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Masters Degrees (Copy Editing)

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This Creative Writing. Writing the City Masters course is the first to focus entirely on the city of London. It will allow you to explore the city as subject matter from a range of perspectives and across all genres. Read more
This Creative Writing: Writing the City Masters course is the first to focus entirely on the city of London. It will allow you to explore the city as subject matter from a range of perspectives and across all genres. It will also give you a theoretical and practical platform from which to develop your understanding, and become part of the London writing scene.

Taught by professional writers and researchers, the course offers plenty of opportunities to network with other writers, agents, TV producers and performance poets. You will be based in the University's headquarters building at 309 Regent Street, which means you will be writing about the city in the heart of London, with ready access to the capital's excellent academic, social and cultural opportunities, including the vibrant West End theatre scene.

Course content

If studying full-time, you will normally take three modules in Semester One and tree modules in Semester Two. You can begin in January or in September. Part-time students take two modules in each semester. The availability of option modules will depend on overall demand and staff availability, but you will normally told which options are on offer at the beginning of your course. You can choose one 'free choice' option module from other Master courses at Westminster, subject to timetabling constraints and the approval of the project during the first semester an submit it after all other modules have been attempted.

To receive your Masters award, you will need to complete taught modules for a total of 120 credits, and the 60-credit Writing Project (giving a total of 180 credits). If you do not meet the requirements for a Masters award, you will be eligible for the award of a Postgraduate Diploma or a Postgraduate Certificate.

The workshop-based structure of the course will allow you to learn through interactive practice. Modules are taught by one two-hour or tree-hour seminar/workshop per week, depending on your subject. Teaching will also include visits to selected London institution to support certain aspects of writing, and you will be encourage to use various archives, theatres and galleries. Assessment methods include coursework portfolios (allowing you to experiment in a variety of genres, reflective logs, essays, and workshop leadership) as well as the 10-12,000-word writing project. There are no formal examinations.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of what you will study on this course.

Core modules
-CONFLICT AND THE CITY (DRAMA)
-TALES OF THE CITY (FICTION)
-CREATIVE PRACTICE
-PORTFOLIO: HOW TO WRITE CREATIVELY (JANUARY STARTERS)
-THE WRITING BUSINESS (YEAR-LONG)
-THE WRITING PROJECT

Option modules - You will choose either a further core module or one of the following:
-ANALYSING SPOKEN AND WRITTEN DISCOURSE
-DIGITAL LONDON
-LANGUAGE AND THE IMAGINATION (POETIC WRITING)
-READING CONTEMPORARY CULTURE
-URBAN CULTURES

Associated careers

The course will enable you to develop sophisticated critical and creative skills and a widely applicable knowledge base that can be adapted to various fields of creative practice and writing business. This course is intended to move you to a new level in your career as a writer by developing your skills as a sophisticated critical practitioner, and your knowledge of literature about the city as well as the writing business. You will be encouraged to network with other writers and identify useful opportunities for career development, partly through a wide range of extra-curricular activities, including writers’ events and talks. The critical and practical skills you will acquire by the end of the course will make you a strong candidate in many areas, including arts management, copy editing, education, freelance writing, journalism, media, publishing, theatre and performance-based writing, and research and academia.

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The English Language and Creative Writing MA allows you to explore the interconnections between your knowledge of how language is used and produced, and your literary compositions. Read more
The English Language and Creative Writing MA allows you to explore the interconnections between your knowledge of how language is used and produced, and your literary compositions. It will provide you with a thorough understanding of the linguistic features of English from a wide range of perspectives (theoretical and applied, synchronic and diachronic), as well as leading you to explore the writing process across genres and to take the city of London as one of your main sources of inspiration. The MA will equip you with the intellectual perspectives and the scholarly skills that will prepare you to conduct independent research, and will offer you many opportunities to network with other writers, agents, TV producers and performance poets.

Course content

The English Language and Creative Writing MA is suitable for students who have taken English language, literature and/or creative writing modules at undergraduate level, and others with experience in these fields. It is of particular interest to those wishing to pursue further study, and those aiming to apply their knowledge of language and the writing process in their careers.

If pursuing the degree full-time, you will study 180 credits in one academic year; if part-time, you will normally complete 180 credits in two academic years. You will study three or four core modules (including a 60-credit dissertation on a topic of English language or a creative writing project), as well as two modules from the list of options. The core module English Language in Use will help you acquire the scholarly tools necessary for the stylistic interpretation of literary and non-literary texts, while the modules Tales of the City and Conflict and the City invite you to explore the writing process in connection with prose and dramatic texts.

The teaching is mainly through weekly two- or three-hour sessions for each module, which include tutorials, seminars, practical sessions and workshops. There is also independent self-directed study, and you will be prepared for the Dissertation via structured sessions in research methodology. Assessment methods include submitted coursework such as essays, reviews and exercises; there are no formal examinations.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of what you will study on this course.

Core modules
-CONFLICT AND THE CITY (DRAMA)
-DISSERTATION
-ENGLISH LANGUAGE IN LITERARY CONTEXTS
-HOW TO WRITE CREATIVELY: PORTFOLIO
-TALES OF THE CITY (FICTION)
-WRITING PROJECT (YEAR-LONG)

Option modules
-ANALYSING SPOKEN AND WRITTEN DISCOURSE
-CREATIVE PRACTICE
-CURRENT DEVELOPMENTS IN LANGUAGE TEACHING
-INTERCULTURAL COMMUNICATION
-LANGUAGE AND THE IMAGINATION (POETIC WRITING)
-SOCIOLINGUISTICS
-THE WRITING BUSINESS
-TRANSLATION STUDIES

Teaching and assessment

Teaching is conducted mainly through weekly two or three hour sessions for each module, which include tutorials, seminars, practical sessions and workshops. Teaching will also include visits to selected London institutions to support certain aspects of writing, and you will be encouraged to use various archives, galleries, etc. There is also independent self-directed study, and you will receive one-to-one advice for your dissertation or writing project.

Assessment methods include submitted coursework such as essays, projects, reports or reflective logs. There are no timed written examinations.

Associated careers

The course will enable you to develop sophisticated critical and creative skills and a widely applicable knowledge base that can be adapted to various fields of language use and study, creative practice and writing business. This course is intended to move you to a new level in your career as a writer by developing your skills as a sophisticated critical practitioner, and your knowledge of literature about the city as well as the writing business. You will be encouraged to network with other writers and identify useful opportunities for career development, partly through the wide range of extra-curricular activities, including writers' events and talks, and partly through the workshops organised by the departmental employability coordinator. The critical and practical skills you will acquire by the end of the course will make you a strong candidate in many areas, including arts management, copy editing, education, freelance writing, journalism, media, publishing, research and academia.

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This flexible pathway provides a solid masters-level foundation in musicology. With a strong focus on theory, methodology and current debates in the discipline, together with appropriate research techniques and presentational styles, it offers excellent preparation for doctoral study and also for applied work. Read more
This flexible pathway provides a solid masters-level foundation in musicology. With a strong focus on theory, methodology and current debates in the discipline, together with appropriate research techniques and presentational styles, it offers excellent preparation for doctoral study and also for applied work. The programme of study consists of four taught course units (each 30 credits) plus a dissertation or critical edition (60 credits). The combination of core and optional course units allows each student to plot a path that best matches his or her special interests and aspirations. Together, the taught units encompass a wide range of topics and approaches - from musicology as cultural history, through musicology and the body, source studies and performance practice, to postcolonial theory and postmodernism. Seminars allow for close collaboration between lecturers and students, with ample opportunity for students to present their own work and receive individual feedback. Discussion and debate forms an important part of most course units.

Aims

This programme aims to:
-Build on undergraduate studies of music and society and the cultural study of music, introducing students to a wide range of advanced methodologies, theories, discourses and practices.
-Enable students to refine and develop their individual skills, talents and interests.
-Prepare students for a career, either inside or outside music, where critical judgement and developed powers of communication are needed.
-Foster the skills in critical thinking, argumentation, and effective written and oral communication necessary for further postgraduate study.
-Enable students to gain an expert and detailed knowledge of a specialist topic, and to formulate ideas that can later be pursued within further research programmes.

Teaching and learning

Most taught course units are delivered via weekly seminars and/or tutorials. Full-time students take two 30-credit course units per semester; part-time students take one. The dissertation or critical edition is supported by one-to-one supervision and is submitted at the beginning of September. (Part-time students may submit in either September or December following their second year of study.)

Seminars feature a range of presentation formats and activities, including presentations by course tutors, student presentations, discussion and debate based on prepared reading or coursework tasks, and workshop-style activities. Members of the academic staff are also available for individual consultations during designated office hours.

Alongside their taught units, students have access to a range of non-assessed seminars, workshops and training sessions offered by the Graduate School of the School of Arts, Languages and Cultures. All postgraduate students are expected to undertake their own programme of self-directed learning and skills acquisition. This may also involve wider reading, language work, computer training and attendance at research seminars in other parts of the university.

Coursework and assessment

There are no formal examinations. Taught course units are assessed by coursework essays or other tasks, normally submitted at the end of each semester (January and May). The precise nature of the assessment varies according to what is appropriate to the course unit in question. In most cases, a choice of questions or topics is offered. All taught units must be satisfactorily completed. The dissertation or critical edition (12,000-15,000 words or equivalent) is based on independent research into a topic agreed in consultation with the supervisor. A Research Outline needs to be presented and approved (usually in February) before students proceed with their dissertation. All coursework is double-marked internally and moderated by the External Examiner. Recitals are heard by at least two internal examiners.

Career opportunities

Graduates of this programme have pursued successful careers in musical and non-musical fields. Some continue to further study via a PhD before securing an academic position. Some go on to teach in schools or further education, both in the UK and overseas. Other areas of work for which advanced musical training has been directly relevant include arts management and the culture industries, music publishing, music journalism, librarianship, music therapy and performance. Careers outside of music have included accountancy, law, social work and human resources. One of our graduates writes of how the skills she honed at Manchester helped prepare her for her first job as an Editorial Assistant at Oxford University Press: `I use my written/essay skills in text editing (prefaces, composer notes, biographies etc.) and in preparing sales copy; analytical skills are continually employed during the editing process; the discipline of editing and proofing your own work is as important in my job as it was in my studies; the research skills that I developed during my time at Manchester have been useful in source research and in checking the factual accuracy of texts; and general skills such as planning and time management have been helpful preparation for the world of work.'

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Why study at Roehampton. Roehampton is ranked third in London for Journalism (Guardian University Guide 2018). This interactive course is taught by experienced academics, many of whom have worked, or still currently work, as journalists. Read more

Why study at Roehampton

  • Roehampton is ranked third in London for Journalism (Guardian University Guide 2018).
  • This interactive course is taught by experienced academics, many of whom have worked, or still currently work, as journalists.
  • Students develop a portfolio that will prepare you for employment in the journalism industry or related areas in the creative industries. 
  • The six-week industry-based work placement in London’s media hub means you’ll take your learning outside of the classroom, build a strong CV and make vital industry contacts.
  • Roehampton is ranked the best modern university in London (Complete University Guide 2018) and the most research-intensive modern university in the UK (Research Excellence Framework 2014).

Course summary

This course provides industry-relevant and specialist journalism training. Based in one of our multimedia newsrooms, designed to give you the experience of working in a fully functioning and fast-paced environment, you’ll learn how to write different types of stories, design digital content and produce audiovisual journalism.

This MA has a specific emphasis on the practice of journalism and develops the skills you'll need for employment in the journalism or creative industries.

You will learn how to write advanced news and features, gain an understanding of the scope of the laws affecting journalists and develop the editorial, interpersonal and self-management skills needed to work within the media industry. You'll examine the journalism business, have the opportunity to specialise in magazine journalism and study shorthand.

You'll also gain practical skills such as audio and video production and photo editing. In your final term you'll choose between either an academic dissertation or a journalism project route – which allows you to work in a team to produce a magazine.

We have a number of dedicated multimedia newsrooms, fitted with Mac computers, a video suite and a viewing room containing industry-standard software, which are designed to give you the experience of working in a fast-paced environment. You'll be taught by a journalism team who have worked for the Daily Mail, the Guardian, Financial Times, the BBC and Reuters.

Carrying out work placements is an important part of this course and you'll need to complete a minimum of six weeks' industry work experience. Not only will you be putting the skills you've learnt on the course into practice, you'll learn valuable new ones, build a strong CV and make vital industry contacts.

There are visits to journalism and media organisations, such as the BBC, as well as special seminars and workshops held by industry professionals. Roehampton has links with local media organisations such as Haymarket Media Group. We also have a strong relationship with Newsquest, which, among other newspapers and websites, publishes the Wandsworth Guardian. These relationships have led to volunteering opportunities and paid internships for students as junior reporters.

Content

In the autumn term, you will learn about the legal and ethical aspects of journalism, covering concepts such as libel, confidentiality, copyright and privacy. You will also explore media regulation. You will develop your advanced news and feature writing skills, as well as learning how to sub-edit a range of copy for print and online. Plus, you'll also produce your own journalism portfolio.

In the spring term, you'll study social media and data journalism, and explore content creation and the distribution of news via social media. In Multimedia Journalism, you will focus on content production within the digital media. You will gain experience in audio, multimedia and video journalism, as well as developing basic editing and sequencing skills, and an understanding of audio-visual hardware and software.

In the final term, you'll choose between a dissertation and a journalism project. The Journalism Project route will give you an in-depth understanding of the way magazines are organised, developed and produced, as well as an insight into the rapid evolution of magazines into multimedia products. You will get to produce a print and online magazine, replicating as much as possible the conditions, organisation and pace of the production of a real magazine.

Modules

Here are the modules we currently offer:

  • Legal and Ethical Journalism 
  • Social Media and Data Journalism 
  • The Journalism Business 
  • Entrepreneurial Journalism 
  • Journalism Portfolio 
  • Digital Reportage
  • Dissertation 
  • Journalism Project 

Career options

Careers in broadcasting, journalism, publishing, professional writing, public relations and social media. The MA also functions as a pathway to a PhD for those pursuing a career in academia.

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The MA Creative Writing is an intensive course which treats your ambition as a writer seriously. Our students come from a range of backgrounds including the arts, teaching, law, journalism, history and writing. Read more

The MA Creative Writing is an intensive course which treats your ambition as a writer seriously. Our students come from a range of backgrounds including the arts, teaching, law, journalism, history and writing. The course is for anyone with an interest in or ambition towards writing.

Some of our most successful students include best-selling author of A Short History of Tractors in Ukrainian, Marina Lewycka, T.S. Eliot short-listed poet Frances Leviston and Radio 4 and BBC TV script writer Sharon Oakes.

Our internationally-acclaimed team of published writers teach in all areas of contemporary literary practice. They include

  • Chris Jones – Forward Prize nominee
  • Conor O'Callaghan – poet and novelist
  • Maurice Riordan – poet, former editor of Poetry London and The Poetry Review
  • Julianne Pachico – short story writer and novelist
  • Harriet Tarlo – environmental poet, editor and critic

The E.A Markham Award

The E.A Markham Award means that one student each year will study the course for free. The award covers the full-time study fees and is awarded solely on merit and potential. It is offered in memory of Professor E.A Markham, a respected tutor here who worked to shape the development of this course.

Download the E.A Markham award guidance for more information.

Short course – single modules

If you are not able to commit to the whole course, you can apply to take a single module. Choose a genre from the optional modules listed in the course content and apply as normal. Your portfolio needs to include examples of writing in your chosen genre. The credit you gain for completing one module will count towards the full MA should you choose to pursue this at a later date.

Publications and prizes

The Ictus Prize in Poetry is awarded to the best poetry collection – this consists of a small pamphlet publication. Every year, we publish Matter, a stylish anthology, edited and designed by students, and sold and promoted in bookshops. If you would like to receive a sample copy of this, email the course leader

Course structure

Core modules

  • The contemporary writer
  • The craft: poetry and short story
  • The craft: novel and script
  • The workshop
  • Writing up

Assessment

Submission of written work to specified word lengths with accompanying critical commentaries.

Employability

By enhancing your skills in writing, literary revision and reflection, you are preparing for a number of roles where knowledge of writing and the processes of writing are important such as

  • writers of fiction, poetry, script, children's writing and memoir
  • editing anthologies and journals online and in print
  • teaching creative writing at all levels including schools community groups adult education FE, HE and professional training
  • going on to further research at PhD and postdoctoral level at Hallam and elsewhere
  • writing for online forums writing blogs
  • taking up writers in residence posts
  • theatre in education
  • copyediting, proofreading, ghost-writing
  • organising literary festivals and events
  • scripting advertisements
  • reviewing online and in print


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On this commercially focused course you'll develop the core skills you need to write flexibly and effectively. Read more
On this commercially focused course you'll develop the core skills you need to write flexibly and effectively.

Whether it's fiction, non-fiction, marketing copy, magazine features or screenplays, you'll learn how to tailor your work to competitive and fast-moving markets, developing a high-quality portfolio along with the confidence and professionalism you need to forge a successful career.

The course is taught entirely by practising writers and editors, and you'll also benefit from Falmouth's outstanding connections across the writing and publishing sector, with opportunities to learn from many leading writers and publishing industry insiders. Through a wide range of projects, live briefs and assignments, you'll discover your strengths as a writer, explore media and audience, and learn how to develop and pitch your ideas – all setting you up to excel as a professional writer.

The MA has a strong reputation for giving talented writers the skills needed to build a viable career. That's because we recognise that only by working to exacting, real-world standards can you rise to the tough demands of life as a writer.

You'll be immersed in the world of writing from the outset, learning how to create compelling narratives and voices before going on to apply these techniques to the specialist areas of your choice. You'll gain in-depth understanding of the content industry, and of how to raise your own professional profile within it. You'll be part of a lively and supportive community of fellow writers.

On graduation you'll be primed to tackle the writing industry head on – with a portfolio and accomplished working style ready to impress potential employers and meet any writing challenge.

Visit the website https://www.falmouth.ac.uk/professionalwriting

Building professional experience

From day one, you'll be supported in shaping your work for publication. Many students succeed in placing work in both local and national publications while still on the course.

During the second half of the MA, you'll be encouraged to identify and undertake writing-related work experience that can feed into your industry-focused research project.

In previous years, students have secured placements with many leading publishers, media organisations, copywriting agencies, magazines and newspapers, often leading to ongoing work after graduation.

How the course is taught

The MA is structured around a mix of seminars, lectures, real-world briefs and practical workshops, along with your own self-managed work. You'll work individually and in teams, collaborating with other media professionals and developing your own projects and business ideas. Critiquing will form a valuable part of your learning experience.

As successful practising writers themselves, your tutors will expect you to take a disciplined and professional approach to your work.

Course outline

The full-time MA course runs over 45 weeks. If you're interested in developing an MA project related to your job, this may well be possible.

Enhanced learning opportunities

We are delighted to host the Writers in Residence programme. Matt Haig is Writer in Residence in 2015 whilst Lionel Shriver joined us in 2014 and Owen Sheers, poet and playwright, was here in 2013. Philip Marsden, novelist and non fiction writer launched the scheme in 2012.

Students have the opportunity to attend the London Book Fair and Port Eliot Festival.

The course is delivered across three study blocks:

- Study Blocks 1 & 2

You'll start by developing your core writing skills across a range of formats, then choose two specialist options from a selection that includes Fiction, Non-fiction, Scriptwriting, and Business & Editorial Writing – building a portfolio that showcases your abilities.

To help guide your choice of specialism, you'll take a module that looks at how writers work in different areas of the content industry. You'll also learn how to use the web and social media to build a profile as a writer.

After completing your specialist options, you'll take a module in research skills. As part of this, you'll carry out industry-focused research and develop a proposal for a longer creative project – your MA project.

- Study Block 3

In the final part of the course, you'll work independently on this project, supported by a specialist tutor. To accompany your project, you'll write a contextual essay focusing on an aspect of your writing practice.

Facilities

- Our library offers access to a wide range of online resources
- Our Media Centre has industry-standard audio/video recording and editing equipment
- Course-specific Virtual Learning Environment

Assessment

- Formal assessment and feedback at the end of each module
- Final assessment is largely based on your extended creative project, which is accompanied by a contextual essay

Careers

Our graduates have forged careers across the publishing and content industry. Potential careers include:

- Full-time author
- Entertainment blogger
- App content creator
- Freelance journalist
- Website editor
- Business writer
- Script editor
- Press officer
- Playwright

Interview and selection process

When you apply, we will ask you to send us a sample of your work along with your application. This could be an unpublished (or published) short story, screenplay, report, journalistic feature, novel extract or anything else that demonstrates your aptitude for writing. If the course team feels you have potential, we'll invite you to interview. We value meeting you in person but Skype interviews can be arranged if this isn't possible.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.falmouth.ac.uk/apply

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With a full programme of workshops and critical study, this MA provides a forum for you to work on your own writing in different genres while being supported by published practitioners. Read more
With a full programme of workshops and critical study, this MA provides a forum for you to work on your own writing in different genres while being supported by published practitioners. The Writers' Workshop will encourage you to develop your writing 'voice' through engagement with fellow students across a range of genre (in fiction or creative non-fiction), while the Special Study module enables you to specialise in one genre, such as fiction, non-fiction, poetry, drama or screen writing.

This MA aims to give you the knowledge and confidence to enter the cultural debate and to begin to identify outlets for your own writing.

What will you study?

You will have the opportunity to develop your creative writing skills in general, or specialise in a chosen genre. You will also study literary criticism and theory and will look at the professional elements of writing, such as copy-editing and how to get your work published.
Assessment

Portfolios of exercises, edited and revised creative writing with evidence of extensive drafting, essays, presentations, research projects, substantial piece of creative writing of publishable standard.

Course structure

Please note that this is an indicative list of modules and is not intended as a definitive list.

Core modules
-Creative Dissertation
-Special Study: Workshops in Popular Genre Writing
-Structure and Style
-Ten Critical Challenges for Creative Writers
-Writers' Workshop

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From books and magazines to apps and websites, publishers need excellent product-development, consumer-marketing and digital-technology skills. Read more
From books and magazines to apps and websites, publishers need excellent product-development, consumer-marketing and digital-technology skills. To succeed in this global business, you will also need great organisational and communication skills, outstanding attention to detail and the ability to work effectively with others. The best publishers are those who can think on their feet and embrace and exploit new challenges. This course aims to help you gain all these skills and qualities.

Key features
-This course will help develop your skills and prepare you for a career in the publishing industry, whether as publisher, agent or supplier. The competencies acquired through this course have an increasingly wide transferrable value within the international economy as a whole.
-You will benefit from the input of a dynamic Publishers' Advisory Board, members of which give lectures and masterclasses on the MA and contribute to its development.
-You will undertake a work placement with a relevant organisation, usually represented by a member of our Publishers' Advisory Board. These placements have resulted in many of our students gaining references and employment opportunities within the industry.

Kingston University's Publishing MA programme has been awarded the Creative Skillset Tick, the industry mark of quality, by experts working in the creative industries. This accolade is awarded to practice-based courses which best prepare students for a career in the industry.

What will you study?

You will learn everything you need to know about the publishing industry, from its structure, the production processes involved, including commissioning titles, editing copy and branding issues, to how to market the title and ensure dissemination. You will attend masterclasses by leading publishers and publishing professionals to keep you up to date with industry developments. You will also develop and demonstrate your analytical skills and competence through discussions, assignments and the culminating dissertation or practical project.

Assessment

Blog posts, business and marketing plans, case studies, critical reflections, essays, portfolios, group and individual presentations.

Course structure

Please note that this is an indicative list of modules and is not intended as a definitive list.

Core modules
-Create: The Business of Publishing
-Do: Work Placements, Networking and Career Planning

Optional modules
-Make: Content Development and Production
-Practical Publishing Project
-Publishing Dissertation
-Share: Strategic Marketing and Sales
-Writers' Workshop

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You’ll develop a critical understanding of the most important current issues and controversies within Germanic Studies. Read more

About the course

You’ll develop a critical understanding of the most important current issues and controversies within Germanic Studies.

You choose one specialised area within the general field of Germanic Studies (for instance German politics, 19th and 20th-century German and Dutch literature, German thought, German and Dutch linguistics or Luxembourg studies).

This focus helps you develop in-depth knowledge and the capacity for independent investigation and critical analysis.

This course will prepare you for doctoral research and improves your chances of obtaining funding from the AHRC and other funding bodies.

About us

You’ll study in a lively, sociable and intellectually stimulating environment. We’re part of the School of Languages and Cultures. We have nine permanent academics, a DAAD Lektor, an Österreich-Kooperation Lektor, and numerous language assistants and research associates. Our teaching is informed by new developments in the field and by our strong interdisciplinary outlook.

Your degree is rooted in our long and distinguished history of research. Our expertise spans Germanic languages, literature and society from the Enlightenment to the present day. Our research is world-leading and internationally recognised.

Fortnightly research seminars bring together students, departmental staff and visiting academics from the UK and abroad.

First-class facilities

We’re based in modern premises at the heart of the University campus. Shared with the School of Languages and Cultures, English and History, the building is designed with student needs in mind, and features modern flexible learning, teaching and research spaces.

Our library has a wide range of materials, including major collections in modern literary, cultural and social studies, nineteenth-century German studies, contemporary German theatre and drama, Germanic linguistics, Dutch studies and Luxembourg studies.

Excellent training

Your course will train you in the techniques you need to prepare, write and present your work. You’ll also learn about research principles and ethics, interview techniques, formulating professional applications and the academic job market.

Studentships

For information about funding opportunities for postgraduate study, please visit our website.

Pathways

Choose either the Research Track or the Programme Track, depending on your future plans. Each can last one year (full-time study) or two years (part-time study).

Core modules

Approaches to Germanic Studies I; Approaches to Germanic Studies II;
Research Methods in Modern Languages; Research Colloquium; Dissertation.

Optional specialisation

Choose from: Modern German Political Culture; German Intellectual History; Nineteenth-Century German Literary Studies; Twentieth-Century German Literary Writing; Post-War German Politics; Germanic Sociolinguistics and Pragmatics; Dutch Linguistics; Dutch Literature Since 1945; Luxembourg Studies.

Teaching and assessment

Teaching takes place through small group seminars (on average two to three students) and one-on-one supervisions. Assessment depends on the module.

Research Methods in Modern Languages is assessed by two 1,500-word reviews of texts in your chosen area, as if for publication in a suitable journal (including initial draft, revisions, adapting to journal house style and copy-editing).

Approaches to Germanic Studies is assessed by a 3,000-word essay. Research Colloquium is assessed by a presentation and participants are required to actively participate in the organisation of the colloquium. Your final dissertation will be 18,000–20,000 words for 90 credits.

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The MA in Creative Writing is an exciting new programme at Durham University. Taught by award-winning writers Dr Paul Batchelor and Dr Vidyan Ravinthiran, this is an academically rigorous programme that will develop students’ practical knowledge of writing poetry and prose fiction. Read more

The MA in Creative Writing is an exciting new programme at Durham University. Taught by award-winning writers Dr Paul Batchelor and Dr Vidyan Ravinthiran, this is an academically rigorous programme that will develop students’ practical knowledge of writing poetry and prose fiction. Students will receive structured support through writing workshops and one-to-one tutorials in order to develop their own ideas. Students will also study a broad range of literature from the 20th and 21st centuries, and produce new work in response.

Core Modules

Creative Writing Poetry OR Creative Writing Prose Fiction

Each student will take one of these writing-workshop modules. In these modules students will write longer pieces within their chosen literary discipline, sharing their work and giving and receiving feedback and suggestions from the module convenor and the other students. There are few if any writing exercises. Each student can expect to have their work scrutinised closely in a workshop setting several times. These modules are assessed via a portfolio of ten pages of poetry plus 2,000-word self-critique, OR a 6,000-word portfolio of prose fiction plus 2,000-word self-critique.

Reading as a Writer

This seminar module brings poets and prose writers together, and (unlike any of the other core modules for Creative Writing) is also open to English Studies students. Each week we discuss some key poetry and prose from across the twentieth century, focusing on the technical innovations introduced by the writers studied, and the ways in which writers learn from one another, both within their medium and beyond it. The module combines breadth and depth of coverage, offering students an advanced understanding of a range of writers, schools, and styles in order to broaden their research interests, and help them to identify and research a topic of their own choosing with guidance from a subject specialist in the extended essay part of the Research Project. It is assessed via two 3,000-word essays. 

Reading as a Writer: the Workshop

This is very much a companion module to Reading as a Writer, and is a writing-workshop module focusing on short, directed writing assignments and their discussion. The focus will be on formal and technical experiments, stretching students’ technical facility via assignments inspired by the texts studied on Reading as a Writer. Prose writers and poetry students will once again work side by side, sharing work and ideas, learning to appreciate literary conventions and their subversion. Each student can expect to have their work work shopped several times, though these engagements will not be as formal or thorough as those in Creative Writing Prose Fiction or Creative Writing Poetry. Assignments might include adapting syntactical techniques; investigative creative non-fiction; experimenting with poetic forms; creative translation; writing an opening paragraph; or trying out editing methods. It is assessed via a portfolio of EITHER ten pages of poetry OR 6,000 words of prose fiction, plus 2,000-word self-critique. 

Research Project

The Research Project provides students with the opportunity to produce a 6-8,000-word extended critical essay on a subject of their choosing. Students choose their own extended essay titles, with guidance from the module convenor and subject to the approval of the English Studies Board of Examiners. Focusing on depth rather than breadth, the essay is independently researched and builds on the work covered in the taught elements of the programme. Students will be expected to choose a research topic with particular bearing on their own creative practice, and to reflect on how their critical and creative work have informed one another, either in the main body of the essay, the introduction, or chapter dedicated to integrative reflection. Students may wish to refer to specific aspects of their own writing when writing this part of the essay. The Research Project also provides the opportunity for students to to produce a final portfolio of creative work: poets will be asked to produce ten pages of poetry; prose writers produce 6-8,000 words of fiction. The portfolio will consist of new work, produced after the completion of the structured workshop-oriented modules. The module is assessed via an extended essay of 6,000-8,000 words and a creative writing portfolio of EITHER ten pages of poetry OR 6,000-8,000 words of prose fiction.

Optional Modules

Creative Writing students would take one module of their own choosing, either from the English Studies MA modules or taking this new optional module:

The Word in the World

This module focuses on the ways in which the students’ writing can be made available to the public. It would take the form of a series of lectures and seminars covering topics such as: how writers make a living; the possibilities and challenges presented by collaborating with other artists; how to adjust teaching methods according to the setting and audience; how to write a pitch letter; how to get a literary agent; submitting work to poetry journals; how to make the most of web resources; how to communicate with an editor; book design, blurbs, jackets; writing copy; formats; sales and distribution channels; publicity and promotion; book reviewing, etc. This part of the module will be taught both in-house at Durham and via visiting speakers such as editors, industry experts. Students would also be invited to either collaborate with a student in another medium (most likely music or the visual arts) or go on a teaching or literary-industry placement that would take place in July. This module is assessed via one 3,000-word essay and one 3,000-word report on the industry placement, teaching placement, or collaborative project.



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The taught MA in French is aimed at graduates with a primary honours degree in French, with a minimum of 2.2 or equivalent, who have spent a year in France, or who have equivalent expertise in French language. Read more

Overview

The taught MA in French is aimed at graduates with a primary honours degree in French, with a minimum of 2.2 or equivalent, who have spent a year in France, or who have equivalent expertise in French language. It is designed for graduates of French who wish to take their study of French language, literature and culture to a deeper level and to enhance their language skills. A significant proportion of the course is delivered and assessed through French. Core teaching involves modules on writing and presentation skills in French, practical translation and research methodology. The course is designed around the theme of writing and exile, a topic that corresponds to departmental research expertise in the modern and early modern periods. There are elective modules (taught through English) in women's writing, translation studies and conflict studies. The minor thesis (15,000-20,000 words) involves independent research and collaboration with a supervisor on an agreed subject.

It is possible to study modules of particular interest without completing a Masters degree or to exit with a Postgraduate Diploma (Level 9) in French after completing 60 credits of taught modules.

See the website https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/french/our-courses/ma-french

Course Structure

Modules include narratives of exile, intercultural studies, translation skills and contemporary European women's writing.

Career Options

Recent graduates from the taught MA in French have gone on to work in teaching at all levels, translating, administration involving use of Frenchand English, editing, management and tourism.

How To Apply

Online application only http://www.pac.ie/maynoothuniversity

PAC Code
MHM50 Full-time / MHM51 Part-time

The following information should be forwarded to PAC, 1 Courthouse Square, Galway or uploaded to your online application form:

Certified copies of all official transcripts of results for all non-Maynooth University qualifications listed MUST accompany the application. Failure to do so will delay your application being processed. Non-Maynooth University students are asked to provide two academic references and a copy of birth certificate or valid passport.

Find information on Scholarships here https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/study-maynooth/postgraduate-studies/fees-funding-scholarships

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