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Masters Degrees (Counter Fraud)

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This course provides you with a unique, flexible approach to studying which allows you to not only choose the units and subject areas you study, but to determine the award you exit with through your choice. Read more

Why take this course?

This course provides you with a unique, flexible approach to studying which allows you to not only choose the units and subject areas you study, but to determine the award you exit with through your choice. Through more than 15 units, this framework allows you to shape your studies to your own interests, developing your knowledge and understanding through your choice of units and dissertation topic.

The subject areas available to study are:

Criminology
Criminal Justice
Security Management
Counter Fraud and Counter Corruption
Cybercrime (Campus-based only)
Criminal Psychology
Crime Science
International Justice (Distance learning only)
Policing and Leadership (Distance learning only)
Intelligence (in combination only)

What will I experience?

On this course you can:

specialise in units leading to an exit award in one of the main subject areas (route A) - e.g. MSc Criminal Psychology
follow a combined route to an exit award in two of the subject areas (route B) - e.g. MSc Crime Science and Cybercrime
study as a campus-based or distance-learning student, tailoring our delivery to suit your needs

Module Details

You will study for this course by following one of the two available routes, depending on whether you want to study, and be recognised for, one or two subject areas.

Whichever route you choose, you will also study the Research Methods and Research Ethics unit. This unit will enable you to both develop and add to your research skills, through the use of specialist research workshops, and help prepare you for completing your dissertation.

Route A

Route A allows you to focus on one subject area from the list above, studying a core unit and specialist option relevant to that subject area. Route A also gives you the option to study a unit from outside that subject area, should you want to broaden you knowledge even further. For example, if you are interested in Criminal Psychology, but want to take one of the units specific to Criminal Justice, this framework will allow you to do so.

Route B

Route B allows you to combine two of the subject areas in your studies, and this will be reflected in the degree title awarded. For example, if you have an interest in Crime Science but also in Cybercrime, you can study both subjects and exit with an MSc in Crime Science and Cybercrime.

Programme Assessment

Assessment is based upon a range of written assignments including essays, case study, a literature review and research proposal focused on your chosen project. You will also complete a 15,000-word dissertation. For each assignment full academic support is provided by an academic subject expert and you will be provided with academic supervisor once you have identified your dissertation subject area.

Student Destinations

Given the broad range of issues considered and the skills acquired throughout the degree programme, you will be well equipped to embark upon a diverse range of career choices. Over the years our graduates have found employment in areas including policing (both as officers and as civilian staff), crime analysis, probation, the courts and prison service, local authorities, academia and research, charities and private industry to name just a few.

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This course provides you with a unique, flexible approach to studying which allows you to not only choose the units and subject areas you study, but to determine the award you exit with through your choice. Read more

Why take this course?

This course provides you with a unique, flexible approach to studying which allows you to not only choose the units and subject areas you study, but to determine the award you exit with through your choice. Through more than 15 units, this framework allows you to shape your studies to your own interests, developing your knowledge and understanding through your choice of units and dissertation topic.

The subject areas available to study are:

Criminology
Criminal Justice
Security Management
Counter Fraud and Counter Corruption
Cybercrime (Campus-based only)
Criminal Psychology
Crime Science
International Justice (Distance learning only)
Policing and Leadership (Distance learning only)
Intelligence (in combination only)

What will I experience?

On this course you can:

specialise in units leading to an exit award in one of the main subject areas (route A) - e.g. MSc Criminal Psychology
follow a combined route to an exit award in two of the subject areas (route B) - e.g. MSc Crime Science and Cybercrime
study as a campus-based or distance-learning student, tailoring our delivery to suit your needs

Module Details

You will study for this course by following one of the two available routes, depending on whether you want to study, and be recognised for, one or two subject areas.

Whichever route you choose, you will also study the Research Methods and Research Ethics unit. This unit will enable you to both develop and add to your research skills, through the use of specialist research workshops, and help prepare you for completing your dissertation.

Route A

Route A allows you to focus on one subject area from the list above, studying a core unit and specialist option relevant to that subject area. Route A also gives you the option to study a unit from outside that subject area, should you want to broaden you knowledge even further. For example, if you are interested in Criminal Psychology, but want to take one of the units specific to Criminal Justice, this framework will allow you to do so.

Route B

Route B allows you to combine two of the subject areas in your studies, and this will be reflected in the degree title awarded. For example, if you have an interest in Crime Science but also in Cybercrime, you can study both subjects and exit with an MSc in Crime Science and Cybercrime.

Programme Assessment

Assessment is based upon a range of written assignments including essays, case study, a literature review and research proposal focused on your chosen project. You will also complete a 15,000-word dissertation. For each assignment full academic support is provided by an academic subject expert and you will be provided with academic supervisor once you have identified your dissertation subject area.

Student Destinations

Given the broad range of issues considered and the skills acquired throughout the degree programme, you will be well equipped to embark upon a diverse range of career choices. Over the years our graduates have found employment in areas including policing (both as officers and as civilian staff), crime analysis, probation, the courts and prison service, local authorities, academia and research, charities and private industry to name just a few.

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The electronic handling of information is one of the defining technologies of our age. Enormous volumes of information are routinely stored and transmitted worldwide and most aspects of our daily lives would come to a halt should the information infrastructure fail. Read more
The electronic handling of information is one of the defining technologies of our age. Enormous volumes of information are routinely stored and transmitted worldwide and most aspects of our daily lives would come to a halt should the information infrastructure fail.

However, with the benefits deriving from the ability to automatically manage so much information, come major threats to businesses, governments and individuals. These threats include possible fraud through information manipulation, deliberate damage to stored and transmitted information, and blackmail associated with the threat of damage.

The field of Information Security, namely the study of countermeasures to these real and serious threats, has grown up very rapidly in recent years. The subject embraces a range of technologies such as cryptography, computer security, and fraud detection, and also includes the study of how security can best be managed.

This advanced course is taught by the Information Security Group (ISG), and security experts from industry. It is designed to produce a comprehensive education in the technical, legal and commercial aspects of Information Security.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/isg/coursefinder/mscinformationsecurity.aspx

Why choose this course?

- This pioneering course was the first of its kind in the world. Our Information Security Group (ISG) was recognised in 1998 when the College was awarded a Queen’s Anniversary Prize for the ISG’s work. The citation read “This pioneering Group provides a unique national resource for the training of information security specialists and the development of highly secure communications and computer systems. It offers world-leading independent expertise in a field of crucial importance where trust and integrity are paramount.”

- As this course was the first of its kind, we consulted with more than 20 companies and Government departments to ascertain what they felt such a degree course should contain. Many of these organisations have maintained close links with the department and, in a typical year, you would benefit from lectures or seminars from up to 50 guest speakers.

- Having an offering that is up to date and relevant to potential employers is a key theme to all our activities. Therefore, in addition to our comprehensive syllabus and accompanying seminars, you will be offered some cutting-edge optional units.

- You will have access to virtualization software from the ISG Lab in which you can experiment with network security settings and concepts introduced in these units. As well as the general purpose lab, there is also a Penetration Testing Laboratory and the Smart Card Centre where specialist equipment and tools may be accessed for those who may be undertaking a practical project in these areas.

- The ISG also recognises the standing of the CISSP qualification in the workplace. As a result we have established an arrangement with (ISC)2 whereby you will attend an intensive two-day CISSP revision course at Royal Holloway and then sit the associated exam on campus.

- Our cryptographers have close links with Bletchley Park and many students visit that historic site during their studies.

Department research and industry highlights

The ISG is an interdisciplinary research group conducting internationally-leading research in all areas of information security:

- device and system security (including security of portable devices, smart cards, smart tokens and embedded systems)

- protection of evolving networks (including wireless, mobile, ad hoc and ubiquitous networks)

- trusted computing

- security infrastructure provision (including protection of critical national infrastructure and grid security)

- socio-technical studies in information security (including both organisational information security research and sociological research in the wider "Information Society" context)

- application security (including identity management and software security)

- fundamental security technologies (including cryptography, cryptographic protocols, and authentication technologies).

Our breadth of coverage, coupled with our size, distinguished educational and academic track record, and long-standing and deep engagement with industry, makes the ISG a unique research group in the UK.

On completion of the course graduates will have a solid foundation in:
- the essential concepts, methods and approaches of information security

- the main security issues in the development of digital business activities

- the technical, legal and commercial issues that need to be addressed when assessing the information security needs of an organisation

- the organisational and personal issues that need to be addressed when implementing information security within an organisation

- the potential sources of vulnerability within an information system and the possible implications of failing to counter these with adequate security controls

- the appropriate countermeasures to information security threats and the likely implications of their adoption

- the relevance and impact of new developments in information security threats, technologies and controls.

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by written examinations (in the four core and two elective units) and by completing the MSc Project.

Employability & career opportunities

Our graduates are highly employable and, in recent years, have entered many different information security-related areas, including banking, telecommunications, large security consultancies, public utilities, and the retail sector. This taught Masters course also equips postgraduate students with a solid foundation for continued PhD studies.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time and postgraduate degrees (campus based courses) are made on the Royal Holloway admissions webpages https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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We have tailored the MA in Criminology and Criminal Justice course to meet the requirements of graduates and professionals wishing to further their studies in this vibrant and increasingly important subject. Read more

We have tailored the MA in Criminology and Criminal Justice course to meet the requirements of graduates and professionals wishing to further their studies in this vibrant and increasingly important subject.

Covering exciting contemporary issues within the criminal process, such as homicide investigation, the threat of global organised crime and fraud investigation the course will equip you with the skills and knowledge necessary to succeed in this competitive field.

The research methodology and dissertation modules aim to ensure that you receive training in a range of research skills; invaluable in both the professional and academic worlds.

Course detail

During the course, you will gain an understanding of key issues in criminal justice policy and the administration of justice.

You will study topics which will give you a specialised understanding of organised crime, the complex relationship between policing and public perception, the investigation of homicidein the UK and internationally, and you will develop a working knowledge of the techniques used in investigating fraud and money laundering.

Modules

• Contemporary Criminal Justice Issues

• Counter Terrorism Policing

• Investigating Financial Crime

• Homicide Investigation

• Organised Crime

• Research Methodology

• Dissertation.

Format

We use a wide range of teaching and learning methods to meet different learning styles and objectives. Our teaching strategy places you at the centre of the teaching and learning process in order to stimulate your interest so that you learn through involvement. We aim to encourage you to learn by your participation in well-structured learning activities.

During your MA studies, you can expect to benefit from small group lectures and workshops, class discussions with your peers and academics, and frequent formal and informal feedback on your ideas and your progress. Although postgraduate level study requires a significant amount of individual study outside of scheduled classes, you will be supported by staff, who will direct you to relevant resources and help guide your learning.

Assessment

Assessment methods vary between modules, but will comprise of a combination of coursework and examinations.

Career and study progression

A Criminology postgraduate degree can open the door to many exciting and rewarding careers. Some of the most popular careers include:

• police

• probation and prison officers

• private companies in the security industry

• in the court system

• administration of justice.

The skills you acquire on this postgraduate level course are also transferable and valued across many other sectors, such as:

• finance

• the charity sector

• the civil service

• the public sector

• the public services.

Research study enables you to specialise in the field you are passionate about.

How to apply

Click the following link for information on how to apply to this course.

Scholarships and bursaries

Information about scholarships and bursaries can be found here.



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The rapid expansion of the use of digital technology has been followed by a similar increase in computer-based crime. Read more
The rapid expansion of the use of digital technology has been followed by a similar increase in computer-based crime. This increase in criminal activity has led to a demand for qualified computer forensic analysts who can investigate digital technology based crime and uncover evidence that helps build a case against suspects. Forensic computer analysts may be involved in a range of investigations, such as online fraud, digital espionage, counter-terrorism, possession of illegal imagery and information theft.

A typical investigation would involve identifying and securing computer equipment, followed by the application of forensic methods and specialist computer programmes in pursuit of evidence. Tasks include recovering data from digital media, analysis of records to establish the location of a device, uncovering data trails, careful documentation of the investigation, presenting findings and acting as an expert witness in court.

You will be taught by an internationally recognised team from the University’s Information Security Research Group, and external speakers contribute to delivering the latest expertise and developments.

The University of South Wales are the only university in Wales to gain the prestigious provisional certification from GCHQ, the UK Government’s Communications HQ, for its Masters course in Computer Forensics.

See the website http://courses.southwales.ac.uk/courses/264-msc-computer-forensics

What you will study

- Computer Forensics and Crime Investigation
- Forensics Techniques and Data Recovery
- Computer Law
- Professional Skills Development
- Advanced Research Methods
- Project Management
- Security Management
- Research Project: an investigation of your choice, related to the course
- MSc Project: the development and evaluation of a significant application or task of your choice, related to the course

Learning and teaching methods

The course is delivered in four major blocks to offer an intensive but focused learning pattern, with two start points every year – February and September. Full-time students will typically spend 12 hours in classes each week. If you choose to study part-time, this is reduced to around six hours each week. You will study through lectures, tutorials, practical
sessions, seminars and projects.

Work Experience and Employment Prospects

You will have had the opportunity to develop skills that strongly relate to the role of a forensic computer analyst or an information security analyst. These include problem solving, a systematic approach to work and an awareness of security standards and legislation.

Graduates will be well equipped for employment, including working for the police, security services, commercial sector, or organisations that specialise in computer security.

Assessment methods

You will need to spend a significant amount of time working independently, reading and preparing for assessments. While the style of coursework may vary, research-style papers or essays of around 4,000 words in length are typical. You will also work on a significant research project and a major project of your choice, where strong independent thinking, critical analysis and project management skills will be important.

Facilities

We have a full range of high-specification computer labs and an ongoing investment programme to ensure that our facilities stay at the forefront of computing developments.

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This programme gives you the widest choice of modules. Modules can be selected from those available for students studying in International Trade and Commercial Law, and European Trade and Commercial Law, Corporate Law and International Law and Governance. Read more

This programme gives you the widest choice of modules. Modules can be selected from those available for students studying in International Trade and Commercial Law, and European Trade and Commercial Law, Corporate Law and International Law and Governance.

Having completed your taught modules, you will undertake an extended dissertation of 10,000, 15,000 or 20,000 words in length, under the supervision of a member of staff who is an expert in your chosen field of research. Teaching is by a mixture of lectures and smaller, student-led, seminars or tutorial groups. The dissertation is pursued by independent research.

Students attending the programme are drawn from a broad range of countries, and their previous academic or professional experiences enrich the programme. The Law School hosts a number of research centres, including the Institute for Commercial and Corporate Law, the Durham European Law Institute, the Centre for Criminal Law and Criminal Justice, Law and Global Justice at Durham and the Human Rights Centre. Students are encouraged to participate in all their activities.

Course Structure

Students must study one compulsory module in Applied Research Methods in Law. You must also choose a number of additional taught modules, from a large body of optional modules. Finally, a dissertation must be completed, on a topic chosen by you in consultation with your allotted supervisor.

Core Modules

  • Applied Research Methods in Law
  • Dissertation (of 10,000, 15,000 or 20,000 words).

Optional Modules

Please note: not all modules necessarily run every year, and we regularly introduce new modules. The list below provides an example of the type of modules which may be offered.

  • Advanced Issues in International Economic Law
  • Advanced Issues of International Intellectual Property Law
  • Advanced Law of Obligations
  • Commercial Fraud
  • Corporations in an EU Context
  • Current Issues in Company Law
  • Competition Law
  • Fundamentals of International Law
  • Fundamental Issues in International Legal Governance
  • Global Environmental Law
  • Global Institutions
  • International and Comparative Corporate Insolvency Law
  • International Co-operation in Criminal Matters in Europe
  • International Counter Terrorism: Theory and Practice
  • International Humanitarian Law
  • International Protection of Human Rights
  • International Trade Law & Policy
  • International Sales Law
  • Introduction to Corporate Governance
  • Introduction to EU Law
  • Introduction to Intellectual Property Law
  • Law of Oil and Gas Contracts
  • Law of the Sea
  • Mergers and Acquisitions
  • Takeover Regulation in the EU.

Course Learning and Teaching

This programme involves both taught modules and a substantial dissertation component. Taught modules are delivered by a mixture of lectures and seminars. Although most lectures do encourage student participation, they are used primarily to introduce chosen topics, identify relevant concepts, and introduce the student to the main debates and ideas relevant to the chosen topic. They give students a framework of knowledge that students can then develop, and reflect on, through their own reading and study.

Seminars are smaller-sized, student-led classes. Students are expected to carry out reading prior to classes, and are usually set questions or problems to which to apply the knowledge they have developed. Through class discussion, or the presentation of student papers, students are given the opportunity to test and refine their knowledge and understanding, in a relaxed and supportive environment.

The number of contact hours in each module will reflect that module’s credit weighting. 15-credit modules will have, in total, 15 contact hours (of either lectures or seminars); 30-credit modules will have 30 contact hours. Students must accumulate, in total, between 90 and 120 credits of taught modules for the programme (depending upon the length of their dissertation).

In addition to their taught modules, all students must produce a dissertation of between 10,000 and 20,000 words. This is intended to be the product of the student’s own independent research. Each student is allocated a dissertation supervisor, and will have a series of (usually four) one-to-one meetings with their supervisor over the course of the academic year.

Finally, all taught postgraduate students on this programme, are encouraged to attend the various events, including guest lectures and seminars, organised through the School’s research centres, including the Institute for Commercial and Corporate Law, the Human Rights Centre, Law and Global Justice at Durham, the Centre for Gender and Law at Durham, the Centre for Criminal Law and Criminal Justice, and the Durham European Law Institute.



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LJMU's Policing and Cyber-Crime Masters enables you to explore the interface between policing and computing, developing the skills required for contemporary crime investigation. Read more
LJMU's Policing and Cyber-Crime Masters enables you to explore the interface between policing and computing, developing the skills required for contemporary crime investigation.

-Based in the Liverpool Centre for Advanced Policing Studies
-Collaborative programme with the Faculty of Engineering and Technology
-Reflects increasing police involvement in computer forensics/cyber crime
-Explore the interface between policing and computing
-Ideal for serving officers and those about to embark on their policing or academic career
-Excellent employment opportunities in policing and fraud investigation
-Valuable foundation for progression to PhD


MSc Policing and Cyber-Crime combines supervised independent research with specialist training in research methods and academic skills, while also helping students become aware of emerging approaches currently practiced in the discipline.

​Over the course of the programme you will be introduced to key developments in policing studies and given the skills necessary to produce a successful postgraduate research project. You will work individually with a supervisor throughout the year, as well as taking part in taught modules with fellow Policing Studies students and/or students from other disciplines/Faculties. In addition, you will be part of the wider research activities of the Liverpool Centre for Advanced Policing Studies, which aims to provide outstanding, innovative teaching and research for the advancement of policing and police forces.

​You will receive specialist supervision and study within a diverse community of fellow researchers, including specialist staff who work within the studies of computing. Staff are active in a wide range of fields including: Crime Prevention, GIS, People Trafficking, Public Order, Mental Health, Multi Agency and Partnership Working in the Public Sector, Computer Crime, Investigation, Terrorism and Counter-terrorism, Port Security, Risk Management and Education.

What you will study on this degree

Please see guidance below on core modules:

​Policing in Context

Gain insights into current policing, community safety and criminal justice priorities by exploring different perspectives that relate to policing, regulatory processes, professional values and ethics

Advanced Research Skills

In preparation for your dissertation, this module introduces key epistemological and methodological issues that impact upon research into crime, security, community safety and criminal justice

Computer Security

Develop an in-depth knowledge of various security threats and vulnerabilities in computer systems as well as the importance of computer security

Network Forensics

Develop a critical appreciation of both the theoretical and practical issues in the field of network forensics

Advanced Topics in Network Security
Explore cutting-edge developments in Network Security by studying recent academic research in the area

Network Security

Develop a deep understanding of various security vulnerabilities in and threats to computer networks as well as the importance of network security

Dissertation

Analyse and interpret an issue in your chosen field

​The information listed in the section entitled 'What you will study' is an overview of the academic content of the programme that will take the form of either core or option modules. Modules are designated as core or option in accordance with professional body requirements and internal Academic Framework review, so may be subject to change. Students will be required to undertake modules that the University designates as core and will have a choice of designated option modules. Additionally, option modules may be offered subject to meeting minimum student numbers.

Academic Framework reviews are conducted by LJMU from time to time to ensure that academic standards continue to be maintained.

Please email if you require further guidance or clarification.

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