members teach one-third of the classes – and the two-week International Winter School, which brings international design schools together in Scotland, is a highlight of the programme.

Taught by Audencia

Shaping a creative career:

Shaping a creative career is an ongoing process which requires the will and ability to keep learning and re-skilling, a good knowledge of yourself and your values and a set of practical tools that will help to enhance your career. This module will mark the start of your journey to design a creative career that is sustainable, enjoyable and fulfilling.

Mapping the creative economy:

Learn what it really means to be a part of the creative economy. Mapping the Creative Economy offers an overview of the development of the cultural and creative industries and their relationship to the creative economy. You’ll learn about important challenges the industries face, such as technological, legal and economic – and the policies adopted to meet those challenges.

Reimagining management:

This module covers the following topics:

- Critical understanding of management
- Management of creativity and innovation
- Sustainable future

From idea to action: starting up:

Building skills to act as bridge between the worlds of creativity and business, you’ll work on a real-life collaborative project where you and your peers will be faced with design, managerial and entrepreneurial challenges.

You’ll learn by doing – working together with a diverse group of students, industry professionals and academic staff.

This experiential work will serve to further develop your career project, as well as help you internalise core entrepreneurial skills and knowledge in an authentic way. Here, you can make mistakes and learn from them in a safe environment.

Creating value in the creative economy:

To have knowledge is a good thing – but to spread it is even more rewarding. During this period, you will be asked to increase societal awareness of the possibilities within the creative economy. How you communicate your knowledge about the creative economy is up to you: conference, digital project, charity work, radio programme, etc. Get creative and begin establishing yourself as a subject-matter expert.

Teaching Methods

A variety of teaching methods are used for the above modules including:

Lectures
Seminars
Workshops
Coaching sessions
Personal blog/vlog
Learning journal
Visits to creative organisations
Group presentations
Debates
Case studies, videos, articles and academic papers
Data visualising techniques

For more information about the course content taught by Audencia please visit the website below

http://master.audencia.com/programmes-english/management-entrepreneurship-in-the-creative-economy/

Taught by GSA

Designing today:

Designing Today will help you develop a critical appreciation of the role of design practice and of designers as drivers of social, economic and organisational change. Your final project will be an exhibition. Topics include:

- Exploring service design and organisational design tools and methods
- Seeing social interaction as value creation
- Considering the contemporary role of designers in the area of management: industrial, experience and knowledge economies
- Understanding design not simply as the manufacture of industrial artefacts, but as an activity that creates value

Designing research:

Within Designing Research, you’ll develop an understanding of user-centred design as an ethnographic and engagement-led process of iterative development built upon collaborative working practices and creative refinement and resolution that responds to a variety of contexts. You’ll be evaluated via a project process journal and reflective writing. Components include:

- Formulating design enquiries (open-ended, empirically validated and discursive) that create the possibility of new knowledge and innovative practices or behaviours
- Methods: critical observation, ethnography, STEP analysis, future casting
- Participation in InDI’s two-week International Winter School to gain international, multi-disciplinary teaching and learning experience and develop a personal and professional network of practitioners, researchers and scholars

From idea to application:

From Idea to Application will help you internalise design practice as the material manifestation and evolution of value propositions. You’ll move from collaborative concept generation to product proposal, refinement and validation as understood across a variety of value regimes: manufacture and supply chain, branding and communication, user experience, etc.

The focus will be on the blend of industrial and digital artefacts, experience of use and the cognitive and narrative dimensions of innovative products and their collaborative production.

You’ll be evaluated through a project presentation and exhibition.

International winter school:

Led by the Institute of Design Innovation, the Winter School is an exemplar of our progressive teaching style and offers a method of research and learning that is both bespoke and distinct. The Winter School brings together international students and academics to fashion a new role for design in the exploration of a contemporary challenge during an intense two-week period.

Leading design academics and students from Köln International School of Design (KISD) and Copenhagen’s KADK (The Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts, Schools of Architecture, Design and Conservation) will join students and academics of the GSA, Audencia and other institutions from around the globe, forming an international network of diverse disciplines.

This component of the course offers a unique opportunity to examine current issues in a transcultural environment at the GSA’s stunning new campus in the Highlands and Islands of Scotland. Research and teaching carried out during the Winter School benefit organisations and communities as well as students.

Company experience

Research or consulting project

Your project is the culmination of your programme experience and the most ambitious expression of your individual motivation, creativity and ability to deliver. It can take the shape of a research project or a consulting project done during an optional internship. You will conduct secondary research, but great value will also be placed on your own primary research efforts.

For more information regarding the project please visit the website by clicking the link below

http://master.audencia.com/programmes-english/management-entrepreneurship-in-the-creative-economy/

Optional Internship

This component of the program is not required. However, we will encourage and support you in finding an internship that corresponds to your personal creative project and helps you shape your creative career.

Creative culture

The MSc in Management and Entrepreneurship in the Creative Economy is an alternative to an MBA or MFA programme. It offers you a uniquely creative culture with a degree from a respected and socially responsible business and management school.

Student profile

The students who will join this programme:

- Are creative people who are passionate about their area of expertise
- Want to explore fields in creative and cultural industries
- Love working with people from all over the world
- Know collaboration will be across fields and disciplines
- Understand the importance of business and management to the creative and cultural industries
- Are motivated by the ability of the creative and cultural industries to improve people's lives

Read less
This unique transdisciplinary course, open to people from all backgrounds, offers a special focus on contemporary social sculpture, ecological citizenship, connective eco-social practices, cultural activism, expanded art practices and transformative, creative action. Read more
This unique transdisciplinary course, open to people from all backgrounds, offers a special focus on contemporary social sculpture, ecological citizenship, connective eco-social practices, cultural activism, expanded art practices and transformative, creative action. It enables you to explore strategies of engagement, agency and the relationship between imagination and transformation. The programme also makes special reference to the proposals and legacies of Joseph Beuys, Schiller and Goethe, as well as other pedagogies of transformation such as Joanna Macy's and Paulo Freire's. It introduces theoretical and philosophical frameworks, with a special emphasis on phenomenology and experiential knowing; explores the relationship of social sculpture to ecological sustainability and offers practice-based research methodologies and creative strategies as the basis for developing individual and collaborative social sculpture processes, interdisciplinary expanded arts and reflective social practice.

The MA is Social Sculpture is, with the MA in Sound Arts, one of two taught postgraduate courses for socially-engaged artists, composers and transdisciplinary practitioners currently offered by the School of Arts at Oxford Brookes University. These MAs share two core modules in Creative Strategies and Phenomenological Methods of practice-based work. These shared modules enable cross-pollination and potential for collaboration between social sculpture and connective practice practitioners and those working in the field of sound arts. The MA in Social Sculpture is linked to the Social Sculpture Research Unit and is part of a thriving post-graduate research culture. There are opportunities to volunteer in social sculpture projects like University of the Trees: Lab for an Eco-Social Future.

Why choose this course?

The MA in Social Sculpture is an internationally renowned programme, running since 2006, linked to the Social Sculpture Research Unit at Oxford Brookes. A dedicated team of international specialists and emerging practitioners delivers innovative cross-disciplinary and socially-engaged creative practices that many students have described as 'life changing'.

-Participating in a community of dialogue and reflection: the unique 'Feedback Forum' approach which runs throughout the programme replaces the traditional art-school 'crit', offering a radical, supportive and creative form of feedback on your work. Another special feature is the regular MA Forum, in which students and staff meet to discuss creative practice in a supportive and stimulating environment. It also offers fortnightly individual tutorials and small group supervision.
-Coherent and unique teaching approach: a carefully sequenced set of modules enable you to uncover, explore and develop your own concerns within the field of contemporary social sculpture, creative cultural action and other interdisciplinary connective practices.
-Research culture and opportunities beyond the programme: MA Social Sculpture students are welcome to participate in 7 day-long 'PhD Social Sculpture Fora' per year. This is part of a stimulating environment where tutors, alumni, research fellows and student interns work closely together in the Social Sculpture Research Unit, and in projects like University of the Trees: Lab for New Knowledge and an Eco-Social Future.
-Based in the School of Arts' beautiful Richard Hamilton Building: situated very close to the city centre in a wooded landscape and arboretum, it offers excellent technical support; well-equipped workshops in video, photography, sound, artists books, printmaking and a variety of 3-D processes; a well- equipped library with materials appropriate to our programme and dedicated support for practice-based research students. There is bookable installation space, a group studio base and 24/7 studio access.
-Wider context: research and teaching programmes in the School of Arts are linked to some of Oxford’s leading cultural organisations such as Modern Art Oxford, and the annual Social Sculpture Festival of MA student work takes place in an around Oxford, using accessible local venues as a hub. You are encouraged to make links with local communities and social and ecological organisations as well as being able to design certain projects related to their home contexts. Once you graduate from the programme you have the opportunity to participate in the annual Social Sculpture Platform which is open to the public.

This course in detail

MA in Social Sculpture students take five compulsory modules - Creative Strategies 1 and 2, Social Sculpture 1 and 2 and a Major Project - in which they develop their particular concerns.

PGDip in Social Sculpture students take four compulsory modules - Creative Strategies 1 and 2 and Social Sculpture 1 and 2.

Teaching and learning

Our teaching methods include:
-Seminars and lectures on interdisciplinary creative practice, practice-based research, phenomenological root methodologies and social sculpture.
-Team teaching in group seminars, involving research methodologies for practice-based research.
-Feedback from staff and students during group feedback sessions, in which you receive constructive feedback on your work.
-Staff-led group discussions arising out of practical presentations.
-Regular individual tutorials that address your research concerns.
-Introductions to creative strategies for generating and making practice-based social sculpture and other forms of connective cultural action and reflective social practice.
-Introductions to the School of Arts technical facilities.
-Induction sessions with subject librarians.

The learning methods include:
-Regular forums where staff and students formulate and articulate responses to work.
-Social sculpture and interdisciplinary creative practice presentations.
-Presentations of practical research.
-The researching and writing of reflective reports, assignments and self-evaluations.
-Private research and study.
-Presentations to peers and group feedback via the 'feedback forum' approach to 'reception theory' in practice.

Careers and professional development

In this unique programme graduates develop excellent creative capacities and new ways of thinking that enable them to identify and develop interdisciplinary arenas and contexts for public engagement with specific communities, organisations and other constituencies.

A strong aspect of the programme is the way it enables graduates to return to existing professions and contexts in new ways: as interdisciplinary practitioners with insightful understandings, greatly enhanced imaginal capacities and knowledge of new forms of reflective and interdisciplinary connective practice.

Many Social Sculpture graduates continue as social sculpture practitioners or eco-cultural activists, whilst others develop careers related to their knowledge, expertise or interests, for example within organisational change, social enterprise programmes, festival management, tertiary education, agro-ecology, arts administration; arts and music teaching, medical humanities, educators and practitioners in arts for health, promoting ecological citizenship, community cross artform work and as sustainability activists.

These diverse career possibilities have much to do with the close relationship between the content and the pedagogic approaches offered on the MA Social Sculpture programme with its focus on experiential knowing, active citizenship and connective practices.

Combining the rigour of a traditional academic programme with innovative practical and vocational components makes graduates well placed for roles as practitioners as well as for further research in territory that includes the arts and sustainability, ecological citizenship, individual and community change processes, cultural and ecological activism and the field of contemporary social sculpture and connective aesthetics.

The methodologies taught also enable new forms of interdisciplinary and postdisciplinary practice and research.

Read less
Delivered by expert practitioners and aimed at graduates from various disciplines and industry professionals wishing to broaden their skills across film, digital, media, photography, writing and performance. Read more
Delivered by expert practitioners and aimed at graduates from various disciplines and industry professionals wishing to broaden their skills across film, digital, media, photography, writing and performance. This programme equips you for a creative media career, offering network contacts, an impressive portfolio and essential practical skills.

About the programme

This unique programme will help you explore and consolidate your creative identity, working with others from diverse creative backgrounds to nurture your creative potential and create new opportunities to help sustain your career.

Informed by research excellence and expert professional practice, the programme will bring out your creative potential, while providing the critical focus essential to respond flexibly to new opportunities and sustain your career.

Practical experience

The Pg Diploma and Masters programmes offer work-related learning through the module Creative Skills 2, either as a placement in the screen and broadcast industries and/or work on a professional project.

Your learning

There are three stages:

- Postgraduate Certificate (60 credits):
Core modules (20 credits each at SCQF 11 unless otherwise noted) include:
• Creative Skills 1 – introducing new creative skill areas in short creative projects

• Critical Media Contexts – an essential overview of contemporary critical debate

• Creative Media Practice – intensive CPD workshops with reflective analysis

Students choose one option including:
• Motion Graphics (SCQF 10)
• Producing for Film & Television (SCQF 10)
• Producing Factual Formats (SCQF 10)
• Writing the One Act Play (SCQF 10)
• Music Film and Sound Aesthetics (SCQF 10)
• Podcasting and New Media (SCQF 10)

- Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits):
• Creative Skills 2 – a placement in the screen and broadcast industries and/or work on a professional project

• Collaborative Project – a previous venture won the 2013 BAFTA New Talent Award

• Research: Critical Development – introduction to research methods associated with creative practice and preparation of a creative research proposal

- MA (180 credits):
A substantial practice-led research project, e.g. production of a feature screenplay, a documentary or digital media project. Previous successful Masters creative projects include an e-publishing project for fairy stories which was subsequently funded by Creative Scotland.

Our Careers Adviser says

Graduates have found roles such as independent producer; scriptwriter; TV development producer; documentary maker; and digital media producer/ developer. For graduates of design for the moving image, careers include artist filmmaker and motion graphics designer.

Financial support

In session 2015/16 the Postgraduate Diploma element of this programme carried SAAS postgraduate loan funding for eligible students. Check http://www.saas.gov.uk for 2016/17 loan info.

Great facilities

Accreditation by Creative Skillset, the Sector Skills Council for Creative Media, has led to the creation of the UWS Creative Media Academy. Operating across our campuses and through the UWS Glasgow Creative Enterprise Cluster, the Academy offers:
• A wide range of practice-led programmes

• First-rate facilities including an £81million investment in our new campus at Ayr

• Teaching in skills which are in demand by the creative industries

Research excellence

Our vibrant research culture spans a wide range of areas, including:
• providing advice on the cultural and educational aspects of the Olympic and Commonwealth Games

• student and industry collaboration on the creation of transmedia projects that offer real research and development potential and generate new online experiences for mobile and tablet users

• practice-led research in popular music, theatre, broadcasting and the visual arts

• new media art, ethics and emerging media technologies

• collaboration with leading arts festivals and venues including CCA Glasgow and Film City Glasgow

• creative writing for fiction, film, theatre and TV, working with leading broadcasters and arts companies

• cultural policy, cultural practice and cultural economy in Scotland and Europe, from small island communities to large urban areas

• participatory arts and media practice, community regeneration and public art

• journalism, politics and media representation

• the future of journalism and social media

• independent film and new media

Read less
Designed primarily for experienced dance professionals, in association with Siobhan Davies Dance and Independent Dance, this unique programme enables you to develop your artistic voice. Read more
Designed primarily for experienced dance professionals, in association with Siobhan Davies Dance and Independent Dance, this unique programme enables you to develop your artistic voice.

Visit the website: http://www.trinitylaban.ac.uk/study/dance/postgraduate-programmes/ma-mfa-creative-practice-dance-professional-practice

We offer two routes of study through the MA and MFA:

- Transdisciplinary
- Dance Professional Practice

Course detail

The MA Creative Practice is a one year (full-time) or two year (part-time) taught programme, culminating in an independent research project.

The MFA Creative Practice is a two year full-time programme. It shares the first year taught programme with the MA. An extended independent project forms the second year, providing time for in-depth research and realisation of a substantial body of work. MFA applicants should demonstrate their capacity to undertake self-directed research and propose a project that warrants the depth and breadth afforded by an extended time frame.

The choice between an MA or an MFA programme of study will depend upon prior experience and future aspirations.

Purpose

Dance Professional Practice is for experienced professionals in the fields of dance, performing arts or humanities, such as dancers, choreographers, academics, teachers and somatic practitioners.

Format

Davies Dance and Independent Dance, the Dance Professional Practice focus enables experienced practitioners to develop their artistic practice in a stimulating environment of intellectual and creative inquiry. We support mid-career artists to: reflect on their body of professional experience and its role in their ongoing learning; engage in intensive studio-based experiences with significant artists and a skilled peer group; deepen their own practice as performers/makers; develop their understanding of a range of research methodologies within the arts; and pursue their own area of artistic interest.

For MA students, the year culminates in an independent research project, allowing you to reflect on dance practice in its many forms, and the social, cultural, aesthetic and political contexts in which performance practice is located.

The MFA Extended Project is an extensive, self-directed module during which you consolidate your independent creative practice. You will create and present a substantial body of work that evidences your capacity to research, develop, realise and identify appropriate modes of presentation for your ideas.

Career progression

All graduates use their creative research findings to inform their practice in whichever professional setting they enter. Some graduates go on to work freelance, creating and performing their own work. Some graduates go on to become dance industry professionals, taking roles within arts management, and others go on to further study.

FACILITIES

• Thirteen purpose built dance studios with the latest sprung flooring and large windows
• Laban Library and Archive
• Laban Theatre
• Bonnie Bird Theatre
• Cafe and Bar

THE FACULTY OF DANCE

Trinity Laban's Faculty of Dance is one of Europe's leading centres for the training of professional contemporary dance artists. Based in the RIBA-award winning Laban Building, in the heart of South East London's thriving arts community, Trinity Laban's Faculty of Dance is a creative and cosmopolitan community of performers, choreographers, teachers, designers and researchers, and is acknowledged internationally as a leader in the contemporary arts.

With one of the largest teams of specialist contemporary dance artist teachers in the world, our world class facilities include a 300 seat theatre, studio theatre and outdoor theatre, 13 purpose built dance studios and the largest dance library and archive in Europe.

We believe that contemporary dance has a vital part to play in everyone's lives. Our unique mix of energy and creativity advances the dance art form and fuels the dance world, connecting people to the exhilarating possibilities that dance offers. Our links with the professional dance world, local communities and other arts organisations ensure that an experience at Trinity Laban will be a rich and rewarding one.

How to apply: http://www.trinitylaban.ac.uk/study/how-to-apply/music-applications

Read less
The MA in Arts Management, Policy and Practice enables students to develop their knowledge and understanding of the history, theory and practice of arts management; to gain an insight into the range of professional opportunities in the creative and cultural sector; and to acquire direct experience of the many areas of arts management. Read more

The MA in Arts Management, Policy and Practice enables students to develop their knowledge and understanding of the history, theory and practice of arts management; to gain an insight into the range of professional opportunities in the creative and cultural sector; and to acquire direct experience of the many areas of arts management. The programme has a strong practical, hands-on element. At the same time it offers a solid theoretical grounding, exploring cultural policy in its historical context and encouraging critical engagement with the philosophical, political, social and economic imperatives informing contemporary practice. Above all, we aim to produce pioneers rather than bureaucrats.

Lecturers from the Centre for Arts Management teach the MA with considerable input from arts professionals including staff from the Martin Harris Centre, Contact Theatre, the Royal Exchange, Whitworth Art Gallery and many other local cultural organisations. We also work closely with our sister programme, the highly regarded MA in Art Gallery and Museum Studies.

Aims

The programme is designed to serve as an entry-level qualification for recent graduates as well as offering professional development for mid-career practitioners. It offers flexibility and opportunities for specialisation, while ensuring a thorough grounding in essential principles and methodology. It provides a solid foundation for careers in different areas of the arts and creative industries, and caters for arts practitioners as well as aspiring managers.

Special features

The siting of the programme close to a range of leading arts venues offers a unique opportunity for students to engage with the practical considerations of arts management. The Martin Harris Centre is a hub of cutting edge research and interdisciplinary investigation: in addition to the Cosmo Rodewald Concert Hall and John Thaw Theatre, it is home to the Tipp Centre (Theatre in Prisons and Probation), the Centre for Screen Studies, Centre for Applied Theatre Research, Manchester Theatre in Sound (MANTIS), Manchester Centre for Music in Culture (MC2), and the NOVARS Research Centre for Electroacoustic Composition, Performance and Sound-Art. Other cultural organisations based at the university - Manchester Academy, Contact Theatre, Manchester Museum and the Whitworth Art Gallery - are only a few minutes' walk away.

The programme also benefits from the exceptionally rich grouping of arts-based institutions and agencies in Manchester and the North West - an area celebrated for containing more theatres than any other region outside London and now hosting the BBC at the new Media City at Salford Quays. Liverpool (European Capital of Culture 2008), Leeds and Sheffield are all within easy reach. A wide range of regional arts venues and organisations contribute to the programme by providing guest lecturers, site visits and work placements.

The programme is based within the School or Arts, Languages and Cultures. The core of the School's interest is the field of human cultures, beliefs and institutions. Its work embraces the material, visual, creative and performative dimensions of culture, and as such fosters a rich interdisciplinary culture led by world-renowned scholars with a diversity of expertise, from analysts to creative artists, from historians of ideas to cultural theorists. We work particularly closely with staff from the highly-rated departments of Music and Drama.

Coursework and assessment

All students take two core modules (Arts Management: Principles and Practice, and Cultural Policy) and write a dissertation (15,000 words, or for a practice-based dissertation 8,000-10,000 words plus project documentation). The remaining credits (two or three additional modules) are taken from a range of options including:

  • Work Placement in an arts organisation
  • Business Strategies for the Arts (Marketing, Finance and Business Planning)
  • Creative Learning: Arts, Heritage and Education
  • Professional Practice Live Project
  • Subject to availability, modules may also be selected from the MA in Art Gallery and Museum Studies or from elsewhere in the school.

All modules include a programme of guest lectures and/or practical seminars by experienced professionals based in cultural institutions in and around Manchester. The programme also features visits to a selection of key sites and venues in the North West.

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 

Career opportunities

This programme prepares graduates for a diverse range of career opportunities as managers, administrators, policy-makers or practitioners in various branches of the arts and cultural and creative industries. Opportunities exist in the public, private, and voluntary sectors; in theatres, opera houses, concert halls, arts centres, museums and galleries, and the media; with orchestras, theatre companies, dance companies, etc.; or with the Arts Council, British Council, Local Authority, Tourist Board and various funding bodies. Discrete posts include: programming manager; marketing director; education director; development or outreach officer; tour organiser; promoter, agent or artist's manager; website, database or IT manager; producer; consultant or market researcher; fundraiser; community artist; freelance workshop leader. Graduates may also find work in related areas such as teaching, social and educational work. Some students go on to pursue further study and research at doctoral level.



Read less

Show 10 15 30 per page



Cookie Policy    X