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This Master's course will give you a completely new insight into how language really works and the way people use words to create meaning. Read more

Course description

This Master's course will give you a completely new insight into how language really works and the way people use words to create meaning.

If you would like to learn how to explore language using innovative techniques and computer tools, then our course will offer you cutting-edge, research-led training of the highest quality, taught by leading researchers in the fields of linguistics and computer science.

You will have options enabling you to study:
• How people use words to make meanings;
• How to analyse real language usage;
• The role of phraseology, metaphor, and idioms;
• Creative and poetic uses of language;
• New approaches to language teaching;
• Translation tools such as translation memory systems;
• Creating dictionaries using new kinds of evidence;
• Using computer tools for teaching and translation.

For further information, please download our flyer here: http://rgcl.wlv.ac.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/MA-Practical-Corpus-Linguistics-for-ELT-Lexicography-and-Translation.pdf

Why choose Wolverhampton?

MA Practical Corpus Linguistics for ELT, Lexicography and Translation is an innovative, unique, and up-to-date course based on high-quality interdisciplinary research, with a selection of modules that is unparalleled both on a national and international level. Our research-led teaching is continually evolving to address the latest challenges and breakthroughs in the field. As a result, the knowledge and practical skills developed on the course will allow you to meet the most recent and relevant demands of the industry.

You will become proficient in the use of sophisticated corpus tools such as the Sketch Engine (https://www.sketchengine.co.uk), as well as state-of-the-art specialist software for professional translators and lexicographers. You will also be given an option to learn basic computer programming in Python, which is one of the most robust, popular, and widely used programming languages in the field. By the end of the course, you will have developed a unique set of transferrable skills that will make you highly competitive in the marketplace and allow you to find employment as a language professional in industry or in academia.

Figures speak louder than words: the University of Wolverhampton boasts an outstanding graduate employability rate – 98% of our postgraduate students are in work or further training six months after graduation!

What will I learn?

This course will introduce you to the use of corpora – large electronic collections of written and/or spoken text that serve as a reliable source of evidence in linguistic analysis. (‘Corpora’ is the plural of ‘corpus’.) You will learn how to design, analyse, and exploit corpora in language teaching, dictionary writing, and translation for English or any other language.

You will be given freedom and flexibility to tailor the course content to your needs and research interests as we offer a unique selection of general and specialized elective modules from which to choose. Our teaching staff will provide you with support and guidance in selecting the most suitable combination for your research topic.

Semester I will focus on developing general linguistic knowledge and research skills, which you will be able to apply to your chosen area of expertise in Semester II. You will learn about words, meanings, and linguistic creativity, broaden your knowledge of grammar, and acquire basic research and professional skills. You will also have an opportunity to learn the essentials of computer programming by attending our elective module in Python.

Semester II will introduce you to corpus linguistic methods and their application to three areas of research: language teaching, lexicography, and translation. You will start planning your dissertation and engage in one-on-one consultations with your supervisor.
For further information on modules and assessments, please visit our website: http://rgcl.wlv.ac.uk/macorling

Opportunities

As a Master's student on this course, you will be part of our Research Institute of Information and Language Processing (RIILP), an independent, research-driven University unit specializing in linguistics and natural language processing.
• You will be taught by leading researchers in the field: http://rgcl.wlv.ac.uk/macorling/who-will-teach-you-on-this-course/; our teaching staff at RIILP are engaged in high-quality research, as evidenced by the latest RAE 2008 and REF 2014 results;
• We offer an exciting programme of invited lectures and research seminars, attended by both students and staff;
• The institute has a wide network of contacts in academia and in the industry which you will be able to benefit from;
• You will also have an opportunity to travel the world – Malaga, Valencia, Besançon, Naples, Alicante, and Plovdiv are just a few of the many possible destinations covered by our institute’s Erasmus agreements.

Career path

Graduates will be able to pursue a career path in language teaching, translation, lexicography, editing, and human language technology, working either as freelancers or in a variety of industry locations, including publishing houses, translation agencies and IT companies that specialize in the development of language resources and tools (e.g. language learning applications, CAT tools). English language teachers will benefit greatly from the course, as they will develop knowledge and practical skills in using modern lexical resources, corpus data and tools in the preparation of teaching material and in the classroom, which will significantly improve their chances of securing a job in the ELT sector.

The course will also provide a sound intellectual platform for students to progress onto doctorate level study and a career in higher education. As the teaching on the course is based on research carried out within the Research Institute of Information and Language Processing (RIILP), graduates will be well-placed to continue their academic careers by applying for PhD positions within our institute or at other leading centres specializing in Corpus Linguistics, ELT/TESOL, Lexicography, Translation Studies, or Natural Language Processing.

Contact us

• Dr Sara Moze (course leader):
• April Harper (admin office):
• Research Group website: http://rgcl.wlv.ac.uk/
• Twitter: @RGCL_WLV


*Subject to approval

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We offer excellent candidates the opportunity to carry out research in one of the most dynamic institutions in Britain. We specialise in, and welcome applications from prospective PhD students interested in the following areas. Read more
We offer excellent candidates the opportunity to carry out research in one of the most dynamic institutions in Britain.

We specialise in, and welcome applications from prospective PhD students interested in the following areas: Corpus Research, Cognitive Linguistics and Psycholinguistics, Discourse Analysis and Stylistics, and Language Learning and Teaching.

The MA by Research programme requires you to prepare a dissertation of up to 40,000 words on a topic of your choice, for which an academic staff member will provide expert supervision.

The PhD – the most advanced research degree – leads to a dissertation of up to 80,000 words on a subject of your choice and under the expert supervision of an academic member of staff.

Our principal areas of research are:

Corpus Research - We are well known for our innovative approaches to the analysis of large corpora, which have had a strong impact on language teaching, dictionary development, and research into academic discourses. We are home to the Centre for Corpus Research (CCR), which supports the use of corpus analysis in research, teaching and learning. CCR provides access to a range of corpora and has a dedicated computer suite with specialist resources as well as an eye-tracking laboratory.

Cognitive Linguistics and Psycholinguistics - Our research in cognitive linguistics and psycholinguistics covers a wide range of areas including figurative language, idioms, embodied cognition, language and perception, sign languages, second language acquisition, and construction grammar. We have particular strengths in British Sign Language, Australian Sign Language and gesture studies.

Discourse Analysis and Stylistics - We are known for the development of several highly influential discourse analysis frameworks, and for our work on narrative, the discursive representation of inequality, new media, the language of politics, as well as new ideas on evaluation and phraseology. Our research draws on a variety of linguistic and theoretical traditions, including: systemic-functional linguistics; critical discourse analysis; corpus linguistics; multimodal analysis; narrative analysis; conversation analysis, and genre analysis. Our particular strength at Birmingham is that we combine discourse analysis with corpus analytic methods of research.

Language Learning and Teaching - We research and publish in: academic literacies; phraseology; the teaching and learning of metaphor and other types of figurative language; applications of cognitive linguistics to second language learning and teaching; and the use of corpora in language teaching.

About the School of English, Drama and American & Canadian Studies

"Welcome to the School of English, Drama and American & Canadian Studies, in the College of Arts and Law. This is one of the largest Schools in the College, and variety is our watchword. We offer one of the most extensive ranges of undergraduate and postgraduate programmes in the country. Our research expertise is equally diverse, and we welcome students and researchers from all over the world." - Professor Andrzej Gasiorek, Head of School

We particularly encourage creative thinking, with a range of pioneering programmes including Masters opportunities in Creative Writing, Film and Television and Shakespeare and Creativity. Our creative offerings are also strengthened by the development of our Department of Film and Creative Writing – established in 2015 – which has opened up exciting new opportunities for postgraduates to benefit from synergies between the two fields.

Our well-established Departments also provide an excellent environment for postgraduate study. The Department of Drama and Theatre Arts has a highly respected national and international reputation for excellence in teaching and research. We are also one of the leading centres for the postgraduate study of English in the UK, spanning language and literature. The Department of English Language and Applied Linguistics is a world-leading centre of excellence for both teaching and research in this field.

We are also proud to be home to the world-renowned Shakespeare Institute, based in Stratford-upon-Avon. Situated within walking distance of Shakespeare’s birthplace, school and grave, and the theatres of the Royal Shakespeare Company (RSC), the Shakespeare Institute offers postgraduate students and scholars an academic experience unrivalled by any other university.

Funding and Scholarships

There are many ways to finance your postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. To see what funding and scholarships are available, please visit: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/pgfunding

Open Days

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open days.
Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/pgopendays

Virtual Open Days

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

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Are you interested in working with cutting-edge technology at the forefront of language processing?. This course is run by a leading research group at the University of Wolverhampton. Read more
Are you interested in working with cutting-edge technology at the forefront of language processing?

This course is run by a leading research group at the University of Wolverhampton. As a Master's student, you will be part of our Research Institute of Information and Language Processing (RIILP) (http://www.wlv.ac.uk/research/institutes-and-centres/riilp---research-institute-in-information-and-lan/), an independent, research-driven University unit specialising in Linguistics and Natural Language Processing.

What will I learn?

Computational Linguistics (sometimes called Natural Language Processing) is the use of computers to study language. On the course, you will be able to study:
• How to use Python and the well-established NLTK library to process natural language texts;
• How to analyse real language usage;
• How to automatically translate text using computer programs;
• The use of computers to study features of language;
• Translation tools such as translation memory systems;
• Computer techniques for automatically classifying natural language texts;
• Understand how Siri, Amazon Echo and Google Home etc. work;
• How to design an experiment that will thoroughly test your research questions.

You will be mentored through this programme by experienced and leading academics from the field. Join our research group today (http://www.wlv.ac.uk/research/institutes-and-centres/riilp---research-institute-in-information-and-lan/) to become part of this team of leading researchers and academics and create your path to a career in computers and language!

What modules will I study?

When studied full-time, this course comprises of three semesters worth 60 credits each. Three modules will be studied in semesters one and two. During the third semester, students will undertake their research project and complete a 15,000 word dissertation on any aspect of Computational Linguistics.

The course covers all aspects of Computational Linguistics in line with current and leading work in research and industry, and is divided into the following taught modules:
1. Computer programming in Python
2. Corpus Linguistics in R
3. Machine translation and other natural language processing applications
4. Computational Linguistics
5. Translation tools for professional translators
6. Machine learning for language processing
7. Research methods and professional skills

Translation Tools for Professional Translators is an elective module that may be chosen in the Second Semester to replace another taught module for those students who are interested in pursuing careers in Translation.

Opportunities

- You will be taught by leading researchers in the field: our teaching staff at the Research Institute of Information and Language Processing (RIILP) (http://www.wlv.ac.uk/research/institutes-and-centres/riilp---research-institute-in-information-and-lan/) are engaged in high-quality research, as evidenced by the latest RAE 2008 and REF 2014 results.
- We offer an exciting programme of invited lectures and research seminars, attended by both students and staff;
- The institute has a wide network of contacts in academia and in the industry from which you will be able to benefit;
- Find out about Dr. Vinita Nahar’s (past group member) innovative research into technology to detect Cyberbullying online http://www.itv.com/news/central/topic/cyber-bulling/.

How will I be assessed?

Assessments will include writing assignments on given topics, reports on practical work carried out in the class, portfolios, projects, oral presentations, and tests. The culmination of the study programme will be your 15,000-word dissertation, which will allow you to carry out an in-depth study of a chosen topic within the areas of corpus linguistics, language teaching, lexicography, or translation.

What skills will I gain?

The practical sessions include working with tools and software and developing programs based on the material taught in the lectures, allowing you to apply the technical skills you are learning. Some of the tasks are group based, feeding into the collaboration aspect of blended learning which enhances team-working skills, and some are done individually. Through portfolio building, you will be able to share your learning with other students. You will also be able to enhance your employability by sharing your online portfolio with prospective employers. Some assessments will require you to present your work to the rest of the class, enabling you to develop your presentation skills, which are useful in both academia and industry. Other transferable skills are the abilities to structure your thoughts, present your ideas clearly in writing and prepare texts for a wider audience. You will acquire these skills through assessed report and essay writing, and most of all through writing your dissertation.

Career path

Graduates of this course will be well-placed to continue their academic/research careers by applying for PhD positions within RIILP or at other leading centres for language and information processing. This degree will also enable graduates to access research and development positions within the language processing and human language technology industries, as well as in related areas such as translation, software development and information and communication technologies, depending on their specific module choices and dissertation topic. It should be noted that computer programming is a skill that is increasingly sought after by many companies from technological backgrounds and skills gained from this course will place graduates in a good position to take up such posts. Past graduates from this course have also gone on to successful careers specifically within the computer programming industry.

Student comments

"This course allowed me to see all the potential of Natural Language Processing - my favourite topic was Corpus Linguistics."

"I would recommend this course to people interested in linguistics or languages in general to show them that linguistics can also be paired with Computer Science and to those interested in Computer Science, for it could show them a new application to Computer Science."

"I would recommend this course to the individuals who seek to increase their knowledge of Machine Learning and Natural Language Processing. People who want to understand how, say, SIRI works, should join this course."

"Thanks to this course, I know what I want to do in the future; I want to be a Professor of Corpus Linguistics. I have several opportunities for a PhD in the US. I also learnt how to use a few programming languages, which is of great importance nowadays if one wants to find a job."

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This programme provides professional development for English language teachers, and focuses on the theory and practice of teaching the English language in a variety of contexts, drawing on innovative research carried out by members of the School of Humanities, which includes work on Mobile Assisted Language Learning (MALL), corpus linguistics, Academic English and telecollaboration. Read more
This programme provides professional development for English language teachers, and focuses on the theory and practice of teaching the English language in a variety of contexts, drawing on innovative research carried out by members of the School of Humanities, which includes work on Mobile Assisted Language Learning (MALL), corpus linguistics, Academic English and telecollaboration.

A distinctive feature of the programme is that you will have opportunities to observe English Language classes in higher education and undertake microteaching practice. You will also develop digital expertise with state-of-the-art e-learning tools and focus on specific English Language issues relating to your own educational contexts.

WHY CHOOSE THIS COURSE?

Students on the programme state that staff provide them with excellent academic and pastoral support and that their learning experience is very positive (evidence from module and course evaluation questionnaires). The course also focuses on the future world of work and students may apply for part-time paid teaching opportunities and work placements within Coventry University, including placements overseas.

The assessment on the programme is varied and includes essays, reports, presentations, digital learning object design, microteaching and seen in-class tests. The course also offers extra-curricular activities, such as participation in lectures and workshops with renowned visiting applied linguists andeducation experts.

There also is a free field trip relevant to the curriculum. In 2014 for example we went to the British Museum in London and then designed intercultural teaching tasks based on the objects viewed at the museum (activity linked to the mandatory module on materials design).

You will moreover be offered other field trips at competitive rates as they are supported by the Faculty of Arts and Humanities and by the Centre for Global Engagement.

WHAT WILL I LEARN?

You will:
-Discuss theory and practice of English language learning and teaching
-Develop skills in the evaluation and design of teaching materials for a variety of settings
-Explore the role played by new technologies for learning, teaching and communicating
-Analyse English as it is spoken and written in the UK and in the rest of the world
-Have the opportunity to practice teaching and observe experienced teachers in a variety of face-to-face and blended-learning settings

The mandatory modules are:
-Theories, Approaches and Methods of Language Learning and Teaching
-Developing Language Teaching Materials
-Analysing Written and Spoken Discourse
-Grammar and Phonology for the English Language Teacher
-Teaching English in Higher Education
-Computer Assisted Language Learning: Theory and Practice
-Dissertation in ELT/Applied Linguistics

In addition, you will choose three of the following optional modules:
-Business English;
-Sociolinguistics and English Language Teaching
-Teaching English Through Literature
-Corpus Analysis and Pedagogy
-English for Academic Purposes Course Design and Language Testing
-Understanding Academic English

HOW WILL THIS COURSE BE TAUGHT?

The full-time, face-to-face, programme runs over three semesters. There are two entry points: September and January. Students normally take four 15-credit modules in semester 1, four 15-credit modules modules in semester 2, and complete a Dissertation in semester 3.

Modules are taught face-to-face with lectures, workshops, laboratory sessions and seminars. All students are asked to submit a diagnostic task on arrival (normally a short essay). One-to-one support is available for students who need practise in academic English writing.

The delivery of all modules is supported by an online learning environment that is used, for example, to display content material, to submit assignments and provide electronic feedback, to discuss seminar topics (discussion forums), to design student-centred glossaries and to engage in online assessment and practice.

Students are also offered the opportunity to discuss English language teaching and analyse the English language with dedicated e-learning platforms for specific purposes (e.g. Corpus Linguistics tools, Computer Assisted Language Learning and Mobile Assisted Language Learning platforms).

Staff teaching on the programme also make use of the new learning spaces in the Disruptive Media Learning Laboratory in the Lanchester Library, to encourage students to practise English teaching in a variety of settings.

A part-time programme is available for UK/EU applicants, and can be tailored to the needs of each applicant.

HOW WILL I BE ASSESSED?

A variety of assessed tasks have been integrated into this programme, offering you a stimulating assessment experience and to enable you to reflect on your work, as the programme is designed to train teachers who will assess work themselves. Each module will normally have two assessment tasks and you will receive feedback on the first task before you submit the second one. The assessment tasks include seen examinations, presentations, essays and reports, corpus-based syllabus and course design, microteaching, reflective test design, e-learning object design in group and peer observation reports.

The external examiners have commented very positively on the variety, innovation and appropriateness of the assessment tasks on this programme. For example in 2013-2014 the External Examiner commented in his annual report: 'The assessment tasks are of good quality - well conceived, often imaginative, and in many cases appropriately practical, matching well with intended learning outcomes. I commend this.'

HOW WILL THIS COURSE ENHANCE MY CAREER PROSPECTS?

English looks likely to continue as the international language for the foreseeable future, and this MA programme leads to a variety of career destinations in teaching the language and/or in education management. Qualifications of this kind are often seen as important for access to senior management posts in both private and state educational institutions around the world. In addition to classroom teaching you will be well equipped to perform roles such as materials developer, resource manager and examiner.

Graduates from the MA in ELT are currently employed as professors in Jordan and China, as Pre-sessional Programme Coordinators in the UK and China and as Academic English Consultants for both the private and public sector, just to provide a few examples.

WORK PLACEMENTS

You will be provided support to find a work placement by dedicated staff in the careers office and in the Centre for Global Engagement.

OPPORTUNITIES FOR AN INTERNATIONAL EXPERIENCE

You will be offered the opportunity to take part in the global leaders programme (additional fees apply, see further details below) that includes international experiences. There will also be international trips organised by the School in collaboration with the Centre for Global Engagement. As English is a global language, international perspectives on learning and teaching English are fully embedded in the curriculum.

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The MA in Applied Linguistics is a programme that allows you to develop expertise in specific areas of linguistics, such as corpus linguistics, cognitive linguistics, discourse analysis and/or language pedagogy. Read more
The MA in Applied Linguistics is a programme that allows you to develop expertise in specific areas of linguistics, such as corpus linguistics, cognitive linguistics, discourse analysis and/or language pedagogy. The programme combines a range of core modules and optional modules to ensure that you develop a solid foundation in the discipline area whilst also having the flexibility to pursue your own specific research interests. This highly flexible programme is ideal for language professionals, or for those intending to become language professionals, in a range of possible careers.

The Department of English Language and Applied Linguistics at the University of Birmingham is a world-leading centre of excellence for both teaching and research in English Language and Applied Linguistics.

You will study two core modules:
Describing Language
Research Methods in Applied Linguistics

In the autumn term, you will choose two optional modules from a range which includes:

Social and Multimodal Aspects of Communication OR Social and Psychological Aspects of Language OR Psychological and Multimodal Aspects of Communication
Discourse, Culture and Communication
Syllabus and Materials Design
Exploring English Grammar

In the spring term, you will choose three further optional modules from a range which includes:

Cognitive Linguistics and Language Learning
Corpus Assisted Language Learning
Corpus Linguistics
English as a Global Language
Issues and Approaches in English for Academic Purposes
Intercultural Communication
Language and Gesture
Language and New Media
Language and the Senses
Language, Gender and Identity
Language Teaching Observation and Practice
Psycholinguistics in TESOL
Teacher Training
Vocabulary and Phraseology

About the School of English, Drama and American & Canadian Studies

"Welcome to the School of English, Drama and American & Canadian Studies, in the College of Arts and Law. This is one of the largest Schools in the College, and variety is our watchword. We offer one of the most extensive ranges of undergraduate and postgraduate programmes in the country. Our research expertise is equally diverse, and we welcome students and researchers from all over the world." - Professor Andrzej Gasiorek, Head of School

We particularly encourage creative thinking, with a range of pioneering programmes including Masters opportunities in Creative Writing, Film and Television and Shakespeare and Creativity. Our creative offerings are also strengthened by the development of our Department of Film and Creative Writing – established in 2015 – which has opened up exciting new opportunities for postgraduates to benefit from synergies between the two fields.

Our well-established Departments also provide an excellent environment for postgraduate study. The Department of Drama and Theatre Arts has a highly respected national and international reputation for excellence in teaching and research. We are also one of the leading centres for the postgraduate study of English in the UK, spanning language and literature. The Department of English Language and Applied Linguistics is a world-leading centre of excellence for both teaching and research in this field.

We are also proud to be home to the world-renowned Shakespeare Institute, based in Stratford-upon-Avon. Situated within walking distance of Shakespeare’s birthplace, school and grave, and the theatres of the Royal Shakespeare Company (RSC), the Shakespeare Institute offers postgraduate students and scholars an academic experience unrivalled by any other university.

Funding and Scholarships

There are many ways to finance your postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. To see what funding and scholarships are available, please visit: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/pgfunding

Open Days

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open days.
Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/pgopendays

Virtual Open Days

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

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This course delivers advanced training in the theory and techniques of applied linguistics with an emphasis on second language acquisition. Read more

About the course

This course delivers advanced training in the theory and techniques of applied linguistics with an emphasis on second language acquisition. We also have expertise in related disciplines including sociolinguistics, critical discourse analysis and corpus linguistics, and in the field of TESOL we offer particular expertise in Academic Writing, ESP, Materials Design and Testing.

Our graduates go on to advanced careers in TESOL all over the world. They also work in business, publishing, translation and interpreting.

Your career

Our graduates are working in teaching (primary, secondary, FE, HE and TESOL), publishing, marketing, libraries, fundraising, charities and the public sector. A masters from Sheffield is a sound basis for a PhD at any leading university.

How we teach

Our expertise covers all aspects of the subject, so whatever you’re interested in you’ll get the best possible advice and support. We provide training in research methods and you can choose to go on a work placement as part of your course.

You’ll be taught by academics whose work is published internationally. Their specialisms include language acquisition, historical language studies, applied linguistics, literary linguistics, discourse analysis and sociolinguistics.

We have a lively research culture. Through lectures and weekly seminars we’ll introduce you to the latest ideas. You’ll have the opportunity to explore these ideas in your own research.

With the School of Languages and Cultures, we established the new University Centre for Linguistic Research to gather and support postgraduate linguistics research across the University.

Our resources

We have specialist recording equipment for fieldwork and experimental work. Interactive computer-based workshops will introduce you to corpus-linguistic technology.

The University library subscribes to several electronic databases including JStor, Early English Texts online and Eighteenth-century Collections online. For more advanced reading, there’s a regular free minibus service to the British Library at Boston Spa.
Funding

There are a number of studentships and fee bursaries available, funded by either the University or the Arts and Humanities Research Council. Deadlines for funding applications are usually in winter/early spring. For details, see our website.

Core modules

Introduction to Language and Linguistics; English Grammar and Discourse; Language Teaching Methodology; Second Language Acquisition; Research Methods; Dissertation (MA only).

Examples of optional modules

Corpus Linguistics; Current Issues in Second Language Acquisition; Discourse and Genre Analysis; English for Specific Purposes; Intercultural Communication; Researching Writing in TESOL; Teaching Practice; Theory and Practice of Language Teaching; World Englishes.

Teaching and assessment

You’ll be taught by a dedicated and enthusiastic team of teachers. Our internationally recognised research feeds straight into our teaching, with students sometimes taking a hands-on role in our research activities. The staff are leading figures in their fields, in many cases having written the books and papers you will be studying: Kook-hee Gil (Second Language Acquisition), Nigel Harwood (TESOL Materials), Gabriel Ozon (English Grammar) and Jane Mulderrig (Critical Discourse Analysis).

You’ll spend about eight hours a week in lectures, seminars and workshops.

And there are chances to take part in classroom-based research projects in the UK and overseas.

Assessment depends on the module, but includes essay assignments and classroom coursework tasks. You’ll write your dissertation (MA only) over the summer.

If you don’t complete the dissertation you’ll be awarded a diploma.

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Advanced knowledge of phonetics and syntax coupled with practical application and exploration of English in context – e.g. speech therapy, English in education, discourse analysis – forms the core of our MA course. Read more
Advanced knowledge of phonetics and syntax coupled with practical application and exploration of English in context – e.g. speech therapy, English in education, discourse analysis – forms the core of our MA course.

Why Study English Language and Linguistics with us?

Taught at our Parkgate Road Campus in Chester, our cutting-edge MA course is delivered by a dynamic team of linguists, each with their own research specialisms. Our range of expertise includes corpus linguistics (computer-assisted discourse analysis), acoustic phonetics (useful for speech therapy), cognitive stylistics (how our minds process fictional and non-fictional texts) and critical discourse analysis (e.g. ideology in the media). Students can also explore conflicts and controversies in the discipline and contribute to our online blog.

Our dedicated English Language research space will allow you to undertake data-based projects using some of the latest specialist software (e.g. for acoustic phonetics and corpus linguistic analysis).

What will I learn?

Integral to the course is the advanced study of phonetics/phonology and morphology/syntax at the micro-level, combined with application of knowledge about structures of English in discourse (corpus linguistics, critical discourse analysis, cognitive stylistics) and research methods. These core areas of study are supplemented with options which may include the role of English in education (e.g. phonics and grammar in the classroom), language and identity, language change and speech disorders.

How will I be taught?

In most modules you will attend a lecture and discuss ideas in smaller seminars and workshops.
Full-time MA contact hours are approximately four hours per week with 20 hours per week of additional independent study, during term time. Further contact hours with lecturers are in the form of dissertation supervision and personal tutorials.

How will I be assessed?

Assessments are tailored for each module and include exercises in grammar and phonetics/phonology, discourse analysis essays, seminar papers (including presentations), discursive essays, extended data collection and analysis projects, lesson plan and commentary, portfolio, and an extended thesis (dissertation). A successful dissertation is also an essential requirement. There are no exams.

Postgraduate Visit Opportunities

If you are interested in this courses we have a number of opportunities to visit us and our campuses. To find out more about these options and to book a visit, please go to: https://www1.chester.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/postgraduate-visit-opportunities

Request a Prospectus

If you would like to know more about the University please request a prospectus at: http://prospectus.chester.ac.uk/form.php

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Are you interested in understanding and critiquing the ways in which language is used in politics, the media, and intercultural communication?. Read more
Are you interested in understanding and critiquing the ways in which language is used in politics, the media, and intercultural communication?

This course is intended for those who wish to upgrade their professional and academic standing in discourse studies, linguistics, semiotics, and/or intercultural communication. It is particularly well-suited for students with backgrounds in linguistics, communication and related fields who want to move into higher education, journalism, and research into the role of communication in media, politics and society.

The programme combines a range of core modules and optional modules to ensure that you develop a solid foundation in the discipline area whilst also having the flexibility to pursue your own specific research interests.

You will study five core modules:

Describing Language
Discourse, Culture and Communication
Intercultural Communication
Social and Multimodal Aspects of Communication
Research Methods in Applied Linguistics

You will also choose one optional module and complete a 15,000-word dissertation.

In addition, there are two non-assessed components in the programme:

During the autumn term, all students will be offered preliminary training in corpus linguistics, introducing you to one or more of the main English language corpora (e.g. the British National Corpus) – invaluable collections of authentic language data against which theory, intuition and pedagogic materials can be measured.

You will also be offered a course in Academic Writing. Those whose first language is not English are particularly encouraged to follow this course.

You will do a total of six assessed pieces of coursework over the year. For assessment purposes, one of the modules you take during the spring term will be ‘linked’ with the Research Methods module – that is, you will produce a piece of work in the field covered by that module, but with a particular focus on research methods.

About the School of English, Drama and American & Canadian Studies

"Welcome to the School of English, Drama and American & Canadian Studies, in the College of Arts and Law. This is one of the largest Schools in the College, and variety is our watchword. We offer one of the most extensive ranges of undergraduate and postgraduate programmes in the country. Our research expertise is equally diverse, and we welcome students and researchers from all over the world." - Professor Andrzej Gasiorek, Head of School.

We particularly encourage creative thinking, with a range of pioneering programmes including Masters opportunities in Creative Writing, Film and Television and Shakespeare and Creativity. Our creative offerings are also strengthened by the development of our Department of Film and Creative Writing – established in 2015 – which has opened up exciting new opportunities for postgraduates to benefit from synergies between the two fields.

Our well-established Departments also provide an excellent environment for postgraduate study. The Department of Drama and Theatre Arts has a highly respected national and international reputation for excellence in teaching and research. We are also one of the leading centres for the postgraduate study of English in the UK, spanning language and literature. The Department of English Language and Applied Linguistics is a world-leading centre of excellence for both teaching and research in this field.

We are also proud to be home to the world-renowned Shakespeare Institute, based in Stratford-upon-Avon. Situated within walking distance of Shakespeare’s birthplace, school and grave, and the theatres of the Royal Shakespeare Company (RSC), the Shakespeare Institute offers postgraduate students and scholars an academic experience unrivalled by any other university.

Funding and Scholarships

There are many ways to finance your postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. To see what funding and scholarships are available, please visit: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/pgfunding

Open Days

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open days.
Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/pgopendays

Virtual Open Days

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

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With a TESOL qualification you could work in any country where people want to learn English. This part-time course leads to a Masters qualification in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL). Read more
With a TESOL qualification you could work in any country where people want to learn English.

Course overview

This part-time course leads to a Masters qualification in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL). English is one of the top three languages spoken worldwide, along with Mandarin and Spanish, and so a TESOL course is a valuable asset for people who want to live and work in other countries.

This TESOL course not only covers theoretical aspects, but also includes a practical teaching module. As part of this, you will learn how to prepare lesson plans and to teach your peers at Sunderland.

Our TESOL MA will give you in-depth understanding of how English is taught to speakers of other languages internationally. The course includes core modules in ‘Principles and Practice of English Language Teaching’ and ‘Linguistics for TESOL’. There are also optional modules with a strong practical element such as 'Corpus Linguistics and Language Teaching’.

For your Masters dissertation, you will negotiate a proposal for a research project with our supportive tutors. This ensures that the topic is relevant to your professional development and career aspirations.

We also offer a full-time TESOL MA that allows you to achieve your Masters qualification in just one year.

Course content

The course mixes taught elements with independent research. The topic of the project/dissertation is negotiated to fit both your personal interests and the expertise of Sunderland's supportive tutors.

You will study four core modules:
-The Principles of Practice of English Language Teaching (20 Credits)
-Linguistics for TESOL (20 Credits)
-L2 Practical Teaching (20 Credits)
-Research Methods in Language Learning and Teaching (20 Credits)

You will also study the following optional modules:
-Theories of Second/Foreign Language Learning (20 Credits)
-Corpus Linguistics and Language Teaching (20 Credits)

Modules may vary from year to year.

Plus the compulsory dissertation:
Dissertation of up to 15,000 words on a TESOL-related topic of your choice (60 Credits)

Teaching and assessment

We use a wide variety of teaching and learning methods including lectures, seminars, practical tasks and independent learning activities. Compared to an undergraduate course, you will find that this Masters course requires a higher level of independent working.

This is a part-time course and contact time will vary during the three year duration of the course. Assessment methods include written assignments, one teaching observation, one teaching practice session, oral and written presentations and the dissertation.

Facilities & location

Our language facilities includes:
-Two digital language laboratories for teaching
-Open-access language laboratory for independent study
-Resources (DVDs, textbooks, magazines, dictionaries)

University Library Services
We have thousands of books and, increasingly, e-books on language topics. We also subscribe to a comprehensive range of print and electronic journals so you can access the most reliable and up-to-date academic articles. An important resource is the EBSCO Professional Development Collection, which provides access to full text articles for TESOL.

IT provision
When it comes to IT provision you can take your pick from hundreds of PCs as well as Apple Macs in the David Goldman Informatics Centre and St Peter’s library. There are also free WiFi zones throughout the campus. If you have any problems, just ask the friendly helpdesk team.

Learning environment
Sunderland offers a vibrant learning environment with an international dimension thanks to the presence of students from around the world. The University has strong links with external organisations and there is a lively exchange of ideas and people.

Employment & careers

On completing this course you will be equipped with professional skills in teaching English to speakers of other languages. You will also have an appropriate skill set for senior roles such as leading a department and managing change in education.
Potential roles include:
-Teacher
-Head of Department
-Educational Adviser
-Inspector
-Researcher into English language teaching

A Masters degree will also prepare you for further postgraduate studies and enhance career opportunities within Higher Education.

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This internationally recognised programme has been preparing students to work in the Language Service Industry for nearly 30 years. Read more
This internationally recognised programme has been preparing students to work in the Language Service Industry for nearly 30 years.

Our commitment to the highest standards of excellence in the profession is reflected in our accreditation and membership of the European Masters in Translation (EMT) network.

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW

This programme is designed to suit current market demands. You will practise specialised translation in language-specific groups and have opportunities to simulate real-life translation scenarios.

The domains covered include economic, business, legal, scientific and technical translation. Our strong emphasis on translation technologies will allow you to work with computer-assisted translation software and state-of-the-art corpus tools and resources.

Equally important, the programme highlights the business requirements of the industry so that you acquire the necessary project management and entrepreneurial skills to work as a professional language service provider.

Furthermore, our EMT membership gives you priority access to traineeships at the EU Directorate-General for Translation.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

The MA Translation is studied over one year (full-time mode) or two years (part-time mode). On successful completion of the programme, you will be awarded a Master’s degree in Translation accredited by the European Masters of Translation.

Language-specific options are paired with English. If you are a native speaker of English, you can take up to two Specialist Translation options. If you are not a native speaker of English, you will normally take one Specialist Translation option (your mother tongue paired with English).

You can also choose one ab initio language if you wish to expand your portfolio of translation languages. Options ending in ‘I’ in semester 1 must be taken in conjunction with modules ending in ‘II’ in semester 2.

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

In addition to enjoying regular contact with professional translators in your practice-based modules, you will benefit from course components that specifically address the business and wider industry aspects of the profession.

Further insights into the industry will be provided by the speakers we invite to our Translation Studies seminars series.

These include professional translators, interpreters, subtitlers and audio describers; professionals working in public services, companies and international organisations; representatives of professional translator/interpreter associations as well as translation/interpreting researchers.

In line with our aim to offer professionally relevant programmes, we have forged close links with the main professional bodies, i.e. the Institute of Translation and Interpreting and the Chartered Institute of Linguists, as well as with many professional language service providers, and we have an extensive network of visiting professionals.

In addition The Centre for Translation Studies has been granted free access to Memsource software to help further student's education.

CAREER DEVELOPMENTS

Thanks to our emphasis on professional development, our students are well-equipped to begin work as freelancers or as language service providers at international organisations, government bodies, universities and private companies.

We also regularly have students who decide to stay on to study for a PhD and pursue an academic career in Translation Studies.

WHAT MAKES THE PROGRAMME SPECIAL?

The MA programme is tailored to suit current market demands. You will practise specialised translation in language-specific groups, with a focus on professional standards and opportunities to simulate real-life translation scenarios.

The domains covered include economic, business, legal, scientific and technical translation. Our strong emphasis on the use of translation technologies will allow you to work hands-on with computer-assisted translation software and state-of- the-art corpus tools and resources.

The programme also emphasises the business requirements of the industry, providing you with an opportunity to acquire necessary project management and entrepreneurial skills, and knowledge to work as a professional language service provider.

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF THE PROGRAMME

The programme combines the study of the major principles of, and scholarly approaches to, translation with opportunities for application and practice – with the aim of enabling students to:
-Perform relevant translation tasks in different contexts
-Reflect on their own practice, using scholarly and professional writing on relevant aspects of translation, transfer the acquired skills and knowledge to novel and unpredictable situations of translation
-Develop a broad understanding of current and future challenges of translation in different contexts
-Apply scholarly approaches to critically evaluate professional practice in the light of current and future requirements
-Have the capacity for carrying out independent research in an area of translation

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes in the following areas:

Knowledge and understanding
-A thorough understanding of issues relevant to translation as a discipline and as a practice/industry
-A thorough understanding of different aspects of translation as a profession, in particular with respect to principles of good practice, efficiency and professional standards, translation quality and resourcing
-Comprehensive knowledge of the strategies involved in good translation practice, i.e. audience identification, translating for a specific purpose
-A thorough understanding of overarching issues in the translation industry, such as the impact of technology and the need for adaptability in the context of different markets
-A thorough understanding of translation in the context of various settings (such as translating in a company compared to translating for a company), and their changing external/social environment

Intellectual/cognitive skills
-Identify theories of translation and be able to show insight into own practice
-Reflect upon the knowledge gained and incorporate this into independent learning and professional development strategies
-Critically appreciate the different frames for analysing text types, genres and other translation-related requirements and apply this to the research work required for the writing of the MA dissertation
-Formulate and address research questions relating to the field of study
-Conduct conceptual and topic-based research related to specific tasks

Professional practical skills
-Apply good principles of practice in the translation, complying with instructions and deadlines, mastering techniques and strategies for proofreading and revision, and knowing how to establish and monitor quality standards
-Gauge and acquire an appropriate understanding of specialised and non-specialised translation, knowing how to search for appropriate information to gain a better grasp of the thematic aspects of a document and develop knowledge in specialist fields
-Create translations appropriate to clients’ requests, knowing how to justify translation choices and decisions
-Produce a register appropriate to a given situation for a particular document, recognising function and meaning in social, geographical, historical, stylistic variants
-Identify issues in computer-assisted translation and terminology and have practical skills in these, including how to use translation technologies effectively to assist in correction, translation, terminology, layout and documentary research
-Work independently on extended pieces of work in a sustained way, with or without guidance, and have further improved research skills
-Apply evaluation skills for translation purposes

Key/transferable skills
-Display competence in a range of skills at postgraduate level, including advanced analysis and synthesis of arguments, presentation, conducting independent research, and the speedy and efficient processing of complex information
-Work both independently and with others in order to achieve common goals, knowing how to comply with instructions, deadlines, commitments, interpersonal competences, and teamwork
-Manage learning self-critically, knowing how to self-evaluate (questioning one's habits and being open to innovations)
-Organise and manage a research project of significant complexity, knowing how to plan and manage one's time and stress

GLOBAL OPPORTUNITIES

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.

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The English Linguistics MA provides students with the theoretical and practical knowledge needed to describe modern English, together with appropriate training in academic writing, linguistic argumentation and research methods. Read more
The English Linguistics MA provides students with the theoretical and practical knowledge needed to describe modern English, together with appropriate training in academic writing, linguistic argumentation and research methods. Students have access to the Survey of English Usage, an unparalleled resource for research into grammatical repertoire.

Degree information

The MA introduces students to the core areas of the study of English Linguistics, including morphology, syntax, phonetics, phonology and prgamatics. The programme trains students to use library OPACS, specialised websites, discussion lists, and databases, among them the ICE-GB corpus, based at the Survey of English Usage in UCL English.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits. The programme consists of three core components (90 credits), two optional modules (30 credits) and a research dissertation (60 credits).

Core modules
-English Grammar and Methodology
-English Corpus Linguistics
OR
-English Language in Use
-Research Methodology

Optional modules - students take two optional modules. Different options are offered each year and have included:
-English Words
-History of the English Language
-Literary Linguistics
-Phonetics and Phonology of English

Dissertation/report
All MA Students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000 words. Students have access to the Survey of English Usage for this project.

Teaching and learning
The programme is taught through seminars and individual tutorials. Student assessment is through a portfolio of essays (two 2,000-word essays on English linguistics), two three-hour written papers and the dissertation. Each of the five components of assessment makes up 20% of the final mark.

Careers

The programme provides an ideal foundation for those wishing to continue for a research degree in English language or linguistics; students who obtain good results in their MA examinations may be considered for the MPhil/PhD programme at UCL (subject to places being available). It is also of interest to those who wish to become teachers or lecturers of English, or those intending to pursue a career in writing, publishing, or editing.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-English Language Teacher, BGS College.
-English Language PhD, University College London (UCL).
-English Teacher, Institute of English.
-Study Consultant, Tiandao Education Group.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The department has exceptional resources for the study of English linguistics. Use of the Survey of English Usage has resulted in many important studies of the grammar, semantics and vocabulary of present-day English.

Excellent library facilities are provided by the UCL Library, Senate House Library and the British Library.

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We provide academic and professional development for English language teachers looking for career advancement. This includes innovative teaching, curriculum and creative materials development, teacher education or training and other teaching-related activities. Read more
We provide academic and professional development for English language teachers looking for career advancement. This includes innovative teaching, curriculum and creative materials development, teacher education or training and other teaching-related activities.

You will gain practical classroom experience, hands-on development of multimedia resources and materials development. There is the opportunity to pursue a specialism, such as ESOL, English for Academic Purposes, Teaching English to Young Learners or teacher training.

We currently offer two routes of study:

- Route One

This route is designed for experienced English language teachers, who are native speakers or have a high level of English. It will offer you professional training and development (including teaching practice) and can include entry for the widely recognised Delta qualification. If you already have the Delta or an equivalent qualification you can enter directly into semester two of this route or study with us by distance learning in September or January, with an expected completion time of approximately 18 months.

- Route Two

This route will offer you practical classroom experience, observation and language awareness for teaching purposes. It is designed for native and non-native speakers of English with some experience of, or an interest in, English language teaching. You can study this course full-time, part-time or distance learning in September or by distance learning starting in January, and you can expect to complete the course in approximately two and a half years.

- Teaching and Learning

Learning will take place through seminars, small group and individual tutorials, as well as independent learning. The course will include practical classroom experience and hands-on development of multi-media resources for English language teaching.

- Assessment

The assessments on the course aim to reflect real-life tasks for English language teaching professionals and include practical assignments such as developing resources, writing journal articles, giving conference presentations, reflecting on practice and analysing texts or language. The dissertation module involves a practical or research project related to English language teaching with a report or rationale. Route 1/Delta students will also complete the Cambridge ESOL assessments for Delta modules 1-3.

- Research Excellence Framework 2014: twice as many of our staff - 220 - were entered into the research assessment for 2014 compared to the number entered in 2008.

Visit the website http://courses.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/elt_ma

Mature Applicants

Our University welcomes applications from mature applicants who demonstrate academic potential. We usually require some evidence of recent academic study, for example completion of an access course, however recent relevant work experience may also be considered. Please note that for some of our professional courses all applicants will need to meet the specified entry criteria and in these cases work experience cannot be considered in lieu.

If you wish to apply through this route you should refer to our University Recognition of Prior Learning policy that is available on our website (http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/studenthub/recognition-of-prior-learning.htm).

Please note that all applicants to our University are required to meet our standard English language requirement of GCSE grade C or equivalent, variations to this will be listed on the individual course entry requirements.

Careers

On successful completion of this course you will have the skills and experience to be an effective English language teacher or to enter or gain promotion in a range of careers. These include teaching, publishing and other educational management roles.You can also choose to remain in education and obtain a PhD in a related area.

- English Language Teacher
- Materials Writer
- Director of Studies or other educational manager
- Teacher Educator

Careers advice:
The dedicated Jobs and Careers team offers expert advice and a host of resources to help you choose and gain employment. Whether you're in your first or final year, you can speak to members of staff from our Careers Office who can offer you advice from writing a CV to searching for jobs.

Visit the careers site - https://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/employability/jobs-careers-support.htm

Course Benefits

Our highly qualified and expert team have many years of experience successfully training teachers and developing innovative materials including a range of multimedia resources.

English Language Teaching at Leeds Beckett University is an approved Cambridge Delta Centre. This highly renowned professional qualification confers TEFLQ status as defined by the British Council accreditation scheme.

Modules

- Students on Route one will study:

Understanding Language, Methodology & Resources for Teaching (Delta Module one, 20 credits):
This will include first and second language acquisition; approaches and methods; and learner error and error analysis. (This module is not available for online learning)

Developing Professional Practice (Delta Module two, 20 credits):
This covers the following topics of teaching practice; lesson observation; evaluating, selecting and using resources and materials; and professional development. (This module is not available for online learning)

Extending Practice & ELT Specialism (Delta Module three, 20 credits):
This will look into researching a specialist area; course/ syllabus design; testing and assessment; and monitoring and evaluating courses.

Multimedia Resources & Independent Learning (20 credits):
You will learn about learner autonomy; virtual learning environments; and web-based technologies.

Materials Development (20 credits):
You will learn about issues such as materials evaluation and adaptation; authenticity; cultural considerations; and task design.

Methodology in Context (20 credits):
This area covers world English; intercultural awareness; sociolinguistics; English for academic purposes; English for young learners; English for specific purposes; and curriculum and syllabus.

Research in English Language Teaching (20 credits):
This will include research theories and methods; qualitative and quantitative research; and interpreting and analysing data. You will undertake a research project.

Dissertation (40 credits):
This double module involves either producing a practical project such as a set of materials; a corpus; a teacher training course; a syllabus or conducting a primary research project.

- Students on Route two will study:

Language Awareness (20 credits):
This will cover lexis; grammar; discourse analysis; phonology; and analysing language and texts for teaching purposes.

Methodology & Second Language Acquisition (20 credits):
You will learn about communicative language teaching; task-based learning; language content and integrated learning; lexical approach; total physical response; text-based approaches; language skills and strategies; and second language learning and acquisition.

Classroom Practice (20 credits):
This will include classroom observation; professional development; classroom management; lesson planning; and micro-teaching.

Multimedia Resources & Independent Learning (20 credits):
This will explore learner autonomy; virtual learning environments; and web-based technologies.

Materials Development (20 credits):
You will learn about issues such as materials evaluation and adaptation; authenticity; cultural considerations; and task design.

Methodology in Context (20 credits):
This subject will cover world English; intercultural awareness; sociolinguistics; English for academic purposes; English for young learners; English for specific purposes; and curriculum and syllabus.

Research in English Language Teaching (20 credits):
You will learn about research theories and methods; qualitative and quantitative research; and interpreting and analysing data.

Dissertation (40 credits):
This double module involves either producing a practical project such as a set of materials; a corpus; a teacher training course; a syllabus or conducting a primary research project.

Facilities

- Libraries
Our libraries are two of the only university libraries in the UK open 24/7 every day of the year. However you like to study, the libraries have got you covered with group study, silent study, extensive e-learning resources and PC suites.

- Dedicated Support Team
A highly-skilled and dedicated support team whose job is to work with you through every step of your online learning.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/postgraduate/how-to-apply/

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If you’re a practising professional in applied linguistics, this course will allow you to work on topics that reflect the multidisciplinary nature of the field, and that go beyond classroom-based language learning and teaching. Read more

Overview

If you’re a practising professional in applied linguistics, this course will allow you to work on topics that reflect the multidisciplinary nature of the field, and that go beyond classroom-based language learning and teaching.

You’ll be introduced to dynamic and challenging concepts and methods that reflect the role language plays as a communication tool in everyday life, and use these to reflect critically and constructively on your current experience and context.

The course is split into two distinct stages. In stage 1, you’ll create a research portfolio consisting of three 7,000-word papers. In stage 2, you’ll produce a 59,000-word thesis, based on original research linked to your professional practice.

For both stages, you’ll be assigned a subject specialist supervisor. Our supervisors are experienced in most areas of applied linguistics, including contemporary approaches, like corpus-driven studies on testing or material compilation, and issues relating to sociocultural adaptation and social cohesion in a migration context.

We’ll provide you with a collaborative environment with strong links to research networks in the University. We host and take part in many research oriented events for staff and postgraduate students, including regular Faculty and departmental research seminars and international conferences. Our staff contribute to the Research Unit for Intercultural and Transcultural Studies (RUITS), Anglia Research Centre in Media and Culture (ARCMedia) and Cultures of the Digital Economy Research Institute (CoDE), who organise many events that you’ll be welcome to attend. These events, along with our online environment, will help you connect with other research students from a range of disciplines.

All your subject-specific studies will be enhanced and supported by our University-wide training sessions, where you’ll gain important research expertise in areas like ethics, presentations, intellectual property and digital scholarship.

Research staff

Our permanent supervisory staff members are recognised experts in their field, and have produced a number of influential books, journal articles and edited collections. Our research expertise includes:

Dr Sebastian Rasinger, BA, PG Cert, PhD: sociolinguistics, discourse analysis, multilingualism, linguistic and cultural identities.

Melanie Bell, MPhil (Cantab), MA (Cantab), DipTEFL: quantitative and corpus linguistics, discourse in the professions, design of language courses.

Dr Bettina Beinhoff, MPhil (Cantab), PhD (Cantab): sociolinguistics, acquisition of speech and discourse patterns in second/foreign languages, social psychology in language (esp. attitudes, stereotypes and identity construction).

Careers

This Professional Doctorate will give you the unique opportunity to research an issue or problem of particular significance to your practice, demonstrating your leadership and developing your expertise.

We’ll provide you with many opportunities for career development and training, in areas like writing up a paper for publication; placing an academic article; giving a conference paper; doctoral writing style; updates on research methods and literature searches; internet training; editing skills for doctoral research; subsequent monograph publication; and dealing with festivals, agents, and publishers.

In conjunction with the University’s research support, you can request specific support for writing-up, conference papers, general research methods and other research skills if you need it.

Specialist facilities

You’ll receive access to our fully-equipped language centre, the University of Cambridge Library, and our own on-campus library, as well as our Faculty’s PhD room, where all our doctoral students can meet up to work and take an active part in our postgraduate student community.

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Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Literary Translation at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Literary Translation at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

We are an established centre for research into literary translation with expertise in the following languages: Chinese, French, German, Italian, Spanish, and Welsh. We are currently leading a project on the Visualisation of Translation Variation and are particularly interested in proposals which articulate with it. See: http://www.delightedbeauty.org/vvv/Home/Project.

Key Features of MA by Research in Literary Translation

An MA by Research in Literary Translation gives you the chance to pursue a project based around your own passions and interests in Literary Translation, leading to a qualification which can open the door to an academic career or boost employment prospects outside academia (in the private sector, the Civil Service, education, or the translation industry).

The Literary Translation research programme will give you the freedom to explore a topic of your own choosing in Literary Translation and develop a methodology under the close supervision of two experienced academics but without attending regular classes as required in taught programmes.

As a student enrolled on the MA by Research in Literary Translation, you will be supervised closely by two experienced academics in your field. Typically, you will meet them fortnightly in the first term and at regular intervals thereafter. Meetings are logged and goals agreed each time.

All research students are required to attend skills and training courses at College and Institutional level. They give presentations to other research students and staff at departmental seminars and the annual departmental postgraduate symposium in June and the College of Arts and Humanities conference in October. Advanced research students may have opportunities to teach undergraduate tutorials and seminars. You have a budget (currently £200 per year) to attend conferences outside Swansea.

MA by Research in Literary Translation degree typically lasts from one year (full-time study) to two years (part-time study).

The MA by Research in Literary Translation is ideal for those who want:

-an MA qualification in niche areas where taught programmes are not offered;
- the experience of a research degree without committing to a PhD.

Research proposals are invited on any topic in Literary Translation for which staff can provide supervision. You may analyse multiple translations of a classic text, for instance, or the consistency of the translation decisions taken by a particular translator. You may like to investigate a whole genre, such as crime fiction, or you may want to try your own hand at a piece of literary translation, explaining your strategy in a detailed theoretical commentary. It is advisable to email a member of academic staff in the appropriate area before applying (see staff web pages).

For informal enquiries regarding Literary Translation please contact Professor Julian Preece ().

Research Interests

Staff research interests in Translation and Interpreting cover a range of themes, including:

• Literary Translation
• Theatre translation/adaptation
• Translation Theory (including non-Western)
• History of Translation
• Comparative Translation Studies
• Translation and Social Discourse
• Corpus-based Translation Analysis
• Translation and the Lexicon
• Computer-based Lexicography and Terminography
• Translation processes: psycholinguistics of translation, translation workflows
• Translation tools and technologies
• Translation visualisation

Research proposals are invited on any topic in Literary Translation for which staff can provide supervision. You may analyse multiple translations of a classic text, for instance, or the consistency of the translation decisions taken by a particular translator. You may like to investigate a whole genre, such as crime fiction, or you may want to try your own hand at a piece of literary translation, explaining your strategy in a detailed theoretical commentary. The Department benefits from extensive library holdings in print and online form. All postgraduate students have access to two computer-based language laboratories, an advanced Translation and Media computing lab, and a more specialised Translation Research facility housing the latest digitisation, corpus analysis and computer assisted translation tools.

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Newcastle University is one of the largest centres for linguistic research in Europe. This gives you the unique opportunity to learn a wide range of methodologies. Read more
Newcastle University is one of the largest centres for linguistic research in Europe. This gives you the unique opportunity to learn a wide range of methodologies. You will be exposed to diverse theoretical perspectives, which will enrich your own research.

As a postgraduate researcher in linguistics or applied linguistics, you will carry out a major research project working with supervisors who are experts in your field. We offer supervision in a wide range of languages and areas, including:
-Second language learning
-Conversation and discourse analysis
-Inter/cross cultural communication
-Corpus linguistics
-Oral communicative competence in a second language
-Language endangerment
-Syntax and morphology
-Phonetics and phonology
-History of English
-Language variation and change
-Language evolution
-(Variationist) sociolinguistics
-Bilingualism
-First and second language acquisition

Linguistics and applied linguistics is split across three Schools:
-School of Education, Communication and Language Sciences
-School of English Literature, Language and Linguistics
-School of Modern Languages

Our Schools score well in student satisfaction surveys and we have a diverse set of staff expertise. In the 2012 Postgraduate Research Experience Survey, 94% of our students stated that their supervision expectations were met or exceeded. More recently, Prof. Anders Holmberg won our student-led award for Best Research Supervisor of 2013.

Career development

You will develop your career within a research-led community and benefit from funding opportunities. Recent MPhil and PhD graduates have gone into a variety of careers, including:
-Academia
-Education
-Publishing
-University administration

Additionally, you can involve yourself in range of activities and events. As a PhD student you can gain experience in journal editing and conference organisation. You will have the opportunity to join the editorial team in publishing the annual Newcastle Working Papers in Linguistics. You can also get involved in the organising team of the annual Postgraduate Conference in Applied and Theoretical Linguistics. As well as this, you can present your work to a student audience for feedback at our regular Student Work in Progress (SWiP) meetings.

You will be welcome to join our Special Interest Groups (SIGs) in linguistics, which meet on a regular basis. These allow researchers to share ideas, develop new skills and get feedback on their work. The meetings involve discussions on research papers, presenting or viewing presentations and receiving linguistic software guidance. Current SIGs include:
-Language variation and change
-Theoretical phonology
-Corpus linguistics
-Syntax
-Language and cognition

You will also have the opportunity to attend guest lectures. We often invite international scholars to present on their research specialism. Recent distinguished speakers include:
-Prof. Ellen Bialystok (York University, Toronto)
-Prof. J.K. Chambers (University of Toronto)
-Prof. David Pesetsky (MIT)
-Prof. Elizabeth Closs Traugott (Stanford University)

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