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This course is to be an interdisciplinary programme enabling students to examine, by way of a thesis, aspects of the history of the English country house between 1485 and 1945. Read more

Course Description

This course is to be an interdisciplinary programme enabling students to examine, by way of a thesis, aspects of the history of the English country house between 1485 and 1945. Students will be encouraged to consider the interrelation of architectural history, art history and social history in the evolution of the country house as a political power house, a setting for the display of art and craftsmanship, a self-contained community and a symbol of continuity and loss in a changing world.

The seminar programme, which serves to complement the student’s individual research, will explore these themes in a series of ten meetings which will be addressed by some of the United Kingdom’s most distinguished country house historians. These will be prefaced by an introduction to research techniques, with particular reference to the use of primary sources such as inventories, estate records and collections of private papers; an introduction to relevant library resources available in London and through the University of Buckingham’s online subscriptions; and an introduction to the most recent academic approaches to the subject.

Each seminar will take place in the early evening, followed by a 40-minute question-and-answer session with the seminar speaker, and a dinner at which there will be further questioning of the speaker and a general conversation about the topic in hand. Four seminars will be scheduled for the period between October and December, and a further six in the period between the New Year and March.

The programme begins with an overview of the architectural and social history of the country house and an examination of recent academic perspectives on the subject, including the latest thematic and period-based approaches and studies of particular mansions and individual architects from Robert Smythson to Sir Edwin Lutyens. It goes on to discuss the changing function of the country house between 1485 and 1945, and to explore how architectural form has been modified by social change.

A series of seminar papers will then explore architectural style; the mechanics of building, owning and living in a country house; and the wider cultural context, which has seen the country house playing a crucial role in the invention of the past, from Ben Jonson’s ‘To Penshurst’ to Evelyn Waugh’s Brideshead Revisited.

Find out more about our School of Humanities on http://www.buckingham.ac.uk/humanities/.

The Course Director

Adrian Tinniswood, OBE, MPhil, Senior Research Fellow of the Humanities Research Institute, Buckingham, and Visiting Fellow in History and Heritage, Bath Spa

Adrian Tinniswood has a distinguished reputation as an architectural and social historian on both sides of the Atlantic. He has worked for many years as a consultant and adviser to the National Trust, and has lectured extensively on the country house and on the architecture and social history of the seventeenth century at British universities including Oxford, Bristol and Nottingham and for the University of California at Berkeley.

His books include His Invention So Fertile: A Life of Christopher Wren, The Verneys (short-listed for the 2007 Samuel Johnson Prize for Non-Fiction) and The Polite Tourist: Four Centuries of Country House Visiting.

His latest book, The Long Weekend: The Country House Between the Wars, is published by Jonathan Cape in March 2016.

He was awarded an OBE in 2013 for services to heritage.

Associate students

For those wishing to attend the evening research seminar programme, but unable to devote the time to the coursework or to register for the MA degree, there is the option of becoming an Associate Student. This status will enable the student to attend the ten research seminars and to meet the guest lecturers, in the first six months of the programme, but does not require the submission of written work. Associate Students are not registered for, and do not receive, the MA degree.

Apply here http://www.buckingham.ac.uk/humanities/ma/country-house.

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Campus-Based. October each year. Distance Learning. February each year. This MA will provide you with a unique and wide-ranging introduction to the complex and ever-changing role of the country house in its local, regional and national environment. Read more

Start Dates

Campus-Based: October each year.
Distance Learning: February each year.

Course Description

This MA will provide you with a unique and wide-ranging introduction to the complex and ever-changing role of the country house in its local, regional and national environment. The course is taught by distance learning, so you can learn around your existing commitments in a way that suits you.

This fascinating course investigates the architectural development of the English country house and its artistic contents, as well as its place within history and literature. The course also examines the economic and political importance of the house and its impact on the landscape, plus the technologies employed to design, build and run it.

[[Course aims ]]

To gain a detailed knowledge of the major issues related to the study of the country house and of the literature on the subject, and to develop an understanding of the complex and changing position of the country house in its local, regional and national environment.

Distance Learning

This course is also available for study by distance learning with a start date in February each year. Modules for the distance learning course may vary.

(Please note: The information included on this webpage is indicative of the course provision provided by the University of Leicester. Due to regular enhancement of the University's courses, please refer to Leicester's own website (http://www.le.ac.uk) for the most accurate and up-to-date course information. We recommend that you familiarise yourself with this information prior to submitting an application.)

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This postgraduate course is designed for students who wish to develop their knowledge and understanding of history across a range of periods, regions and theoretical perspectives. Read more
This postgraduate course is designed for students who wish to develop their knowledge and understanding of history across a range of periods, regions and theoretical perspectives.

The MA in History provides students with opportunities to study the subject at an advanced level. It allows students to undertake detailed study of a range of periods and processes – from Britain’s experience of warfare to the material culture of the English country house. By studying particular topics in depth, students are encouraged to think not only about the diversity of the past, but also how history itself is constructed.

Students will develop the skills necessary to understand, critique, utilise and communicate concepts and theories used within the discipline of History. They will acquire methodological skills for historical research, particularly the selection, evaluation and interpretation of primary sources.

The course comprises 120 credits of taught modules and a 60 credit dissertation. Students must take the History Research Methods module and complete a dissertation. The remainder of the programme is made up from a selection of specialist modules (normally three 30 credit modules) which reflect staff research expertise.

Course content

The MA is taught on a full time and part time basis, with the opportunity to complete in one and two years respectively. The year is split into three trimesters.

Full time students take 60 credits in each of the first two trimesters, running from September to January and February to May. They then complete their dissertation over the spring and summer trimesters, from February to September.

Part time students take 60 credits of modules in their first year (normally two 30 credit modules in each of the first two trimesters) and 60 credits of modules in their second years, plus the 60 credit dissertation.

Modules are normally fourteen weeks in duration – alternating fortnightly between evening classes on campus (typically 6pm to 9pm on a weekday) and online learning activities. Students are also encouraged to attend the History Research Seminar, which runs monthly in the evening. All students must take History Research Methods before proceeding to their dissertation.

Course modules (16/17)

-History Research Methods
-British Colonialism and Islamic Politics, c. 1800-1970
-Men at Arms: Masculinity and War in Britain, 1756-1918
-Consumption and the Country House, 1660-1830
-Exploring English Society, 1500-1750
-Medicine and Healing Through the Ages
-Violence and the Law in English Society
-Britain and the First World War
-From Privilege to Pressure: English Landed Society, 1850-1950
-Breeding Supermen: Eugenics in Britain, America and Germany
-Narrating the Nation: Rethinking Modern British History
-Dissertation
-Fascism and Anti-Fascism in Britain from 1945 to the Present Day

Methods of Learning

At Master’s level study, we aim to encourage student-led debates and exchange of ideas. Modules will typically alternate fortnightly between classes on campus and online learning activities. Each module incorporates a variety of teaching methods in class, including workshops, student presentations and discussions of primary and secondary materials (such as film, images, documentary sources and online resources). Online learning activities include online seminars, discussion boards, podcasts and blogs.

Full-time students get six hours of timetabled contact per week, part-time students will have three hours. This does not include individual tutorials or dissertation supervision.

Independent study and assessment time equate to approximately 18 hours per week full time or nine hours part time.

Schedule

One year full time or two years part time.

Assessments

Assessment is by coursework only, consisting of assessments such as essays, student presentations, book reviews and seminar portfolios.

For the award of Master’s, students must accumulate a total of 180 credits, including a 15,000 word dissertation, undertaken under the supervision of an appropriate member of the course team. A Postgraduate Certificate is awarded for 60 credits and a Postgraduate Diploma for 120 credits.

Facilities and Special Features

-Teaching takes place in evening classes, blended with online learning activities, providing a convenient programme for postgraduate learners.
-Students study a range of specialist topics in-depth with staff who are engaged in research and publication.
-Much of the teaching is centred on the use and interpretation of primary sources, giving students the opportunity to engage in active learning.

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The LLM in International Commercial Law covers the core issues relevant to the resolution of commercial disputes together with contractual principles. Read more
The LLM in International Commercial Law covers the core issues relevant to the resolution of commercial disputes together with contractual principles.

This course will provide you with the skills and knowledge needed to thrive in the area of corporate law with subjects specifically pertaining to e-commerce, intellectual property, contracts and more.

Why study International Commercial Law at Dundee?

The International Commercial modules that we offer will provide you with a detailed understanding of core issues relevant to the resolution of commercial disputes and an appreciation of contractual principles.

Central to this are the courses in International Business Transactions, Problems in International Commercial Litigation and International Dispute Resolution. These modules are complemented by the comparative contract law course, Principles of International Contract Law.

What's so good about International Commercial Law at Dundee?

In the Times Good University Guide 2012 Dundee Law School was placed 7th in the United Kingdom law school rankings, and we were ranked 1st in Scotland in the 2011 National Student Survey (NSS).

In the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise Dundee Law School was one of only two law schools in the United Kingdom to achieve a 100% international standard classification, with half of our submissions being graded internationally excellent or world leading. Our commitment on is to provide high quality instruction, with a focus on matters of practical relevance, to prepare students for a successful legal career, whether at home or abroad.
Postgraduate culture

Dundee Law School prides itself as being a friendly Law School where all members of staff are accessible and students are treated as individuals and valued members of our legal community.

We offer all new students an induction programme at the start of each semester, to ensure that all students have the necessary understanding of the UK and European legal systems as well as core principles of public and private law.

We seek to integrate all LLM students into the life of the Law School, and invite you to all guest lectures and seminars. We also have an annual reading party to a beautiful country house location, where you are joined by senior staff and can work on academic skills and dissertation preparation.

"Studying at Dundee University helped me develop my legal writing, speaking, and analytical skills and as a result to become a real specialist in the legal field."
Margarita Khegay, LLM 2009

Who should study this course?

This course is designed for individuals with a background in law, i.e. a good honours degree in law (acquired or anticipated to have by the expected start date), or in exceptional circumstances non-law graduates with a considerable amount of relevant legal experience.

This course has January and September start dates and can be taken part time and full time.

How you will be taught

Students are taught through a mix of lectures, seminar discussions and tutorials.

What you will study

Core modules

Principles of Corporate Law
Competition Law
Corporate Governance
International Taxation Law
Intellectual Property Law

Candidates for this programme must take at least two of the following modules:

International Business Transactions I
Principles of International E-Commerce
Principles of International Contract Law

Private International Law (Common Law Perspectives)
International Insolvency Law
International Dispute Resolution

How you will be assessed

Substantive modules: continuous assessment plus end of semester examinations in December and March/April. Compulsory dissertation: 12-15,000 words.

Careers

Dundee graduates have reached the highest levels of success in the profession as senior partners, Queen's Counsel, judges and front bench politicians.

We have close links with employers and we offer programmes to support and develop the employability of our students. Our good reputation throughout the profession and close links to employers help Dundee graduates find employment.

The Law School runs an annual Law Fair which attracts law firms and employers from around the UK and further afield. Law firms also regularly visit the law school on an individual basis for recruitment purposes.

While many students study law in order to qualify to practise, the skills acquired in a law degree are also attractive to many prospective employers in professions such as:

The Police
Banking
Journalism
Management
Civil service

Find out more about legal careers from our Careers Service.

"At present I do work at Deloitte TCF, LLP as a legal consultant in Tax and Legal Department. Our Department deals with clients from various professional fields: construction, telecommunications, energy resources and others. In future I ... hope to be able to draw on my good experience and skills from the School of Law of Dundee University and make my own contribution on the commercial issues in my country, on the development of International Commercial Law in Kazakhstan."
Margarita Khegay, LLM 2009

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Develop your knowledge across a range of fields including urban studies, gender studies, race studies, travel writing, postcolonial writing, autobiographical and epistolary studies. Read more

About the course

Develop your knowledge across a range of fields including urban studies, gender studies, race studies, travel writing, postcolonial writing, autobiographical and epistolary studies. You’ll cover contemporary and recent American fiction and the way ‘real history’ appears in the texts. You are also able to take modules in American history offered by the History Department. If you intend to continue to PhD study, you’ll get essential research training.

Your career

You’ll examine early modern texts, language and culture. Staff expertise includes palaeography, rhetoric, news writing, the sermon, drama, and issues of political, sectarian and national identity between 1400 and 1700. Modules (including modules from History) can be tailored to suit your interests. You’ll complete one core module, optional modules and a dissertation.

Cultural life

There is always something going on, and there are plenty of chances to get involved. We have extensive links with arts and heritage organisations including Arts Council England and Sheffield Theatres. Recent poetry readings featured Carol Ann Duffy and Ciaran Carson. Our Arts/Science Encounters events bring together musicians, writers, architects and academics to explore ideas. The English Society, run by our students, organises theatre trips, guest lectures, and seminars. Students also get the chance to take part in drama and readings.

First-rate facilities

We’re based in a brand new building at the heart of the campus. There are computer workstations especially for postgraduates and a DVD library with viewing facilities. Our theatre workshop is a fully equipped teaching/performance area with excellent film-viewing facilities and audio suites.

Specialist resources

The University Library subscribes to the major periodicals and full-text electronic archives, including Early English Books Online and Eighteenth-Century Collections Online. Special collections include an outstanding collection of Restoration drama, the Hope Collection of eighteenth-century periodicals, the Jack Rosenthal scripts collection, and papers of contemporary writers such as Anita Brookner, Marina Warner, Fay Weldon and Peter Redgrove.

Funding

There are a number of studentships and fee bursaries available, funded by the University. Deadlines for funding applications are usually in winter/early spring. For details, see our website.

Research training for PhD

If you intend to progress to a PhD, your course can be tailored to include essential research training. The same applies to students on the online course.

Part-time study

Part-time students usually take one taught module in each semester. In the second year, you’ll also take a dissertation module. For most courses, you’ll need to come in for one half-day per week. The MA Creative Writing is taught in the evening. Some modules, such as Theatre and Performance, may require greater time commitment. We try to be as flexible as possible to accommodate the different needs of our students.

Core module

Reconsidering the Renaissance.

Examples of optional modules – literature

Modules may include: Early Modern Paleography (i.e. training in reading sixteenth and seventeenth-century manuscripts); The English Civil War; The Country House; Directed Reading: Early Modern Books; Pastoral Literature (online module) and Shakespeare and Early Women Dramatists (online module).

Teaching and assessment

Teaching is by seminars. You’ll be assessed on your essays, coursework and a 15,000-word dissertation.

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How does literature debate and reflect humanity’s relationship with ‘Nature’? What makes ‘the country’, ‘the wilderness’ or ‘the city’ what it is? How does literature respond to environmental destruction? Is it influenced by modern environmental movements?. Read more
How does literature debate and reflect humanity’s relationship with ‘Nature’? What makes ‘the country’, ‘the wilderness’ or ‘the city’ what it is? How does literature respond to environmental destruction? Is it influenced by modern environmental movements?

The MA in Literature, Landscape and Environment examines how literature reflects and shapes the way in which we see the landscape and the environment and it gives you the opportunity to study the kind of analyses that are becoming increasingly important to the direction of modern English literary studies. The MA is designed for students interested in further study or for those looking for careers in the rapidly expanding green industry.

The MA is taught by Bath Spa staff who are internationally recognised for their research in this field. In addition, we are located in a World Heritage site at the centre of a region rich with literary connections and with some of the finest landscapes in the country.

COURSE STUCTURE AND CONTENT

The programme aims to provide you with an excitingly wide range of issues and approaches in relation to the representations of various kinds of landscapes. It will present:

• a mix of thematic topics, types of landscape and regions
• a balance between literature pre- and post-1900
• a range of methodologies and approaches
• although its main focus is literary, you will also engage with real landscapes and environments (for example, an eighteenth-century country estate; London; the Eden Project; Quantock Hills; Hardy country).

To visit the course blog-site, visit http://literaturelandenvironment.org.uk/

TEACHING METHODS AND RESOURCES

You will be taught at our Corsham Court Campus, an eighteenth-century country house currently owned by the Methuen family and Bath Spa University’s postgraduate centre. Teaching and learning on the taught modules will primarily be via seminars, but opportunities for other types of engagement may be offered as an alternative to seminars, depending upon the nature of the thematic strand for research, for example: skills workshops, field-trips, directed research, and independent research associated with the Dissertation or Project. Assessment will be via essays, proposals, and a final Dissertation or Project.

Our Library offers access to high-quality electronic resources such as Eighteenth-century Collections Online (ECCO), Early English Books Online (EEBO). You will also be to able to gain access to research libraries such as the British Library and we also have established links with bodies such as the Science Museum collection at Swindon and Bath Central Library, as well as close connections with archives at the city of London, and the Thomas Hardy archives at Dorchester.

The MA is founded upon our staff’s expertise and substantial publications record in the areas of ecocriticism, contemporary environmental writing, early modern London, postmodern American cities, and literary journeys in modernist/postmodernist literature. Tracey Hill is the author of a prize-winning book on early-modern London; Richard Kerridge has won the BBC Wildlife Award for Nature Writing and launched the first ever course on ecocriticism in the UK; and Greg Garrard is the author of Ecocriticism (now in its second edition). Kerridge and Garrard have been chairs of the UK branch of the Association for the Study of Literature and the Environment. In addition, Bath Spa University is the home of the journal Green Letters: Studies in Ecocriticism. The MA draws upon and is supported by three research centres: Writing and the Environment; Book, Text and Place 1500-1750; Contemporary Writing. You will become members of the research centres and, therefore, part of the School’s research culture.

The MA draws upon Bath Spa University’s location. We are at the centre of a region whose writers have been intimately engaged with their environment: Coleridge (Nether Stowey and the Quantock Hills), Hardy (Dorchester), Austen (Bath), and the region is also associated with the writers Richard Jeffries, John Cooper Powys and Sylvia Townsend Warner. In addition, the area has some of the finest examples of the English country estate in the UK, for example, Stourhead, Prior Park, Dryham Park and Bowood House, in addition to our own campuses at Newton Park and Corsham Court. Stourhead, for instance, offers a learning space with talks and access to archival material, and has welcomed the prospect of students shadowing the estate guides. We are, then, uniquely positioned to build links with other regional organisations; for example, environmental organisations such as the RSPB or the Forestry Commission, as well as country estates, places of literary heritage run by the National Trust and Bath Preservation Trust.

COURSE ASSESSMENT

The course is assesed by essays, an annotated bibliography, research proposals, and a dissertation or project.
Career opportunities
Typical career destinations include:
• Traditional English postgraduate destinations (e.g. Higher Research degree programmes, public and private sector research careers, book and publishing industries)
• Environmental sector and 'Green' careers (e.g. advocacy, communications, charities, education, internships, ecotourism, urban planning)
• Heritage and tourism sector (e.g. charities and trusts, visitor centres, private estates, local government, planning, management, communications)
• Creative industries (e.g. radio, TV, cable and satellite broadcasters, book publishing, web media, news and magazine media).

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The Joint LLM Comparative and European Private International Law programme aims to provide advanced instruction in key aspects of contemporary private international law, from comparative and European prospective, that are of particular contemporary relevance and which will benefit and interest students coming from a wide range of legal traditions. Read more
The Joint LLM Comparative and European Private International Law programme aims to provide advanced instruction in key aspects of contemporary private international law, from comparative and European prospective, that are of particular contemporary relevance and which will benefit and interest students coming from a wide range of legal traditions.

Why study at Dundee?

Building on the success of the Joint LLM in International Commercial Law, Dundee Law School has established a partnership with the University of Toulouse to run a joint LLM programme in Comparative and European Private International Law.

This is a topic of increasing practical importance in the era of globalisation - where to litigate, what law should be applied, and when can foreign judgments be recognised. This unique programme will explore the contrasting approaches of the common law and civil law worlds.

In the Spring semester (January-March) students will undertake private international law modules at Dundee, and then over the summer a dissertation.

In September, students will go to Toulouse to undertake a range of private international law modules, all taught through English.

What's great about Comparative & European Law at Dundee?

In the Times Good University Guide 2012 Dundee Law School was placed 7th in the United Kingdom law school rankings, and we were ranked 1st in Scotland in the 2011 National Student Survey (NSS).

In the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise Dundee Law School was one of only two law schools in the United Kingdom to achieve a 100% international standard classification, with half of our submissions being graded internationally excellent or world leading. Our commitment on is to provide high quality instruction, with a focus on matters of practical relevance, to prepare students for a successful legal career, whether at home or abroad.

Postgraduate culture

Dundee Law School prides itself as being a friendly Law School where all members of staff are accessible and students are treated as individuals and valued members of our legal community.

We offer all new students an induction programme at the start of each semester, to ensure that all students have the necessary understanding of the UK and European legal systems as well as core principles of public and private law.

We seek to integrate all LLM students into the life of the Law School, and invite you to all guest lectures and seminars. We also have an annual reading party to a beautiful country house location, where you are joined by senior staff and can work on academic skills and dissertation preparation.

Who should study this course?

This course is designed for graduates in Law. However, the LLM can be taken both by students who have already studied private international law at undergraduate level as well as by those who are new to the subject, for the latter will be provided with additional instruction.

How you will be taught

Students are taught through a mix of lectures, seminar discussions and tutorials.

What you will study

Modules

At Toulouse, students will take a number of compulsory modules on core and specialist aspects of private international law.

Fundamental Private International Law
Private International Law Applications
Contract Law in European Context
International Organisations as Law Makers
European Criminal Law.
European contract and business law as well as international law are also covered.

In addition, students are required to attend intensive courses offered by invited foreign professors. At Dundee, students have to choose 2 private international law modules.

How you will be assessed

Substantive modules: continuous assessment plus end of semester examinations in December and March/April. Compulsory dissertation: 12-15,000 words.

Careers

Dundee graduates have reached the highest levels of success in the profession as senior partners, Queen's Counsel, judges and front bench politicians.

We have close links with employers and we offer programmes to support and develop the employability of our students. Our good reputation throughout the profession and close links to employers help Dundee graduates find employment.

The Law School runs an annual Law Fair which attracts law firms and employers from around the UK and further afield. Law firms also regularly visit the law school on an individual basis for recruitment purposes. While many students study law in order to qualify to practise, the skills acquired in a law degree are also attractive to many prospective employers in professions such as:

The Police
Banking
Journalism
Management
Civil service

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The LLM Corporate & Commercial Law programme aims to provide advanced instruction in key aspects of contemporary and commercial law, that are of particular contemporary relevance and which will benefit and interest students coming from a wide range of legal traditions. Read more
The LLM Corporate & Commercial Law programme aims to provide advanced instruction in key aspects of contemporary and commercial law, that are of particular contemporary relevance and which will benefit and interest students coming from a wide range of legal traditions.

Why study Corporate & Commercial Law at Dundee?

The corporate modules at Dundee provide students with a detailed understanding of core issues relating to corporate law and corporate governance as well as allowing for specialisation in intellectual property law.

The programme will also develop a wide range of transferable skills including in research, written and oral presentation and time management.

What's so good about Corporate & Commercial Law at Dundee?

In the Times Good University Guide 2012 Dundee Law School was placed 7th in the United Kingdom law school rankings, and we were ranked 1st in Scotland in the 2011 National Student Survey (NSS).

In the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise Dundee Law School was one of only two law schools in the United Kingdom to achieve a 100% international standard classification, with half of our submissions being graded internationally excellent or world leading. Our commitment on is to provide high quality instruction, with a focus on matters of practical relevance, to prepare students for a successful legal career, whether at home or abroad.

Postgraduate culture

Dundee Law School prides itself as being a friendly Law School where all members of staff are accessible and students are treated as individuals and valued members of our legal community.

We offer all new students an induction programme at the start of each semester, to ensure that all students have the necessary understanding of the UK and European legal systems as well as core principles of public and private law.

We seek to integrate all LLM students into the life of the Law School, and invite you to all guest lectures and seminars. We also have an annual reading party to a beautiful country house location, where you are joined by senior staff and can work on academic skills and dissertation preparation.

Who should study this course?

This course has been developed for those individuals with a background in law who wish to specialise and expand upon their existing knowledge and ability in the area of corporate and commercial law.

How you will be taught

Students are taught through a mix of lectures, seminar discussions and tutorials.

What you will study

To qualify for the LLM in Corporate & Commercial Law, students must complete at least 2 options which adopt a specifically corporate focus and complete their dissertation on a corporate law topic.

The Corporate modules at Dundee provide students with a detailed understanding of core issues relating to corporate law and allow for specialisation in the fields of corporate governance, as well as in banking and finance.

Principles of Corporate Law provides a strong central core which links to many of the other modules in the programme. This module focuses on the structure and development of company law in the United Kingdom in an international context. It covers the radical re-shaping of company law in the United Kingdom in 2006 which will almost certainly impact on the reform of corporate law in other jurisdictions which have shaped their corporate regimes on earlier UK legislation.

Corporate Governance covers issues relating to the distribution of power within companies and looks at governance regimes across the world. The impact of Enron and Worldcom have made governance issues much more high profile than had previously been the case. Dundee's strength in the field of corporations is equally reflected in the specialised option in Banking and Financial Services.

Alongside the corporate modules, students may select options from the School's broad commercial law portfolio, which includes: Intellectual Property Law; Principles of International E-Commerce, Competition Law and International Taxation Law.

How you will be assessed

Substantive modules: continuous assessment plus end of semester examinations in December and March/April. Compulsory dissertation: 12-15,000 words.

Careers

Dundee graduates have reached the highest levels of success in the profession as senior partners, Queen's Counsel, judges and front bench politicians.

We have close links with employers and we offer programmes to support and develop the employability of our students. Our good reputation throughout the profession and close links to employers help Dundee graduates find employment.

The Law School runs an annual Law Fair which attracts law firms and employers from around the UK and further afield. Law firms also regularly visit the law school on an individual basis for recruitment purposes. While many students study law in order to qualify to practise, the skills acquired in a law degree are also attractive to many prospective employers in professions such as:

The Police
Banking
Journalism
Management
Civil service

Find out more about legal careers from our Careers Service.

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The LLM programme in Environmental Law aims to give law graduates and others a conceptual understanding of the main legal issues related to environmental protection and more widely, sustainable development. Read more
The LLM programme in Environmental Law aims to give law graduates and others a conceptual understanding of the main legal issues related to environmental protection and more widely, sustainable development. You will be encouraged to critically evaluate current research and practice in the field.

Why study Environmental Law at Dundee?

Interest in and concern about environmental issues is accelerating and the law has a crucial part to play in shaping our response.

Both public and private sectors are becoming subject to increasingly onerous environmental obligations, from detailed rules on pollution control to wider duties in relation to biodiversity and climate change, whilst environmental impact assessment is now an everyday requirement.

This course will prepare students for the challenges lawyers face in understanding the impact of the physical changes, and to help legislate for the future and to support those grappling with the increasingly complex regulatory setting.

Here at Dundee, the research expertise of the Law School's staff covers all aspects of environmental law and this is reflected in the diverse range of modules offered.

Registered students also have full access to all the electronic databases available to the University, enabling study to be undertaken at times and places to fit your own convenience.

What's so good about Environmental Law at Dundee?

In the Times Good University Guide 2012 Dundee Law School was placed 7th in the United Kingdom law school rankings, and we were ranked 1st in Scotland in the 2011 National Student Survey (NSS).

In the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise Dundee Law School was one of only two law schools in the United Kingdom to achieve a 100% international standard classification, with half of our submissions being graded internationally excellent or world leading. Our commitment on is to provide high quality instruction, with a focus on matters of practical relevance, to prepare students for a successful legal career, whether at home or abroad.

Postgraduate culture

Dundee Law School prides itself as being a friendly Law School where all members of staff are accessible and students are treated as individuals and valued members of our legal community.

We offer all new students an induction programme at the start of each semester, to ensure that all students have the necessary understanding of the UK and European legal systems as well as core principles of public and private law.

We seek to integrate all LLM students into the life of the Law School, and invite you to all guest lectures and seminars. We also have an annual reading party to a beautiful country house location, where you are joined by senior staff and can work on academic skills and dissertation preparation.

Who should study this course?

This course has been developed for those individuals with a background in law who wish to specialise and expand upon their existing knowledge and ability in the area of environmental law.

The taught LLM can be taken over one or two years. The programme can be started in September or January and attendance at class in Dundee is required (two or three classes a week for full-time students; one for part-time students)

How you will be taught

Students are taught through a mix of lectures, seminar discussions and tutorials.

What you will study

The programme aims to give law graduates and others a conceptual understanding of the main legal issues related to environmental regulation as well as knowledge of the subject sufficient to encourage the critical evaluation of current research and practice in the field. Students can choose from a range of modules designed to develop their knowledge and understanding of issues connected with the environment and the law. Possible modules include Sustainable Development, Environmental Regulation, Ecosystems & International Law and Environmental Justice.

How you will be assessed

Substantive modules: continuous assessment plus end of semester examinations in December and March/April. Compulsory dissertation: 15,000 words.

Careers

Dundee graduates have reached the highest levels of success in the profession as senior partners, Queen's Counsel, judges and front bench politicians.

We have close links with employers and we offer programmes to support and develop the employability of our students. Our good reputation throughout the profession and close links to employers help Dundee graduates find employment.

The Law School runs an annual Law Fair which attracts law firms and employers from around the UK and further afield. Law firms also regularly visit the law school on an individual basis for recruitment purposes.

While many students study law in order to qualify to practise, the skills acquired in a law degree are also attractive to many prospective employers in professions such as:

The Police
Banking
Journalism
Management
Civil service

Find out more about legal careers from our Careers Service.

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If you do not wish to select an LLM specialism, you can enrol on our general LLM. This will allow you to construct your own degree with a free choice of available options offered by the Law School, from across the public - private law spectrum. Read more
If you do not wish to select an LLM specialism, you can enrol on our general LLM. This will allow you to construct your own degree with a free choice of available options offered by the Law School, from across the public - private law spectrum.

Why study Law (General) at Dundee?

Dundee Law School offers a broad portfolio of private and public law LLM programmes reflecting the expertise of our academics; from International Commercial Law to Environmental Law and International Criminal Justice & Human Rights.

The Dundee LLM may be started in September or January, it may also be undertaken full time or part-time, wholly in Scotland or in both Scotland and France, if one of our innovative Joint LLM programmes is selected.

Whichever format and start date is chosen you will find that the Dundee LLM is academically rigorous and challenging. We have created programmes of legal merit and practical relevance which are composed of carefully selected modules, designed to inter-relate.

What's so good about Law (General) at Dundee?

In the Times Good University Guide 2012 Dundee Law School was placed 7th in the United Kingdom law school rankings, and we were ranked 1st in Scotland in the 2011 National Student Survey (NSS).

In the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise Dundee Law School was one of only two law schools in the United Kingdom to achieve a 100% international standard classification, with half of our submissions being graded internationally excellent or world leading. Our commitment on is to provide high quality instruction, with a focus on matters of practical relevance, to prepare students for a successful legal career, whether at home or abroad.

Postgraduate culture

Dundee Law School prides itself as being a friendly Law School where all members of staff are accessible and students are treated as individuals and valued members of our legal community.

We offer all new students an induction programme at the start of each semester, to ensure that all students have the necessary understanding of the UK and European legal systems as well as core principles of public and private law.

We seek to integrate all LLM students into the life of the Law School, and invite you to all guest lectures and seminars. We also have an annual reading party to a beautiful country house location, where you are joined by senior staff and can work on academic skills and dissertation preparation.

"Studying at Dundee University helped me develop my legal writing, speaking, and analytical skills and as a result to become a real specialist in the legal field."
Margarita Khegay, LLM International Commercial Law, 2009

Who should study this course?

The programme will appeal to LLB qualified professionals who seek to up-skill, as well as practitioners who want to diversify.

This course has two start dates, one in September and one in January and can be taken as a full-time or part-time course. The full-time course lasts for 12 months, and the part-time course for 24.

How you will be taught

Students are taught through a mix of lectures, seminar discussions and tutorials.

What you will study

Students can choose from any of the modules offered as part of the School of Law LLM programmes, see our website for full course listings.

How you will be assessed

Substantive modules: continuous assessment plus end of semester examinations in December and March/April. Compulsory dissertation: 12-15,000 words.

Careers

Dundee graduates have reached the highest levels of success in the profession as senior partners, Queen's Counsel, judges and front bench politicians.

We have close links with employers and we offer programmes to support and develop the employability of our students. Our good reputation throughout the profession and close links to employers help Dundee graduates find employment.

The Law School runs an annual Law Fair which attracts law firms and employers from around the UK and further afield. Law firms also regularly visit the law school on an individual basis for recruitment purposes. While many students study law in order to qualify to practise, the skills acquired in a law degree are also attractive to many prospective employers in professions such as:

The Police
Banking
Journalism
Management
Civil service

Find out more about legal careers from our Careers Service.

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Dundee Law School has an excellent reputation as a Diploma Provider. We have three decades of experience of delivering the legal practice programme in collaboration with dedicated members of the local legal profession who bring their enthusiasm and expertise to the enterprise. Read more

Why study Professional Legal Practice at Dundee?

Dundee Law School has an excellent reputation as a Diploma Provider. We have three decades of experience of delivering the legal practice programme in collaboration with dedicated members of the local legal profession who bring their enthusiasm and expertise to the enterprise. We pride ourselves on the accessibility of our staff and the fact that students are treated as individuals and valued members of our legal community.

The Diploma aims to bridge the gap between the conclusion of undergraduate study with its emphasis on academic study and the start of practical, hands-on experience in a solicitor's office.
Flexible study routes

This course is offered on both a full-time and a part-time basis, taking either 9 months (full-time) or 2 years (part-time) to complete.
Professional accreditation: Law Society of Scotland

All teaching of the Diploma is based on achieving the outcomes set by the Law Society. These outcomes emphasise the development of practical legal skills within a backdrop of ethical and professional behaviour.

You will consolidate and build on the black letter law and the research and analytical skills that you acquired as undergraduates and apply them to practical situations through interactive learning.

You will be assigned to a law firm, elect a senior partner, and develop your group and team-building skills as part of the learning process. You will be trained in video-recording so that you can electronically record your progress in many of the key skills of lawyering, such as interviewing, negotiating and advocacy.

What's so good about Professional Legal Practice at Dundee?

In the Times Good University Guide 2012 Dundee Law School was placed 7th in the United Kingdom law school rankings, and we were ranked 1st in Scotland in the 2011 National Student Survey (NSS).

In the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise Dundee Law School was one of only two law schools in the United Kingdom to achieve a 100% international standard classification, with half of our submissions being graded internationally excellent or world leading. Our commitment on is to provide high quality instruction, with a focus on matters of practical relevance, to prepare students for a successful legal career, whether at home or abroad.

Postgraduate culture

Dundee Law School prides itself as being a friendly Law School where all members of staff are accessible and students are treated as individuals and valued members of our legal community.

We offer all new students an induction programme at the start of each semester, to ensure that all students have the necessary understanding of the UK and European legal systems as well as core principles of public and private law.

We seek to integrate all LLM students into the life of the Law School, and invite you to all guest lectures and seminars. We also have an annual reading party to a beautiful country house location, where you are joined by senior staff and can work on academic skills and dissertation preparation.

Who should study this course?

This course is designed for students holding a law degree who wish to enter into a career in legal practice as either a solicitor or an advocate.

This course can be taken either full time or part time. The full time course lasts for 9 months and the start date is September.
The course for part time students lasts for two years.

How you will be taught

The assessments are continuous and the focus is on learning by doing, receiving feedback, giving feedback to your peers, practising to improve, and reflecting on your progress.

What you will study

The Diploma curriculum runs over two semesters, from September to April. Primarily delivered by practising solicitors; the programme acts as a bridge between the academic study of law and the requirements of legal practice. Dundee Law School aims to provide a modern, progressive general Diploma programme with a range of specialist electives.

The Law Society framework for the Diploma consists of several compulsory core areas which all students must complete. The modules at Dundee which satisfy these areas are taught in semester 1 with the exception of Business and Financial Services which is taught within Semester 2.

Conveyancing (there are presently three sessions of Conveyancing in semester 2)
Criminal Court Practice
Civil Court Practice
Private Client
Professional Practice (there are presently three sessions of Professional Practice in semester 2)
In semester 2, students will have a choice of a number of electives of 20 credits each and totalling 60 credits. The modules are subject to availability. In 2014-2015 the available elective choices are expected to be:

Advocacy (civil & criminal)
Company / Commercial
Employment Law
Family Law
Advanced Private Client
Renewables
Personal Injury

How you will be assessed

Students are required to reach a satisfactory standard overall in the Diploma modules which they are taking. All aspects - attendance, completion of coursework, participation in tutorials, performance in examinations - are taken into account in judging student performance.

Careers

This course will give you the skills necessary to work as a solicitor or advocate.

We have close links with employers and we offer programmes to support and develop the employability of our students. Our good reputation throughout the profession and close links to employers help Dundee graduates find employment.

The Law School runs an annual Law Fair which attracts law firms and employers from around the UK and further afield. Law firms also regularly visit the law school on an individual basis for recruitment purposes.

Find out more about legal careers from our Careers Service.

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This interdisciplinary programme will equip you with valuable skills and a critical understanding of issues in curatorship, museology and museum management. Read more

Overview

This interdisciplinary programme will equip you with valuable skills and a critical understanding of issues in curatorship, museology and museum management.

You’ll develop your understanding of the ways in which historians and cultural theorists have interpreted and represented architecture, material culture and museums over the past 2,000 years. You’ll look at different methods of display and interpretation and the methodologies behind museum practice and country house collections. Then you’ll choose from optional modules on topics such as cultural theory, sculpture, Hollywood icons or cinema.

At the same time, you’ll develop practical skills. You’ll work on an interpretation project in our Stanley and Audrey Burton Gallery and you’ll even undertake a negotiated work placement in your second semester. Supported by the Centre for Critical Studies in Museums, Galleries and Heritage, you’ll gain the knowledge and skills for a successful career in the museum and art gallery sector.

All students on the degree become members of the Centre for Critical Studies in Museums, Galleries and Heritage and enjoy opportunities from networking events and links to alumni to conferences, seminars and reading groups.

You’ll study in the heart of a cultural hub for this diverse and vibrant region. Leeds is home to a national museum, nine council-run museums, galleries and heritage sites and many private and charitable museums and galleries.

We’re also a short bus or train journey away from everything the rest of Yorkshire has to offer, from The Hepworth Wakefield to the National Media Museum, Yorkshire Sculpture Park and the Bronte Parsonage Museum. We have close links with many of these cultural institutions to support your practical learning.

The degree is also available to study part-time over 24 months. Students who study part-time will attend on one day per week each year. The part-time MA may be of special interest to those who are working in related fields as part of their career development.

Course Content

A set of core modules form the bedrock of the programme, introducing you to the concept of the ‘museum’ and the ways in which Western museums have represented and interpreted history and historical material.

You’ll also use contemporary theory to consider 20th-century museum practice and key questions around curatorship, museology and museum management. The role of the curator, funding and sponsorship and the display and interpretation of objects are among the topics you’ll cover.

Your core modules will give you the chance to apply your theoretical knowledge and gain practical skills. You’ll take part in an interpretation project in the University’s Stanley and Audrey Burton Gallery, as well as completing a work placement in an external arts or heritage organisation.

All MA students in the School take two core modules which develop the research skills to complete research projects such as your essays and dissertation. This will build to our unique MA Symposium in Semester 2, where you present some of your own research across interdisciplinary panels, and a dissertation which enables you to undertake research in a topic of interest to you.

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The MA in English Building History is a collaborative programme delivered by Lifelong Learning and the Department of Archaeology. Read more
The MA in English Building History is a collaborative programme delivered by Lifelong Learning and the Department of Archaeology.

Over the course of study, we broadly cover England’s architectural history from the Anglo-Saxon period to the present day. A range of significant buildings and sites from vernacular dwellings to the Country House are considered, and thus the difference between vernacular and polite styles of building. As well as engaging with key themes and debates, students will be trained in the practical skills of analysis. You will learn how to recognise archetypal styles, and how these were shaped by technological, social, economic, geographic and cultural forces; different methods of investigation; and the relevance of such buildings today, drawing on examples from across the country.

The programme starts in late September/early October, concurrent with each new academic year – places are limited to ensure a constructive atmosphere for discussions.

This is a three-year, part-time, MA programme delivered online in a fully-supported learning environment, with blended learning support for the final year Independent Study Module. Students can exit with a Postgraduate Certificate or Diploma if their circumstances change.

Overview

-Demonstrate detailed knowledge and expertise of English building history and of key buildings c.1000-1950
-Demonstrate understanding of buildings as manifestations of complex social, cultural, economic, and political influences characteristic of a particular historical era and an awareness of the associated scholarly themes and debates
-Apply a range of specialised skills required for analysing, understanding, and interpreting English built history
Assimilate material from a variety of sources and contextualise information in relation to the history of buildings in various forms
-Identify a range of historic buildings’ developments and analyse their phases, date, materials, style, and function
-Identify, select, and employ appropriate media for communicating ideas clearly on English building history to specialist and non-specialist audiences
-Research and develop a critical argument using resources from a broad spectrum of intellectual fields
-Apply contemporary interpretive and theoretical approaches to the form, function, and meaning of a range of historic building types
-Complete a dissertation that is a substantial piece of independent research and present an assessed lecture
-Apply research skills in the field of English Building History.

Structure

This part-time three-year programme will initially comprise six 20-credit modules:
-An Introduction to the Built Environment
-The Medieval Era
-Early Modern Buildings
-The Neo-Classical Tradition
-The Modern Era
-Approaches to Historic Buildings Research

Students will then undertake a 60-credit Independent Study Module (ISM) facilitated by the Department of Archaeology in the third year, which will operate under their usual regulations for ISMs. The ISM includes an assessed lecture assessment. The dates of these will be made available in a timely fashion to allow for travel and accommodation to be arranged. An alternative assessment via Skype (or its equivalent) will be arranged in the event the student is unable to attend campus.

Online Study

Our approach to e-learning is distinctive and may be different from your general perceptions about online study:
-Flexible, fully supported, modular delivery
-Taught exclusively online
-Part-time study (approximately 15 hours per week) allows participants to structure their learning around the other life circumstances

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This course is to be an interdisciplinary programme enabling students to examine, by way of a thesis of the usual length allowed for Buckingham Master’s degree dissertations, aspects of Western Architectural History from the medieval period to the mid-twentieth century. Read more
This course is to be an interdisciplinary programme enabling students to examine, by way of a thesis of the usual length allowed for Buckingham Master’s degree dissertations, aspects of Western Architectural History from the medieval period to the mid-twentieth century. Students will be encouraged to consider the interrelation of architectural history, art history and social history.

The seminar programme, which serves to complement the student’s individual research, will explore these themes in a series of twelve meetings, which will be addressed by some of the United Kingdom’s most distinguished architectural historians. These will be prefaced by a general introductory class led by the Course Director, offering an introduction to research techniques, relevant library resources available in London and through the University of Buckingham’s online subscriptions, to relevant museum collections and to the most recent academic approaches to the subject.

Each seminar will take place in central London in the early evening, followed by a 40-minute question-and-answer session with the seminar speakers, all recognised experts in their fields, and a dinner at which there will be further discussion with the speaker and a general conversation about the topic in hand. Six seminars will be scheduled for the period between October and December, and a further six in the period between the New Year and March.

After the course leader’s general introduction, there will be a series of twelve seminar papers which explore the architecture of the Western world: the medieval castle, the Gothic cathedral, Italian renaissance architecture, French and English baroque palace and country house architecture, European baroque church architecture, the inspiration of the Classical world, the Gothic Revival and historicism, Ruskin and Morris and the birth of conservation philosophy, industrialisation and the transformation of urban architecture, colonial architecture, Beaux-Arts architecture in America in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century, and the meaning of Modern architecture. Reading lists will be made available before each lecture to allow for background reading and discussion with the expert speakers.

Location for seminars: The Reform Club (104 Pall Mall, London, SW1Y 5EW) and the University of Buckingham’s London premises at 51 Gower Street (Bloomsbury, London, WC1E 6HJ)

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Our LLM International Human Rights examines the impact of international human rights standards on national constitutions and laws, with particular focus given to the conflict between international standards and national provision. Read more
Our LLM International Human Rights examines the impact of international human rights standards on national constitutions and laws, with particular focus given to the conflict between international standards and national provision.

The course will expose you to the fundamental aspects of international human rights and provide you with the opportunity to critically examine different systems of law at a higher level. In addition, our LLM provides an opportunity to acquire, or build upon existing skills gained from your undergraduate course - enhancing employment opportunities in the legal profession and providing a basis for progression to doctoral studies.

We have active student-led Legal, Mooting and Debate Societies. Our Student Mooting Society is one of the most successful in England. Our students have reached five finals in the past six years and have regularly beaten teams from some of the country’s most prestigious universities. In the past 10 years, we have beaten eight of the elite Russell Group of universities, including Cambridge, Oxford and Warwick.

Continuing Professional Development

The LLM is accredited for Continuing Professional Development purposes by the Solicitors Regulation Authority and the Bar Standards Board.

What's covered in the course?

The LLM International Human Rights also provides you with an opportunity to assess how international human rights law offers protection to different categories of vulnerable groups. You’ll also study the new and emerging area of law and catastrophe.

We’ll develop your ability to analyse and evaluate the principle features of international human rights, as well as being able to synthesise complex legal issues, arguments and discourse. You’ll learn how to communicate complex and abstract ideas in an articulate and confident manner, as well as developing a host of transferrable skills that employers crave.

The key areas on International Human Rights covered on the LLM modules include:
-Research methods
-The United Nations human rights system
-Regional human rights systems
-Women’s rights
-Children’s rights
-The rights of refugees
-The relationship between business and human rights
-Environmental rights
-Criminal justice
-The right to life

Why Choose Us?

-Our outstanding facilities include two mock courtrooms and an e-learning suite that can be used to bring study to life.
-Our Student Mooting Society is one of the most successful in the country; our students have reached five finals in the past six years and have regularly beaten teams from some of the country’s most prestigious universities including Cambridge University. Two members of the Society are the current Web Legal national mooting champions.
-The School’s Centre for American Legal Studies operates the UK’s largest US internship scheme, giving you the opportunity to gain practical experience in federal and state public defenders’ offices, private attorney offices and American university law schools.
-We have strong professional links with the Birmingham Law Society (the UK’s largest Law Society outside London), the four Inns of Court, and respected firms such as Squire Sanders LLP.
-We also boast a comprehensive law library and an outstanding team of staff with extensive practice experience. This gives you ample access to information, experience and insight.

Course Structure

The LLM is taught by an outstanding team of professional research active staff who have extensive practice experience.

The modules are delivered through weekly seminars, which you’re required to underpin with preparatory reading and research. The seminars are designed to facilitate participation and you will be required to articulate your preparatory reading and work in the seminar and complete activities.

You’ll also conduct work via our online learning system, Moodle. We’ll use this support interaction with the materials through online activities, including discussion forums.

To qualify for a Postgraduate Certificate (PgCert) you must complete 60 credits of taught modules. To qualify for a Postgraduate Diploma (PgDip) you must complete 120 credits of taught modules. To qualify for the LLM you must complete all the taught modules and a dissertation.

Employability

We have active student-led Legal, Mooting and Debate Societies. Our Student Mooting Society is one of the most successful in England. Our students have reached five finals in the past six years and have regularly beaten teams from some of the country’s most prestigious universities. In the past 10 years, we have beaten eight of the elite Russell Group of universities, including Cambridge, Oxford and Warwick.

You may be working, or aspiring to work as a solicitor, barrister, or in-house counsel specialising (or seeking to specialise) in this area of the law. Public sector organisations increasingly require the 'private sector' skills and understanding which you will develop throughout your studies.

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