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Masters Degrees (Corpus Linguistics)

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This Masters course will give you a completely new insight into how language really works and the way people use words to create meaning. Read more

This Masters course will give you a completely new insight into how language really works and the way people use words to create meaning.

If you would like to learn how to explore language using innovative techniques and computer tools, then our course will offer you cutting-edge, research-led training of the highest quality, taught by leading researchers in the fields of linguistics and computer science.

You will have options enabling you to study:

- How people use words to make meanings;

- How to analyse real language usage;

- The role of phraseology, metaphor, and idioms;

- Creative and poetic uses of language;

- New approaches to language teaching;

- Translation tools such as translation memory systems;

- Creating dictionaries using new kinds of evidence;

- Using computer tools for teaching and translation.

The course will enable you to develop interdisciplinary knowledge and practical, transferrable skills, enabling you to meet the most recent and relevant demands of the field.

If you are interested technological aspects of language study, you will also have an option to learn basic computer programming – a skill that is increasingly sought after by companies seeking to employ language professionals.

As a Masters student on this course, you will be part of our Research Institute of Information and Language Processing (RIILP), an independent, research-driven University unit specializing in linguistics and natural language processing.

Join our team of international researchers and start exploring language now!

Why Wolverhampton?

MA Practical Corpus Linguistics for ELT, Lexicography and Translation is an innovative, unique, and up-to-date course based on high-quality interdisciplinary research, with a selection of modules that is unparalleled both on a national and international level. Our research-led teaching is continually evolving to address the latest challenges and breakthroughs in the field. As a result, the knowledge and practical skills developed on the course will allow you to meet the most recent and relevant demands of the industry.

You will become proficient in the use of sophisticated corpus tools such as the Sketch Engine (https://www.sketchengine.co.uk), as well as state-of-the-art specialist software for professional translators and lexicographers. You will also be given an option to learn basic computer programming in Python, which is one of the most robust, popular, and widely used programming languages in the field. By the end of the course, you will have developed a unique set of transferrable skills that will make you highly competitive in the marketplace and allow you to find employment as a language professional in industry or in academia.

Figures speak louder than words: the University of Wolverhampton boasts an outstanding graduate employability rate – 96 % of students are in work or further training six months after graduation!

Facilities

The course will be run on the City Campus, which is situated in the heart of the city centre, only a seven-minute walk from both the train station and St Georges Metro terminus, and a five-minute walk from the main bus station.

The newly renovated City Campus features:

- The Harrison Learning Centre, which has four floors of electronic, online, hardcopy and audio-visual materials;

- The Technology Centre, which has 500 PCs available for you to use for work or play;

- A 'Social Learning Space', which incorporates a coffee and sandwich bar with islands of PCs and comfortable seating;

- On-campus food court, shops, and outlets such as Starbucks;

- Sports facilities including a gym and a sports hall;

- Three Halls of Residence for 1,000 students, located only a short walk from the campus and next to a 24-hour supermarket;

- City centre location, close to all amenities (post office, restaurants, shopping centres, art gallery, theatre etc.);

- Excellent train connections to all major cities (Birmingham: 20 minutes, London: 1 hour 50 minutes).

Career path

Graduates will be able to pursue a career path in language teaching, translation, lexicography, editing, and human language technology, working either as freelancers or in a variety of industry locations, including publishing houses, translation agencies and IT companies that specialize in the development of language resources and tools (e.g. language learning applications, CAT tools). English language teachers will benefit greatly from the course, as they will develop knowledge and practical skills in using modern lexical resources, corpus data and tools in the preparation of teaching material and in the classroom, which will significantly improve their chances of securing a job in the ELT sector.

The course will also provide a sound intellectual platform for students to progress onto doctorate level study and a career in higher education. As the teaching on the course is based on research carried out within the Research Institute of Information and Language Processing (RIILP), graduates will be well-placed to continue their academic careers by applying for PhD positions within our institute or at other leading centres specializing in Corpus Linguistics, ELT/TESOL, Lexicography, Translation Studies, or Natural Language Processing.



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Are you interested in working with cutting-edge technology at the forefront of language processing?. MA Computational Linguistics is a course run by a leading research group at the University of Wolverhampton. Read more

Are you interested in working with cutting-edge technology at the forefront of language processing?

MA Computational Linguistics is a course run by a leading research group at the University of Wolverhampton. As a Masters student on this course, you will be part of our Research Institute of Information and Language Processing (RIILP), an independent, research-driven University unit specialising in Linguistics and Natural Language Processing.

As the name suggests, Computational Linguistics (sometimes called Natural Language Processing) is the use of computers to study language. On the course, you will be able to study:

• How to use Python and the well-established NLTK library to process natural language texts;

• How to analyse real language usage;

• How to automatically translate text using computer programs;

• The use of computers to study features of language;

• Translation tools such as translation memory systems;

• Computer techniques for automatically classifying natural language texts;

• Understand how Siri, Amazon Echo and Google Home etc. work;

• How to design an experiment that will thoroughly test your research questions.

You will be mentored through this programme by experienced and leading academics from the field. Join our research group today to become part of this team of leading researchers and academics and create your path to a career in computers and language!

What happens on the course?

MA Computational Linguistics, when studied full-time, comprises of three semesters worth 60 credits each. Three modules will be studied in both Semester One and Semester Two. During the third semester, students will undertake their research project and complete a 15,000 word dissertation on any aspect of Computational Linguistics.

The course covers all aspects of Computational Linguistics in-line with current and leading work in research and industry, and is divided into the following taught modules:

1. Computer programming in Python

The students will be taught the Python computer programming language, which is specially designed for dealing with natural language texts.

2. Corpus Linguistics in R

Corpus Linguistics involves storing large amounts of text on the computer for linguistic analysis. R is a programming language used to study the statistics of language.

3. Machine translation and other natural language processing applications

The automatic translation of text using statistics. The members of the Research Group will each speak on their own research areas throughout the module.

4. Computational Linguistics

The use of computers to study language at all levels, such as relations between words, part of speech tagging, syntactic parsing and anaphora resolution.

5. Translation tools for professional translators

Using computer tools to speed up many aspects of translation, such as product manuals, film scripts, medical texts, video games and simultaneous interpreting.

6. Machine learning for language processing

Computer techniques for automatically classifying natural language texts, for NLP tasks such as making summaries of text automatically.

7. Research methods and professional skills

You will learn how to design an experiment to thoroughly test your research questions.

Translation Tools for Professional Translators is an elective module that may be chosen in the Second Semester to replace another taught module for those students who are interested in pursuing careers in Translation.

You will be expected to dedicate 9 hours per week to lectures and a proportionate amount of time to self-study and tutorials with your supervisor.

Opportunities:

- You will be taught by leading researchers in the field: our teaching staff at the Research Institute of Information and Language Processing (RIILP) are engaged in high-quality research, as evidenced by the latest RAE 2008 and REF 2014 results.

- We offer an exciting programme of invited lectures and research seminars, attended by both students and staff;

- The institute has a wide network of contacts in academia and in the industry from which you will be able to benefit.

The knowledge and skills developed in the course will be assessed in a variety of ways. Assessments will include writing assignments on given topics, reports on practical work carried out in the class, portfolios, projects, oral presentations, and tests.

The culmination of the study programme will be your 15,000-word dissertation, which will allow you to carry out an in-depth study of a chosen topic within the areas of corpus linguistics, language teaching, lexicography, or translation.

Career path

Graduates of this course will be well-placed to continue their academic/research careers by applying for PhD positions within RIILP or at other leading centres for language and information processing. This degree will also enable graduates to access research and development positions within the language processing and human language technology industries, as well as in related areas such as translation, software development and information and communication technologies, depending on their specific module choices and dissertation topic. It should be noted that computer programming is a skill that is increasingly sought after by many companies from technological backgrounds and skills gained from this course will place graduates in a good position to take up such posts. Past graduates from this course have also gone on to successful careers specifically within the computer programming industry.

What skills will you gain?

The practical sessions include working with tools and software and developing programs based on the material taught in the lectures, allowing you to apply the technical skills you are learning. Some of the tasks are group based, feeding into the collaboration aspect of blended learning which enhances team-working skills, and some are done individually. Through portfolio building, you will be able to share your learning with other students. You will also be able to enhance your employability by sharing your online portfolio with prospective employers. Some assessments will require you to present your work to the rest of the class, enabling you to develop your presentation skills, which are useful in both academia and industry. Other transferrable skills are the abilities to structure your thoughts, present your ideas clearly in writing and prepare texts for a wider audience. You will acquire these skills through assessed report and essay writing, and most of all through writing your dissertation.



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This programme is tailored for any career requiring specialised language awareness, including Teaching English as a Foreign Language and professional communication. Read more

This programme is tailored for any career requiring specialised language awareness, including Teaching English as a Foreign Language and professional communication.

Overview

The MA in Applied Linguistics incorporates three broad areas of study: research methodology; language description; and its application to achieve a better understanding of a wide range of language-related issues, such as language acquisition and teaching, social interaction (including workplace and intercultural communication), critical discourse analysis, corpus analysis or the role of linguistic analysis in forensic contexts.  

Throughout the course you will improve your research skills by being given specific training in research methodology, planning your own work and being involved in ongoing research projects led by various members of staff. You will have the opportunity to either specialise in a particular area of applied linguistics, such as discourse analysis and social interaction, or acquire a good working knowledge of various subdisciplines within applied linguistics and thus take advantage of the wide-ranging expertise in applied linguistics by the staff in the Centre for Language and Communication Research. Furthermore, you will learn how to use specific software packages that can aid research in the areas of applied linguistics you are most interested in.

The MA in Applied Linguistics develops your ability to undertake linguistic analysis confidently and effectively; to collect, evaluate, synthesise and interpret qualitative and/or quantitative data; and to critique arguments and research. The curriculum also helps you enhance important work-related skills, such as the ability to communicate clearly and persuasively, and to work both independently and in collaboration with others.

This course offers access to an established research training programme that has been developed with two function: Firstly, it provides an integrated foundation in research activities and bases in order that you are prepared for research activities. Secondly, it provides hands-on experience of working within an established staff research project in order to gain practical insights into the ways that research works in authentic team contexts.

You will experience excellence in teaching and learning at an advanced level, in an environment where you will benefit from the fact that the Centre is home to world-leading research in linguistics and communication.

Distinctive features

  • The opportunity to gain a strong foundation in research activities as well as an excellent understanding of the varied nature of the discipline. While most MAs with a similar title focus specifically on language teaching, this course allows you to engage with a much wider range of methodological approaches besides language acquisition and teaching, such as discourse analysis, sociolinguistics, corpus linguistics and forensic linguistics.
  • Teaching by members of Cardiff’s Centre for Language and Communication Research, which has an international reputation as a field leader in sociolinguistics, professional and critical discourse analysis, multimodal communication, language acquisition and loss, systemic functional linguistics, forensic linguistics, corpus linguistics and formulaic language. The MA in Applied Linguistics builds on these strengths to provide a cohesive and yet wide-ranging degree.

Learning and assessment

During the taught stage, teaching will take place mainly through weekly seminars / workshops, where you will have the opportunity to develop an understanding of particular topics related to language and linguistics. You will be able to discuss concepts and ideas in small groups and open class discussions, to consolidate and get feedback on your individual learning, and to develop communication skills in informal group discussions and oral presentations. Depending on your prior experience, you might be encouraged to attend the lectures for various undergraduate modules as well. You will be taught through regular supervision sessions in Research Experience in Applied Linguistics. These will offer the opportunity for structured but independent learning of practical research skills. Teaching will be varied and responsive.

All modules within the MA in Applied Linguistics make extensive use of the University’s virtual learning environment, Learning Central, where you can access discussion forums and find course materials.

During the dissertation stage, you will conduct independent research on a topic of your choice with regular supervision from a member of staff.

Career prospects

This programme will offer preparation for all careers where language is used for any purpose, for example to influence or persuade, inform, educate or entertain. Gaining an MA will demonstrate higher abilities in research and communication.

Some obvious future work destinations include research, teaching, speech and language therapy, publishing, writing, editing, information design, librarianship, as well as professional jobs, such as banking and HR, and public sector jobs, such as those in the civil service or local government. However, the degree is not limited to these possible directions and offers a good preparation for roles in a variety of fields which involve reasoning, critical and evaluative work, verbal and written skills, assimilation of information, communicative skills such as an awareness of linguistic variation, as well as some quantitative skills and skills in presenting information using technology.

Some students will also choose to undertake further study in the form of a PhD.



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Newcastle University is one of the largest centres for linguistic research in Europe. This gives you the unique opportunity to learn a wide range of methodologies. Read more
Newcastle University is one of the largest centres for linguistic research in Europe. This gives you the unique opportunity to learn a wide range of methodologies. You will be exposed to diverse theoretical perspectives, which will enrich your own research.

As a postgraduate researcher in linguistics or applied linguistics, you will carry out a major research project working with supervisors who are experts in your field. We offer supervision in a wide range of languages and areas, including:
-Second language learning
-Conversation and discourse analysis
-Inter/cross cultural communication
-Corpus linguistics
-Oral communicative competence in a second language
-Language endangerment
-Syntax and morphology
-Phonetics and phonology
-History of English
-Language variation and change
-Language evolution
-(Variationist) sociolinguistics
-Bilingualism
-First and second language acquisition

Linguistics and applied linguistics is split across three Schools:
-School of Education, Communication and Language Sciences
-School of English Literature, Language and Linguistics
-School of Modern Languages

Our Schools score well in student satisfaction surveys and we have a diverse set of staff expertise. In the 2012 Postgraduate Research Experience Survey, 94% of our students stated that their supervision expectations were met or exceeded. More recently, Prof. Anders Holmberg won our student-led award for Best Research Supervisor of 2013.

Career development

You will develop your career within a research-led community and benefit from funding opportunities. Recent MPhil and PhD graduates have gone into a variety of careers, including:
-Academia
-Education
-Publishing
-University administration

Additionally, you can involve yourself in range of activities and events. As a PhD student you can gain experience in journal editing and conference organisation. You will have the opportunity to join the editorial team in publishing the annual Newcastle Working Papers in Linguistics. You can also get involved in the organising team of the annual Postgraduate Conference in Applied and Theoretical Linguistics. As well as this, you can present your work to a student audience for feedback at our regular Student Work in Progress (SWiP) meetings.

You will be welcome to join our Special Interest Groups (SIGs) in linguistics, which meet on a regular basis. These allow researchers to share ideas, develop new skills and get feedback on their work. The meetings involve discussions on research papers, presenting or viewing presentations and receiving linguistic software guidance. Current SIGs include:
-Language variation and change
-Theoretical phonology
-Corpus linguistics
-Syntax
-Language and cognition

You will also have the opportunity to attend guest lectures. We often invite international scholars to present on their research specialism. Recent distinguished speakers include:
-Prof. Ellen Bialystok (York University, Toronto)
-Prof. J.K. Chambers (University of Toronto)
-Prof. David Pesetsky (MIT)
-Prof. Elizabeth Closs Traugott (Stanford University)

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Are you interested in learning how the English language works? How it may be analysed and how you learn languages?. Read more

Are you interested in learning how the English language works? How it may be analysed and how you learn languages?

The MA in Applied Linguistics is a programme that allows you to develop expertise in specific areas of linguistics, such as corpus linguistics, cognitive linguistics, discourse analysis and/or language pedagogy. The programme combines a range of core modules and optional modules to ensure that you develop a solid foundation in the discipline area whilst also having the flexibility to pursue your own specific research interests. This highly flexible programme is ideal for language professionals, or for those intending to become language professionals, in a range of possible careers.

We also offer a distance learning programme over 2.5 years. For more information see Applied Linguistics MA (Distance Learning).

Course details

You will study two core modules:

  • Describing Language
  • Research Methods in Applied Linguistics

You will then choose five optional modules from a wide range, giving you the flexibility to focus on areas of language and linguistics which reflect your specific interests. (See module information below).

In addition, there are two non-assessed components in the programme:

  • During the autumn term, all students will be offered preliminary training in corpus linguistics, introducing you to one or more of the main English language corpora (e.g. the British National Corpus) – invaluable collections of authentic language data against which theory, intuition and pedagogic materials can be measured.
  • You will also be offered a course in Academic Writing. Those whose first language is not English are particularly encouraged to follow this course.

Assessment

You will do a total of six assessed pieces of coursework over the year. For assessment purposes, one of the modules you take during the spring term will be ‘linked’ with the Research Methods module – that is, you will produce a piece of work in the field covered by that module, but with a particular focus on research methods, and this will count as your assignment for Research Methods in Applied Linguistics.

You will also complete a 15,000-word dissertation on a topic of your choice.

Learning and teaching

Modules are typically delivered via weekly two-hour seminars. You will also receive one-to-one supervision to support you in the development of your dissertation. 

Support with academic writing

As a postgraduate student in the College of Arts and Law, you have access to the Academic Writing Advisory Service (AWAS) which aims to help your transition from undergraduate to taught Masters level, or back into academia after time away. The service offers guidance on writing assignments and dissertations for your MA/MSc programme with individual support from an academic writing advisor via tutorials, email and the provision of online materials.

International students can access support for English Language development and skills through the Birmingham International Academy (BIA).

Employability

Your degree will provide excellent preparation for employment and this will be further enhanced by a range of employability support services offered by the University.

The University's Careers Network provides advice and information specifically for postgraduates that will help you to develop an effective career and skills development strategy, and to make the most of your time with us at the University. The College of Arts and Law also has a dedicated careers and employability team to deliver tailored programmes of careers events and local support.

You will have opportunities to: meet employers face-to-face at on-campus recruitment fairs; attend employer presentations and skills workshops; receive individual guidance on your job applications, writing your CV and improving your interview technique; and access to comprehensive listings of hundreds of graduate jobs and work experience opportunities.

You will also be able to access our full range of careers support for up to two years after graduation.

Postgraduate employability: English Language and Applied Linguistics

Birmingham's English Language and Applied Linguistics postgraduates develop a broad range of transferable skills that are highly valued by employers, particularly in relation to verbal and written communication. They also develop crucial skills in organisation, time management, analysis and interpretation of information.

Many of our graduates enter roles for which their programme has prepared them, such as teaching and lecturing; others use their transferable skills in a wide range of occupations including journalism, marketing and events.



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About the course. This course delivers advanced training in the theory and techniques of applied linguistics with an emphasis on second language acquisition. Read more

About the course

This course delivers advanced training in the theory and techniques of applied linguistics with an emphasis on second language acquisition.

We also have expertise in related disciplines including sociolinguistics, critical discourse analysis and corpus linguistics, and in the field of TESOL we offer particular expertise in Academic Writing, ESP, Materials Design and Testing.

Our course includes options to take part in work placements and gain additional professional qualifications.

Our graduates go on to advanced careers in TESOL all over the world. They also work in business, publishing, translation and interpreting.

Your career

Our graduates are working in teaching (primary, secondary, FE, HE and TESOL), publishing, marketing, libraries, fundraising, charities and the public sector. A masters from Sheffield is a sound basis for a PhD at any leading university.

How we teach

Our expertise covers all aspects of the subject, so whatever you’re interested in you’ll get the best possible advice and support. We provide training in research methods and you can choose to go on a work placement as part of your course.

You’ll be taught by academics whose work is published internationally. Their specialisms include language acquisition, historical language studies, applied linguistics, literary linguistics, discourse analysis and sociolinguistics.

We have a lively research culture. Through lectures and weekly seminars we’ll introduce you to the latest ideas. You’ll have the opportunity to explore these ideas in your own research.

With the School of Languages and Cultures, we established the new University Centre for Linguistic Research to gather and support postgraduate linguistics research across the University.

Our resources

We have specialist recording equipment for fieldwork and experimental work. Interactive computer-based workshops will introduce you to corpus-linguistic technology.

The University library subscribes to several electronic databases including JStor, Early English Texts online and Eighteenth-century Collections online. For more advanced reading, there’s a regular free minibus service to the British Library at Boston Spa.

Funding

There are a number of studentships and fee bursaries available, funded by either the University or the Arts and Humanities Research Council. Deadlines for funding applications are usually in winter/early spring. For details, see our website.

Core modules

  • Introduction to Language and Linguistics
  • English Grammar and Discourse
  • Language Teaching Methodology
  • Second Language Acquisition
  • Research Methods
  • Dissertation (MA only)

Examples of optional modules

  • Corpus Linguistics
  • Current Issues in Second Language Acquisition
  • Discourse and Genre Analysis
  • English for Specific Purposes
  • Intercultural Communication
  • Researching Writing in TESOL
  • Teaching Practice
  • Theory and Practice of Language Teaching
  • World Englishes

Teaching and assessment

You’ll be taught by a dedicated and enthusiastic team of teachers. Our internationally recognised research feeds straight into our teaching, with students sometimes taking a hands-on role in our research activities. The staff are leading figures in their fields, in many cases having written the books and papers you will be studying: Kook-hee Gil (Second Language Acquisition), Nigel Harwood (TESOL Materials), Gabriel Ozon (English Grammar), Jane Mulderrig (Critical Discourse Analysis), Valerie Hobbs (English for Specific Purposes) and Oksana Afitska (Language Teaching Materials).

You’ll spend about eight hours a week in lectures, seminars and workshops. And there are chances to take part in classroom-based research projects in the UK and overseas.

Assessment depends on the module, but includes essay assignments and classroom coursework tasks. You’ll write your dissertation (MA only) over the summer. If you don’t complete the dissertation you’ll be awarded a diploma.



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The Linguistics MA is a flexible programme which aims to explore the breadth and the depth of linguistics. It builds on the widest range of teaching and research expertise, covering all aspects of theoretical and descriptive linguistics. Read more

The Linguistics MA is a flexible programme which aims to explore the breadth and the depth of linguistics. It builds on the widest range of teaching and research expertise, covering all aspects of theoretical and descriptive linguistics: phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, pragmatics, discourse and conversation analysis, typology, historical linguistics, sociolinguistics, cognitive linguistics and psycholinguistics, computational and corpus linguistics, field linguistics, and the documentation and description of endangered languages. The academic staff teaching on the programme work on various practical applications of linguistics (e.g. language codification and language policy, institutional language, language in the community) and have expertise in a wide range of languages, including English and its varieties, Germanic, Latin and Romance, Russian, Polish, Kurdish and other Iranian languages, Arabic, Hebrew, Turkish, and several languages spoken in the Americas (e.g. Huave, Quechua, Ulwa), Australia (e.g. Jamingjung), and beyond.

All students receive a solid foundation for linguistic study in three core modules (of which at least two are compulsory): 

  • Grammatical Theory
  • Semantics and Pragmatics
  • Phonetics and Phonology

The remainder of the programme allows the students to make the most of what the staff have to offer. Students can either take a variety of course units in different areas including the new Forensic Linguistics unit, or specialise in one of the following pathways: Phonetics and Phonology, Sociolinguistics, Syntax and Semantics, Typology or Romani Linguistics.

Aims

The course aims to give students a grounding in breadth and depth in Linguistics, by exploring the central features of linguistic theory: its history, objectives, principal theoretical frameworks, methodologies, contested areas and uncontested results. Students will gain experience of excellence in teaching and learning at an advanced level, in an environment where they will benefit from the fact that the School is also home to world-leading research in Linguistics.

Teaching and learning

Teaching takes on a variety of forms. Core course units and other MA specific course units are typically taught as seminars, in a small group, combining lectures with discussion. Many of them have practical tutorials as well which will help students prepare for individual research projects. Directed Readings involve individual or small group meetings during which pre-set readings on a particular topic are discussed. The enhanced Level 3 undergraduate course units combine lectures or seminars, depending on the aim of the course unit, with more optional tutorials. The aim across all teaching forms is to create the opportunity for intensive scholarly work, with areas of focus determined by the participants and their individual interests, which can be investigated in considerable depth.

If you wish to discover more about the academic staff in the department, please visit:http://www.alc.manchester.ac.uk/about/people/staff-directory/linguistics-english-language-staff/

Coursework and assessment

Course units are assessed at the end of the semester during which they are offered. All taught course units except Introduction to Grammatical Theory and Phonetics and Phonology are assessed by examined coursework only. All course units include formative assessments to ensure interim feedback during the semester.

Deadlines for assessments are stated in the MA in Linguistics and English Language 2016-2017 Programme Handbook .

Course unit details

The Linguistics MA consists of the following elements:

  • At least two of the following compulsory core course units in Introduction to Grammatical Theory (15 credits), Phonetics and Phonology (15 credits), Semantics and Pragmatics (15 credits)
  • Research Methods I and II (2 x 15 credits)
  • Optional course units (60 credits altogether)
  • Dissertation (60 credits).

Alternatives to the compulsory course units in Introduction to Grammatical Theory and/or Phonetics and Phonology may be chosen if students can provide evidence of having covered comparable material in their undergraduate degree; in borderline cases, students may be asked to take a proficiency test in Welcome Week.

The optional course units can be selected to follow specialised pathways, which include Sociolinguistics, Phonetics and Phonology, Syntax and Semantics, Typology, and Romani Linguistics. One or two course units may take the form of Directed Reading units, which are individual or small group seminars about set readings on a particular topic. These are available after consultation with an appropriated member of staff and the PGT Officer. One or two course units may also be taken from a list of MA course units available in other subject areas within the School of Arts, Languages and Cultures, or from a list of enhanced Level-3 undergraduate course units in Linguistics and English Language, which supplement the MA specific course units on offer.

For details of postgraduate course units currently on offer, please refer to the Programme Handbook.

Facilities

All postgraduate students on this programme can make use of the purpose-designed Centre for Graduate Studies within the Ellen Wilkinson Building. The Centre opened in 2014 and provides state-of-the-art facilities for postgraduate study. These include 30 computers, LaserJet printers, `hot-desk' facilities for around 50 students (including workstation facilities for students with disabilities), and 132 secure lockers. The Centre is a meeting place for postgraduate taught and postgraduate research students, and also has several areas to relax, socialise and network.

In addition to the Centre for Graduate Studies, the University has five major computer clusters, together with many smaller clusters. In total there are more than 10,000 PCs and workstations across the campus. All provide access to standard office software as well as specialist programs, and all are connected to the campus network and internet. Every student is registered for email, file storage and internet access. If more demanding computer access is required, our specialist computing division Manchester Computing can provide high-end and specialist computing services.

The University Library is one of the best-resourced academic libraries in the UK and is widely recognised as one of the world's greatest research libraries. We also have one of the largest academic IT services in Europe - supporting world-class teaching and research.

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 



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Applied linguistics identifies, investigates, and offers solutions to language-related real-life problems, such as improving how languages are taught or how multicultural workplaces can improve communication between staff. Read more

Applied linguistics identifies, investigates, and offers solutions to language-related real-life problems, such as improving how languages are taught or how multicultural workplaces can improve communication between staff.

This one-year full-time (or part-time) course has a particular focus on research methodology, exploring how language shapes human interaction.

 By studying this course you will:

  • understand how to employ a range of research approaches to language, from discourse analysis to corpus linguistics
  • have the opportunity to investigate language and communication from an interdisciplinary angle
  • develop a thorough grounding in language research and its practical applications
  • use your knowledge of how languages are formed to solve real-life problems.

 The course is excellent preparation for students who wish to continue their studies at PhD level.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • Research Methods
  • Approaches to Language and Linguistics
  • Teaching Language and Literature
  • Discourse Analysis
  • Dissertation

Restricted modules

Group 1

Students must take 20-40 credits from this group

  • Teaching Language and Literature
  • Corpus Linguistics
  • Intercultural Communication
  • Syllabus Design and Methodology

Group 2

Students can take maximum 20 credits from this group if only 2 modules are chosen from Group 1

  • Advanced Translation
  • Advanced Interpreting

Please note: This degree structure and modules may be subject to change.

Careers

By studying applied linguistics you will develop skills that are highly valued by employers, such as critical thinking, research, analysis, oral/written communication, presentation and problem solving skills. The types of careers you might expect to pursue include:

  • Advertising and marketing
  • Business analyst
  • Communications
  • Language teaching
  • Project management
  • Publishing
  • Research and academia
  • Writing

Detailed module information can be accessed on Online Module Catalogue. Please search by module name or module code. Detailed programme specifications information can be accessed on Online Programme Specifications.



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This programme provides professional development for English language teachers, and focuses on the theory and practice of teaching the English language in a variety of contexts, drawing on innovative research carried out by members of the School of Humanities, which includes work on Mobile Assisted Language Learning (MALL), corpus linguistics, Academic English and telecollaboration. Read more
This programme provides professional development for English language teachers, and focuses on the theory and practice of teaching the English language in a variety of contexts, drawing on innovative research carried out by members of the School of Humanities, which includes work on Mobile Assisted Language Learning (MALL), corpus linguistics, Academic English and telecollaboration.

A distinctive feature of the programme is that you will have opportunities to observe English Language classes in higher education and undertake microteaching practice. You will also develop digital expertise with state-of-the-art e-learning tools and focus on specific English Language issues relating to your own educational contexts.

WHY CHOOSE THIS COURSE?

Students on the programme state that staff provide them with excellent academic and pastoral support and that their learning experience is very positive (evidence from module and course evaluation questionnaires). The course also focuses on the future world of work and students may apply for part-time paid teaching opportunities and work placements within Coventry University, including placements overseas.

The assessment on the programme is varied and includes essays, reports, presentations, digital learning object design, microteaching and seen in-class tests. The course also offers extra-curricular activities, such as participation in lectures and workshops with renowned visiting applied linguists andeducation experts.

There also is a free field trip relevant to the curriculum. In 2014 for example we went to the British Museum in London and then designed intercultural teaching tasks based on the objects viewed at the museum (activity linked to the mandatory module on materials design).

You will moreover be offered other field trips at competitive rates as they are supported by the Faculty of Arts and Humanities and by the Centre for Global Engagement.

WHAT WILL I LEARN?

You will:
-Discuss theory and practice of English language learning and teaching
-Develop skills in the evaluation and design of teaching materials for a variety of settings
-Explore the role played by new technologies for learning, teaching and communicating
-Analyse English as it is spoken and written in the UK and in the rest of the world
-Have the opportunity to practice teaching and observe experienced teachers in a variety of face-to-face and blended-learning settings

The mandatory modules are:
-Theories, Approaches and Methods of Language Learning and Teaching
-Developing Language Teaching Materials
-Analysing Written and Spoken Discourse
-Grammar and Phonology for the English Language Teacher
-Teaching English in Higher Education
-Computer Assisted Language Learning: Theory and Practice
-Dissertation in ELT/Applied Linguistics

In addition, you will choose three of the following optional modules:
-Business English;
-Sociolinguistics and English Language Teaching
-Teaching English Through Literature
-Corpus Analysis and Pedagogy
-English for Academic Purposes Course Design and Language Testing
-Understanding Academic English

HOW WILL THIS COURSE BE TAUGHT?

The full-time, face-to-face, programme runs over three semesters. There are two entry points: September and January. Students normally take four 15-credit modules in semester 1, four 15-credit modules modules in semester 2, and complete a Dissertation in semester 3.

Modules are taught face-to-face with lectures, workshops, laboratory sessions and seminars. All students are asked to submit a diagnostic task on arrival (normally a short essay). One-to-one support is available for students who need practise in academic English writing.

The delivery of all modules is supported by an online learning environment that is used, for example, to display content material, to submit assignments and provide electronic feedback, to discuss seminar topics (discussion forums), to design student-centred glossaries and to engage in online assessment and practice.

Students are also offered the opportunity to discuss English language teaching and analyse the English language with dedicated e-learning platforms for specific purposes (e.g. Corpus Linguistics tools, Computer Assisted Language Learning and Mobile Assisted Language Learning platforms).

Staff teaching on the programme also make use of the new learning spaces in the Disruptive Media Learning Laboratory in the Lanchester Library, to encourage students to practise English teaching in a variety of settings.

A part-time programme is available for UK/EU applicants, and can be tailored to the needs of each applicant.

HOW WILL I BE ASSESSED?

A variety of assessed tasks have been integrated into this programme, offering you a stimulating assessment experience and to enable you to reflect on your work, as the programme is designed to train teachers who will assess work themselves. Each module will normally have two assessment tasks and you will receive feedback on the first task before you submit the second one. The assessment tasks include seen examinations, presentations, essays and reports, corpus-based syllabus and course design, microteaching, reflective test design, e-learning object design in group and peer observation reports.

The external examiners have commented very positively on the variety, innovation and appropriateness of the assessment tasks on this programme. For example in 2013-2014 the External Examiner commented in his annual report: 'The assessment tasks are of good quality - well conceived, often imaginative, and in many cases appropriately practical, matching well with intended learning outcomes. I commend this.'

HOW WILL THIS COURSE ENHANCE MY CAREER PROSPECTS?

English looks likely to continue as the international language for the foreseeable future, and this MA programme leads to a variety of career destinations in teaching the language and/or in education management. Qualifications of this kind are often seen as important for access to senior management posts in both private and state educational institutions around the world. In addition to classroom teaching you will be well equipped to perform roles such as materials developer, resource manager and examiner.

Graduates from the MA in ELT are currently employed as professors in Jordan and China, as Pre-sessional Programme Coordinators in the UK and China and as Academic English Consultants for both the private and public sector, just to provide a few examples.

WORK PLACEMENTS

You will be provided support to find a work placement by dedicated staff in the careers office and in the Centre for Global Engagement.

OPPORTUNITIES FOR AN INTERNATIONAL EXPERIENCE

You will be offered the opportunity to take part in the global leaders programme (additional fees apply, see further details below) that includes international experiences. There will also be international trips organised by the School in collaboration with the Centre for Global Engagement. As English is a global language, international perspectives on learning and teaching English are fully embedded in the curriculum.

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Built on a solid research foundation, the MA in Language and Linguistics offers a broad and highly flexible suite of modules covering such topics as linguistics, communication, language, and English language. Read more

Built on a solid research foundation, the MA in Language and Linguistics offers a broad and highly flexible suite of modules covering such topics as linguistics, communication, language, and English language. The programme also offers a broad-based but advanced introduction for those new to the study of language, linguistics and communication.

Overview

Built on a solid research foundation, the curriculum offers a broad and highly flexible suite of modules enabling you to tailor the programme to your own specific interests. The MA Language and Linguistics also offers a broad-based but advanced introduction for those new to the study of language, linguistics and communication, as well as building on topics that will be familiar to those who studied language and linguistics an undergraduate level. 

The MA in Language and Linguistics enables you to develop knowledge and research skills over the course of the programme. We support you to become an independent and active learner, able to understand key issues in the different sub-fields of language and linguistics. Throughout the course you will improve your research skills by being given specific training in research methodology, planning your own work and being involved in ongoing research projects led by various members of staff. You will also gain a thorough understanding of different theoretical and methodological approaches that can be used to explore the linguistic structures of a language.

We develop your ability to undertake linguistic analysis confidently and effectively; to collect, evaluate, synthesise and interpret qualitative and/or quantitative data; and to critique arguments and research. The curriculum also develops important work-related skills, such as the ability to communicate clearly and persuasively and to work both independently and in collaboration with others.

The structure of the MA enables you to develop expertise in specific areas of linguistics and language study. Particular strengths in the Centre for Language and Communication Research are discourse analysis, sociolinguistics, historical linguistics, systemic functional linguistics, corpus linguistics, forensic linguistics, intercultural communication and professional communication. The wide range of subject modules available ensures that you develop a strong foundation in the discipline area whilst also having the flexibility to pursue your own specific research interests within that area.

We aim to give our students experience of excellence in teaching and learning at an advanced level, in an environment where they will benefit from the fact that the Centre is home to world-leading research in linguistics and communication.

Distinctive features

  • Access to an established research training programme making it possible to continue to PhD, should you wish
  • Provision of an integrated foundation in research activities and bases in order that you are prepared for research activities
  • Hands-on experience of working on an established staff research project in order to gain practical insights into the ways that research works in authentic team contexts
  • Optional modules which form the bulk of the programme and provide a vital foundation for later dissertation-writing
  • Situated in the lively Centre for Language and Communication Research, where we regularly host talks from visiting academics from around the world, Advanced Research Residencies and Summer Schools, and where a range of reading and research groups run on topics including sociolinguistics, discourse analysis, systemic functional

Learning and assessment

During the taught stage, you will be taught mostly through weekly seminars / workshops, where you will have the opportunity to develop an understanding of particular topics related to language and linguistics.

You will be able to discuss concepts and ideas in small groups and open class discussions, to consolidate and get feedback on your individual learning, and to develop communication skills in informal group discussions and oral presentations.

Depending on your prior experience, you might be encouraged to attend the lectures for various undergraduate modules as well. You will be taught through weekly or fortnightly supervision sessions in Research Experience. These will offer the opportunity for structured but independent learning of practical skills. Teaching will be varied and responsive.

All modules within the MA in Language and Linguistics make extensive use of the University’s virtual learning environment, Learning Central, where you can access discussion forums and find course materials.

During the dissertation stage, you will conduct independent research on a topic of your choice with regular supervision from a member of staff.

Career prospects

This programme will offer preparation for all careers where language is used for any purpose, for example, to influence or persuade, inform, educate or entertain. Gaining an MA will demonstrate higher abilities in research and communication.

Examples of future work destinations include research, teaching, speech and language therapy, publishing, writing, editing, information design, librarianship, as well as professional jobs, such as banking and HR, and public sector jobs, such as those in the civil service or local government. However, the degree is not limited to these possible directions and offers a good preparation for roles in a variety of fields which involve reasoning, critical and evaluative work, verbal and written skills, assimilation of information, communicative skills such as an awareness of linguistic variation, as well as some quantitative skills and skills in presenting information using technology.

You may also choose to undertake further study in the form of a PhD.



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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Applied Linguistics at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Applied Linguistics at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

The Department of English Language and Literature welcomes applications from students wishing to pursue graduate level research at MA level in Applied Linguistics, particularly topics in second language acquisition, bilingualism, vocabulary learning, corpus linguistics and discourse analysis.

MA by Research in Applied Linguistics

The MA by Research in Applied Linguistics would suit those wanting the freedom to explore a topic of their choosing under the close supervision of two experienced academics but without attending regular classes as required in taught programmes; an MA qualification in niche areas where taught programmes are not offered; the experience of a research degree without committing to a PhD at the outset. Research proposals are invited on any topic in Applied Linguistics for which staff can provide supervision. It is advisable to email a member of academic staff in the appropriate area before applying.

Key Features of Applied Linguistics MA by Research

An MA by Research in Applied Linguistics gives you the chance to pursue a project inspired entirely by your own particular interests in Applied Linguistics. The qualification would be a good preparation for proceeding to doctoral work. Alternatively, the proven ability to conduct independent research in Applied Linguistics will boost employment prospects in the area of English language teaching, but also outside academia (for example, in the media, publishing, the Civil Service, or education).

As a student of the Applied Linguistics programme you will be closely supervised by two experienced academics in your field. Typically, you will meet them fortnightly in the first term and at regular intervals thereafter. Meetings are logged and goals agreed each time. All research students in Applied Linguistics are required to attend skills and training courses at College and Institutional level. They give presentations to other research students and staff at departmental seminars and the annual departmental postgraduate symposium in June and the College of Arts and Humanities conference in October. MA by Research in Applied Linguistics typically last from one year (full-time study) to two years (part-time study).

Postgraduate Research

About 70 of the postgraduates currently studying at Swansea University’s Department of English Language and Literature [ELL] are researchers working on an MA, MPhil or PhD thesis. Each is supervised by two members of staff, 60% of whose own research publications were rated ‘internationally excellent’ or ‘world-leading’ in the 2008 REF exercise. We supervise interdisciplinary projects as well as traditional areas of the discipline - in language studies, creative writing, literature (from medieval to the present) and critical and cultural theory. If you have an idea for a research project in Applied Linguistics, do get in touch and discuss it with us informally before applying.

Postgraduates often join a research centre, e.g. the Centre for Research into Gender and Culture (GENCAS) or the Centre for Research into Welsh Writing in English (CREW) where they work alongside other students and staff in dedicated research rooms. As a student of the Applied Linguistics programme you will present your work in the friendly environment of our Research Institute’s annual postgraduate conference, ELL’s fortnightly research seminars, and the monthly workshop of the Creative Writing Programme. Our research environment was judged 100% ‘internationally excellent’ by the 2008 REF, and research students help staff organise a lively programme of conferences, readings and performances on campus and in the city’s arts centres. As well as being inducted into academic research and dissemination, doctoral students have the opportunity to undertake undergraduate teaching to prepare them for an academic career. We provide study stations with computers and postgraduate common-rooms, research training and the services of a research officer and subject librarian.

REF 2014

What the Research Excellence Framework 2014 had to say about Postgraduate research in the Swansea Department of English Language and Literature …

The environment in the Department is conducive to producing research of mostly at least internationally excellent and at its best world-leading quality’…

‘Arrangements for postgraduates were deemed of world-leading quality’

‘There is clear evidence of the development of a research culture into which research students are fully integrated’

‘Recruitment is strong’

‘There are excellent arrangements for support, training and employability’.

Summing up: ‘The unit makes an outstanding contribution to the health of the discipline’.



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Advanced knowledge of phonetics and syntax coupled with practical application and exploration of English in context – e.g. speech therapy, English in education, discourse analysis – forms the core of our MA course. Read more

Advanced knowledge of phonetics and syntax coupled with practical application and exploration of English in context – e.g. speech therapy, English in education, discourse analysis – forms the core of our MA course.

The next start date for this course is October 2019.

Why Study English Language and Linguistics with us?

Taught at our Parkgate Road Campus in Chester, our cutting-edge MA course is delivered by a dynamic team of linguists, each with their own research specialisms. Our range of expertise includes corpus linguistics (computer-assisted discourse analysis), acoustic phonetics (useful for speech therapy), cognitive stylistics (how our minds process fictional and non-fictional texts) and critical discourse analysis (e.g. ideology in the media). Students can also explore conflicts and controversies in the discipline and contribute to our online blog.

Our dedicated English Language research space will allow you to undertake data-based projects using some of the latest specialist software (e.g. for acoustic phonetics and corpus linguistic analysis).

What will I learn?

Integral to the course is the advanced study of phonetics/phonology and morphology/syntax at the micro-level, combined with application of knowledge about structures of English in discourse (corpus linguistics, critical discourse analysis, cognitive stylistics) and research methods. These core areas of study are supplemented with options which may include the role of English in education (e.g. phonics and grammar in the classroom), language and identity, language change and speech disorders.

How will I be taught?

In most modules you will attend a lecture and discuss ideas in smaller seminars and workshops.

Full-time MA contact hours are approximately four hours per week with 20 hours per week of additional independent study, during term time. Further contact hours with lecturers are in the form of dissertation supervision and personal tutorials.

How will I be assessed?

Assessments are tailored for each module and include exercises in grammar and phonetics/phonology, discourse analysis essays, seminar papers (including presentations), discursive essays, extended data collection and analysis projects, lesson plan and commentary, portfolio, and an extended thesis (dissertation). A successful dissertation is also an essential requirement. There are no exams.

Postgraduate Visit Opportunities

If you are interested in this courses we have a number of opportunities to visit us and our campuses. To find out more about these options and to book a visit, please go to: https://www1.chester.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/postgraduate-visit-opportunities

Request a Prospectus

If you would like to know more about the University please request a prospectus at: http://prospectus.chester.ac.uk/form.php



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The postgraduate programme in applied linguistics and communication began at Birkbeck in 1965, making it one of the oldest and most established linguistics courses in the world. Read more
The postgraduate programme in applied linguistics and communication began at Birkbeck in 1965, making it one of the oldest and most established linguistics courses in the world. It is unique, as it provides students with opportunities to explore many topics in applied linguistics and communication in a comprehensive and interdisciplinary manner. Furthermore, lecturers specialise in various areas of multilingualism and multiculturalism, offering a range of modules to suit individual interests.

You first complete 2 compulsory modules - Introduction to Applied Linguistics and Research Methods and Design - but then you are able to choose from a range of option modules, including, for example: Second Language Acquisition; Bilingualism; International Management Communication; Sociolinguistics; Language, Culture and Communication; Language Teaching and Learning in a Multilingual and Multicultural Contexts; and Linguistic Description and Corpus Application.

The core module Research Methods and Design aims to equip you with professional and technical knowledge in qualitative and quantitative research methods. It will also prepare you for undertaking your own empirical and/or theoretical research into language and language behaviour in the form of an extended literature review or dissertation.

The programme aims to introduce you to multiple sub-domains and topics that reflect the research interests of staff, e.g. code-switching, first and second language acquisition, intercultural communication, language pedagogy and assessment, language impairment, language policy, language and identity, corpus linguistics, and speech production and perception.

All academic staff are active in state-of-the-art teaching and research. Applied linguistics and communication at Birkbeck enjoys a strong international reputation for its quality teaching and research.

The programme is suitable for people with diverse career goals: those who wish to further their career prospects and professional development, or those who have an interest in doctoral research and aspire to work in higher education. In particular, the programme is beneficial for those who do not have specific research interests at the beginning of their degree, but who intend to identify and focus on an area of research after exploring various disciplines in applied linguistics and communication and immersing themselves in the research and learning culture of a renowned department.

Our students work in a rich research environment that is supported by excellent resources, including a multimedia library and computing facilities. We have a large MPhil/PhD community and this programme offers the opportunity to progress to our integrated PhD programmes in Applied Linguistics, Intercultural Communication, Language Teaching or TESOL.

Our postgraduate students join a vibrant and diverse community supported by the Birkbeck College Applied Linguistics Society, which is student run. There is an annual Postgraduate Student Research Conference which is organised by the Society every summer. In addition, the Research Centre for Multilingual and Multicultural Research hosts a lecture series given by international visiting scholars. Birkbeck also actively collaborates with the larger community of applied linguists throughout University of London colleges. The Institute of Education, School of Oriental and African Studies and University College London are all within walking distance in Bloomsbury, as well as King's College London. The British Library and the British Museum are also a short walking distance away.

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The English Linguistics MA provides students with the theoretical and practical knowledge needed to describe modern English, together with appropriate training in academic writing, linguistic argumentation and research methods. Read more

The English Linguistics MA provides students with the theoretical and practical knowledge needed to describe modern English, together with appropriate training in academic writing, linguistic argumentation and research methods. Students have access to the Survey of English Usage, an unparalleled resource for research into grammatical repertoire.

About this degree

The MA introduces students to the core areas of the study of English Linguistics, including morphology, syntax, phonetics, phonology and pragmatics. The programme trains students to use library OPACS, specialised websites, discussion lists, and databases, among them the ICE-GB corpus, based at the Survey of English Usage in UCL English.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of three core components (90 credits), two optional modules (30 credits) and a research dissertation (60 credits).

Core modules

  • English Grammar and Methodology
  • Either English Corpus Linguistics or English Language in Use
  • Research Methodology

Optional modules

Students take two optional modules. Different options are offered each year and have included:

  • English Words
  • History of the English Language
  • Literary Linguistics
  • Phonetics and Phonology of English

Dissertation/report

All MA Students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000 words. Students have access to the Survey of English Usage for this project.

Teaching and learning

The programme is taught through seminars and individual tutorials. Student assessment is through a portfolio of essays (two 2,000-word essays on English linguistics), two three-hour written papers and the dissertation. 

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: English Linguistics MA

Careers

The programme provides an ideal foundation for those wishing to continue to a research degree in English language or linguistics; students who obtain good results in their MA examinations may be considered for the MPhil/PhD programme at UCL (subject to places being available). Graduates may also become teachers or lecturers of English, or pursue a career in writing, publishing, or editing.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Secondary School Teacher (English Language), Unspecified Middle School, China
  • TEFL (Teaching English as a Foreign Language) and SAT Teacher, Unspecified Teaching Company
  • English Teacher, Institute of English
  • Editor, Self-Employed Editor

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The department has exceptional resources for the study of English linguistics. Use of the Survey of English Usage has resulted in many important studies of the grammar, semantics and vocabulary of present-day English.

Excellent library facilities are provided by the UCL Library, Senate House Library and the British Library.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: English Language & Literature

85% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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The Cross-Cultural Communication and Applied Linguistics MA provides theoretical, research and practical training in areas of international and intercultural communication. Read more
The Cross-Cultural Communication and Applied Linguistics MA provides theoretical, research and practical training in areas of international and intercultural communication. It also provides training on the analysis of language in use, in a variety of settings and on the teaching and learning of English as a second language.

The Applied Linguistics Pathway is a specialism on the Cross-Cultural Communication MA. It is designed for students who wish to combine the study of cross-cultural communication (CCC) with the study of language as it is used in a wide range of settings. If you are interested in gaining knowledge and expertise in the new approaches and techniques for teaching English as a second or foreign language you would also benefit from this course.

This specialist pathway is delivered by academic staff in applied linguistics and communication within the School of Education, Communication and Language Sciences. It offers a wide range of optional modules in the areas of applied linguistics and Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL).

You will have the opportunity to develop:
-An understanding of the theories, principles, concepts and methodologies in applied linguistics and TESOL
-A critical awareness of key issues or debates concerning teaching and learning English as a second/foreign language
-In-depth knowledge of methodologies and techniques applicable to research in areas of applied linguistics and TESOL, including corpus linguistics, multimodal analysis, discourse analysis and conversation analysis.

The applied linguistics academic staff have teaching and research expertise in:
-Second language acquisition
-Discourse analysis
-Classroom interaction
-Multimodal interaction
-Teaching and learning English through media and technology
-Teacher development

If you are interested in a career in language teaching, but have little or no previous teaching experience, this pathway offers the option of introductory modules in TESOL. These provide a thorough grounding in the practical skills and knowledge for language teaching and learning.

Work experience

You are encouraged to apply your research interests to real world case studies, particularly of international organisations or workplaces with which you have a connection.

For example, your empirical project submitted in research file three can be in connection with voluntary work (for a charity or NGO) or an internship, arranged over the summer towards the end of the course.

As a part time student you can conduct a research project of relevance to your employer and/or industry.

Pathway

The Cross-Cultural Communication MA has six specialist pathways:
-Applied Linguistics
-Education
-International Management
-International Marketing
-Media
-International Relations

Facilities

As a student in the School of Education, Communication and Language Sciences you'll have access to facilities and a growing collection of online resources, including:
-A well-stocked Education Resource Centre
-Language Analysis Lab
-A phonetics lab
-An audio-video lab
-A recording studio

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