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Masters Degrees (Corruption)

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Corruption damages economic development and the health of civil society, nationally and internationally. Read more

Corruption damages economic development and the health of civil society, nationally and internationally.

Our innovative LLM in Corruption, Law and Governance brings Sussex’s expertise to Qatar, offering a challenging insight into issues of corruption, law and governance with a particular focus on the problems being encountered in the Gulf region.

You will be introduced to the latest research in the subject giving you an overview of the legislative and regulatory strategies which have proved effective in both the domestic and international struggle against corruption.

Why Choose Sussex?

  • Sussex is known for its world-leading research in this area, especially within the Sussex Centre for the Study of Corruption.
  • By studying the LLM in Corruption, Law and Governance you will gain a strong understanding and expertise in how to understand what causes corruption, how to recognise it in its many forms and how to tackle it.
  • We have worked with Governments and organisations around the world and bring these learnings and experience to the course in Qatar.

How Will I Study?

You will learn through core modules and options. Over the two years of your course you plan and work on your dissertation.

Teaching will take place at the Rule of Law and Anti-Corruption Centre (ROLACC) in Qatar, and will consist of week-long intense teaching blocks with classes typically held Sunday to Thursday from 3pm onwards. Find out more about your core modules and options here.

Knowledge and hands-on training will be provided on all corruption related fields including: anti-corruption and anti-bribery, compliance, risk management, public and private sector anticorruption policies and procedures, integrity ethics, compliance investigations and audits, and sports integrity.

Rule of Law and Anti-Corruption Centre

This course is taught by Sussex faculty at the Rule of Law and Anti-Corruption Centre (ROLACC) in Doha, Qatar. ROLACC is a not-for-profit organisation, established in 2013 by the Emir of Qatar. 

The Centre aims to build knowledge and raise individual and institutional competencies that promote the rule of law and fight corruption in line with international standards. 

It plans to create a permanent framework for the exchange of experiences and expertise through the establishment of strategic partnerships with offices and agencies of the United Nations – particularly the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime – as well as the most prominent studies and research centres in the world.

Funding Opportunities

The University of Sussex is proud to offer a range of postgraduate funding awards up to £5000, in order to help talented students to come and study at Sussex.  Find out more about funding awards available to you by visiting our funding database.

Careers

This course prepares you to take leading roles in supporting anti-corruption strategies in government, non-government and commercial organisations, and in a variety of domestic, regional and international anti-corruption agencies. 

“As a practising lawyer aspiring to leadership in the sphere of legal research and practice, this LLM program, with its unique content, was the best option to achieve my goal.”

Dr Izeldin Elamin

Corruption, Law and Governance LLM 2017



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Develop your understanding of what corruption is, where and why it proliferates, and what can be done to counteract it. Our interdisciplinary MA looks at issues of corruption and governance. Read more
Develop your understanding of what corruption is, where and why it proliferates, and what can be done to counteract it.

Our interdisciplinary MA looks at issues of corruption and governance. You’ll address challenging issues of how different disciplines define corruption and how this can lead to different anti-corruption approaches.

You examine specific examples, from systematic abuses of power by parties, politicians and civil servants to small-scale, petty misdemeanours. The role of business can also be analysed.

We welcome applications from all disciplines and from those who have first-hand experience of the world of anti-corruption.

How will I study?

You will study core modules and options during the spring and autumn terms. In the spring term, you can also opt for an internship. In the summer you work on your dissertation.

All modules are assessed by term papers, presentations and exams. You also write a 15,000-word dissertation in the summer term. The internship is assessed by a report on what you did and how this links into theories of corruption, anti-corruption and/or good governance.

Internship

You have the opportunity to take up a three-month internship. Here, you put the theory learned in the seminar room in to practice.

Scholarships

Our aim is to ensure that every student who wants to study with us is able to despite financial barriers, so that we continue to attract talented and unique individuals.

Chancellor's International Scholarship (2017)
-25 scholarships of a 50% tuition fee waiver
-Application deadline: 1 May 2017

HESPAL Scholarship (Higher Education Scholarships Scheme for the Palestinian Territories) (2017)
-Two full fee waivers in conjuction with maintenance support from the British Council
-Application deadline: 1 January 2017

USA Friends Scholarships (2017)
-A scholarship of an amount equivalent to $10,000 for nationals or residents of the USA on a one year taught Masters degree course.
-Application deadline: 3 April 2017

Careers

Our MA equips you with the skills for a career in a wide variety of fields. You are particularly well placed to work:
-At the interface between the private and public sectors
-In the area of public policy-making
-The Civil Service and business
-In areas of corporate social responsibility – an area of growing importance for many national and international companies

Development and a wide variety of NGOs and charities are also options. The skills you develop are highly valued in journalism, including a fine eye for what is and is not acceptable government and business practice.

The optional internship helps you to develop and apply a range of practical skills prospective employers find attractive.

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Every February, May, August and November. Most organisations have their fair share of fraud and corruption, and it affects all of us. Read more

Start Dates

Every February, May, August and November.

Course Outline

Most organisations have their fair share of fraud and corruption, and it affects all of us. As we know, what comes out in the press is the sharp tip of the iceberg. So, in these austere times, can we really accept to carry hidden costs and lose value through unethical behaviour perpetrated against us? At the School of Management we have decided to take a stand and teach what most business schools still do not teach... defence against the commercial dark side.

Properly combating fraud and corruption is still an elusive goal. Time and again we see people and apparently well-managed organisations subjected to major embarrassment, financial penalties or even bankruptcy as the result of inappropriate actions and failings by 'trusted' individuals. This course will help you to learn how to address the challenge; how you can ensure that you actively defend yourself and your organisation against the very real threats we would rather not see?

The aims and objectives of the course are to:

-Demystify fraud and corruption (what it is, who does it and why, what it costs us).
-Explore how to bridge the gap between anti-fraud and corruption and 'rhetoric' and the reality of the world we live in.
-Learn how to spot fraud, and develop your own fraud and corruption risk assessment which represents a true picture of what could be happening (in your organisation).
-Demonstrate in practical steps what you can do to pre-empt and prevent fraud, corruption and all forms of unethical business behaviour in your organisation.

This course is accredited by the Chartered Institute of Management Accountants (CIMA)

If you have any questions about this course, join us for a live online chat with academic tutors and admissions staff.

How will the course be taught?

This is a 12 week course delivered solely online using engaging audio-visual based teaching methods in addition to selected case studies. The course will be moderated by a leading practitioner on fraud and corruption, who will share their experiences and insights with the group. In addition to all of this, the course provides you with full access to the extensive library provision offered by the University of Leicester.

The course is assessed by a practice based assignment. In addition to the development of key skills and acquiring new knowledge, successfully completing the course will provide you with 15 Master's level credits of study and a Confirmation of Completion.

For COURSE STRUCTURE information, please visit the University of Leicester website.

(Please note: due to regular enhancement of the University’s courses, please refer to Leicester’s own website (http://www.le.ac.uk) or/and Terms and Conditions (http://www2.le.ac.uk/legal) for the most accurate and up-to-date course information. We recommend that you familiarise yourself with this information prior to submitting an application.)

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The Programme.  . IACA is the first international organization and educational institution to offer a global, postgraduate degree programme in anti-corruption and compliance. Read more

The Programme

 

IACA is the first international organization and educational institution to offer a global, postgraduate degree programme in anti-corruption and compliance: the Master of Arts in Anti-Corruption Studies (MACS). The MACS is a two-year, in career programme designed for working professionals who wish to remain fully employed while pursuing their degree. The programme focuses on an advanced study of anti-corruption and compliance and runs over a period of 26 months. It brings together professionals from around the world with related work experience in the public and private sectors, international and non-governmental organizations, media, and academia.

Programme is formally accredited under the laws of the Republic of Austria, and in accordance with the European Bologna process. Programme graduates will receive a Master of Arts degree (M.A.) in Anti-Corruption Studies, which includes 120 ECTS credits and enables enrollment in Ph.D. Programmes. The language of instruction in the MACS programme is English. The deadline to apply for the MACS 2017 Programme is 30 June 2017.

Structure and Curriculum

 

The programme is comprised of seven modules and a master thesis. Each module includes a ten-day in-class session at IACA campus or other locations worldwide, as well as self-study phases before and after the session. Four modules are completed in the first academic year. Three modules and the Master Thesis are completed in the second academic year.

Fees and Scholarships

 

The overall programme fee is 28,820 EUR, payable in two instalments. This includes all teaching materials, catering, and shuttle bus service during the in-class sessions and excludes accommodation, travel, and any other expenses during the modules.

IACA offers a limited number of scholarships fully or partially covering the programme fee, travel and accommodation expenses. These scholarships are highly competitive. They are available to citizens of Least Developed Countries (LDC), as defined by the United Nations.

http://www.iaca.int/



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The International Master in Anti-Corruption Compliance and Collective Action (IMACC) is the first master’s programme specially designed for anti-corruption compliance and collective action professionals involved with the business sector. Read more

The Programme

The International Master in Anti-Corruption Compliance and Collective Action (IMACC) is the first master’s programme specially designed for anti-corruption compliance and collective action professionals involved with the business sector.
It is a practical, comprehensive answer to the ever-evolving regulatory environment and rising demand for specialized skills.
The two-year programme enables participants to upgrade their expertise and add value to their companies and organizations, while continuing to work, by implementing best practices in anti-corruption and compliance; identifying and mitigating various types of risks
initiating and managing collective action; conducting internal investigations; doing business based on the highest ethical standards.

Structure and Curriculum

IACA’s IMACC is a two-year programme consisting of six modules and a final project or thesis.
Four modules are completed in the first academic year, followed by two modules and the final project or thesis in the second year.
Each module has three phases: pre-module, an in-class session, and post-module (see Module Structure). Intensive in-class phases (either seven or ten days) allow for maximum learning opportunities within a condensed period of time. Classes take place approximately every three months at the IACA campus in Laxenburg, Austria (Vienna area) and, for study visits, possibly other locations worldwide.
The IMACC degree comes with a total of 120 ECTS credits (European Credit Transfer and Accumulation System), enabling enrolment into PhD programmes if desired.
IACA is recognized by the Republic of Austria as an institution of post-secondary education to the effect that IACA’s study programmes and academic degrees are treated equivalent to those of educational institutions accredited in accordance with the EU’s Bologna process.

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This MA provides an opportunity to study political and social developments in post-communist Europe in breadth and depth, acquiring a mix of in-depth knowledge, analytical and research skills, and theoretical understanding. Read more

This MA provides an opportunity to study political and social developments in post-communist Europe in breadth and depth, acquiring a mix of in-depth knowledge, analytical and research skills, and theoretical understanding. Regions covered include central and Eastern Europe, the western Balkans and most parts of the former Soviet Union.

About this degree

The programme tackles issues such as democracy and authoritarianism, corruption, ethno-political conflict, foreign policy and security in both thematic and area/country-oriented modules. Students are able to either focus on one region or to study regions across the post-communist world. All students take a core module in political analysis and have the option of learning Russian or another east European language.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two core modules (30 credits), optional modules (90 credits) and a research dissertation (60 credits).

Core modules

Students take two core modules of 15 credits each, one of which much be 'Political Analysis'

  • Political Analysis
  • And at least one chosen from:
  • Qualitative Methods
  • Understanding and Analysing Data
  • Comparative Analysis in Social and Political Research
  • Introduction to Discourse Analysis
  • Quantitative Methods
  • Advanced Quantitative Methods

Optional modules

Choose from a list including the following:

  • Causes, Consequences and Control: Corruption and Governance
  • Ethnopolitical Conflict in Central and Eastern Europe
  • Informal Practices in Post-Communist Societies
  • Making of Modern Ukraine
  • Nation, Identity and Power in Central and Eastern Europe
  • Russian Politics
  • Security, Identity, Polarity
  • Governance and Democracy in Central and Eastern Europe
  • Russian Foreign Policy
  • Baltic Politics and Society

Dissertation/report

All MA students undertake an independent research project, which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000-12,000 words.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, laboratory sessions, workshops and classes. Students will be assessed by a variety of methods: unseen examinations, long essays, coursework and the research dissertation.

Detailed module information

See full details of modules for this programme.

Funding

AHRC Scholarships may be available.

For a comprehensive list of the funding opportunities available at UCL, including funding relevant to your nationality, please visit the Scholarships and Funding website.

Careers

With their specialist knowledge and language skills, SSEES Master's graduates can be found in business, finance, the media, international agencies, charities, diplomacy, international security organisations, the law, and academia.

Some graduates advise the Russian, Polish, American, and other governments, and the European Commission.

Employability

The range of modules offered allows students either to focus on one region or to study regions across the post-communist world. The MA opens up a range of opportunities and previous graduates from this programme have gone on to work in think tanks; political parties; national, European and international private and public sector organisations; and in the media and in NGOs as political analysts. Other graduates have gone on to further academic study. Networking is facilitated by two major collaborations led by SSEES: CEELBAS and the International Master's (IMESS). Scholarships, internship opportunities and excellent links with other universities in the region provide further benefits.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL School of Slavonic & East European Studies (SSEES) is a world-leading specialist institution, and the largest national centre in the UK, for the study of central, Eastern and south-east Europe and Russia.

Our MA allows you to study the political development of the region in unparalleled breadth and depth and to develop analytical and research capabilities, language skills and practical insights.

Our nationally unequalled specialist library and central London location provide an ideal environment for research, while our close contacts with employers, policy-makers and alumni afford excellent opportunities for networking and career development.



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This Master's programme is designed to respond to the growing strategic importance of Russia and the former Soviet Union and meet the emerging demand for area-focused academic training. Read more

This Master's programme is designed to respond to the growing strategic importance of Russia and the former Soviet Union and meet the emerging demand for area-focused academic training. The programme focuses on the unique and challenging political and social environment of the region and students gain valuable analytical and research skills.

About this degree

This degree offers students a structured, focused programme as well as flexibility to pursue individual interests. Study of Russian and post-Soviet politics is supplemented by a wide range of options on other regions of the former Soviet Union and broad thematic issues such as corruption and governance, ethno-political conflict, sexual identity and security. Students are also encouraged to learn Russian, Ukrainian or Estonian.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two core modules (45 or 60 credits), optional modules (60 or 75 credits), and a research dissertation (60 credits).

Core modules

Students take one core module in Russian Politics (30 credits) and either a 15- or 30-credit core module on another aspect of Russian or post-Soviet politics. 

  • Russian Politics
  • Plus at least one chosen from:
  • Baltic Politics and Society
  • Corruption and Governance Causes, Consequences and Control
  • Informal Practices in Post-Communist Societies
  • Making of Modern Ukraine
  • Post-Soviet Politics
  • Russian Foreign Policy

Optional modules include

  • Advanced Quantitative Methods
  • Being Soviet: Typologies of Soviet Identity in Russian Cinema 1917-1956
  • Comparative Analysis in Social and Political Research
  • Contemporary Russian Cinema and Society since the Collapse of the Soviet Union: The Journey into the Unknown
  • Ethno-political Conflict in Central and Eastern Europe
  • Governance and Democracy in Central and Eastern Europe
  • Introduction to Discourse Analysis
  • Politics of South-East Europe
  • Qualitative Methods
  • Quantitative Methods
  • Security, Identity, Polarity
  • Sexuality and Society in Russia and Eastern Europe
  • Understanding and Analysing Data
  • SSEES language module in Russian, Ukrainian or Estonian at beginner's level or at intermediate or advanced level as appropriate

Dissertation/report

All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000–12,000 words.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, laboratory sessions, workshops, presentations, self-study and specialist language classes. Students are assessed by a variety of methods, including unseen examinations, long essays, coursework and a dissertation.

Detailed module information

See full details of modules for this programme.

Funding

For a comprehensive list of the funding opportunities available at UCL, including funding relevant to your nationality, please visit the Scholarships and Funding website.

Careers

SSEES Master's graduates with expertise in the politics and societies of Russia and the post-Soviet states have achieved success in both public and private sectors. Career destinations include NGOs, think tanks, risk and business consultancies, diplomacy, government and international organisations, journalism and the media; often – but not always - in roles dealing directly with Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union.

Employability

The programme allows students to develop a blend of specialist area knowledge, analytical expertise and language skills tailored to their individual interests and requirements. The programme – together with regular workshops and events such as the weekly Post-Soviet Press Group discussion forum - provides opportunities to develop understanding of current developments in Russia and the post-Soviet region alongside deeper theoretical and historical insights into their politics and societies. This skill set leaves students well placed to meet the requirements of employers and policy-makers, or to move on to further study.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL School of Slavonic & East European Studies (SSEES) is a world-leading specialist institution, and the largest UK centre, for the study of Russia and the post-Soviet region.

The school has superb research facilities and can point to expertise in a range of disciplines, including language training. The SSEES Library, in particular, is unequalled in Britain in the scope and size of its specialist collections.

Our central London location, regular workshops and events, and close links with employers and alumni afford excellent opportunities for networking and career development.



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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Sports Ethics and Integrity at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Sports Ethics and Integrity at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

Responding to the global crisis in sports integrity this course is a world-first innovation for sports administration and governance.

Key features of MA in Sports Ethics and Integrity

The world of sport is increasingly beset by ethical problems, from corruption and match fixing to doping and illegal betting. College of Engineering offers an MA in Sports Ethics and Integrity.

The integrity of sporting bodies and organisations at every level is being brought into question, creating an urgent need to develop a coherent, professional response to these issues.

Our response is to establish sports ethics and integrity as a new, internationally recognised profession within the field of sports administration and governance in both public and private sectors; to develop 100 new postgraduate experts between 2016-21, selected from around the world who will enrich sport federations with their expertise in ethics and integrity and revolutionise the world of sport. This may be one of the few chances to respond effectively and rapidly to the global crisis in sport integrity.

‌‌‌The MA Sports Ethics and Integrity will focus on:

- Global sports governance (e.g. FIFA, IOC)

- Anti-doping and drugs education

- Privacy and data protection issues

- Fair Play, justice and human rights

- Youth Olympics, ethics and education

- Equity, diversity and inclusion (especially age and disability issues)

- Illegal and irregular gambling

- Match-fixing and sport manipulation

- Legislation and codes of conduct

- Equality and anti-discrimination (class, race, ethnicity, religion and gender issues)

- Child protection and children’s rights

- Olympism, peace, and The Olympic Truce

Course description

The MA Sports Ethics and Integrity will equip students for high-level careers in sports administration and governance, with a focus on ethical sports, integrity and compliance. Students will receive training that enables them to identify ethical issues, engage in moral thinking, and translate decisions into moral actions – the three core skills required to develop sports integrity.

The MA Sports Ethics and Integrity will support students in developing an ethical mind-set and transferable skills that are indispensable for addressing the value and integrity issues facing national and international sporting federations, national Olympic Committees, and Paralympic Committees with a focus on:

Year 1

- Ethical theory, sports and integrity

- Anti-doping: ethics, policy and practice

- Sport integrity, corruption and gambling

- Ability, disability and athlete integrity

- Sport vales, fair play and integrity

- Summer School at the International Olympic Academy - Greece

Year 2

- Olympism and the Olympic Movement

- Research methods and skills

- Governance, law and sport integrity

- Sports, management and integrity

- Student Dissertation

- Summer School at the International Olympic Academy, Greece

The MA Sports Ethics and Integrity graduates will benefit from opportunities to undertake practical placements within the partner’s extensive network of advisory bodies, federations, policy-makers and commercial organisations, as well as from extensive international collaboration and training opportunities.

International networks

This course is a product of an international collaboration of the following universities:

- Swansea University, founded in 1920, is a rapidly growing, UK top 30, research-intensive University with world-leading sports science research and productive international partnerships. Swansea has pioneered globally the ethics of sports as an area of applied research and consultancy in elite sport.

- Charles University in Prague, founded in 1348, is the oldest University in Central Europe, and is consistently ranked first among the Universities of Central and Eastern Europe.

- Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, founded in 1477, is one of the top research universities in Germany of national and international recognition. It is a founding partner of the groundbreaking Executive Master in European Sports Governance.

-KU Leuven, founded in 1425, is one of the oldest Universities in the world, and ranks among the world’s top 100 Universities. It is a leading centre of international excellence in disability and Paralympic sport.

- The University of the Peloponnese is the most recently founded of Greek Universities, and draws on extensive links with the International Olympic Academy and the Olympic Movement. It hosts summer schools on Olympic Studies at its Ancient Olympia campus, adjacent to the archaeological site of the Ancient Olympic Games

- The University Pompeu Fabra is ranked as the 1st University in Spain, the 7th in Europe and 13th worldwide in the Times Higher Education (THE) top Universities under 50 years old. It is recognised as a “Campus of International Excellence”‌‌‌



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The LL.M. is directed at well-qualified graduates in law and related disciplines. It seeks to promote critical analysis of, and reflection on, different aspects of national, European and international law. Read more
The LL.M. is directed at well-qualified graduates in law and related disciplines. It seeks to promote critical analysis of, and reflection on, different aspects of national, European and international law. This programme is delivered over one academic year. Students are examined in six modules and complete a research dissertation of up to 25,000 words over the academic year on an approved theme. The modules offered might typically include the following: Advanced Comparative Law: European Legal Systems, Advanced European Union Law, Advanced Lawyering Techniques, African Human Rights Law, Arbitration and Alternative Dispute Resolution, Chinese Legal System in Comparative Perspective, Comparative Civil Rights, Comparative Constitutional Law and Theory, Comparative Product Liability: Common Law, EU and US Perspectives, Copyright and Innovation, Online, Corporate Governance, Corporate, White-Collar and Regulatory Crime, Corruption Law, Creative Works and Intellectual Property, Employment Litigation, EU Aviation Law, EU Banking and Securities Law, EU Competition Law, EU Consumer Law, EU Copyright, Patents and Design Law, EU External Relations Law, EU Financial Services Law, EU Trademark Law, European Human Rights Law, Freedom of Expression and Intellectual Property Law, Online, Globalisation and the Law, Intellectual Property Law and Sport, International and Comparative analysis of Unfair Competition and Trade Mark Law, International Aviation Law, International Criminal Evidence, International Criminal Law, International Economic Law, International Dispute Resolution, International Humanitarian Law, International and European Tax Law, International Trade Law, Islamic Law, Judicial Activism, Human Rights and Indian Constitution, Judicial Review and Human Rights: Theory and Practice, Law and Bioethics, Law on the Seizure of Criminal Assets, Principles of Corporate Insolvency and Rescue, Principles of Delaware Corporate Law, Public Law of the European Union, Theoretical and Comparative Criminal Law, Transitional Justice. The Law School reserves the right to vary the above list and, in particular, the right to withdraw and add courses. Note that timetabling considerations may also restrict choice. Further information on the precise modules available in a given year is available on the LLM website.

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The SOAS LLM degree is a postgraduate qualification for those who hold an undergraduate degree in law. A specialist LLM in International Economic Law will be of interest to those who wish to focus on legal aspects of international economic activity. Read more
The SOAS LLM degree is a postgraduate qualification for those who hold an undergraduate degree in law.

A specialist LLM in International Economic Law will be of interest to those who wish to focus on legal aspects of international economic activity.

Students following the SOAS International Economic Law LLM are immersed in one of the youngest and most dynamic fields of international legal theory and practice.

The questions they confront are difficult, urgent and compelling:
- When we regulate international trade, do we sometimes do more harm than good?
- What impact do bureaucracy and corruption have on foreign investment levels?
- What might international institutions do to prevent a future global economic crisis?
- What changes are China and India bringing to international economic law?
- What is the impact of economic liberalization on labour law and social welfare ?

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/law/programmes/llm/llminteconlaw/

Duration: One calendar year (full-time)
Two, three of fours years (part-time, daytime only)
We recommend that part-time students have between two-and-a-half and three days a week free to pursue their course of study.

Structure

Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four (4.0) full units. Students who wish to graduate with a specialised LLM are required to take at least three (3.0) of the four (4.0) units within their chosen specialism, including the dissertation. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (within the LLM specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation. The fourth unit can be chosen from either the general Law Postgraduate Modules or the following modules associated with the International Economic Law specialisation:

Please note: Not all modules listed will be available every year. Please see the individual module page for information

Full Module Units (1.0):
Banking Law - 15PLAC105 (1 Unit)
Comparative Commercial Law - 15PLAC175 (1 Unit)
International and Comparative Copyright Law: Copyright in the global village - 15PLAC115 (1 Unit)
International and Comparative Corporate Law - 15PLAC116 (1 Unit)
International Commercial and Investment Arbitration - 15PLAC153 (1 Unit)
International Labour Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAC169 (1 Unit)
International Trade Law - 15PLAC120 (1 Unit)
Law and International Inequality: Critical legal analysis of political economy from colonialism to globalisation - 15PLAC131 (1 Unit)
Law of International Finance - 15PLAC135 (1 Unit)
Law of Islamic Finance - 15PLAC159 (1 Unit)
Multinational Enterprises and the Law - 15PLAC140 (1 Unit)
Law and Natural Resources - 15PLAC126 (1 Unit)

Half Module Units (0.5):
EU Law in Global Context - 15PLAH051 (0.5 Unit)
Foundations of Comparative Law - 15PLAH031 (0.5 Unit)
Foundations of International Corporate Law - 15PLAH059 (0.5 Unit)

Dissertation (1.0):
The dissertation module unit forms part of the required three (3.0) units within the chosen LLM specialism. Please see the dissertation module units below. You will need to attend the teaching on the module and then submit a dissertation in place of the module method of assessment.

Banking Law - 15PLAD105 (1 Unit)
Comparative Commercial Law - 15PLAD175 (1 Unit)
International and Comparative Copyright Law: Copyright in the global village - 15PLAD115 (1 Unit)
International and Comparative Corporate Law - 15PLAD116 (1 Unit)
International Commercial and Investment Arbitration - 15PLAD153 (1 Unit)
International Labour Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAD169 (1 Unit)
International Trade Law - 15PLAD120 (1 Unit)
Law and International Inequality: Critical legal analysis of political economy from colonialism to globalisation - 15PLAD131 (1 Unit)
Law of International Finance - 15PLAD135 (1 Unit)
Law of Islamic Finance - 15PLAD159 (1 Unit)
Multinational Enterprises and the Law - 15PLAD140 (1 Unit)
Law and Natural Resources - 15PLAD126 (1 Unit)

Faculty of Law and Social Sciences (L&SS)

Welcome to the Faculty of Law and Social Sciences at SOAS. The faculty is the largest in the School in terms of student and staff numbers and consists of the departments of Development Studies, Economics, Financial and Management Studies, Politics and International Studies and the School of Law, as well as the Asia-Pacific Centre for Social Sciences, the Centre for Gender Studies, the Centre for International Studies and Diplomacy, the Centre of Taiwan Studies and a number of department-specific centres. All five departments offer undergraduate programmes, and all but Finance and International Management offer joint undergraduate degrees which can be combined with other disciplines from across the School. Each department also offers a range of masters-level programmes with a regional or disciplinary specialism, as well as a postgraduate research programme. The range of course options and combinations is one of the most distinctive characteristics of studying at SOAS and all students are given the option of studying an Asian or African language, either as part of or on top of their degree.

Staff in the faculty come from all over the world and combine regional knowledge with disciplinary specialisms. Teaching draws heavily on academic staff’s individual research which allows the faculty to maintain a large portfolio of courses, often exploring cutting-edge issues. Many faculty members have played a significant part in public debates and policy-making in relation to Asia and Africa. Academics in the faculty are regularly consulted by governments, public bodies and multilateral organisations including the United Nations and the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank, European Commission, DFID and other country-specific organisations and NGOs.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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The Comparative Business Economics MA at UCL is focused principally at company-level study and offers the chance to examine. the role of multinationals; corporate governance and finance; privatisation; entrepreneurship, and the determinants of innovation and technological change within the European area. Read more

The Comparative Business Economics MA at UCL is focused principally at company-level study and offers the chance to examine: the role of multinationals; corporate governance and finance; privatisation; entrepreneurship, and the determinants of innovation and technological change within the European area.

About this degree

The programme offers discipline-based training combined with empirical application, drawing on the experience of the 28 nations that have emerged from the former Soviet block in Europe and Asia. Students are equipped with strong foundations in both international business and economics as well as in finance and corporate governance.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of three core modules (60 credits), plus a compulsory choice of one of four additional modules (15 credits), a selection of optional modules to the value of 45 credits, and a research dissertation (60 credits).

Core modules

60 credits of core modules:

  • Quantitative Methods
  • Advanced Quantitative Methods
  • Political Economy of International Business

Optional modules

  • Financial Development
  • Corporate Finance and Investment in Emerging Markets
  • Causes, Consequences and Control: Corruption and Governance
  • Informal Practices in Post-Communist Societies
  • Trade and FDI Policy with reference to Eastern Europe
  • Public Choice-Private Interest
  • International Macroeconomic Policy
  • Language modules
  • Corporate Governance
  • The Economics of Property Rights

Dissertation/report

All MA students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of approximately 12,000 words.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, tutorials and seminars. Students will be assessed by unseen written examinations, coursework and the research dissertation.

Detailed module information

See full details of modules for this programme.

Careers

With their specialist knowledge and language skills, SSEES Master's graduates can be found in business, finance, the media, international agencies, charities, diplomacy, international security organisations, the law, and academia.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Analyst, J.P. Morgan
  • Auditor, KPMG
  • Commodities Derivative Officer, Goldman Sachs
  • Reporting Analyst, News UK
  • Risk Analyst, Royal Bank of Scotland (RBS)

Employability

The Comparative Business Economics MA prepares our graduates for both further research, and for work in international business, for European and national government institutions, and for developing their own entrepreneurial ventures. Networking is facilitated by two major collaborations led by SSEES: CEELBAS and the International Master's (IMESS). Scholarships, internship opportunities and excellent links with other universities in the region provide further benefits.

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL School of Slavonic & East European Studies (SSEES) is a world-leading specialist institution, and the largest national centre in the UK, for the study of central, Eastern and south-east Europe and Russia.

Located in Bloomsbury, SSEES offers an ideal location for scholars. The British Library, British Museum, University of London Library and other similar research centres are all close by.

Our unique specialist library and central London location provide an ideal environment for research, while our close contacts with employers, policymakers and alumni afford excellent opportunities for networking and career development.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: SSEES - School of Slavonic & East European Studies

64% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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The Russian Studies MA draws on the unique area studies expertise at the UCL School of Slavonic & East European Studies (SSEES) to offer a choice of modules unparalleled in depth and breadth, ranging from Russia's medieval history to its contemporary politics, from 19th-century literature to 21st-century film. Read more

The Russian Studies MA draws on the unique area studies expertise at the UCL School of Slavonic & East European Studies (SSEES) to offer a choice of modules unparalleled in depth and breadth, ranging from Russia's medieval history to its contemporary politics, from 19th-century literature to 21st-century film.

About this degree

Russian culture is explored from a variety of perspectives. Students specialise in literature and culture, social sciences or history, or combine modules into an interdisciplinary programme. They are encouraged to develop their research skills, and many choose to learn Russian, or improve their command of Russian, through a language course.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of one of a choice of three core modules (30 credits), a choice of a Russian language module (30 credits) and/or optional modules (to a total of 90 credits), and a research dissertation (60 credits).

Core modules

This is a multidisciplinary programme. Nevertheless, students are required to gain a thorough methodological and theoretical grounding in disciplinary study and hence must choose between one of the following three modules:

  • Literary and Cultural Theory
  • Historical Methods and Approaches
  • Political Analysis AND Political Sociology

Optional modules

90 credits from a range of options, which may include:

  • Advanced Qualitative Methods
  • Contemporary Cultural Studies: Between Post-Communism & Post-Modernism
  • The Reflecting Screen: Russian and Soviet Cinema in its Cultural Context, 1896 to the Present
  • The Nineteenth-Century Russian Novel
  • Beyond Stereotypes: The Jews in Polish Culture
  • Causes, Consequences and Control: Corruption and Governance
  • Linguistic Methods
  • How to Read/Interpret Texts: Introduction to Hermeneutics
  • Informal Practices in Post-Communist Societies
  • Russian Foreign Policy
  • Russian Monarchy: Court Ritual and Political Ideas, 1498-1917
  • Russian Language Module
  • Introduction to Discourse Analysis

Dissertation/report

All MA students undertake an independent research project, which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000–12,000 words.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, workshops, film viewings, tutorials and specialist language courses. Assessment is carried out through unseen examinations, long essays, coursework and the research dissertation.

Detailed module information

See full details of modules for this programme.

Funding

AHRC Scholarships may be available.

For a comprehensive list of the funding opportunities available at UCL, including funding relevant to your nationality, please visit the Scholarships and Funding website.

Careers

With their specialist knowledge and language skills, SSEES Master's graduates can be found in business, finance, the media, international agencies, charities, diplomacy, international security organisations, the law, and academia.

Some graduates advise the Russian, Polish, American, and other governments, and the European Commission.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Diplomat/Third Secretary, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of The Kingdom of Thailand
  • Editorial Intern, openDemocracy
  • Marketing Planner, Waterstones
  • Support Officer, Refugee Council
  • Principal Examiner for GCE and GCSE, Pearson-Edexcel

Employability

Russia is one of the most exciting and important countries in the world, and SSEES is the ideal place in which to study it. Students who have successfully completed the programme have progressed to further academic research on the region, or have obtained employment in such organisations as the European Parliament and the Ministry of Defence, as well as roles in business, think tanks, NGOs, or similar, both in Britain and abroad. Networking is facilitated by two major collaborations led by SSEES: CEELBAS and the International Master's (IMESS). Scholarships, internship opportunities and excellent links with other universities in the region provide further benefits.

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

SSEES is a world-leading specialist institution, and the largest national centre in the UK, for the study of central, Eastern and south-east Europe and Russia.

Located in Bloomsbury, SSEES offers an ideal location for scholars. The British Library, British Museum, University of London Library and other similar research centres are all close by.

The SSEES Library is unequalled in Britain for the depth and breadth of its collections, the majority of which are on open access in the SSEES building.



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Anthropology prides itself on its inclusive and interdisciplinary focus. It takes a holistic approach to human society, combining biological and social perspectives. Read more
Anthropology prides itself on its inclusive and interdisciplinary focus. It takes a holistic approach to human society, combining biological and social perspectives.

All of our Anthropology Master’s programmes are recognised by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) as having research training status, so successful completion of these courses is sufficient preparation for research in the various fields of social anthropology. Many of our students go on to do PhD research. Others use their Master’s qualification in employment ranging from research in government departments to teaching to consultancy work overseas.

We welcome students with the appropriate background for research. If you wish to study for a single year, you can do the MA or MSc by research, a 12-month independent research project.

If you are interested in registering for a research degree, you should contact the member of staff whose research is the most relevant to your interests. You should include a curriculum vitae, a short (1,000-word) research proposal, and a list of potential funding sources.

About the School of Anthropology and Conservation

Kent has pioneered the social anthropological study of Europe, Latin America, Melanesia, and Central and Southeast Asia, the use of computers in anthropological research, and environmental anthropology in its widest sense (including ethnobiology and ethnobotany).

Our regional expertise covers Europe, the Middle East, Central, Southeast and Southern Asia, Central and South America, Amazonia, Papua New Guinea, East Timor and Polynesia. Specialisation in biological anthropology includes forensics and paleopathology, osteology, evolutionary psychology and the evolutionary ecology and behaviour of great apes.

Course structure

The first year may include coursework, especially methods modules for students who need this additional training. You will work closely with one supervisor throughout your research, although you have a committee of three (including your primary supervisor) overseeing your progress. If you want to research in the area of applied computing in social anthropology, you would also have a supervisor based in the School of Computing.

Research areas

- Social Anthropology

The related themes of ethnicity, nationalism, identity, conflict, and the economics crisis form a major focus of our current work in the Middle East, the Balkans, South Asia, Amazonia and Central America, Europe (including the United Kingdom), Oceania and South-East Asia.

Our research extends to inter-communal violence, mental health, diasporas, pilgrimage, intercommunal trade, urban ethnogenesis, indigenous representation and the study of contemporary religions and their global connections.

We research issues in fieldwork and methodology more generally, with a strong and expanding interest in the field of visual anthropology. Our work on identity and locality links with growing strengths in customary law, kinship and parenthood. This is complemented by work on the language of relatedness, child health and on the cognitive bases of kinship terminologies.

A final strand of our research focuses on policy and advocacy issues and examines the connections between morality and law, legitimacy and corruption, public health policy and local healing strategies, legal pluralism and property rights, and the regulation of marine resources.

- Environmental Anthropology and Ethnobiology

Work in these areas is focused on the Centre for Biocultural Diversity. We conduct research on ethnobiological knowledge systems and other systems of environmental knowledge as well as local responses to deforestation, climate change, natural resource management, medical ethnobotany, the impacts of mobility and displacement and the interface between conservation and development. Current projects include trade in materia medica in Ladakh and Bolivia, food systems, ethno-ornithology, the development of buffer zones for protected areas and phytopharmacy among migrant diasporas.

- Digital Anthropology: Cultural Informatics, Social Invention and Computational Methods

Since 1985, we have been exploring and applying new approaches to research problems in anthropology – often, as in the case of hypermedia, electronic and internet publishing, digital media, expert systems and large-scale textual and historical databases, up to a decade before other anthropologists. Today, we are exploring cloud media, semantic networks, multi-agent modelling, dual/blended realities, data mining, smart environments and how these are mediated by people into new possibilities and capabilities.

Our major developments have included advances in kinship theory and analysis supported by new computational methods within field-based studies and as applied to detailed historical records; qualitative analysis of textual and ethnographic materials; and computer-assisted approaches to visual ethnography. We are extending our range to quantitative approaches for assessing qualitative materials, analysing social and cultural invention, the active representation of meaning, and the applications and implications of mobile computing, sensing and communications platforms and the transformation of virtual into concrete objects, institutions and structures.

- Biological Anthropology

Biological Anthropology is the newest of the University of Kent Anthropology research disciplines. We are interested in a diverse range of research topics within biological and evolutionary anthropology. These include bioarchaeology, human reproductive strategies, hominin evolution, primate behaviour and ecology, modern human variation, cultural evolution and Palaeolithic archaeology. This work takes us to many different regions of the world (Asia, Africa, Europe, the United States), and involves collaboration with international colleagues from a number of organisations. We have a dedicated research laboratory and up-to-date computing facilities to allow research in many areas of biological anthropology.

Currently, work is being undertaken in a number of these areas, and research links have been forged with colleagues at Kent in archaeology and biosciences, as well as with those at the Powell- Cotton Museum, the Budongo Forest Project (Uganda) and University College London.

Kent Osteological Research and Analysis (KORA) offers a variety of osteological services for human remains from archaeological contexts.

Careers

Higher degrees in anthropology create opportunities in many employment sectors including academia, the civil service and non-governmental organisations through work in areas such as human rights, journalism, documentary film making, environmental conservation and international finance. An anthropology degree also develops interpersonal and intercultural skills, which make our graduates highly desirable in any profession that involves working with people from diverse backgrounds and cultures.

Many of our students go on to do PhD research. Others use their Master’s qualification in employment ranging from research in government departments to teaching to consultancy work overseas.

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The Masters in Public Administration is a well established and prestigious programme aimed at students who aspire to access or progress within a public service or a voluntary sector career. Read more
The Masters in Public Administration is a well established and prestigious programme aimed at students who aspire to access or progress within a public service or a voluntary sector career. Benefiting from a work placement with an organisation from our wide network of public and voluntary sector employers, this programme offers an intensive year of professional and academic development at the highest standards. In the most recent (2014-15) Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education (DLHE) survey, 100% of graduates from this course were in work or further study within six months.

More about this course

The aim of this course is to equip present and future public service practitioners with the skills and understanding needed to play a significant role as change agents within their home professional environments.

The programme places great emphasis on:
-Developing a variety of academic capacities and transferable skills related to public administration
-Instilling flexibility of thought and innovation as guiding principles to public sector management and reforms
-Developing a commitment to lifelong learning and reflective practice in students.

This innovative public policy oriented and public management based course is taught by an experienced and dynamic team of academic staff who are active in the international research community in the fields of public management reform in transitional countries, comparative public policy and governance, strategic management in public sector organisations, corruption in transitional countries, and local and regional governance.

Our aim is to develop high quality administrators and managers who will play a critical role in their home country environments. This will be achieved through an interdisciplinary programme of study, which is intellectually rigorous and professionally relevant to your local context and organisation. The course is particularly attractive to graduates working in public services abroad who want to develop expertise in public service reform, capacity strengthening and institutional development.

The course meets the demands of an ever more complex and dynamic sector comprised of government departments, local authorities, public agencies and voluntary organisations from Britain and abroad, thus reflecting the need for skilled and innovative public managers, administrators and policy makers acting as agents for change.

Using a blended learning approach incorporating a variety of teaching and learning strategies appropriate to postgraduate level study, the course introduces you to the latest strategic management and planning tools applied in public agencies, overviews emerging trends and best practice in public policy within a comparative context and provides a strong theoretical and methodological grounding. Uniquely, the programme benefits from a bespoke research methodology component focused on public policy and management research and analysis. Moreover, the University’s vanguard Virtual Learning Environment, coming to support the teaching and learning process, as well repeated opportunities to reflect upon personal academic development, add value to your student experience and to the overall value of the programme.

The core teaching team on this course is both experienced and dynamic. The team is involved, on a regular basis, in civil service training, in consultancy and advisory work for public sector organisations, as well as in internationally recognised academic research, thus providing the Master in Public Administration teaching with relevant, informative and contemporary case-studies. One of the course’s greatest strengths is that it achieves a fine balance between its theoretically informed structures and the practical application of skills developed throughout. Expert practitioners from a range of public and voluntary sector organisations contribute to the course.

The course has historically attracted students sponsored by the Commonwealth, the governments of Bangladesh, Indonesia, Japan, Romania, South Korea, Vietnam, and students from (amongst others) Afghanistan, Germany, Kosovo, Morocco, Nigeria, South Africa, Poland, Russia, Ukraine and the USA. Our graduates access managerial and decision-making positions in a range of public and voluntary sector organisations.

A key feature of this course is that it includes a work placement module that offers students the chance to experience directly the work of a relevant area of public service in a London-based organisation over a substantial period of time. You will also benefit from the skills and support from our full-time placement and employability officer.

The course’s variety of teaching and learning styles is reflected in the variety of assessment tools employed throughout the course. Within the general principle of mixed mode formative and summative assessment, we use a diversity of assessment instruments: a range of written assignments, such as essays, reports, portfolios, individual or group classroom presentations, and the dissertation.

The MPA dissertation is a 60 credit project that allows students to pursue individual research on a topic of their choice, within the public administration and public policy fields.

Detailed verbal and written feedback is given on all assessments, and significant tutorial support is given during the dissertation, including bespoke dissertation workshops.

Modular structure

The course consists of five taught modules, a work experience placement in a UK public service organisation (two days a week over 15 weeks), and a triple-module dissertation (which may be completed in your home country).

Core modules cover:
-Strategic Planning and Change Management Core (20 credits)
-Comparative Public Policy Core (20 credits)
-Researching Public Services Core (20 credits)
-Public Administration Dissertation Core (60 credits)

A range of subject-related optional modules within management, community development and European studies. You have the opportunity to specialise in, for example, health management, development and administration, or project and human resources management.

After the course

Graduates can expect a host of public administration job opportunities in the contexts of transition and modernisation – the course is ideal for those already employed in the sector who wish to update their skills, or progress to further study.

The work placement is also an excellent opportunity for you to practice the skills and apply the knowledge acquired during the programme, but also to forge long lasting professional relationships within the sector. The network of employers that offer work placements for our students include: the London Boroughs of Hackney, Harrow, Havering, Islington, Redbridge, Tower Hamlets, Westminster; government bodies such as the Department of Work and Pensions, and voluntary sector organisations such as Thames Reach, amongst others. Students have praised the work placement for its relevance to their career development and the employability skills it fosters.

Our recent graduates have accessed positions in central governments in Romania, Poland, Bangladesh, in executive agencies and local government in the UK and in wide range of voluntary sector organisations in the UK and abroad – to name just a few.

International links

The London Met MPA operated two international franchises in Russia, in conjunction with the Higher School of Economics in Moscow and the Urals Academy of Public Administration in Ekaterinburg. London Met MPA staff are regularly invited to contribute to programmes abroad.

Additionally the International Summer School in Public Administration, delivered by core MPA staff, has run since 2003, attracting students of politics, management and public administration.

Moving to one campus

Between 2016 and 2020 we're investing £125 million in the London Metropolitan University campus, moving all of our activity to our current Holloway campus in Islington, north London. This will mean the teaching location of some courses will change over time.

Whether you will be affected will depend on the duration of your course, when you start and your mode of study. The earliest moves affecting new students will be in September 2017. This may mean you begin your course at one location, but over the duration of the course you are relocated to one of our other campuses. Our intention is that no full-time student will change campus more than once during a course of typical duration.

All students will benefit from our move to one campus, which will allow us to develop state-of-the-art facilities, flexible teaching areas and stunning social spaces.

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Discover how international relations theory affects real-world events, and develop crucial skills like decision making and debating. Read more

Discover how international relations theory affects real-world events, and develop crucial skills like decision making and debating. With prestigious guest lecturers and visits to think tanks such as Chatham House, you’ll gain all the experience you need for a role in global politics.

Course duration: 12 months full-time or 24 months part-time (September starts); 15 months full-time or 32 months part-time (January starts)

Teaching times

Full time: Semester 1 - Monday and Wednesday 3-6pm; Semester 2 - Tuesday and Thursday 3-6pm

NB: Part-time students take only one module per Semester. Your own timetable may differ depending on your choice of optional modules.

This course will give you an understanding of how international relations theory is applied to real-world policy and strategy, and the practical problems involved in this.

You’ll examine the theory and definition of the ‘state’ and relations between different states, and the roles of other institutions and organisations, like multinational companies and transnational crime organisations. All your studies will contain a strong vocational element, with a focus on how theory affects, and is affected, by real events on the ground.

As well as this foundation in general international relations theory and practice, you’ll also have the chance to focus on your own areas of interest. Our optional modules will let you choose from subjects like the global risk society, policing and security, corruption and cross-border crime, war reporting, and terrorism.

To develop your decision-making, planning and debating skills, you’ll take part in interactive sessions, respond to specific scenarios and briefs, and undertake critical analysis. You’ll also receive advanced instruction in research methods, a vital skill both for your studies and your future career.

With a supporting team of lecturers who have academic and professional backgrounds in international relations, you can be sure you’re receiving the latest theory and careers advice.

Careers

Our course will prepare you for a career in many roles relating to international relations, such as diplomacy and the diplomatic services, strategy and strategic planning, public services, the Foreign Office, the UN and other international bodies, local government, NGOs, charities, education, journalism and press agencies.

Modules & assessment

Core modules

  • International Relations Theory in Context
  • International Institutions and Policy
  • Major Project

Optional modules

  • War, Peacekeeping and Military Intervention
  • Policing Transnational Crime
  • Communication and Conflict
  • Terror as Crime
  • Postgraduate Research Methods
  • Independent Learning Module

Assessment

We offer a range of core and optional modules, with optional modules sometimes changing depending on staff availability. 

You’ll demonstrate your progress through a combination of role-play scenarios, briefs, written reports, poster presentations, group projects, dissertation, longer essays, case studies, research proposal, short analyses of global events, short review papers, practical data gathering exercises, and short abstracts of core course readings.

Events and activities

You’ll have the chance to attend cutting-edge lectures and seminars from prestigious guest speakers, practitioners and diplomats, and to visit media agencies and think tanks, such as Chatham House. ARU is an institutional member at Chatham House and our students can use the library and other resources, as well as attending events there. In recent years, we have also organised a reception and roundtable at Chatham house for our students.

Work placements

We’ll help you to arrange internships and placements.

Specialist facilities

Our campus in Cambridge features a mock courtroom for debates and role-playing.



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