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Masters Degrees (Coursework)

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Get a degree that's recognised worldwide and contribute to knowledge in your field. A Master of Science (MSc) will develop your technical, laboratory and academic writing skills to prepare you for a career in science. Read more

Get a degree that's recognised worldwide and contribute to knowledge in your field. A Master of Science (MSc) will develop your technical, laboratory and academic writing skills to prepare you for a career in science.

The MSc will take you between two and two and half years of full-time study or up to four years part time. In the first year of your MSc you'll take several courses related to your specialist subject area. Next, you'll carry out in-depth supervised research for 12–15 months and write a thesis. During your studies you might also author publications for peer-reviewed journals.

To do an MSc you'll need a Bachelor's degree in an appropriate field, with an average grade of B+ or higher in your subject area. You may also be able to qualify for entry if you have appropriate work or other experience.

Range of Master's programmes

Choose to complete this Master's programme or one of the specialist science Master's programmes. Most specialist programmes are 180 points and don't require a thesis.

If you have already done a BSc(Hons) you can apply to go directly into the 120-point MSc by thesis.

Available subjects

Workload

If you are studying full time, you can expect a workload of 40–45 hours a week for much of the year. Part-time students doing two courses per trimester will need to do around 20–23 hours of work a week. Make sure you take this into account if you are working.



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Make the move into higher-level study with a degree that combines the variety and structure of classroom-based courses with opportunities for research. Read more

Make the move into higher-level study with a degree that combines the variety and structure of classroom-based courses with opportunities for research.

You'll be able to expand your expertise in one of nine subjects while taking advantage of the flexibility to study courses across a range of commerce disciplines.

Build on your Bachelor's degree to enhance your career options in business, management and government with advanced study at Victoria Business School.

International recognition

Victoria Business School is among a small group of business schools worldwide that hold the 'Triple Crown' of international business education accreditations. You can be confident your qualification will stand up against the best around the world.

Find out more about university accreditations and what they mean for you.

Available subjects

Workload

If you are studying full time, you can expect a workload of 40–45 hours a week for much of the year. Part-time students doing two courses per trimester will need to do around 24–28 hours of work a week. Make sure you take this into account if you are working full time.

You can estimate your workload by adding up the number of points you'll be doing. One point is roughly equal to 10–12 hours work.

Duration

This 180-point programme will take you three to four trimesters of full-time study. If you’re studying part time it usually takes six trimesters.



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Today more than ever, quantitative skills form an essential basis for successful careers in ecology, conservation, and animal and human health. Read more

Today more than ever, quantitative skills form an essential basis for successful careers in ecology, conservation, and animal and human health. This Masters programme provides specific training in data collection, modelling and statistical analyses as well as generic research skills. It is offered by the Institute of Biodiversity, Animal Health and Comparative Medicine (IBAHCM), a grouping of top researchers who focus on combining field data with computational and genetic approaches to solve applied problems in epidemiology and conservation.

Why this programme

  • This programme encompasses key skills in monitoring and assessing biodiversity critical for understanding the impacts of environmental change.
  • It covers quantitative analyses of ecological and epidemiological data critical for animal health and conservation.
  • You will have the opportunity to base your independent research projects at the university field station on Loch Lomond (for freshwater or terrestrial-based projects); Millport field station on the Isle of Cumbrae (for marine projects); or Cochno Farm and Research Centre in Glasgow (for research based on farm animals). We will also assist you to gain research project placements in zoos or environmental consulting firms whenever possible.
  • The uniqueness of the programme is the opportunity to gain core skills and knowledge across a wide range of subjects, which will enhance future career opportunities, including entrance into competitive PhD programmes. For example, there are identification based programmes offered elsewhere, but most others do not combine practical field skills with molecular techniques, advanced informatics for assessing biodiversity based on molecular markers, as well as advanced statistics and modelling. Other courses in epidemiology are rarely ecologically focused; the specialty in IBAHCM is understanding disease ecology, in the context of both animal conservation and implications for human public health.
  • You will be taught by research-active staff using the latest approaches in quantitative methods, sequence analysis, and practical approaches to assessing biodiversity, and you will have opportunities to actively participate in internationally recognised research. Some examples of recent publications lead by students in the programme:
  • Blackburn, S., Hopcraft, J. G. C., Ogutu, J. O., Matthiopoulos, J. and Frank, L. (2016), Human-wildlife conflict, benefit sharing and the survival of lions in pastoralist community-based conservancies. J Appl Ecol. doi:10.1111/1365-2664.12632. 
  • Rysava, K., McGill, R. A. R., Matthiopoulos, J., and Hopcraft, J. G. C. (2016) Re-constructing nutritional history of Serengeti wildebeest from stable isotopes in tail hair: seasonal starvation patterns in an obligate grazer. Rapid Commun. Mass Spectrom., 30:1461-1468. doi: 10.1002/rcm.7572.
  • Ferguson, E.A., Hampson, K., Cleaveland, S., Consunji, R., Deray, R., Friar, J., Haydon, D. T., Jimenez, J., Pancipane, M. and Townsend, S.E., 2015. Heterogeneity in the spread and control of infectious disease; consequences for the elimination of canine rabies. Scientific Reports, 5, p. 18232. doi: 10.1038/srep18232.
  • A unique strength of the University of Glasgow for many years has been the strong ties between veterinarians and ecologists, which has now been formalised in the formation of the IBAHCM. This direct linking is rare but offers unique opportunities to provide training that spans both fundamental and applied research.

Programme structure

The programme provides a strong grounding in scientific writing and communication, statistical analysis, and experimental design. It is designed for flexibility, to enable you to customise a portfolio of courses suited to your particular interests.

You can choose from a range of specialised options that encompass key skills in

  • monitoring and assessing biodiversity – critical for understanding the impacts of environmental change
  • quantitative analyses of ecological and epidemiological data – critical for animal health and conservation
  • ethics and legislative policy – critical for promoting humane treatment of both captive and wild animals.

A total of 180 credits are required, with 50 flexible credits in the second term. See the accompanying detailed course descriptions found in the IBAHCM Masters Programme Overview. When selecting options, please email the relevant course coordinator as well as registering using MyCampus.

Term 1: Core courses (assessment in %)

  • Key research skills (scientific writing, introduction to R, introduction to linear models; advanced linear models, experimental design). Coursework – 60%; scientific report – 40%
  • Spatial Ecology and Biodiversity. Coursework – 60%; assignment – 40%

Term 2: Core courses

  • Programming in R. Coursework – 50%; assignment – 50%

Term 2: Optional courses

  • Biodiversity Informatics. Coursework – 25%; assignment – 75%
  • GIS for Ecologists. Set exercise – 60%; critical review – 40%
  • Infectious Disease Ecology & the Dynamics of Emerging Disease. Coursework – 50%; assignment – 50%
  • Introduction to Bayesian Statistics. Coursework – 50% assignment – 50%
  • Invertebrate Identification. Coursework – 20%; class test – 40%; assignment – 40%
  • Molecular Analyses for Biodiversity and Conservation. Coursework – 40%; assignment – 60%
  • Molecular Epidemiology & Phylodynamics. Coursework – 40%; assignment – 60%
  • Multi-species Models. Coursework – 50%; assignment – 50%
  • Single-species Population Models. Coursework – 30%; assignment – 70%
  • Vertebrate Identification. Coursework – 20%; class test – 40%; assignment – 40%
  • Human Dimensions of Conservation*. Press statement – 50%; assignment – 50%
  • Principles of Conservation Ecology*. Coursework – 30%; set exercise – 15%; poster – 55%
  • Protected Area Management*. Coursework – 50%; assignment – 50%
  • Animal Ethics. Oral presentation – 50%; reflective essay – 50%
  • Biology of Suffering. Essay – 100%
  • Care of Captive Animals. Report – 100%
  • Enrichment of Animals in Captive Environments. Essay – 100%
  • Legislation & Societal Issues. Position paper – 50%; press release – 50%
  • Welfare Assessment. Critical essay – 100%

Term 3: Core MSc Component

  • Research project. Research proposal – 25%; project report – 60%; supervisor’s assessment –15%

Career prospects

You will gain core skills and knowledge across a wide range of subjects that will enhance your selection chances for competitive PhD programmes. In addition to academic options, career opportunities include roles in zoos, environmental consultancies, government agencies, ecotourism and conservation biology, and veterinary or public health epidemiology.



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The Master of Research (MRes) programme in Ecology and Environmental Biology provides research training for students wishing to enter a PhD programme or seeking a career in ecological science. Read more

The Master of Research (MRes) programme in Ecology and Environmental Biology provides research training for students wishing to enter a PhD programme or seeking a career in ecological science.

Why this programme

This programme consists of a taught component, and a laboratory or field based research project. The taught component consists of core research skills and specialist options in analytical and sampling techniques. The main part of the degree is devoted to experience of research techniques. You will carry out an extended research project chosen to reflect your interests and the skills you wish to acquire. 

A total of 180 credits are required, with 30 flexible credits in the first term. See the accompanying detailed course descriptions found in the IBAHCM Masters Programme Overview. When selecting options, please email the relevant course coordinator as well as registering using MyCampus.

Term 1: Core courses (assessment in %)                             

Key Research Skills (scientific writing, introduction to R, introduction to linear models; advanced linear models, experimental design). Coursework – 60%; scientific report – 40%

 Term 1: Optional courses                        

  • Spatial Ecology and Biodiversity**. Coursework – 60%; assignment – 40%
  • Programming in R (*prerequisite B grade in KRS R component). Coursework – 50%; assignment – 50%
  • Biodiversity Informatics. Coursework – 25%; assignment – 75%
  • GIS for Ecologists. Set exercise – 60%; critical review – 40%
  • Infectious Disease Ecology & the Dynamics of Emerging Disease*. Coursework – 50%; assignment – 50%
  • Introduction to Bayesian Statistics*. Coursework – 50%; assignment – 50%
  • Invertebrate Identification. Coursework – 20%; class test – 40%; assignment – 40%
  • Molecular Analyses for Biodiversity and Conservation. Coursework – 40%; assignment – 60%
  • Molecular Epidemiology & Phylodynamics. Coursework – 40%; assignment – 60%
  • Multi-species Models**. Coursework – 50%; Assignment – 50%
  • Single-species Population Models. Coursework – 30%; assignment – 70%
  • Vertebrate Identification. Coursework – 20%; class test – 40%; assignment – 40%
  • Human Dimensions of Conservation**. Press statement – 50%; assignment – 50%
  • Principles of Conservation Ecology**. Coursework – 30%; set exercise – 15%; poster – 55%
  • Protected Area Management**. Coursework – 50%; assignment – 50%

Projects:                       

  • MRes Ecology and Environmental Biology Project 1 (terms 1 + 2). Oral presentation – 20%; project report– 80%
  • MRes Ecology and Environmental Biology Project 2 (Summer). Poster – 15%; supervisor’s assessment – 15%; project report– 70%

Career prospects

The programme will provide an excellent training for those who wish to apply for a PhD programme or enter ecological consultancy or conservation sectors. It also serves as an excellent introduction to research in the UK for overseas students.



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Electrical and Electronic Engineering is characterised by the need for continuing education and training. Today, most Electrical and Electronic Engineers require more than is delivered in a conventional four-year undergraduate programme. Read more
Electrical and Electronic Engineering is characterised by the need for continuing education and training. Today, most Electrical and Electronic Engineers require more than is delivered in a conventional four-year undergraduate programme. The aim of the MEngSc (Electrical and Electronic Engineering) programme is to provide advanced coursework with options for a research element or industrial element, and additional professional development coursework. Students choose from a range of courses in Analogue, Mixed Signal, and RF Integrated Circuit Design, VLSI Architectures, Intelligent Sensors and Wireless Sensor Networks, Wireless Communications, Robotics and Mechatronics, Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Drives, Optoelectronics, Adaptive Signal Processing and Advanced Control. A range of electives for the coursework-only stream includes modules in Computer Architecture, Biomedical Design, Microsystems, Nanoelectronics, Innovation, Commercialisation, and Entrepreneurship

Visit the website: http://www.ucc.ie/en/ckr47/

Course Details

The MEngSc (EEE) has three Streams which include coursework only, coursework with a research project, or coursework with an industrial placement. Students following Stream 1 take course modules to the value of 60 credits and carry out a Minor Research Project to the value of 30 credits. Students following Stream 2 take course modules to the value of 60 credits and carry out an Industrial Placement to the value of 30 credits. Students following Stream 3 take course modules to the value of 90 credits, up to 20 credits of which can be in topics such as business, law, and innovation.

Format

In all Streams, students take five core modules from the following range of courses: Advanced Analogue and Mixed Signal Integrated Circuit Design, Advanced RF Integrated Circuit Design, Advanced VLSI Architectures, Intelligent Sensors and Wireless Sensor Networks, Wireless Communications, Robotics and Mechatronics, Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Drives, Optoelectronics, and Adaptive Signal Processing and Advanced Control. In addition, students following Stream 1 (Research Project) and Stream 2 (Industry Placement) carry out a Research Report. Following successful completion of the coursework and Research Report, students in Streams 1 and 2 carry out a research project or industry placement over the summer months.

Students who choose the coursework-only option, Stream 3, take additional courses in lieu of the project or placement. These can be chosen from a range of electives that includes modules in Computer Architecture, Biomedical Design, Microsystems, Nanoelectronics, Innovation, Commercialisation, and Entrepreneurship.

Assessment

Part I consists of coursework modules and mini-project to the value of 60 credits. These are assessed using a combination of written examinations and continuous assessment. Successful completion of the initial tranche of coursework modules qualifies the student to progress to Part II, the research project, industrial placement, or additional coursework to the value of 30 credits in the cases of Streams 1, 2, and 3, respectively.

Placement and Study Abroad Information

For students following Streams 1 and 2, research projects and industrial placements are normally in Ireland. Where the opportunity arises, a research project or work placement may be carried out outside Ireland.

Careers

MEngSc (Electrical and Electronic Engineering) graduates will have a competitive advantage in the jobs market by virtue of having completed advanced coursework in Electrical and Electronic Engineering and, in the case of Streams 1 and 2, having completed a significant research project or work placement.

How to apply: http://www.ucc.ie/en/study/postgrad/how/

Funding and Scholarships

Information regarding funding and available scholarships can be found here: https://www.ucc.ie/en/cblgradschool/current/fundingandfinance/fundingscholarships/

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About the program. The Master of Arts (Coursework) program offers an opportunity for graduates to continue studies in a particular area, or branch out into other areas. Read more

About the program

The Master of Arts (Coursework) program offers an opportunity for graduates to continue studies in a particular area, or branch out into other areas. Graduates of this program will possess a strong and broad set of skills essential to all professions, no matter what their chosen career. A range of majors are available in the program allowing students to tailor their qualifications to suit their specific career interests.

Specialise your knowledge

Growth in corporate organisations require graduates to obtain specialist knowledge. The Master of Arts (Coursework) allows graduates to tailor their studies to specialisations of interest. Graduates can choose from an array of disciplines, from Criminology, to International Relations and Communication. This flexible approach ensures graduates enhance their knowledge and specific skill set in an area of interest.

Flexibility

Students in the Master of Arts (Coursework) program are required to complete a major dissertation or a minor dissertation. Students can choose from a variety of foundation subjects that will support their dissertation. This flexibility ensure students are able to focus on an area of interest and graduate with desired specialist knowledge.

Structure & subjects

View the Master of Arts (Coursework) - Program Structure and Sequencing

The Master of Arts (Coursework) comprises 12 subjects, as follows:

Core subjects (2)

Foundation subjects (6)

Students can choose any six (6) subjects from the following list:

Dissertation/Elective option (4)

Students must choose one (1) of the following suites of subjects:

Or

  • Minor Dissertation/Portfolio A (HUMR71-705)
  • Minor Dissertation/Portfolio B (HUMR71-706)
  • Plus two (2) elective subjects from the Faculty of Society & Design list of available postgraduate subjects. (Internship and further Minor Dissertation/Portfolio subjects are available as elective subject options).

Teaching methodology

Bond University’s teaching methodology involves a combination of lectures, tutorials, seminars, examinations, projects, presentations, assignments, computer labs and industry projects.



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Delivered fully online, the course-based Master of Science (MSc) in One Health degree program is designed to equip veterinarians, animal scientists, medical doctors, health professionals and biological scientists with an in-depth understanding of the principles of, and issues associated with, One Health. Read more

Program Description

Delivered fully online, the course-based Master of Science (MSc) in One Health degree program is designed to equip veterinarians, animal scientists, medical doctors, health professionals and biological scientists with an in-depth understanding of the principles of, and issues associated with, One Health. Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine (RUSVM) is committed to a One Health approach to sectoral and multidisciplinary integrative mechanism to enable research aimed at sustainably reducing the burden of zoonoses. RUSVM’s geographical location in the Caribbean, its existing research focus on One Health, its experienced faculty and its global partnerships will allow students to gain a hands-on educational experience on one of the most topical global issues.

Zoonoses and other diseases affecting livestock production and health have serious impacts on the economic growth, health and food security and alleviation of poverty in tropical and resource constrained countries. Students will have the opportunity to explore the complex interplay of altered environments and infectious diseases as an increasing threat to agriculture, public health and endangered/threatened species, on a global basis.

The MSc One Health degree program requires 41 credits ( based on guidelines from the United States Department of Education), obtained through coursework and a project, leading to the submission of a thesis. Students are required to undertake specified core courses amounting to 23 credits. The MSc program is delivered over 1 year on a full-time basis as well as part-time over 2 or 3 years.

Course Structure

• Applied Epidemiology and Biostatistics (5 cr.)
• Public Policy Formulation & Implementation (3 cr.)
• Leadership and Organizational Behavior (3 cr.)
• Research project design (1 cr.)
• Conservation medicine/ecosystem health (5 cr.)
• Zoonoses (intersection between human and animal health) (3 cr.)
• Surveillance and diagnostic methods (3 cr.)

The program also includes a research project/Mini Dissertation (15 cr.) and a 1-week residential in St Kitts (1cr.) as well as electives (dependent on availability) such as animal health program management (2 cr.), safety of foods of animal origin (2 cr.), disaster management (2 cr.).

Learning Outcomes

The MSc One Health degree program is designed to provide the skills and preparation needed for careers in a broad range of environments. The flexible program of study has particular strengths in:
• Tropical animal health and diseases
• The intersection of animal health and human health
• Epidemiology
• Conservation medicine
• Food safety
• Policy Formulation
• Leadership
• research and diagnostic methods
• the interface between domestic animals and wildlife

On completion of the degree program the student will have gained knowledge, research skills and research experience in topics relevant to the broad field of One Health. The program provides graduates the background and experience to assess, investigate and manage animal health and zoonotic disease risks, to design and execute targeted research in animal health, and to manage veterinary intervention in the prevention and control of animal disease. Within the program the student will have had the opportunity to focus on an area of interest, such as area disease control, vector borne diseases, zoonotic infections or conservation medicine.

Students will acquire and enhance intellectual skills in scientific assessment and research methodology, as well as practical skills in communication, organization and scientific writing.

Delivery

The taught component will be instructed by distance learning via eCollege®, our virtual learning environment. You will be taught by our faculty and specialist modules may be delivered by our partner institutions.
The research project may be carried out in St. Kitts and Nevis or in other locations, as appropriate, under the supervision of a RUSVM faculty member. The research component may be desk-based, lab-based or through fieldwork and will result in the submission of a thesis. A short residential component will allow the student cohort to share their perspective and dissertation work to the RUSVM research community.

Assessment

Assessment will be conducted through traditional and novel methods suited to an online delivery mode and will include, for example, essays, critical review of peer-reviewed articles, online tests and quizzes, blog writing, research proposal writing, research/fieldwork journal development, group discussions, group project work and social media interactions. The degree is based on certified completion of research training plus other designated projects and the completion of a thesis.

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This one-year postgraduate course is designed to enable engineers, architects, fire prevention officers and other suitably qualified professionals working in the construction industry acquire a sound knowledge and understanding of fire in buildings, the safety requirements in the design of buildings and the various options available for minimising the risk of fire in buildings. Read more
This one-year postgraduate course is designed to enable engineers, architects, fire prevention officers and other suitably qualified professionals working in the construction industry acquire a sound knowledge and understanding of fire in buildings, the safety requirements in the design of buildings and the various options available for minimising the risk of fire in buildings. The course also includes the design of fire safety systems and guidance in the preparation of an application for a fire safety certificate. This course has been approved by Engineers Ireland as meeting its requirements for continuing professional development.

Course Organisation:

Lectures are normally held on Friday evening 7 - 10 p.m. and Saturday morning 9.30 a.m. - 12.30 p.m. each week throughout the two semesters (September to April). Coursework, which is an integral part of the course, consists of two assignments that are carried out in the students' own time.

Course Content:

Fundamentals of Fire Science and Fire Engineering
Fire Safety Engineering
Active Fire Protection Systems
Legal Principles; Fire, Safety and Health Legislation, Insurances
The Building Control Act, 1990 and Building Regulations
The Fire Services Acts, 1981 and 2003
Coursework Assignments

Assessment:

The award of a Postgraduate Diploma in Fire Safety Practice is based on a combination of the results of two examination papers and two coursework assignments. Each paper and the coursework constitute one third of the overall assessment. Students must pass each paper and the coursework. There is no system of compensation. The pass mark for the examinations and the coursework is 40%. A Distinction is awarded to those who obtain an overall average mark of 70% or more in both the coursework and two papers combined at the summer examination. The Diploma awarding ceremony takes place in November.

Recommended Texts:

Extensive notes are provided by individual lecturers, who may also recommend texts.

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This is a one-year postgraduate course designed to provide engineers and other suitably qualified graduates with a good appreciation and understanding of project management techniques and practice in civil engineering and construction. Read more
This is a one-year postgraduate course designed to provide engineers and other suitably qualified graduates with a good appreciation and understanding of project management techniques and practice in civil engineering and construction. Since much of this course is generic, it is also suitable for those involved in managing projects in other areas, for example, in manufacturing and information technology. This course has been approved by Engineers Ireland as meeting its requirements for continuing professional development.

Course Organisation:

Lectures are normally held on Friday evenings and Saturday mornings each week throughout the academic year. Coursework involves carrying out an individual research project in one's own time and also using project management software on the College computers as an integral part of the course on some Friday evenings.

Course Content:

Project Management Principles and Practice
Contracts and Tendering Procedures
Legal Principles and Employment Legislation
Project Accounting and Cost Control
The Computer and IT in Project Management
Human Resources Management, Health and Safety, Insurances
Coursework Assignments

Assessment:

The award of a Postgraduate Diploma in Project Management is based on a combination of the results of two examination papers and two coursework assignments. Each paper and the coursework constitute one third of the overall assessment. Students must pass each paper and the coursework; there is no system of compensation. The pass mark for the examination papers and the coursework is 40%. A Distinction is awarded to those who obtain an overall average mark of 70% or more in both the coursework and two papers combined at the summer examination. The Diploma awarding ceremony takes place in November.

Recommended texts:

Extensive notes are provided by individual lecturers, who may also recommend texts.

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The general objective of this programme is to communicate an anthropologically-informed understanding of social life in both Western and non-Western societies. Read more

The general objective of this programme is to communicate an anthropologically-informed understanding of social life in both Western and non-Western societies. By confronting students with the remarkable diversity of human social and cultural experience, its aim is to encourage them to question taken-for-granted assumptions and to view the world from a new perspective.

Through a set of core modules, comprising about a third of coursework credits, students are provided with a comprehensive grounding in classical as well as contemporary debates in social anthropology and are introduced to the distinctive research methods and ethical positions associated with the discipline. Students then complete their coursework credits by choosing from a broad range of around 50 different modules offered around the Faculty of Humanities. Through these options, students apply the social anthropological theories and methods learnt on the core modules to particular substantive themes and topics. Diploma students complete their coursework in May and formally graduate in July. Over the summer vacation, MA students carry out research for a 15,000 word dissertation that is submitted in September. They then would normally expect to graduate formally in December.

Most of the coursework optional modules have been organized into pathways based on particular themes and topics. Go to the Study Details tab for more details on the Visual and Sensory Mediapathway. Pathways are designed to ensure both an academic and timetabling fit between the options. Students are encouraged, on the basis of past experience and/or future goals, to select a pathway shortly after registration in consultation with the programme director. MA students' dissertation topics will normally also relate to this pathway. In addition to the Visual and Sensory Media pathway, there are currently six others. 

Please note that it is not compulsory to select a pathway and all students will be awarded the same generic degree, MA in Social Anthropology

Teaching and learning

In each semester students take a small number of 15 credit core modules, and a selection of optional modules that they choose shortly after arrival. Many optional modules are worth 15 credits, though some are worth 30 credits. In total, students are required to achieve 120 coursework credits. Over the summer vacation, students are required to write a dissertation which is worth a further 60 credits.

Some 50 optional modules are available, not only in Social Anthropology but across many other disciplines in the Faculty of Humanities, including Visual Anthropology, Archaeology, Museum Studies, Latin American Studies, Development Studies, Drama, Sociology & History. Drawing on this broad range of disciplines, a number of pathways have been devised in order to maximize the academic & timetabling coherence of the options chosen by students.

The Visual & Sensory Media pathway draws exclusively on modules offered by Social Anthropology & the Granada Centre for Visual Anthropology.

  • Students normally take two modules exploring the representation of visual culture in the visual arts, in cinema & in ethnographic film & related documentary genres.
  • In the second semester, they take a practice-based module that offers basic training in photography & sound-recording as well as encouraging reflection on these media both as means of creating anthropological knowledge & as a means of representing it. An important feature of this module are the workshops given by practising professional photographers & sound-recordists. Please note that this last module requires the payment of an additional fee of £500 (currently under review) to cover equipment & facilities costs.
  • The dissertation normally consists of a text directly supported by & integrated with still images &/or sound recordings.

Coursework and assessment

In each semester, students take two 15-credit core modules, & up to 30 credits of optional modules. Many optional modules are worth 15 credits, though some are worth 30. In total, students are required to achieve 120 coursework credits. Over the summer vacation, MA students write a dissertation worth a further 60 credits.

Most modules are assessed by means of an extended assessment essay. Typically, for 15 credit modules, these must be of 4000 words, whilst for 30 credit courses, they are normally of 6000 words. But certain options involving practical instruction in research methods, audiovisual media or museum display may also be assessed by means of presentations &/or portfolios of practical work. The dissertation that MA students are required to submit is normally 15,000 words though this may be reduced in length if work in other media is presented in conjunction with the written text.

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 

Career opportunities

Past graduates of the MA in Social Anthropology have gone on to many different careers both inside and outside academic life. As it is a 'conversion' course aimed at those who want to explore anthropology after undergraduate studies in another field, or at least within a different anthropological tradition, it often represents a major change of career direction, opening up a wide range of different possibilities.

About 20% of our graduates carry on to do a doctorate, be it here or elsewhere. But the MA in Social Anthropology also represents a very appropriate preparation for careers in which an informed awareness of the implications of social and cultural diversity are important. Some past students have been drawn to the voluntary sector, either in the UK or with development agencies overseas, others have gone on to work in the media or cultural industries or in education at many different levels. Others again have found opportunities in business or the civil service, where ethnography-based methods are increasingly popular as a way of finding out how people - from consumers to employees - interact with their everyday worlds.

The MA in Social Anthropology also trains students in a broad range of transferable skills that are useful in many walks of life, including social research methods and the ethics associated with these, effective essay-writing, oral presentational skills in seminars and other contexts, basic computing skills, using the internet as a research tool and conducting bibliographic research.



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Take your passion for law to the next level with advanced study and research. Be at the centre of debate, analysis and dialogue about law and legal policy issues in New Zealand. Read more

Take your passion for law to the next level with advanced study and research. Be at the centre of debate, analysis and dialogue about law and legal policy issues in New Zealand.

Full time or part time, your study will be relevant, accessible and intellectually rewarding—research an area of law that interests you or tailor a course of study that suits your career goals.

Programmes

Master of Laws by coursework

You'll take one core course—Advanced Legal Study LAWS 581 worth 10 points—and make up the rest of your 120 points from a choice of other 500-level LAWS courses. Up to 40 points can be replaced by equivalent courses from another faculty or another university.

500-level LAWS courses differ from year to year and are either taught in block format, intensive format or seminars. Look at the course timetable to see when the intensive and block courses are offered. The seminar courses are mainly led by you and the other students who will prepare papers in advance.

Internship

International students can also choose to do a 20-point one-trimester internship. You'll work with a community, government or private sector organisation under the joint supervision of a Faculty member and an outside professional. Assessment is based on the work you produce, a journal and your performance at fortnightly seminars.

Master of Laws by dissertation and coursework

You'll take LAWS 581 Advanced Legal Study (10 points), a further 20 points from the Master of Laws course-selection and LAWS 592, a 90-point dissertation of 35,000 words.

Dissertation supervision

The Faculty can provide dissertation supervision on a wide range of subjects. Explore the full list of the Faculty's research areas to help you decide on your own research topic.

Master of Laws by thesis

The Master of Laws by thesis requires you to complete a 120-point 50,000 word thesis on an area of law that interests you. You'll also do the course Advanced Legal Study LAWS 581 at no extra cost.

Thesis supervision

The Faculty can provide thesis supervision on a wide range of subjects. Explore the full list of the Faculty's research areas to help you decide on your own research topic.

Master of Laws by research portfolio

This is a more flexible combination of coursework and research on an approved topic. You'll take the 10-point Advanced Legal Study LAWS 581 and the 90-point Research Portfolio LAWS 593.

The research portfolio consists of two courses that include two research papers of 12,000 words each on related topics. You'll also complete a 2,500-word linking paper to establish and justify your research, as well as a further 20 points from Master of Laws courses.

Flexible study

Designed to be flexible, the Master of Laws offers courses that are taught in different formats. Some courses meet weekly, others are taught in a more compact format.

Block courses are taught in a concentrated manner over a one-to-two week period, and intensive courses are broken into chunks of eight to twelve hours. They are often taught over two-to-three consecutive evenings or in Friday afternoon and Saturday sessions, with a break of two-to-three weeks between sessions.

Workload and duration

The Master of Laws can be completed in one year of full-time study, or in up to three years part time.

If you are studying full time, you can expect a workload of 40–45 hours a week for much of the year. Part-time students doing two courses per trimester will need to do around 20–23 hours of work a week. Make sure you take this into account if you are working.

You can estimate your workload by adding up the number of points you'll be doing. One point is roughly equal to 10–12 hours work.

Research and supervision

No matter how you choose to study for your Master of Laws there will be an element of research required. Take advantage of exciting research opportunities at New Zealand's leading centre of academic legal research

And if you're planning on doing a Master's by thesis, or a PhD, you'll have the opportunity to be supervised in wide range of subject areas by New Zealand's best legal scholars.



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Would you like personalised supervision from the very first week of study?. Do you want a course that links with Visual Anthropology and uses our ethnographic film-making facilities?. Read more
  • Would you like personalised supervision from the very first week of study?
  • Do you want a course that links with Visual Anthropology and uses our ethnographic film-making facilities?
  • Are you interested in the series of pathways offering specialist knowledge of different areas?

The objective of this programme is to communicate an anthropologically-informed understanding of social life in both Western and non-Western societies. By confronting students with the remarkable diversity of human social and cultural experience, its aim is to encourage them to question taken-for-granted assumptions and to view the world from a new perspective.

Through a set of core modules, comprising about a third of coursework credits, students are provided with a comprehensive grounding in classical as well as contemporary debates in social anthropology and are introduced to the distinctive research methods and ethical positions associated with the discipline. Students then complete their coursework credits by choosing from a broad range of modules offered around the Faculty of Humanities. 

Through these options, students apply the social anthropological theories and methods learnt on the core modules to particular substantive themes and topics. Diploma students complete their coursework in May and formally graduate in July. Over the summer vacation, MA students carry out research for a 15,000 word dissertation that is submitted in September. They then would normally expect to graduate formally in December.

Most of the coursework optional modules have been organized into pathways based on particular themes and topics. If they wish, students are able, on the basis of past experience and/or future goals, to select a pathway shortly after registration in consultation with the programme director. MA students' dissertation topics will normally also relate to this pathway. In total, there are currently 5 pathways.  

However, please note that it is not compulsory to select a pathway and all students will be awarded the same degree, an MA in Social Anthropology

Teaching and learning

In each semester, students take two 15-credit core modules, and a selection of optional modules that they select shortly after arrival. Many optional modules are worth 15 credits, though some are worth 30 credits. In total, students are required to achieve 120 coursework credits. Over the summer vacation, students are required to write a dissertation which is worth a further 60 credits.

In total, some 50 optional modules are available, not only in Social Anthropology but in a broad range of other disciplines across the Faculty of Humanities, including Visual Anthropology, Archaeology, Museum Studies, Latin American Studies, Development Studies, History, Sociology and Drama. Drawing on this broad range of disciplines, a number of pathways have been devised in order to maximize the academic and timetabling coherence of the options chosen by students. However students are not obliged to select one of these pathways and, provided the course director and tutor are in agreement, may follow their own 'customized' selection of modules.

IMPORTANT NOTE ON PART-TIME STUDY

Part-time students complete the full-time programme over two years.  There are NO evening or weekend course units available on the part-time programme.  

You must first check the schedule of the compulsory modules and then select your optional modules to suit your requirements.  

Updated timetable information will be available from mid-August and you will have the opportunity to discuss your module choices during induction week with your Course Director

Coursework and assessment

Most modules are assessed by means of an extended assessment essay. Typically, for 15 credit modules, these must be of 4000 words, whilst for 30 credit courses, they are normally of 6000 words. Certain options involving practical instruction in research methods, audiovisual media or museum display may also be assessed by means of presentations and/or portfolios of practical work. In addition, all MA students are required to write a 15,000 word dissertation.

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 

Career opportunities

Past graduates of the MA in Social Anthropology have gone on to many different careers both inside and outside academic life. As it is a 'conversion' course aimed at those who want to explore anthropology after undergraduate studies in another field, or at least within a different anthropological tradition, it often represents a major change of career direction, opening up a wide range of different possibilities.

About 20% of our graduates carry on to do a doctorate, be it here or elsewhere. But the MA in Social Anthropology also represents a very appropriate preparation for careers in which an informed awareness of the implications of social and cultural diversity are important. Some past students have been drawn to the voluntary sector, either in the UK or with development agencies overseas, others have gone on to work in the media or cultural industries or in education at many different levels. Others again have found opportunities in business or the civil service, where ethnography-based methods are increasingly popular as a way of finding out how people - from consumers to employees - interact with their everyday worlds.

The MA in Social Anthropology also trains students in a broad range of transferable skills that are useful in many walks of life, including social research methods and the ethics associated with these, effective essay-writing, oral presentational skills in seminars and other contexts, basic computing skills, using the internet as a research tool and conducting bibliographic research.



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The general objective of this programme is to communicate an anthropologically-informed understanding of social life in both Western and non-Western societies. Read more

The general objective of this programme is to communicate an anthropologically-informed understanding of social life in both Western and non-Western societies. By confronting students with the remarkable diversity of human social and cultural experience, its aim is to encourage them to question taken-for-granted assumptions and to view the world from a new perspective.

Through a set of core modules, comprising about a third of coursework credits, students are provided with a comprehensive grounding in classical as well as contemporary debates in social anthropology and are introduced to the distinctive research methods and ethical positions associated with the discipline. Students then complete their coursework credits by choosing from a broad range of around 50 different modules offered around the Faculty of Humanities. Through these options, students apply the social anthropological theories and methods learnt on the core modules to particular substantive themes and topics. Diploma students complete their coursework in May and formally graduate in July. Over the summer vacation, MA students carry out research for a 15,000 word dissertation that is submitted in September. They then would normally expect to graduate formally in December.

Most of the coursework optional modules have been organized into pathways based on particular themes and topics.

Go to the Study Details tab for more details on the Culture, Ethnography and Development pathway.

Pathways are designed to ensure both an academic and timetabling fit between the options. Students are encouraged, on the basis of past experience and/or future goals, to select a pathway shortly after registration in consultation with the programme director. MA students' dissertation topics will normally also relate to this pathway. In addition to the Culture, Ethnography and Development pathway, there are currently 5 others.  

Please note that it is not compulsory to select a pathway and all students will be awarded the same generic degree, MA in Social Anthropology

Contact:

Programme Director: Prof Karen Sykes

Tel: 0161 275 3992

Email:     

Teaching and learning

In each semester, students take two 15-credit core modules, and a selection of optional modules that they select shortly after arrival. Many optional modules are worth 15 credits, though some are worth 30 credits. In total, students are required to achieve 120 coursework credits. Over the summer vacation, students are required to write a dissertation which is worth a further 60 credits.

In total, some 50 optional modules are available, not only in Social Anthropology but in a broad range of other disciplines across the Faculty of Humanities, including Visual Anthropology, Archaeology, Museum Studies, Latin American Studies, Development Studies, History, Sociology and Drama. Drawing on this broad range of disciplines, a number of pathways have been devised in order to maximize the academic and timetabling coherence of the options chosen by students.

The Culture, Ethnography & Development pathway provides you with the opportunity to study the history, theory and practice of development in a broad variety of social and geographical contexts, encouraging you to think of development critically as a complex transformative process that has cultural as well as economic and political consequences. You may select from modules covering a broad range of topics, including:

  • relationships of dependence between the global North and the global South
  • social and cultural effects of international labour migration
  • the Millennium Development Goals
  • the political economy of foreign investment
  • inequality and urban planning in the cities of the global South
  • the international agenda for the reduction of poverty
  • the impact of local civil society and NGOs
  • social welfare policies
  • the politics of biodiversity conservation.

Coursework and assessment

Most modules are assessed by means of an extended assessment essay. Typically, for 15 credit modules, these must be of 4000 words, whilst for 30 credit courses, they are normally of 6000 words. Certain options involving practical instruction in research methods, audiovisual media or museum display may also be assessed by means of presentations and/or portfolios of practical work. In addition, all MA students are required to write a 15,000 word dissertation.

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 



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The Diploma is a one-year postgraduate course designed to provide civil engineers and other suitably qualified graduates with a sound knowledge of present day practice in environmental engineering. Read more
The Diploma is a one-year postgraduate course designed to provide civil engineers and other suitably qualified graduates with a sound knowledge of present day practice in environmental engineering. The course has special relevance for local authority engineers but it has also been designed for those in the private sector who have a particular interest in environmental management with a particular emphasis on measures of quantitative assessment. Topics covered in the course include air quality, noise, hydrological processes, water and wastewater treatment, solid and toxic waste management, fire safety engineering and environmental monitoring and control. Environmental Impact Studies and analysis of risk, as an inherent part of infrastructural development, are also considered. This course has been approved by Engineers Ireland as meeting its requirements for continuing professional development.

Course organisation:

Lectures are normally held on Friday evening 7 - 10 p.m. and Saturday morning 9.30 a.m. - 12.30 p.m. each week throughout the two semesters (September to April). In addition to attending lectures, participants are required to submit coursework as part of the students' assessment.

Course content:

Environmental legislation, EIA and EIS

Hydrology for environmental management

Water and wastewater engineering

Air quality and noise monitoring and management

Solid and hazardous wastes

Fire safety engineering

Renewable energy

Special topics including water borne diseases, radiation hazards

Assessment:

The award of a Postgraduate Diploma in Environmental Engineering is based on a combination of the results of two examination papers and coursework. Each paper constitutes one third of the overall assessment. The mark for the coursework also constitutes one third of the overall grade. Students must pass each paper and the coursework element independently; there is no system of compensation. The pass mark for the examination papers is 40%. A Distinction is awarded to those who obtain an overall average mark of 70% or over in both the coursework and two papers combined at the summer examination. The Diploma awarding ceremony takes place in November.

Recommended texts:

Extensive notes are provided by individual lecturers, who may also recommend texts.

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In this Master’s degree you will acquire conceptual ideas, theoretical approaches and analytical research skills needed to study social and cultural geography at postgraduate level. Read more

In this Master’s degree you will acquire conceptual ideas, theoretical approaches and analytical research skills needed to study social and cultural geography at postgraduate level. You will engage with questions that interrogate the foundations of inequality, the relationship between power and dissent, identity and belonging, race, gender, cultural change and conflict. Representations of cultural landscapes and critical cartographies are used to explore the geographical imagination of the world from local to global scales.

UK-focused and international case studies are used to illustrate critical, contemporary challenges, from understanding the dynamics of inequality in a city like London to the cultural processes underpinning the rise in populist politics and social movements across the world. To support the development of learning in areas that are of particular interest, you can choose option modules from a wide variety of subject areas such as urbanisation, culture and development, social anthropology, politics, religion and society.

In addition to core content, you will learn research methods that will enable you to specialise and undertake the researching and writing of a dissertation on a subject that appeals to you, as well as develop skills to conduct independent research in both academic and non-academic contexts.

HIGHLIGHTS

  • This distinctive Master's degree combines theoretical and critical approaches to social and cultural geography using real-world case studies.
  • The programme allows you to follow your own interests, with a wide choice of option modules, while developing your research skills and undertaking a dissertation in an area that interests you.
  • Our students have the opportunity to access activities and research centres across the College, including the Birkbeck Institute for Social Research and the Birkbeck Institute for the Humanities.

TEACHING

At Birkbeck, almost all of our courses are taught in the evening and our teaching is designed to support students who are juggling evening study with work and other daytime commitments. We actively encourage innovative and engaging ways of teaching, to ensure our students have the best learning experience. In the 2017 Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF), the government’s system for rating university teaching, Birkbeck was allocated a Silver award.

Teaching may include formal lectures, seminars, and practical classes and tutorials. Formal lectures are used in most degree programmes to give an overview of a particular field of study. They aim to provide the stimulus and the starting point for deeper exploration of the subject during your own personal reading. Seminars give you the chance to explore a specific aspect of your subject in depth and to discuss and exchange ideas with fellow students. They typically require preparatory study.

Our distance-learning and blended-learning courses and modules are self-directed and we will provide you with interactive learning opportunities and encourage you to collaborate and engage via various learning technologies. These courses involve limited or no face-to-face contact between students and module tutors.

In addition, you will have access to pastoral support via a named Personal Tutor.

METHODS OF TEACHING ON THIS COURSE

Teaching is via lectures, seminars, presentations and fieldwork.

CONTACT HOURS

On our taught courses, you will have scheduled teaching and study sessions each year. Alongside this, you will also undertake assessment activities and independent learning outside of class. Depending on the modules you take, you may also have additional scheduled academic activities, such as tutorials, dissertation supervision, practical classes, visits and fieldtrips.

On our taught courses, the actual amount of time you spend in the classroom and in contact with your lecturers will depend on your course, the option modules you select and when you undertake your final-year project.

On our distance-learning and blended-learning courses, discussion, collaboration and interaction with your lecturers and fellow students are encouraged and enabled through various learning technologies, but you may have limited or no face-to-face contact with your module tutors.

INDICATIVE CLASS SIZE

Class sizes vary, depending on your course, the module you are undertaking, and the method of teaching. For example, lectures are presented to larger groups, whereas seminars usually consist of small, interactive groups led by a tutor.

INDEPENDENT LEARNING

On our taught courses, much of your time outside of class will be spent on self-directed, independent learning, including preparing for classes and following up afterwards. This will usually include, but is not limited to, reading books and journal articles, undertaking research, working on coursework and assignments, and preparing for presentations and assessments.

Independent learning is absolutely vital to your success as a student. Everyone is different, and the study time required varies topic by topic, but, as a guide, expect to schedule up to five hours of self-study for each hour of teaching.

On our distance-learning and blended-learning courses, the emphasis is very much on independent, self-directed learning and you will be expected to manage your own learning, with the support of your module tutors and various learning technologies.

ASSESSMENT

Assessment is an integral part of your university studies and usually consists of a combination of coursework and examinations, although this will vary from course to course - on some of our courses, assessment is entirely by coursework. The methods of assessment on this course are specified below under 'Methods of assessment on this course'. You will need to allow time to complete coursework and prepare for exams.

Where a course has unseen written examinations, these may be held termly, but, on the majority of our courses, exams are usually taken in the Summer term, during May to June. Exams may be held at other times of the year as well. In most cases, exams are held during the day on a weekday - if you have daytime commitments, you will need to make arrangements for daytime attendance - but some exams are held in the evening. Exam timetables are published online.

Find out more about assessment at Birkbeck, including guidance on assessment, feedback and our assessment offences policy.

METHODS OF ASSESSMENT ON THIS COURSE

All assessment is by coursework. You also write a 15,000-word dissertation.




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