• Northumbria University Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Bristol Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Derby Online Learning Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Edinburgh Featured Masters Courses
  • Aberystwyth University Featured Masters Courses
  • Jacobs University Bremen gGmbH Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Leeds Featured Masters Courses

Postgrad LIVE! Study Fair

Birmingham | Bristol | Sheffield | Liverpool | Edinburgh

Cranfield University Featured Masters Courses
Cranfield University Featured Masters Courses
Xi’an Jiaotong-Liverpool University Featured Masters Courses
King’s College London Featured Masters Courses
Swansea University Featured Masters Courses
"copyright" AND "law"×
0 miles

Masters Degrees (Copyright Law)

We have 76 Masters Degrees (Copyright Law)

  • "copyright" AND "law" ×
  • clear all
Showing 1 to 15 of 76
Order by 
Our distance learning UK, EU & US Copyright Law Postgraduate Diploma/MA programme will introduce you to the main International Copyright Conventions. Read more

Our distance learning UK, EU & US Copyright Law Postgraduate Diploma/MA programme will introduce you to the main International Copyright Conventions. It deals with a wide range of rights (e.g. literary, dramatic, artistic works), as well as covering infringement and remedies, and looks at the challenges presented by international communication through satellite and the internet.

Key benefits

  • Gives an in-depth insight into the general principles and practice of copyright law.
  • Programme materials written by leading academics and professional experts in the field.
  • Can be studied anywhere in the world.
  • Weekend seminars led by programme directors.
  • Hard copy study material with online additional support, traditional one year cohort.

Description

Our Copyright PG Diploma is structured into three modules of 13 units. Each unit comes in the form of hard copy print and as a pdf file via the programme website. The units are designed to be largely self-contained, but recommended and further reading will be suggested. A unit will comprise text, copies of relevant Regulations, Commission Decisions and Notices, Judgments of the General Court and the Court of Justice of the European Union, practical examples, questions and model answers to test your knowledge as you progress.

On the programme website you can view and listen to seminar recordings and access further learning resources to support you in your studies. This website also offers students the opportunity to interact with each other and to post questions for the module leader.

The UK, EU & US Copyright Law MA is only open to students who have successfully completed the UK, US & Copyright Law Postgraduate Diploma.

Course format and assessment

This is a distance learning course taught via course-specific printed matter which is despatched from October to March at fortnightly intervals. The PgDip also features three intensive residential weekend seminars (equivalent to 48 hours of contact time) at which programme leaders will lecture and organise group work where appropriate. You are expected to engage in 220 hours of self-study and will be assessed through a combination of coursework and examinations; 55 per cent of the course is assessed by examination and 45 per cent is assessed by coursework.

The follow-up MA is open to students who complete the Diploma. It involves the research for and writing of a 12000 -15000 dissertation under supervision. You are expected to spend at least 110 hours engaged in self-directed study. You are assessed exclusively by marking of your dissertation.

Career prospects

This programme is attended by lawyers, senior licensing officers, rights executives and trade mark specialists and will enable them to progress in their career path.



Read less
Your programme of study. The General Law programme at Aberdeen is one of the best programmes in terms of scope and areas of interest you can choose to study at advanced level. Read more

Your programme of study

The General Law programme at Aberdeen is one of the best programmes in terms of scope and areas of interest you can choose to study at advanced level. If your first degree was in a specific area of law there is nothing preventing you from choosing another area of law completely or a complementary area. You could study environmental law areas such as oil and gas law, energy and environmental law, low carbon energy transition with further environmental regulation. If you are more interested in criminal law you could look at Criminology, the politics of human rights, humanitarian law.  If you are more interested in business you might choose international law, intellectual property law, world trade organisation or for business with a creative aspect you might think about specialist in cultural property issues or law for business and arts and museums law.  There are many possible mixes of these general areas of law you might want to explore. Employment possibilities are huge from this range of areas of law and include all notable areas to practise law and careers within the legal profession to welfare sectors such as employment, business, HR and finance.

Law careers

You may become a Barrister if you wish to represent people at High Court and Magistrates court to put legal argument forward for decision. You could start off as a legal executive to later qualify as a solicitor with further training or after a number of years experience you may wish to become a judge. If you want some work experience you could become a court usher. Other careers include a Paralegal. This role undertakes much of a lawyers role in drafting documents, meetings and contracts.  If you decide your law degree is useful for other areas you may look at Civil Service careers, become a politician, work in the police, city, or teach.

This programme is ideal if you want to be a generalist to an advanced level rather than a specialist in a specific area of law. You develop your analysis and research skills and you have the option of wide ranging courses to choose from which stretches your intellectual thinking capabilities in a top 10 School of Law (Complete University Guide 2018)

Courses listed for the programme

Semester 1

Compulsory

  • Critical Legal Thinking and Scholarship

Optional (4 courses 2 in Semester 1 and 2)

  • International Energy and Environmental Law
  • Oil and Minerals for Good
  • Low Carbon Energy Transition: Renewable Energy Law
  • International Law: A Time of Challenges
  • The Politics of Human Rights
  • Oil and Gas Law
  • International Commercial Arbitration
  • International Commercial Arbitration In the Asia Pacific
  • Private International Law: Concepts and Institutions
  • Issues in Criminal Justice
  • World Trade Organisation: Gatt
  • Comparative Contract Law for International Transactions
  • International Intellectual Property: Frameworks and Challenges
  • International Criminal Law
  • Copyright and Patents
  • Private International Law - Jurisdiction, Recognition and Enforcement

Semester 2

Optional

  • Cultural Property Issues: Law, Art and Museums
  • Principles of Environmental Regulation
  • Choice of Law for Business
  • International Humanitarian Law
  • Low Carbon Energy Transition: Nuclear Energy and Carbon Capture and Storage
  • Criminal Evidence and Proof
  • Criminal Law
  • The use of Force in International Law
  • Trade Marks and Brand Development
  • International Trade and Finance Law
  • Private International Law of Family Law
  • International Human Rights Law
  • Carriage of Goods By Sea
  • Oil and Gas Law: Taxation of Upstream
  • Downstream Energy Law
  • Commercialising Innovation and Law
  • Commercial Tax Law and Policy
  • International Investment Law and Arbitration in the Energy Sector

Semester 3

  • Dissertation

Find out more detail by visiting the programme web page

Why study at Aberdeen?

  • You are taught by a School of Law ranked 10th in the UK (The Complete University Guide 2018). The University has been teaching and researching law since the Middle Ages.
  • You develop skills which are vital to the legal profession in a highly personalised environment with high contact from your lecturers.
  • You get a great range of options which you can tailor to your own requirements and build upon your undergraduate degree and experience to widen your career options, and you can take your qualifications further with programmes such as International Arbitration and Dispute Resolution

Where you study

  • University of Aberdeen
  • 12 Months or 24 Months
  • Full Time or Part Time
  • January or September

Scholarships

View all funding options on our funding database via the programme page and the latest postgraduate opportunities

Living in Aberdeen

Find out more about:

  • Your Accommodation
  • Campus Facilities
  • Aberdeen City
  • Student Support
  • Clubs and Societies

Find out more about https://abdn.ac.uk/study/student-life" target="_blank">living in Aberdeen and https://www.abdn.ac.uk/study/international/finance.php" target="_blank">living costs

You may be interested in:



Read less
Studying an LLM Master of Laws offers unrivalled academic stimulation, the opportunity to deepen your understanding of the law and specialise your knowledge in a particular area, and improved career prospects at the highest level whether that be in practice or academia. Read more

Studying an LLM Master of Laws offers unrivalled academic stimulation, the opportunity to deepen your understanding of the law and specialise your knowledge in a particular area, and improved career prospects at the highest level whether that be in practice or academia.

The Exeter LLM is a substantive, rigorous, and genuinely flexible programme of postgraduate study designed for the most ambitious and capable students. Delivered by some of the biggest names in legal research, our LLM allows you to create a bespoke programme of learning addressing your specific academic and professional needs, readying you to fulfil your career ambitions or for doctoral study.

Our faculty is able to teach and supervise an extensive range of international subjects, with particular specialities inspired by our renowned research in the areas of Commercial Law, Public Law, Human Rights Law, and Family Law.

Specialist Pathways

Students can obtain a specialised LLM. Specialisms include International Commercial Law, European Law, Maritime Law, Intellectual Property Law, Insurance Law, International Human Rights Law, and International Law, Conflict and Security.

International Commercial Law

The LLM in International Commercial Law provides a wide range of options. Students may focus on banking and financial law, corporate law or general commercial law. Exeter’s strong links with the legal profession’s top global firms and employers make this LLM a particularly attractive one for students who are looking to go into private practice or to work in banks or financial institutions. This LLM is also an ideal preparation for a career in international business as it covers areas of expertise required to succeed in senior positions in international trading companies. Internships in Europe and further afield, are often advertised to participants in this course, especially those with hard-to-find linguistic or other skills. http://www.exeter.ac.uk/postgraduate/taught/law/masteroflaws/commercial

European Law

This specialism is designed to give students the opportunity to study the constitutional issues which arise from the concept of the European Union, including law making and the relationship between the EU and Member States.

We provide modules which examine the substantive law of the EU and the way in which that law has been implemented in English law. http://www.exeter.ac.uk/postgraduate/taught/law/masteroflaws/european

Maritime Law

The LLM in Maritime Law is designed specifically for students who wish to study shipping and international trade law in detail.

The modules are particularly suited to students who intend to pursue careers in chartering, trade and marine insurance (including Protection and Indemnity Clubs).

English law is widely adopted in other jurisdictions, so a study of English law is particularly important. http://www.exeter.ac.uk/postgraduate/taught/law/masteroflaws/maritime

Intellectual Property Law

The LLM in Intellectual Property allows students to study in depth the substantive areas of law which make up intellectual property such as competition law, copyright, trade mark law, patents and consumer protection.

Much of the law is derived from EU measures, and the modules are taught from both a domestic and EU perspective. http://www.exeter.ac.uk/postgraduate/taught/law/masteroflaws/property

International Human Rights Law

This specialism has been specifically developed to allow you to construct a programme appropriate to private practice or public employment in the field of international human rights law.

http://www.exeter.ac.uk/postgraduate/taught/law/masteroflaws/humanrights

Insurance Law

Insurance is a key part of commercial law and practice but it is only researched and taught at a few universities. This pathway will allow you to construct a programme that will equip you with the knowledge, skills and practical tools needed to gain a thorough understanding of insurance law, practice and regulation.

The programme is designed for those with a special interest in the wide field of insurance law. While the precise modules available may vary from year to year, typical examples modules for the pathway might include general principles of insurance, consumer insurance, marine insurance, reinsurance, EU motor insurance and financial regulations. http://www.exeter.ac.uk/postgraduate/taught/law/masteroflaws/insurance

International Law, Conflict and Security

Designed with the needs of practitioners in mind, the programme will equip you with a comprehensive understanding of international conflict and security law, including the rules relating to the conduct of hostilities, peacetime military deployments, cyber operations and post-conflict governance. Consistent with its hands-on approach, the LLM will develop your professional and personal skills, including through a simulated command post exercise that will test your knowledge and aptitude in a practical setting. http://www.exeter.ac.uk/postgraduate/taught/law/masteroflaws/internationalconflictsecurity



Read less
The course is designed for graduates seeking to gain a solid foundation into the growing discipline of International Commercial Law. Read more

About the course

The course is designed for graduates seeking to gain a solid foundation into the growing discipline of International Commercial Law.

The LLM in International Commercial Law provides a flexible route for students to focus on areas of their own interest and further explore commercial law in both the European and wider international contexts.

Our wide choice of elective modules enables students to tailor the programme to their specific needs, selecting the areas of commercial law in which they wish to specialise.

On completing the programme graduates will be able to critically analyse legal concepts as well as practical scenarios. Such knowledge is increasingly sought by law firms, businesses and government bodies all over the world in response to the expansion of international trade, commerce and international regulation, resulting from economic, political and technological change.

The programme is available full-time:
September (12 months)
January (15 months, due to dissertation submission requirements)

And also part-time:
September (24 months)
January (27 months, due to dissertation submission requirements)

Aims

You will gain knowledge and understanding to confidently tackle areas of controversy in the area of international commercial law

You will be able to assess critically situations and challenges, appreciate the importance of the international boundaries, and the influence of culture on the processes of law.

You will develop an expertise in the corpus and complexities of commercial, competition, trade law and financial regulations.

You will gain critical and analytical skills in this complex international field.

You will be able to demonstrate through original research the application of knowledge, practical understanding and critical appreciation that can contribute to the discourse on both corporate law and the financial regulations in place.

You will develop the professional skills required to develop a career in commercial law, law practice and the academia.

Course Content

The LLM consists of both compulsory and optional modules, a typical selection can be found below. Modules can vary from year to year, but these offer a good idea of what we teach.

Compulsory modules:

Dissertation

Optional modules:
(modules are subject to withdrawal at the School's discretion)

Term I

EU Competition Law 1 or 2
Corporate Law I 1 or 2
Corporate Law II 1 or 2
Theory of International Finance Regulation 1 or 2
World Trade Organisation Law 1 or 2
Privacy and Data Protection 1 or 2
Principles of International Commercial Arbitration 1 or 2
Trade Marks and Allied Rights 1 or 2
Media Law and Regulation 1 or 2
Internet Law 1 - Substantive Legal Issue 1 or 2

Term II

International Trade Law 1 or 2
International Environmental Law 1 or 2
Corporate Governance and Corporate Socail Responsibility 1 or 2
World Trade Organisation (WTO) and Human Rights Law 1 or 2
Practice of International Financial Regulation 1 or 2
Internet Law II - Resolving internet-related Legal Issue or Disputes 1 or 2
Copyright, Design and Allie Rights 1 or 2
Managing Intellectual Property 1 or 2
Practice of International Commercial Arbitration1 or 2
International Intellectual Property Law 1 or 2

Term I and II
EU Intellectual Property Law 1 or 2

*The superscript 1 or 2 indicates which year of study each module will normally take place in for part-time students.

Teaching

We promote a personalised learning experience that considers your interests, needs and abilities. This course is delivered through a combination of lectures which introduce you to new subjects and provide an overview of subject matter, and seminars that allow these topics to be investigated in more detail. There will be 16 hours of teaching per 15 credit module, spread out over each of the teaching terms, and classes are taught in groups of approximately 30 students.

Assessment

The faculty places great emphasis on the creation of a unique learning experience. In addition to attending seminars and preparing coursework and exams, students will also learn by participating in research centre activities and research trips, contributing to newsletters, making oral presentations, attending law film screenings as well as participating in debating events and reading group sessions.

Assessment methods in this programme range from coursework, seen examinations and a dissertation (15,000 words) to oral presentations and assessment by contribution in seminars.

Special Features

Flexible start times and learning options
The programme is available in full-time and part-time mode, with start dates in September and January. You will have greater flexibility with this programme because Brunel Law School offers smaller 15 credit modules, whihc enables you to choose from a range of options to tailor your studies.

Research and Research Centres
The Law School benefits from active research centres which regularly host research seminars and workshops. The Law School is particularly proud of its diverse events programme, which students are encouraged to actively participate in to support their learning.
Brunel Law School believes that an active research community is important in providing postgraduate with the latest thinking in human rights. In the most recent Research Excellence Framework (REF2014) we were ranked 14th in the UK for REF Intensity in Law.
Brunel Law School is highly rated for it published scholarship, and recognised amongst law firms for its distinctive courses. The school has considerable expertise in various aspects of commercial law.

Extra-curricular activities
The Law School offers students numerous opportunities to participate in extra-curricular activities, including a Reading Group, a Law Film society, mooting and debating societies and research workshops organised by the research centres based at the School. LLM students are expected to play a leading role organising and participating in these activities.

Research skills
The Law School offers an elaborate scheme of research and writing skills sessions designed to facilitate students’ learning and to equip them with appropriate transferable skills. Some of the modules in this programme also integrate skills training, for example on how to answer essay questions, make use of electronic legal databases and cite legal authorities.

Read less
In today’s global competitive marketplace, the successful corporate executive needs to understand how the legal system and legal regulation can impact on their own area of expertise. Read more
In today’s global competitive marketplace, the successful corporate executive needs to understand how the legal system and legal regulation can impact on their own area of expertise. Accordingly, the BangorBusinessSchool and the Bangor School of Law have combined to offer an innovative suite of interdisciplinary MBA and MA programmes.

The MA in Banking and Law is an interdisciplinary programme that will enable the student to study key legal and regulatory developments affecting the financial sector. This includes the regulation of financial services, security instruments, corporate finance, arbitration and other issues affecting modern banks at UK, EU and international level. As well as the general principles of International Banking Law, you will also choose from a wide range of law and business. The programme will equip candidates with higher level knowledge in both the Banking and Law areas, as global Banking practice today is heavily influenced by the Law. In particular the financial and regulatory lessons to be drawn from the so-called ‘credit crunch’ in the USA and the UK will be examined. The MA degree is suitable for those who wish to adopt a predominantly non-quantitative approach to their studies.

Course Structure
January intake: Taught modules are undertaken in the period of January to June and September to January and will involve the study of 120 credits. The dissertation (or equivalent) is valued at 60 credits and is undertaken during the period of June to September.

September intake: Taught modules are undertaken in the period of September to June and will involve the study of 120 credits. The dissertation (or equivalent) is valued at 60 credits and is undertaken during the period of June to September.

Compulsory modules:

Research Methods: This module develops knowledge of intermediate and advanced research methods, and provides a basis in research methodology for those who may eventually wish to pursue research degrees.

Bank Financial Management: This module provides a grounding in the nature, strategic context and managerial functions of financial management in banks, and other financial services firms.

International Banking: This module examines the origins of international banking, the activities of international banks, the markets in which they participate, and the sources of risk.

Financial Institutions Strategic Management: This module examines the main theoretical and practical issues concerning banking business. You will develop a critical awareness of the theory of the banking firm, the motives for international banking, and regulatory and structural issues impacting on bank behaviour.

Financial Crises and Bank Regulation: This module examines why banks and financial markets are inherently vulnerable to crises, and analyses the role of policy makers and institutions. The roles of monetary policy, bank supervision and regulation, corporate governance and ratings agencies in mitigating or exacerbating crises are considered.

International Banking and Capital Markets Law: This module will provide a sound understanding of the law and practice of modern international banking, including the regulation and prudential supervision of banks in the UK and EU in the areas of capital adequacy and risk management.

Optional Law modules (choose 2):

Comparative Corporate Governance: Major corporate scandals in the US, Europe and the UK in recent years have raised questions about the organisation and governance of companies, in particular large multinational organisations. The growth of private equity buy-outs has also raised issues of transparency and accountability.

Credit and Security Law: The supply of credit is the lifeblood of industry but of course a lender will require security. This module will examine in detail the provisions relating to the regulation of the supply of credit to consumers and business.

International Corporate Finance Law and Merger Regulation Law: This module focuses on the study of leading case law and selected legislation, relating to international mergers and their financing from several common law countries such as the USA, Britain, Ireland, Canada, Australia and New Zealand, as well as China, India and the EU.

International Commercial Arbitration: This module considers the theoretical and institutional structure of arbitration and alternative dispute resolution, examines the legal framework within which disputes are resolved and reviews the practice of international commercial arbitration.

Consumer Law: This module focuses on the main areas of legal liability and the pitfalls that can arise if an organisation does not comply with the relevant consumer protection rules both in the UK and Europe.

Intellectual Property Law: This module addresses the fundamentals of intellectual property law, the definition and scope of copyright; the authorship, ownership, duration and qualification for copyright protection.

Competition Law: This module focuses on the theory and law of competition, focusing on UK competition law, and EU competition law relating to the control of restrictive practices, vertical and horizontal restraints and abuse of a dominant position. Comparative regimes, in particular that of the US, are examined.

Industrial Property Law: This module examines the history and development of industrial property law in the UK, EU and internationally. It covers the law relating to trade secrets, patents, copyrights, design rights and trademarks.

World Trade Law: This module studies aspects of the regulation of international trade through the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) and the World Trade Organisation.

International Insurance Law: Insurance plays an important role in commerce and risk management. Insurance contracts are governed by the rules of general law of contract. The module explores the nature and scope of the contract of insurance, considers the general principles of insurance, and examines the relationships between parties to a contract.

International Taxation Law: This module studies the basic principles of income taxation of international transactions involving taxpayers of several European countries (including the UK, the Netherlands, France, Germany, Ireland), the US, Australia, Canada and Japan.

Employment Law: Modern employment law is complex, and imposes major compliance costs on employers. This module covers contract of employment, minimum wage legislation, discrimination against employees, and unfair dismissal actions before Employment Tribunals.

International Environmental Law: This module focuses on internationally recognised principles and values concerning environmental protection, and how they are translated into legally enforceable tools. Methods of environmental regulation are analysed and compared.

Read less
In today’s global competitive marketplace, the successful corporate executive needs to understand how the legal system and legal regulation can impact on their own area of expertise. Read more
In today’s global competitive marketplace, the successful corporate executive needs to understand how the legal system and legal regulation can impact on their own area of expertise. Accordingly, the BangorBusinessSchool and the Bangor School of Law have combined to offer an innovative suite of interdisciplinary MBA and MA programmes.

The MA in Banking and Law is an interdisciplinary programme that will enable the student to study key legal and regulatory developments affecting the financial sector. This includes the regulation of financial services, security instruments, corporate finance, arbitration and other issues affecting modern banks at UK, EU and international level. As well as the general principles of International Banking Law, you will also choose from a wide range of law and business. The programme will equip candidates with higher level knowledge in both the Banking and Law areas, as global Banking practice today is heavily influenced by the Law. In particular the financial and regulatory lessons to be drawn from the so-called ‘credit crunch’ in the USA and the UK will be examined. The MA degree is suitable for those who wish to adopt a predominantly non-quantitative approach to their studies.
Course Structure

January intake: Taught modules are undertaken in the period of January to June and September to January and will involve the study of 120 credits. The dissertation (or equivalent) is valued at 60 credits and is undertaken during the period of June to September.

September intake: Taught modules are undertaken in the period of September to June and will involve the study of 120 credits. The dissertation (or equivalent) is valued at 60 credits and is undertaken during the period of June to September.

Compulsory modules:

Research Methods: This module develops knowledge of intermediate and advanced research methods, and provides a basis in research methodology for those who may eventually wish to pursue research degrees.

Bank Financial Management: This module provides a grounding in the nature, strategic context and managerial functions of financial management in banks, and other financial services firms.

International Banking: This module examines the origins of international banking, the activities of international banks, the markets in which they participate, and the sources of risk.

Financial Institutions Strategic Management: This module examines the main theoretical and practical issues concerning banking business. You will develop a critical awareness of the theory of the banking firm, the motives for international banking, and regulatory and structural issues impacting on bank behaviour.

Financial Crises and Bank Regulation: This module examines why banks and financial markets are inherently vulnerable to crises, and analyses the role of policy makers and institutions. The roles of monetary policy, bank supervision and regulation, corporate governance and ratings agencies in mitigating or exacerbating crises are considered.

International Banking and Capital Markets Law: This module will provide a sound understanding of the law and practice of modern international banking, including the regulation and prudential supervision of banks in the UK and EU in the areas of capital adequacy and risk management.

Optional Law modules (choose 2):

Comparative Corporate Governance: Major corporate scandals in the US, Europe and the UK in recent years have raised questions about the organisation and governance of companies, in particular large multinational organisations. The growth of private equity buy-outs has also raised issues of transparency and accountability.

Credit and Security Law: The supply of credit is the lifeblood of industry but of course a lender will require security. This module will examine in detail the provisions relating to the regulation of the supply of credit to consumers and business.

International Corporate Finance Law and Merger Regulation Law: This module focuses on the study of leading case law and selected legislation, relating to international mergers and their financing from several common law countries such as the USA, Britain, Ireland, Canada, Australia and New Zealand, as well as China, India and the EU.

International Commercial Arbitration: This module considers the theoretical and institutional structure of arbitration and alternative dispute resolution, examines the legal framework within which disputes are resolved and reviews the practice of international commercial arbitration.

Consumer Law: This module focuses on the main areas of legal liability and the pitfalls that can arise if an organisation does not comply with the relevant consumer protection rules both in the UK and Europe.

Intellectual Property Law: This module addresses the fundamentals of intellectual property law, the definition and scope of copyright; the authorship, ownership, duration and qualification for copyright protection.

Competition Law: This module focuses on the theory and law of competition, focusing on UK competition law, and EU competition law relating to the control of restrictive practices, vertical and horizontal restraints and abuse of a dominant position. Comparative regimes, in particular that of the US, are examined.

Industrial Property Law: This module examines the history and development of industrial property law in the UK, EU and internationally. It covers the law relating to trade secrets, patents, copyrights, design rights and trademarks.

World Trade Law: This module studies aspects of the regulation of international trade through the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) and the World Trade Organisation.

International Insurance Law: Insurance plays an important role in commerce and risk management. Insurance contracts are governed by the rules of general law of contract. The module explores the nature and scope of the contract of insurance, considers the general principles of insurance, and examines the relationships between parties to a contract.

International Taxation Law: This module studies the basic principles of income taxation of international transactions involving taxpayers of several European countries (including the UK, the Netherlands, France, Germany, Ireland), the US, Australia, Canada and Japan.

Employment Law: Modern employment law is complex, and imposes major compliance costs on employers. This module covers contract of employment, minimum wage legislation, discrimination against employees, and unfair dismissal actions before Employment Tribunals.

International Environmental Law: This module focuses on internationally recognised principles and values concerning environmental protection, and how they are translated into legally enforceable tools. Methods of environmental regulation are analysed and compared.

Read less
The Brunel International Intellectual Property Law LLM (available full-time and part-time) is one of the most comprehensive programmes in the UK in the field of intellectual property. Read more

About the course

The Brunel International Intellectual Property Law LLM (available full-time and part-time) is one of the most comprehensive programmes in the UK in the field of intellectual property.

The programme provides students with extensive knowledge on the fundamentals of intellectual property, as well as the opportunity to develop specialised skills through a wide range of elective modules, covering both policy and practical technology-related issues.

Intellectual property, especially at international level, is a fast-growing area of law largely due to the impact of technology. The widespread use of the Internet and other cross-border communications and commercial technologies has led to a comprehensive and complex legislative framework at international level (WTO, WIPO, EU). With the undisputed relevance of intellectual property in innovation and access to knowledge, the demand for structured study of the area has increased.

The LLM in International Intellectual Property Law keeps ahead of the 'curve' in thinking in this area, due to our highly active Intellectual Property research centre, which in addition to providing direction and support to students’ study, regularly hosts seminars and workshops, as well as international conferences.

The programme is available full-time:
September (12 months)
January (15 months, due to dissertation submission requirements)

And also part-time:
September (24 months)
January (27 months, due to dissertation submission requirements)

Aims

You will develop an expertise in the corpus and complexities of intellectual property law.

You will acquire critical and analytical skills in the complex field of intellectual property law.

You will be able to produce original research, apply knowledge and demonstrate practical and critical understanding

You will gain valuable professional skills required to develop a successful career.

You will be able to demonstrate a detailed knowledge of the legislative framework at international level (WTO, WIPO, EU).

This Master's course is designed for graduates from anywhere in the world who wish to develop a specialist knowledge on intellectual property law and related areas.

Course Content

The LLM consists of both compulsory and optional modules, a typical selection can be found below. Modules can vary from year to year, but these offer a good idea of what we teach.

Compulsory modules:

Term I
Philosophical Foundations of IP 1

Term II
International Intellectual Property Law 1

PLUS, EITHER

Term I
Patent Law and Practice 1

OR

Term II
Trade Marks and Allied Rights 1

Optional modules:

Term I

EU Competition Law 2
Privacy and Data Protection 2
Media Law and Regulation 1 or 2
Internet Law I - Substantive Legal Issues 2
Patent Law and Practice 2 (if not taken as a compulsory module)
Trade Marks and Allied Rights 2 (if not taken as a compulsory module)

Term II

Internet Law II - Resolving Internet-related Legal Issues and Disputes 1 or 2
International Commercial Litigation 1 or 2
Copyright, Design and Allied Rights 1 or 2
Managing Intellectual Property 1 or 2

Term I and II
EU Intellectual Property Law 2

* The superscript 1 or 2 indicates which year of study each module will normally take place in for part-time students.

Teaching

The faculty places great emphasis on the creation of a unique learning experience.

In addition to attending seminars and preparing coursework and exams, students will also learn by participating in research centre activities and research trips, contributing to newsletters, making oral presentations, attending law film screenings as well as participating in debating events and reading group sessions. On average there are 16 hours of teaching per credit module, delivered through a combination of teaching methods.

This is a challenging programme that is at the forefront of thinking in International Intellectual Property Law. It is taught by leading academics with a wide range of expertise in internet law, copyright, patents and competition law.

Assessment

For each module you will be assessed twice, first by way of a written essay and then by way of a "seen" or "pre-release" examination, where the question paper is released a short time before the day of the exam.

Each assessment is worth 50% of the overall mark.

Special Features

Intellectual Property Law at Brunel University is a well-established area of teaching and research. It is highly rated for the quality of its staff publications, research projects and teaching standard.

Lecturers at the International Intellectual Property Law LLM include academics and practitioners with recognised expertise in all areas of intellectual property law.

Flexible start times and learning options
The course is available in full-time and part-time mode, with start dates in September and January. Students gain greater flexibility with this programme because Brunel Law School offers smaller 15 credit modules, which provides its students a range of options to tailor study and provide additional flexibility in study arrangements.

Research and Research Centres
The Law School benefits from active research centres which regularly host research seminars and workshops, as well as international conferences.
The Law School is equally particularly proud of its various events that are offered on Intellectual Property, there is a diverse programme which supports the learning of our students and LLM students will be expected to actively participate.
At Brunel Law School we believe that an active research community is important in providing postgraduate with the latest thinking in human rights. In the most recent Research Excellence Framework
(REF2014) we were ranked 14th in the UK for REF Intensity in Law.

Extra-curricular activities
The Law School offers students numerous opportunities to participate in extra-curricular activities, including a Reading Group, a Law Film society, mooting and debating societies, research workshops, and study visits. All students are expected to play a leading role in participating in these activities.

Research skills
The Law School offers an elaborate scheme of research and writing skills sessions designed to facilitate students’ learning and to equip them with appropriate transferable skills.
Some of the modules in this programme also integrate skills training, for example on how to answer essay questions, make use of electronic legal databases and cite legal authorities.

Career Support
Students benefit from the University’s award winning Professional Development Centre which offers specialist workshops, interview skills, and one-to-one advice sessions to help prepare graduates for their chosen career.

Read less
The MBA in Banking and Law will develop knowledgeable and capable banking executives and banking lawyers who will move quickly into key positions in the financial sector. Read more
The MBA in Banking and Law will develop knowledgeable and capable banking executives and banking lawyers who will move quickly into key positions in the financial sector. The degree focuses on the financial and strategic management of banks and other financial institutions as well as the increasingly complex legal and regulatory structures within which banks and their executives have to operate. The legal issues will cover a wide range of topics at UK, EU and international level with which a modern banker needs to be familiar. As well as the general principles of International Banking Law, you will also choose from a wide range of law and business options. You will gain practical insight and skills in a range of financial, legal and strategic management topics in the supply of international financial services as well as key Law subjects which have a direct impact on Banking practice. Case studies and contemporary issues figure prominently in the programme, particularly focusing on the lessons to be learnt from the recent ‘credit crunch’ and the issues for international financing and regulation that this has thrown up.

Compulsory modules:

Organisations and People: This module examines key issues arising from contemporary research in organisational behaviour (OB) and human resource management (HRM). It provides an integrated analysis of management, organisations and people, developing the conceptual, strategic and practical skills necessary for managers in complex, global organisational contexts.

Management Research: This module analyses the philosophical basis for research in the management sciences, and examines a number of key methodological issues and approaches. Research designs for both quantitative and qualitative research methodologies are developed, including interviews, case studies, focus groups, surveys and experiments.

Bank Financial Management: This module provides a grounding in the nature, strategic context and managerial functions of financial management in banks and other financial services firms. Three key themes are: identification and management of the trade-off between risk and return; improvement of a bank’s value using market models; and external market-based tests of bank performance.

International Banking: This module examines the origins of international banking, the activities of international banks, the markets in which they participate, and the sources of risk. You will investigate the determinants of the efficiency of international banks, and evaluate the implications for banks’ strategic decision-making.

Financial Institutions Strategic Management: This module examines the main theoretical and practical issues concerning banking business. You will develop a critical awareness of the theory of the banking firm, the motives for international banking, and regulatory and structural issues impacting on bank behaviour.

International Banking and Capital Markets Law: This module will provide a sound understanding of the law and practice of modern international banking, including the regulation and prudential supervision of banks in the UK and EU in the areas of capital adequacy and risk management.

Optional modules (choose 2):

Comparative Corporate Governance: Major corporate scandals in the US, Europe and the UK in recent years have raised questions about the organisation and governance of companies, in particular large multinational organisations. The growth of private equity buy-outs has also raised issues of transparency and accountability.

Credit and Security Law: The supply of credit is the lifeblood of industry but of course a lender will require security. This module will examine in detail the provisions relating to the regulation of the supply of credit to consumers and business.

International Corporate Finance Law and Merger Regulation Law: This module focuses on the study of leading case law and selected legislation, relating to international mergers and their financing from several common law countries such as the USA, Britain, Ireland, Canada, Australia and New Zealand, as well as China, India and the EU.

International Commercial Arbitration: This module considers the theoretical and institutional structure of arbitration and alternative dispute resolution, examines the legal framework within which disputes are resolved and reviews the practice of international commercial arbitration.

Consumer Law: This module focuses on the main areas of legal liability and the pitfalls that can arise if an organisation does not comply with the relevant consumer protection rules both in the UK and Europe.

Intellectual Property Law: This module addresses the fundamentals of intellectual property law, the definition and scope of copyright; the authorship, ownership, duration and qualification for copyright protection.

Competition Law: This module focuses on the theory and law of competition, focusing on UK competition law, and EU competition law relating to the control of restrictive practices, vertical and horizontal restraints and abuse of a dominant position. Comparative regimes, in particular that of the US, are examined.

Industrial Property Law: This module examines the history and development of industrial property law in the UK, EU and internationally. It covers the law relating to trade secrets, patents, copyrights, design rights and trademarks.

World Trade Law: This module studies aspects of the regulation of international trade through the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) and the World Trade Organisation.

International Insurance Law: Insurance plays an important role in commerce and risk management. Insurance contracts are governed by the rules of general law of contract. The module explores the nature and scope of the contract of insurance, considers the general principles of insurance, and examines the relationships between parties to a contract.

International Taxation Law: This module studies the basic principles of income taxation of international transactions involving taxpayers of several European countries (including the UK, the Netherlands, France, Germany, Ireland), the US, Australia, Canada and Japan.

Employment Law: Modern employment law is complex, and imposes major compliance costs on employers. This module covers contract of employment, minimum wage legislation, discrimination against employees, and unfair dismissal actions before Employment Tribunals.

International Environmental Law: This module focuses on internationally recognised principles and values concerning environmental protection, and how they are translated into legally enforceable tools. Methods of environmental regulation are analysed and compared.

Read less
The LL.M. is directed at well-qualified graduates in law and related disciplines. It seeks to promote critical analysis of, and reflection on, different aspects of national, European and international law. Read more
The LL.M. is directed at well-qualified graduates in law and related disciplines. It seeks to promote critical analysis of, and reflection on, different aspects of national, European and international law. This programme is delivered over one academic year. Students are examined in six modules and complete a research dissertation of up to 25,000 words over the academic year on an approved theme. The modules offered might typically include the following: Advanced Comparative Law: European Legal Systems, Advanced European Union Law, Advanced Lawyering Techniques, African Human Rights Law, Arbitration and Alternative Dispute Resolution, Chinese Legal System in Comparative Perspective, Comparative Civil Rights, Comparative Constitutional Law and Theory, Comparative Product Liability: Common Law, EU and US Perspectives, Copyright and Innovation, Online, Corporate Governance, Corporate, White-Collar and Regulatory Crime, Corruption Law, Creative Works and Intellectual Property, Employment Litigation, EU Aviation Law, EU Banking and Securities Law, EU Competition Law, EU Consumer Law, EU Copyright, Patents and Design Law, EU External Relations Law, EU Financial Services Law, EU Trademark Law, European Human Rights Law, Freedom of Expression and Intellectual Property Law, Online, Globalisation and the Law, Intellectual Property Law and Sport, International and Comparative analysis of Unfair Competition and Trade Mark Law, International Aviation Law, International Criminal Evidence, International Criminal Law, International Economic Law, International Dispute Resolution, International Humanitarian Law, International and European Tax Law, International Trade Law, Islamic Law, Judicial Activism, Human Rights and Indian Constitution, Judicial Review and Human Rights: Theory and Practice, Law and Bioethics, Law on the Seizure of Criminal Assets, Principles of Corporate Insolvency and Rescue, Principles of Delaware Corporate Law, Public Law of the European Union, Theoretical and Comparative Criminal Law, Transitional Justice. The Law School reserves the right to vary the above list and, in particular, the right to withdraw and add courses. Note that timetabling considerations may also restrict choice. Further information on the precise modules available in a given year is available on the LLM website.

Read less
The Master of Laws (LLM Law) course allows students to choose from a wide range of international and English law specialist subjects, including aspects of commercial and international trade law, intellectual property, and international human rights. Read more

About the course

The Master of Laws (LLM Law) course allows students to choose from a wide range of international and English law specialist subjects, including aspects of commercial and international trade law, intellectual property, and international human rights.

This enables graduates to fill the increasing demand for expertise in these areas and to produce their own 'bespoke' degree to suit their career needs.

Furthermore, because many of the modules have an international dimension, the LLM law course has proven to be of great interest to overseas candidates.

The programme is available full-time:
September (12 months)
January (15 months, due to dissertation submission requirements)

And also part-time:
September (24 months)
January (27 months, due to dissertation submission requirements)

Aims

Students receive a thorough grounding in the legal concepts and principles operating in the areas of law chosen.

They are given the opportunity to gain an understanding of areas of social and criminal justice policy where relevant and are introduced
to areas of controversy in their selected areas of law and socio-legal studies.

The Brunel Law School’s Masters of Law programme is designed to flexible enabling students to either broaden their proficiency in a range of areas or gain in-depth specialist knowledge of a particular subject of interest.

Course Content

The LLM consists of both compulsory and optional modules, a typical selection can be found below. Modules can vary from year to year, but these offer a good idea of what we teach.

Compulsory modules:

Dissertation

Optional modules:

EU Competition Law
International Criminal Law
International Criminal Justice
Corporate Law I
Corporate Law II
International Human Rights and Islamic Law
Theory of International Financial Regulation
World Trade Organisation (WTO) Law
Privacy and Data Protection
Principles of International Commercial Arbitration
Philosophical Foundations of IP
Media Law and Regulation
Internet Law I -Substantive Legal Issues
Public International Law
European System of Human Rights Protection
Foundations of International Human Rights Law
International Humanitarian Law
Multiculturalism and Human Rights
Patent Law and Practice
Trade Marks and Allied Rights
International Trade Law
International Environmental Law
Comparative Criminal Justice
Comparative Counter-Terrorism and Human Rights
Corporate Governance and Corporate Social Responsibility
World Trade Organisation (WTO) and Human Rights Law
Theory and Practice of International Human Rights
Practice of International Financial Regulation
Internet Law II - Resolving Internet-related Legal Issues and Disputes
Practice of International Commercial Arbitration
Human Rights of Women
Regional Systems of Human Rights Protection: Americas, Africa, Asia
Copyright, Design and Allied Rights
Managing Intellectual Property
International Intellectual Property Law
EU Intellectual Property Law

Teaching

The classes are taught to groups of approximately 30 students. Tutors use a variety of teaching methods to deliver their modules. Lectures provide a structure for the module and give an overview of the subject matter. They will introduce students to new topics relevant to their modules.

Some classes will take the form of a lecture, others will be taught seminar style. Some may use a mixture of teaching methods (eg lecture, research, case law and problem methods), in order to promote a personalised learning that considers the individual student’s interests, needs and abilities. We believe that it is part of student experience to be exposed to different teaching styles.

There will be 16 hours of teaching per 15 credit module, spread out over one of the teaching terms.

Assessment

The faculty places great emphasis on the creation of a unique learning experience. In addition to attending seminars and preparing coursework and exams, students will also learn by:

- participating in research centre activities and research trips
- contributing to newsletters
- making oral presentations
- attending law film screenings
- participating in debating events and reading group sessions.

Assessment methods in this programme range from coursework, seen examinations and a dissertation (15,000 words) to oral presentations and assessment by contribution in seminars.

Special Features

Flexible Start Times and Learning Options
Programme is available in full-time and part-time mode, with start dates in September and January. Students gain greater flexibility with this programme because Brunel Law School offer smaller 15 credit modules, which provides students a range of options to both tailor study and provide additional flexibility in study arrangements.

Research and Research Centres
Brunel Law School benefits from very active research centres, which have hosted a large number of research seminars and workshops in the last few years. Many of these events focus on a wide range of issues and they tackle the latest debates in the industry with a number of highly respected guests. Brunel Law School believes that an active research community is important in providing postgraduate with the latest thinking, and it is important to us that all our staff are included in our Research Assessment’s (RAE).  In the most recent Research Excellence Framework (REF2014) we were ranked 14th in the UK for REF Intensity in Law.

Extra-Curricular Activities
Brunel Law School offers students numerous opportunities to participate in extra-curricular activities, including a Reading Group, a Law Film society, mooting and debating societies and research workshops organised by the research centres based at the School. LLM students are expected to play a leading role organising and participating in these activities.

Research Skills
Brunel Law School offers an elaborate scheme of research and writing skills sessions designed to facilitate students’ learning and to equip them with appropriate transferable skills. Some of the modules in this programme also integrate skills training, for example on how to answer essay questions, make use of electronic legal databases and cite legal authorities.

The Graduate School
Brunel Graduate School offers postgraduates additional features for study and the opportunity to meet fellow postgraduate students from across the University, so you will have the opportunity to meet others studying for their master of laws degrees and socialise with fellow postgraduate students.

Read less
The dynamic world of intellectual property and communications law is a fast changing specialist field. Our Master of Intellectual Property and Communications Law can assist you to advance your expertise in this dynamic area. Read more
The dynamic world of intellectual property and communications law is a fast changing specialist field.

Our Master of Intellectual Property and Communications Law can assist you to advance your expertise in this dynamic area. You will gain in-depth knowledge of recent developments, including the laws and regulatory frameworks applicable. We are one of the most prestigious law schools in Australia, and teach units accredited by the Professional Standards Board for Patent and Trade Marks Attorneys to satisfy the knowledge requirements for registration as a Patent Attorney or Trade Marks Attorney.

This one-year course is designed for non-law graduates and is offered at our Monash University Law Chambers in the heart of the legal district of Melbourne. Our course provides you with the flexibility to choose a program of study to suit your interests, skills and professional goals. Full-time or part-time study options allow you to continue to work as well as meet your personal commitments.

The course offers choice from a broad range of intellectual property, communications law areas, or you can select from across the range of Master's law elective units. Our specialist units cover areas such as copyright, international trade law, competition law, law of the Internet, and cybercrime—to name a few. You will gain a thorough theoretical and practical grounding in the laws regulating intellectual property regimes and the broader fields of communications and technology, and develop the advanced professional skills and specialist knowledge required for work in this complex and dynamic field.

You will investigate contemporary issues in law, practice and scholarship, and evaluate complex issues relevant to the field from theoretical, international and interdisciplinary perspectives. The course also enhances your capacity to undertake independent research, and includes options for a pathway to doctoral studies.

Visit the website http://www.study.monash/courses/find-a-course/2016/intellectual-property-and-communications-law-l6003?domestic=true

Course Structure

The course is structured in two parts. Part A: Intellectual property and communications law knowledge and Part B: Extending specialist knowledge electives and research.

PART A: Intellectual Property and communications law knowledge
These studies enable you to develop specialised knowledge and advanced skills in areas of Intellectual property and communications law that suit your interests, skills and career goals.

PART B: Extending specialist knowledge electives and research
These studies will provide you with in-depth knowledge of a wide range of areas of intellectual property and communications law or you can select from across the range of Masters law elective units. You will focus on sources of information relevant to intellectual property and communications law and the application of research methods and specialist discipline knowledge and skills necessary to support work in this field. Depending on your interests and motivation, you can choose a program of study in which you plan and execute a major research-based project with a high level of personal autonomy and accountability.

For more information visit the faculty website - http://www.study.monash/media/links/faculty-websites/law

Faculty of Law

- Who we are

Monash Law is one of the largest and most prestigious law schools in Australia. We have a broad teaching base, strong international links and offer our students a variety of experiential learning opportunities. We are proud to offer a range of Undergraduate, Masters and Research degrees and provide legal education and training to over 3500 undergraduate and postgraduate students at any one time.

- Study with us

Studying a Law degree with Monash, your qualification will be internationally recognised as one of the world's best. We have a long established reputation as one of Australia's leading law schools and are a member of the prestigious Group of Eight universities, recognised globally for excellence in research, teaching and scholarship.

When you commence your Law degree with us, you commence your study of Law from day one. You can gain tangible, real legal experience in our two Clinical Legal Education Centres or undertake an international law program in Italy and Malaysia. Whatever your choice, a Law degree from Monash equips you with practical and transferable skills that you can take to your future career.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.study.monash/courses/find-a-course/2016/intellectual-property-and-communications-law-l6003?domestic=true#making-the-application

Read less
The LL.M. is directed at well-qualified graduates in law and related disciplines. It seeks to promote critical analysis of, and reflection on, different aspects of national, European and international law. Read more
The LL.M. is directed at well-qualified graduates in law and related disciplines. It seeks to promote critical analysis of, and reflection on, different aspects of national, European and international law. This programme is delivered over one academic year. Students are examined in six modules and complete a research dissertation of up to 25,000 words over the academic year on an approved theme relating to some aspect of International and/or European business law.
The modules offered might typically include the following:

Advanced Comparative Law: European Legal Systems, Advanced European Union Law, Arbitration and Alternative Dispute Resolution, Chinese Legal System in Comparative Perspective, Comparative Product Liability: Common Law, EU and US Perspectives, Copyright and Innovation, Online, Corporate Governance, Corporate, White-Collar and Regulatory Crime, Corruption Law, Creative Works and Intellectual Property, Employment Litigation, EU Aviation Law, EU Banking and Securities Law, EU Competition Law, EU Consumer Law, EU Copyright, Patents and Design Law, EU External Relations Law, EU Financial Services Law, EU Trademark Law, Globalisation and Law, Intellectual Property Law and Sport, International Aviation Law, International Dispute Resolution, International Economic Law, International and European Tax Law, International Trade Law, Islamic Law, Law and Bioethics, Principles of Corporate Insolvency and Rescue, Principles of Delaware Corporate Law, Public Law of the EU.

The Law School reserves the right to vary the above list and, in particular, the right to withdraw and add courses. Note that timetabling considerations may also restrict choice. Further information on the precise modules available in a given year is available on the LLM website.

Read less
Intellectual Property Law has become an interdisciplinary field comprised of law, engineering, medical science, economics, and numerous other fields. Read more

Overview

Intellectual Property Law has become an interdisciplinary field comprised of law, engineering, medical science, economics, and numerous other fields. The MSc in Management of Intellectual Property explores the foundations of this area of law with relation to patents, trade marks and the other core areas within this field.

This Masters of Science is primarily aimed at science and engineering graduates who wish to pursue a career as patent or trade mark attorneys, though it is also open to graduates from all academic backgrounds who wish to study Intellectual Property (IP) at postgraduate level.

There is continued need for expertise in intellectual property law and management in industry, commerce and the innovative and creative industries, and this MSc gives you the opportunity to study IP to a high level. The programme offers a professional stream (for science and technology graduates), and a business stream, available to graduates from all fields looking to expand their knowledge of the application and management of IP.

Professional stream
The professional stream is directed towards graduates (primarily sciences and other technical industries, but also from all other backgrounds) seeking qualification as patent and trade mark attorneys.

Business stream
Students on the business stream will gain profound knowledge of the law and its operation with a view to working in areas such as the press and media, the entertainment industry, the internet and software industries, or the luxury goods industries. Further sectors where knowledge in Intellectual Property and related areas is seen as a particular advantage include governments, international organisations, universities or non-governmental institutions.

This programme will:
◦Give you a choice of two streams to suit your background; a professional stream for science and engineering graduates, and a business stream for graduates of other disciplines.
◦Offer science and engineering graduates the opportunity to gain professional exemptions from Chartered Institute of Patent Attorneys (CIPA) and Institute of Trade Mark Attorneys (ITMA).

What is Intellectual Property (IP) law?

Intellectual Property Law has become an interdisciplinary field comprising law, engineering, medical science, economics, and numerous other fields. This programme teaches the foundations of this area of law with relation to patents, trademarks and the other core areas within this field.

Why study Intellectual Property law?

The MSc Management of Intellectual Property programme was developed as we recognised the increasingly important role of intellectual property in our modern economy. There is an emerging need in industry, in commerce and in those professions concerned with intellectual property law, for science and technology graduates who have studied intellectual property law to a high level. In industry, particularly in small and medium-sized firms involved in research and development, where there is no in-house lawyer or patent agent, there is often a need for an intermediary between the firms and the external lawyer or patent agent for example; or for an executive to handle the inward or outward licensing of technology, to negotiate research and development contracts (where ownership of intellectual property is usually central to the bargaining) or generally to have a basic knowledge of current developments in the field of business law (eg. contract law, product liability law) insofar as these may relate to the firm's present or future activities.

With the introduction of the new business stream we also offer a distinct avenue for graduates from all backgrounds to gain valuable knowledge of intellectual property.

Structure of the MSc in Management of Intellectual Property

Classes usually commence mid-September with examinations in May/June. Courses are taught during the day at Queen Mary University of London campuses and usually take place between 9.00am and 5.00pm.

There is an initial Basic English Law examination which takes place two weeks after the start of the programme. Students then select which stream they wish to undertake.

Compulsory modules:

◦Study project (45 credits)
◦Basic principles of English law, evidence and practice (non-credit bearing but all students must pass this module at the start of the programme)

All students require 180 credits in total.

Professional stream students have core modules plus one free choice half module of 22.5 credits. In addition to this, professional stream students also sit two additional papers to gain exemption from the foundation papers of CIPA and ITMA, both papers must be passed to gain the exemption for either institution.

Business stream students have a free choice of 135 credits (three full modules or six half modules, or a combination of the two.)

All students are required to study the core subject units: Patent law, Copyright and designs law, Law of trade marks and unfair competition, Competition law, and Basic principles of English law, evidence and practice in term one. Occasional additional second semester options may be available.

]]Modules:]]

Read the full module descriptions on the QMUL web site.

Modules which run annually:
◦The law of copyright and design I (Compulsory for Professional stream)
◦The law of patents I and II (Compulsory for Professional stream)
◦Trade mark law I and II (Compulsory for Professional Stream
◦Study Project (Core Module for all students)
◦The law of competition I
◦Media law
◦Trade mark law I
◦The law of patents I
◦Intellectual property in food, biotechnology and agriculture
◦Intellectual property in the United States.

Modules which may run but cannot be guaranteed:
◦Competition law and licensing I and II
◦The law of copyright and design I and I
◦Information technology law
◦Intellectual property transactions
◦Licensing practice.

Read less
In today’s global competitive marketplace, the successful corporate executive needs to understand how the legal system and legal regulation can impact on their own area of expertise. Read more
In today’s global competitive marketplace, the successful corporate executive needs to understand how the legal system and legal regulation can impact on their own area of expertise. Accordingly, the Bangor Business School and the Bangor School of Law have combined to offer an innovative suite of interdisciplinary MBA and MA programmes. The MBA in Banking and Law will develop knowledgeable and capable banking executives and banking lawyers who will move quickly into key positions in the financial sector.

Course Structure

January intake: Taught modules are undertaken in the period of January to June and September to January and will involve the study of 120 credits. The dissertation (or equivalent) is valued at 60 credits and is undertaken during the period of June to September.

September intake: Taught modules are undertaken in the period of September to June and will involve the study of 120 credits. The dissertation (or equivalent) is valued at 60 credits and is undertaken during the period of June to September.

Compulsory modules:

Organisations and People: This module examines key issues arising from contemporary research in organisational behaviour (OB) and human resource management (HRM). It provides an integrated analysis of management, organisations and people, developing the conceptual, strategic and practical skills necessary for managers in complex, global organisational contexts.

Management Research: This module analyses the philosophical basis for research in the management sciences, and examines a number of key methodological issues and approaches. Research designs for both quantitative and qualitative research methodologies are developed, including interviews, case studies, focus groups, surveys and experiments.

Bank Financial Management: This module provides a grounding in the nature, strategic context and managerial functions of financial management in banks and other financial services firms. Three key themes are: identification and management of the trade-off between risk and return; improvement of a bank’s value using market models; and external market-based tests of bank performance.

International Banking: This module examines the origins of international banking, the activities of international banks, the markets in which they participate, and the sources of risk. You will investigate the determinants of the efficiency of international banks, and evaluate the implications for banks’ strategic decision-making.

Financial Institutions Strategic Management: This module examines the main theoretical and practical issues concerning banking business. You will develop a critical awareness of the theory of the banking firm, the motives for international banking, and regulatory and structural issues impacting on bank behaviour.

International Banking and Capital Markets Law: This module will provide a sound understanding of the law and practice of modern international banking, including the regulation and prudential supervision of banks in the UK and EU in the areas of capital adequacy and risk management.

Optional modules (choose 2):

Comparative Corporate Governance: Major corporate scandals in the US, Europe and the UK in recent years have raised questions about the organisation and governance of companies, in particular large multinational organisations. The growth of private equity buy-outs has also raised issues of transparency and accountability.

Credit and Security Law: The supply of credit is the lifeblood of industry but of course a lender will require security. This module will examine in detail the provisions relating to the regulation of the supply of credit to consumers and business.

International Corporate Finance Law and Merger Regulation Law: This module focuses on the study of leading case law and selected legislation, relating to international mergers and their financing from several common law countries such as the USA, Britain, Ireland, Canada, Australia and New Zealand, as well as China, India and the EU.

International Commercial Arbitration: This module considers the theoretical and institutional structure of arbitration and alternative dispute resolution, examines the legal framework within which disputes are resolved and reviews the practice of international commercial arbitration.

Consumer Law: This module focuses on the main areas of legal liability and the pitfalls that can arise if an organisation does not comply with the relevant consumer protection rules both in the UK and Europe.

Intellectual Property Law: This module addresses the fundamentals of intellectual property law, the definition and scope of copyright; the authorship, ownership, duration and qualification for copyright protection.

Competition Law: This module focuses on the theory and law of competition, focusing on UK competition law, and EU competition law relating to the control of restrictive practices, vertical and horizontal restraints and abuse of a dominant position. Comparative regimes, in particular that of the US, are examined.

Industrial Property Law: This module examines the history and development of industrial property law in the UK, EU and internationally. It covers the law relating to trade secrets, patents, copyrights, design rights and trademarks.

World Trade Law: This module studies aspects of the regulation of international trade through the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) and the World Trade Organisation.

International Insurance Law: Insurance plays an important role in commerce and risk management. Insurance contracts are governed by the rules of general law of contract. The module explores the nature and scope of the contract of insurance, considers the general principles of insurance, and examines the relationships between parties to a contract.

International Taxation Law: This module studies the basic principles of income taxation of international transactions involving taxpayers of several European countries (including the UK, the Netherlands, France, Germany, Ireland), the US, Australia, Canada and Japan.

Employment Law: Modern employment law is complex, and imposes major compliance costs on employers. This module covers contract of employment, minimum wage legislation, discrimination against employees, and unfair dismissal actions before Employment Tribunals.

International Environmental Law: This module focuses on internationally recognised principles and values concerning environmental protection, and how they are translated into legally enforceable tools. Methods of environmental regulation are analysed and compared.

Read less
In today’s global competitive marketplace, the successful corporate executive needs to understand how the legal system and legal regulation can impact on their own area of expertise. Read more
In today’s global competitive marketplace, the successful corporate executive needs to understand how the legal system and legal regulation can impact on their own area of expertise. Accordingly, the BangorBusinessSchool and the Bangor School of Law have combined to offer an innovative suite of interdisciplinary MBA and MA programmes.

The MBA in Law and Management emphasises both professional and vocational development as well as an awareness of key legal and regulatory issues that play a central role in the successful management of modern enterprises of all types and sizes. You will develop an understanding of higher-level managerial skills and concepts, and their application in practical situations. You will have the opportunity to examine the law and regulation that affects business in a wide range of key areas.

Course Structure

Compulsory modules:

Organisations and People: This module examines key issues arising from contemporary research in organisational behaviour (OB) and human resource management (HRM). It provides an integrated analysis of management, organisations and people, developing the conceptual, strategic and practical skills necessary for managers in complex, global organisational contexts.

Management Research: This module analyses the philosophical basis for research in the management sciences, and examines a number of key methodological issues and approaches. Research designs for both quantitative and qualitative research methodologies are developed, including interviews, case studies, focus groups, surveys and experiments.

Comparative Corporate Governance: Major corporate scandals in the US, Europe and the UK in recent years have raised questions about the organisation and governance of companies, in particular large multinational organisations. The growth of private equity buy-outs has also raised issues of transparency and accountability.

Finance for Managers: This module is designed for those who aim to achieve a basic understanding of financial management and control, and who require an understanding of finance in order to manage an organisation effectively. Financial planning and control are central themes, as well as the appraisal techniques of investment projects.

Optional modules+ (choose 4):

Marketing Strategy: This module critically evaluates the contributions of various schools of thought in marketing, and examines the relevant analytical models and management practices, with emphasis on the strategic importance of marketing to all organisations.

International Strategic Management: This module introduces the language of strategy and explores the link between strategic and operational management.

Knowledge Management: This module examines the processes whereby organisations and individuals develop and utilise their knowledge bases. Successful knowledge management hinges on people, culture and technology. As such it has professional and academic links with organisational behaviour and organisational learning.

Contemporary Issues in Management: This module analyses strategic decision-making within business. You will develop a critical understanding of the strategic processes of business management, the interconnections with the functional domains of marketing, human resource management and corporate finance, and the management of knowledge systems.

New Venture Creation: This module examines the advantages and disadvantages of the various routes to business start-up, including new venture creation, or establishing a business based on your own expertise, experience and ideas; buying an established business; purchasing a franchise; and succession through a family firm, an increasingly common way of becoming involved in entrepreneurial activity.

Credit and Security Law: The supply of credit is the lifeblood of industry but of course a lender will require security. This module will examine in detail the provisions relating to the regulation of the supply of credit to consumers and business.

International Corporate Finance Law and Merger Regulation Law: This module focuses on the study of leading case law and selected legislation, relating to international mergers and their financing from several common law countries such as the USA, Britain, Ireland, Canada, Australia and New Zealand, as well as China, India and the EU.

International Commercial Arbitration: This module considers the theoretical and institutional structure of arbitration and alternative dispute resolution, examines the legal framework within which disputes are resolved and reviews the practice of international commercial arbitration.

Consumer Law: This module focuses on the main areas of legal liability and the pitfalls that can arise if an organisation does not comply with the relevant consumer protection rules both in the UK and Europe.

Intellectual Property Law: This module addresses the fundamentals of intellectual property law, the definition and scope of copyright; the authorship, ownership, duration and qualification for copyright protection.

Competition Law: This module focuses on the theory and law of competition, focusing on UK competition law, and EU competition law relating to the control of restrictive practices, vertical and horizontal restraints and abuse of a dominant position. Comparative regimes, in particular that of the US, are examined.

Industrial Property Law: This module examines the history and development of industrial property law in the UK, EU and internationally. It covers the law relating to trade secrets, patents, copyrights, design rights and trademarks.

World Trade Law: This module studies aspects of the regulation of international trade through the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) and the World Trade Organisation.

International Insurance Law: Insurance plays an important role in commerce and risk management. Insurance contracts are governed by the rules of general law of contract. The module explores the nature and scope of the contract of insurance, considers the general principles of insurance, and examines the relationships between parties to a contract.

International Taxation Law: This module studies the basic principles of income taxation of international transactions involving taxpayers of several European countries (including the UK, the Netherlands, France, Germany, Ireland), the US, Australia, Canada and Japan.

Employment Law: Modern employment law is complex, and imposes major compliance costs on employers. This module covers contract of employment, minimum wage legislation, discrimination against employees, and unfair dismissal actions before Employment Tribunals.

International Environmental Law: This module focuses on internationally recognised principles and values concerning environmental protection, and how they are translated into legally enforceable tools. Methods of environmental regulation are analysed and compared.

+ Your optional modules must include either International Strategic Management or Marketing Strategy, and at least 2 Law options.

Read less

Show 10 15 30 per page



Cookie Policy    X