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Masters Degrees (Counter Insurgency)

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The Masters in History provides you with an outstanding learning experience in the company of Glasgow's thirty-strong cohort of historians, and the opportunity to conceive, design and execute a research project/dissertation. Read more
The Masters in History provides you with an outstanding learning experience in the company of Glasgow's thirty-strong cohort of historians, and the opportunity to conceive, design and execute a research project/dissertation. The programme combines training in historical theory, skills and methods with a wide range of specialist taught options which cover all periods from medieval to late modern, in relation to Scotland, Britain, Europe, America and elsewhere.

Why this programme

-Our links with the University’s museum and art gallery, The Hunterian, provide access to primary source material including an enormous collection of anatomical and pathological specimens, coins, books, manuscripts and ethnography.
-You will also enjoy access to The Baillie Collection, our prized collection of printed medieval and modern sources in Scottish, Irish and English history, which includes printed state papers, Historical Manuscript Commission publications and a select collection of modern monographs.
-If you are looking for the opportunity to pursue your own historical interests in a lively and friendly environment, led and supported by internationally-regarded historians, this programme is ideal for you.

Programme structure

Our pathway structure allows you to tailor your degree to match an interest in one of the following fields:
-Medieval history
-Modern and late modern history
-Scottish history
-Social and cultural history
-Gender history
-Military history

Each programme is built around a hands-on research training course, specialised courses on historical and theoretical themes, and other courses developing your technical skills and other abilities like languages and palaeography.

For your chosen programme, there will be a guided selection of courses that will provide you with specialised knowledge in that field. You will be taught through a series of seminars and workshops. Internationally recognised historians give guest lectures throughout the year.

These courses are taught in history, economic and social history (in the College of Social Sciences), and by related subject areas in the School of Humanities (archaeology, Celtic, classics) and the College of Arts (such as English language and French).

In the final part of the programme, you will select a specialised topic and conduct original primary source research for your dissertation. You are supported in your research and writing up by an assigned supervisor with expertise in your field of enquiry.

Core course
-Research resources and skills for historians

Optional courses (NB this is not an exhaustive list)
-American Way of War
-Approaches to History
-Belief and Conversion in Europe c. 300 – c.1000
-Century of the refugee: refugees and statelessness in comparative perspective
-Chivalry and Warfare
-Crusading Warfare in the Eastern Mediterranean
-Culture, Politics and Society in Highland Clearances
-Gender and Text
-Gender, Politics and Power
-Insurgency and Counter-Insurgency
-Issues, Ideologies & Institutions in Modern Scotland
-Medieval Palaeography 1
-Medieval Deep Structures of Russia and Eastern Europe
-Scottish Castles and Palaces in European Context, c.1100-1600
-Scottish Radicalism
-Scottish Reformation
-Secularisation and Society: the decline of religion in the west since 1800
-Specialist course in Medieval Scottish Studies 1
-Specialist course in Medieval Scottish Studies 2
-Special Topic History 1
-Special Topic in History 2
-The Normans
-The Ottomans in history, 1300–1922
-Thomas Paine as an Enlightenment Revolutionary
-Western Intelligence in an Age of Terror
-Women and Power in Renaissance Italy

Career prospects

Apart from continuing to study a PhD, you can transfer the Arts research skills and methods you learn on this programme to positions in the modern public and private sectors, such as heritage, policy and projects, journalism and teaching.

Positions held by recent History graduates include Editor Business & History Products, Lead Scholar/Instructor and Secretary.

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An understanding of war, for good or ill, is of vital importance. This programme offers the opportunity to study the theory and practice of war in a wide range of aspects, from the Middle Ages to the present day, and from causes to consequences. Read more
An understanding of war, for good or ill, is of vital importance. This programme offers the opportunity to study the theory and practice of war in a wide range of aspects, from the Middle Ages to the present day, and from causes to consequences.

Why this programme

-This MLitt aims to challenge, educate and engage by exposing you to a wide range of different ideas about war. It is specifically designed to broaden and deepen your understanding of the nature of war in theory and practice, and its place in history.
-The University of Glasgow is home to the Scottish Centre for War Studies. You will be able to participate in regular research seminars on critical themes related to conflict as well as to related conferences.
-All courses are designed to expose you to detailed research topics, source criticism and current debate, and are led by internationally acknowledged experts.

Programme structure

You will spend the first semester studying on the degree’s core course which covers both the major thinkers on warfare and the practice and conduct of war.

Core topics may include:
-Jomini, aggressive warfare and the Confederate States of America at war
-The evolution of Military Thought between the two World Wars
-Europe’s ‘small wars’, 1800–present
-Vegetius and ‘Vegetian strategy’ in medieval warfare.

In the second semester, you will take three optional courses which delve in greater detail into a particular aspect of military or strategic history.

Optional courses may include:
-Chivalry and warfare in later medieval Europe, 1300–1450
-The American way of warfare; from the Revolution to the War on Terror
-Insurgency and counter-insurgency, 1800-present
-Western intelligence in an age of terror.

You will complete the programme by writing a dissertation based on your own research. This requires you to engage in original research guided by an expert in the field.

Career prospects

The programme provides an excellent platform for you to move onto PhD studies and an academic career.

Positions held by recent graduates include Development Director, Professor, Correspondent, and Freelance Journalist.

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The MSc is designed for practitioners looking to enhance their skills in the context of broader theoretical models, as well as graduates with a career in government, the armed forces, inter-governmental organisations, NGOs or academia in mind. Read more
The MSc is designed for practitioners looking to enhance their skills in the context of broader theoretical models, as well as graduates with a career in government, the armed forces, inter-governmental organisations, NGOs or academia in mind.

The intensive professional workshops are open to practitioners who are not on the MSc programmes as Continuing Professional Development courses, enhancing students' opportunities for networking and learning from other practitioners' perspectives.

Courses are taught by a mixture of academics and practitioners, and cover both critical and problem-solving approaches. Conflict dynamics are analysed drawing on multiple disciplines, including security studies, peace studies, anthropology, law, archaeology, history and political theory. Modules include both traditional term-long modules and short, usually more skills-oriented, continuing professional development courses as well as fieldtrips (e.g. past fieldtrips were organised to Labanon, Napal, Kenya, Sri Lanka and Kosovo).

Student Profiles

“Doing MSc Defence, Development and Diplomacy was an enriching experience for me mainly because of a huge diversity of students participating from all corners of the world having their own unique views on contemporary issues, academically engaged professors with profound knowledge and experience and equally stimulating academic environment of Durham. I was particularly amazed at how professors always motivated us to think critically on contemporary issues and existing knowledge system dealing with them, develop extended understanding of pressing issues that we are facing today, and offer innovative solutions to those problems.” Salina Chaulagain, 2015/16

“Complementing my background in Middle Eastern Studies and Political Science, the MSc DDD has equipped me with tools used by practitioners and taught me to problematise, analyse and empathise with people in a conflict-ridden world.” Clemens Chay, 2014/15

“This programme uniquely addresses the issue of siloed thinking present in the interwoven sectors of defence, development, and diplomacy. The course is grounded on a “critical thinking” versus “problem solving” approach, and unswervingly focuses on the theory-practice connection. Most importantly, though, I cannot say enough about the caliber of my DGSi peer group. I am thankful not only for their friendship, but for the professional insights they will be able to offer in years to come. As a military officer, I am grateful for the ability to pick up the phone and gain a better understanding of the dynamics of a conflict or an operation from one of my former Durham peers.” Eric Davids, 2014/15

Course Structure

With conflicts becoming either increasingly drawn-out, asymmetric wars of attrition or normalise into states of no peace – no war, our understanding of conflict and conflict intervention is shifting. Conflicts are rarely determined by military victory, diplomacy or long-term development, but require to securing populations through a comprehensive approach that sees to their political, and economic, as well as their security-related needs. Their outcome will be determined by how well the different arms of government and civil society, both locally and internationally, can work together and how well they understand each others' perspectives.

This inter-disciplinary and custom designed MSc offers the unique opportunity to look at conflict, conflict intervention and post-conflict reconstruction through the lenses of defence, development and diplomacy.

The MSc is designed for graduates with a career in government, the armed forces, inter-governmental organisations, NGOs or academia in mind, and for practitioners looking to enhance their practical skills while placing these within a broader theoretical perspective.

Five core modules worth 75 credits plus a Dissertation worth 60 credits plus three optional modules to the value of 45 credits.

Core Modules
-Defence, Development and Diplomacy in Conflict: Evolving Actors, Factors and Paradigms
-Conflict Prevention and Sustainable Peace
-Conflict Intervention: International Law, Counter-Insurgency and Conflict Diplomacy
-Post-Conflict Reconstruction: Stabilisation, Development and State-Building
-Capstone Exercise: Humanitarian Intervention Simulation (in MSc-specific roles)
-Dissertation

Optional Modules - Optional module in previous years have included:
-Religion, Culture and Conflict
-Conflict Mediation
-Fieldtrip
-Conflict Sensitive Programme Management
-Re-thinking Counter Terrorism
-Conflict Analysis
-Urban Violence - Urban Peacebuilding
-International Negotiation as Instrument in Conflict Management
-Policing Post-Conflict Cities

Learning and Teaching

At the beginning of the academic year, students go through two-day induction events in which they are informed about the University, the School, the MSc programmes and the facilities available for their learning.

The 180 credits one-year MSc degree programme is divided into five core and three optional modules of 15 credits each. Furthermore, students have to submit a dissertation of 60 credits of not more than15,000 words. Most of the modules are delivered during the first two terms and students spend the remaining time to write the dissertation.

Although all modules have 18/19 contact hours, the core modules are spread over 9/10 weeks and 132 hours of self-directed learning. The modules are mainly delivered through weekly 2-hour sessions which take the form of a one hour lecture and a one hour tutorial. The form in which seminars are conducted can differ from one module to another. Typically modules would have elements of lectures, discussions, and presentations from students—the extent of each of these components would differ from one module to another. The optional modules of the programme are delivered over two full days, through a mixture of lectures, Q&A sessions, seminar discussions, and role plays.

Formative assessment is given on seminar contributions, role plays, and formative essays. Students have the opportunity to meet their lecturers to discuss their marks and other issues arising from their course performance. Students also have the opportunity to attend ‘essay surgeries’ in which they can discuss the structure and content of their essays early in the course.

Students can also meet their module coordinators or programme coordinator during their weekly contact hours or by making an appointment. When students are working on their dissertations during the latter half of the year, they are required to attend two 4-hour workshops. In addition, they have the opportunity to meet their assigned supervisors for an average of 6 meetings. Students also have access to the MSc Programme Director and the School’s Director of Taught Post Graduate Studies whenever there is a need.

SGIA conducts weekly seminars and organises lectures and conferences which all postgraduate students can attend. Students are also fully integrated into the Durham Global Security Institute, which delivers this MSc programme and hosts guest lectures and seminars throughout the year. These events provide students with the opportunity to engage with, and debate, the most important issues in current political and international studies, and in conflict, peace and security studies.

Throughout the programme students can contact the Careers Office of the University to get advice on available job prospects and get assistance on applying for these.

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The traditional military threats which defined global security matters for the best part of the 20th century have been quickly replaced by new and re-emerging security challenges. Read more
The traditional military threats which defined global security matters for the best part of the 20th century have been quickly replaced by new and re-emerging security challenges.

Why this programme

-You will study research methods within the College of Social Sciences’ Graduate School which is one of the top research training centres in the UK and benefits from ESRC recognition for many of its courses.
-You will have the opportunity to undertake a study visit to Brussels which offers the chance to experience security and political institutions like NATO and the European Commission and meet key security personnel.
-You will combine your research methods training with a range of security focused optional courses from a broad spectrum of subject areas, including politics, sociology, Central & East European studies, war studies, computing science, geography, law, business and education.
-The programme includes a series of master classes from high profile professionals and academics working in the field of security.
-You will have the opportunity to take part in special formative learning workshops and training days - working with government officials and policy-makers to simulate the process of responding to major international security crises.

Programme structure

Core courses
-International security and global politics
-Thematic issues in global security
-Qualitative research methods
-Social sciences statistics
-Introduction to social theory for researchers
-Dissertation

Sample optional courses
-Critical perspectives on securities and vulnerabilities
-Comparative approaches to warfare and violent conflict
-Freedom, security and justice in the European Union
-Globalisation and European integration
-Globalisation and the new security agenda in Central and Eastern Europe
-Society, environment and the concept of sustainable development in post Soviet Russia
-Post-Soviet Russia: renegotiating global and local identities
-The European Union in international politics and development
-International relations theory
-The Internet and civil society
-Human rights and global politics
-Insurgency and counter-insurgency, 1800-present
-British military power since 1945
-The American way of war: from the revolution to the war on terror
-Social change and social justice: activism, social movements and democracy
-Development, postcolonialism and environment
-The global criminal economy
-Ethics in global politics

Career prospects

The programme provides a dedicated research training pathway if you are to looking to go onto doctoral study or to seek a career within a social research field.

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This MA programme examines key questions of war and peace, life and death, safety and survival. A core module on Concepts and Theories of International Security provides a lens on the most pressing contemporary challenges to international security. Read more
This MA programme examines key questions of war and peace, life and death, safety and survival. A core module on Concepts and Theories of International Security provides a lens on the most pressing contemporary challenges to international security. It encourages you to develop critical and reflective perspectives on the engagement between ‘traditional’ and ‘critical’ approaches to the issues under consideration.

With around 20 members of staff working in this area within PAIS, we can offer you an expansive and distinctive range of optional modules. Topics available for advanced study include: regional security environments; the politics and practices of intelligence and covert action; migration, human security and development; insurgency and (counter) terrorism.

Many of our postgraduates have advanced into roles in international organisations (e.g. UN, World Bank), foreign ministries and intelligence services (e.g. Egypt, Malta and UK), NGOs (e.g. Campaign Against Arms Trade), security and development consulting, think tanks, charities and journalism.

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This fully-online MA in Military History offers potential graduate students from around the world a chance to engage with reputable military historians and leading academics, also from around the world, through 24 hours a day, 7 days a week ongoing lectures and discussion seminars in state-of-the-art learning environments. Read more
This fully-online MA in Military History offers potential graduate students from around the world a chance to engage with reputable military historians and leading academics, also from around the world, through 24 hours a day, 7 days a week ongoing lectures and discussion seminars in state-of-the-art learning environments.

This is military history like never before; universally-accessible, affordable and dynamic. Students will be offered a wide range of fascinating topics to explore, from classic 'war theorists' to military technologies to counter-insurgency tactics. You will then be able to combine your research with skills-based analysis, under the personal supervision of a qualified expert in the field.

Successful completion of this course will enhance your career prospects, whether studied at PGCert, PGDip or MA level . It will be particularly relevant to archivists and curators, researchers, journalists, political and central government professionals, civil servants, military professionals, conflict resolution and NGO workers, charity and campaign workers. Attainment of the MA degree could also lead to doctoral research.

Typical modules include:

The Discipline of Military History
The Rise of Air Power
The Evolution of Modern Sea Power
War Media & Propaganda
The American Civil War
The Second World War
The Art of War to the Age of Napoleon

All of our modules can be easily accessed and feature exciting ‘virtual classrooms’ where lectures and seminar discussions are conducted on a weekly basis, making the most of a variety of multi-media formats. Furthermore, our online platform gives you access to unlimited course materials and University-supported learning resources at no extra cost.

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How has the decline of European empires in the extra-European world shaped the 20th century – and beyond?. The Master’s degree in The Making of the Modern World is an innovative programme which addresses the legacies of decolonisation on contemporary nation and state-building around the world. Read more
How has the decline of European empires in the extra-European world shaped the 20th century – and beyond?

The Master’s degree in The Making of the Modern World is an innovative programme which addresses the legacies of decolonisation on contemporary nation and state-building around the world. Students are introduced to debates about decolonisation and its relationship with modernity, addressing the question of how the end of empire has shaped the modern world.

This MA examines the nature of decolonisation in comparative perspective, looking at the British, French, Dutch, Spanish, Portuguese, German and Belgian empires, rather than limiting the study of empire to a few case studies or to a single colonial power. The MA examines the differences in colonial governance and decolonisation processes, and how this has impacted the development of successor colonial states and the processes of decolonisation, nation-building, and the strengthening of the state which these states experienced.

Upon graduating, students will receive a degree awarded by the University of London.

Students will:

Learn about and analyse the political, developmental, institutional and social legacies of the decolonisation process;
Understand the connectivity between domestic politics and society and international diplomacy and policymaking;
Develop skills in understanding and analysing archival sources and undertaking archival and oral research;
Understand the ways in which the decline of the European empires in the extra-European world has shaped the 20th century.
This advanced degree provides an excellent foundation for students who wish to expand their knowledge of international history, politics and society prior to working for international organisations, the media, or in other professional capacities. It also provides the base for those wishing to do further research in African, Asian or European studies.

In addition to the knowledge gained over the course of the MA, the skills students develop - including the ability to analyse material in detail, process quantitative and qualitative data to reach informed conclusions, critique existing knowledge and conduct independent research - will be relevant to a wide variety of careers and will broaden students' appeal to a range of employers.

Structure

In order to pass the MA, students need to have achieved a total of 90 European Credit Transfer and Accumulation System (ECTS) credits. ECTS credits are recognised across the European Union. The degree comprises four compulsory modules (including the dissertation), and three optional modules.

Required (core) modules (Autumn Term):

Historical Research Skills (with the Institute of Historical Research) [10 ECTS]
European Decolonisation in the 20th Century [10 ECTS]
Ethnicity, Nationalism, Liberation and Identity: the view from the Extra-European world [10 ECTS]
Optional modules* (Spring Term):

Diplomacy and Decolonisation [10 credits]
Geopolitics and Decolonisation [10 credits]
Policing, Intelligence and Counter-Insurgency [10 credits]
Decolonisation, Nation-State Building and Development [10 credits]
*All modules are subject to availability.

Dissertation [30 ECTS]

Students will complete a 15,000-word research-based dissertation on a chosen topic within human rights which is of special interest to them. This topic will be chosen in consultation with your dissertation supervisor, who will provide support.

Assessment

The MA is assessed primarily through essays, although class participation also contributes towards assessment. Additional formative assessments include class presentations.

Mode of study

Study options: full-time over one year, or part time over 24 months.

Students undertaking the MA on a part-time basis will take two required modules in Autumn Term of their first year, and up to two optional modules in the Spring Term. They will take one required module in the Autumn Term of their second year, and one or two optional modules in the Spring Term.

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